Carl Jung on “Soul” in Liber Novus – Anthology

The meaning of events is the way of salvation that you create. The meaning of events comes from the possibility of life in this world that you create. It is the mastery of this world and the assertion of your soul in this world. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 239.

Keep it far from me, science that clever knower, that bad prison master who binds the soul and imprisons it in a lightless cell. But above all protect me from the serpent of judgment, which only appears to be a healing serpent, yet in your depths is infernal poison and agonizing death. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 238

Cleverness couples itself with intention. Simplemindedness knows no intention. Cleverness conquers the world, but simplemindedness, the soul. So take on the vow of poverty of spirit in order to partake of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 237.

When you say that the place of the soul is not, then it is not. But if you say that it is, then it is. Notice what the ancients said in images: the word is a creative act. The ancients said: in the beginning was the Word. Consider this and think upon it. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 236.

Did you not see that when your creative force turned to the world, how the dead things moved under it and through it, how they grew and prospered, and how your thoughts flowed in rich rivers? If your creative force now turns to the place of the soul, you will see how your soul becomes green and how its field bears wonderful fruit. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 236.

I must learn that the dregs of my thought, my dreams, are the speech of my soul. I must carry them in my heart and go back and forth over them in my mind, like the words of the person dearest to me. Dreams are the guiding words of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

From this we learn how the spirit of the depths considers the soul: he sees her as a living and self-existing being, and with this he contradicts the spirit of this time for whom the soul is a thing dependent on man… ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

Therefore the spirit of the depths forced me to speak to my soul, to call upon her as a living and self-existing being. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

Who knows the way to the eternally fruitful climes of the soul? You seek the way through mere appearances; you study books and give ear to all kinds of opinion. What good is all that? There is only one way and that is your way. You seek the path. I warn you away from my own. It can also be the wrong way for you. May each go his own way. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 231

Just as you become a part of the manifold essence of the world through your bodies, so you become a part of the manifold essence of the inner world through your soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 264.

I had to recognize that I am only the expression and symbol of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 234.

The spirit of this time of course allowed me to believe in my reason. He let me see myself in the image of a leader with ripe thoughts. But the spirit of the depths teaches me that I am a servant, in fact the servant of a child: This dictum was repugnant to me and I hated it. But I had to recognize and accept that my soul is a child and that my God in my soul is a child. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 234.

The moon is dead. Your soul went to the moon, to the preserver of souls. Thus the soul moved toward death. I went into the inner death and saw that outer dying is better than inner death. And I decided to die outside and to live within. For that reason I turned away and sought the place of the inner life. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 267.

Every man has a quiet place in his soul, where everything is self-evident and easily explainable, a place to which he likes to retire from the confusing possibilities of life, because there everything is simple and clear, with a manifest and limited purpose. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 295.

My soul: “Who gives you thoughts and words? Do you make them? Are you not my serf a recipient who lies at my door and picks up my alms? And you dare think that what you devise and speak could be nonsense? Don’t you know yet that it comes from me and belongs to me?” ~Carl Jung, Red Book, Page 241.

The soul has its own peculiar world. Only the self enters in there, or the man who has completely become his self, he who is neither in events, nor in men, nor in his thoughts. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, 240.

He whose desire turns away from outer things, reaches the place of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 233.

My friends, it is wise to nourish the soul, otherwise you will breed dragons and devils in your heart. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

The dead who besiege us are souls who have not fulfilled the principium individuationis, or else they would have become distant stars. Insofar as we do not fulfill it, the dead have a claim on us and besiege us and we cannot escape them. ~Carl Jung; The Red Book; Appendix C; Page 370

Man is a gateway, through which you pass from the outer world of Gods, daimons, and souls into the inner world, out of the greater into the smaller world. Small and inane is man, already he is behind you, and once again you find yourselves in endless space, in the smaller or inner infinity. ~Carl Jung; The Red Book; Page 354.

But the spirit of the depths had gained this power, because I had spoken to my soul during 25 nights in the desert and I had given her all my love and submission. But during the 25 days, I gave all my love and submission to things, to men, and to the thoughts of this time. I went into the desert only at night.   ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 238.

The world of the inner is as infinite as the world of the outer. Just as you become a part of the manifold essence of the world through your bodies, so you become a part of the manifold essence of the inner world through your soul. This inner world is truly infinite, in no way poorer than the outer one. Man lives in two worlds. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 264.

My Soul, where are you? Do you hear me? I speak, I call you—are you there? I have returned, I am here again. I have shaken the dust of all the lands from my feet, and I have come to you, I am with you. After long years of long wandering, I have come to you again…. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

And you, my soul, I found again, first in images within men and then you yourself I found you where I least expected you. You climbed out of a dark shaft. You announced yourself to me in advance in dreams.  ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 233.

I had to accept that what I had previously called my soul was not at all my soul, but a dead system that I had contrived. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book Page 232.

Meine Seele, meine Seele, wo bist Du? (My Soul, my Soul, where are You?) …~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Pages 232.

Hence I had to speak to my soul as to something far off and unknown, which did not exist through me, but through whom I existed. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

I am weary, my soul, my wandering has lasted too long, my search for myself outside of myself. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 233.

I am ignorant of your mystery. Forgive me if I speak as in a dream, like a drunkard—are you God?” ~Carl Jung to his Soul, The Red Book, Page 233.

The soul demands your folly; not your wisdom. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 264.

Thus your soul is your own self in the spiritual world.  As the abode of the spirits, however, the spiritual world is also an outer world. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 288.

You have the one God, and you become your one God in the innumerable number of Gods. ~Carl Jung’s Soul, The Red Book, Page 371.

You should call me if you want to live with men, but the one God if you want to rise above the human world to the divine and eternal solitude of the star. ~Carl Jung’s Soul, The Red Book, Page 371.

Here the soul drew near to my ear and whispered, “The Gods are even happy to turn a blind eye from time to time, since basically they know very well that it would be bad for life if there were no exception to eternal law. Hence their tolerance of the devil.  ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 359.

Everything to come was already in images: to find their soul, the ancients went into the desert. This is an image. The ancients lived their symbols, since the world had not yet become real for them. Thus they went into the solitude of the desert to teach us that the place of the soul is a lonely desert. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 236.

Now that white shape of a girl with black hair-my own soul-and now that white shape of a man, which also appeared to me at the time it resembles Michelangelo’s sitting Moses-it is Elijah. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Pages 248-9, Footnote 187.

When my soul fell into the hands of evil, it was defenseless except for the weak fishing rod which it could use, again with its power, to pull the fish from the sea of emptiness. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

But who can withstand fear when the divine intoxication and madness comes to him? Love, soul, and God are beautiful and terrible. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 238.

My soul is my supreme meaning, my image of God, neither God himself nor the supreme meaning. God becomes apparent in the supreme meaning of the human community. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Footnote 92, Page 240.

The self, I thought, was like the monad which I am, and which is my world. The mandala represents this monad and corresponds to the microcosmic nature of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 206 and MDR, Page 221.

But I had to recognize and accept that my soul is a child and that my God in my soul is a child. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 234.

This meaning of events is the supreme meaning, that is not in events, and not in the soul, but is the God standing between events and the soul, the mediator of life, the way, the bridge and the going across. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 239.

This new world appears weak and artificial to me. Artificial is a bad word, but the mustard seed that grew into a tree, the word that was conceived in the womb of a virgin, became a God to whom the earth was subject. ~Carl Jung to his Soul, Liber Novus, Pages 242-243.

But when the mother, my soul, was pregnant with the God, I did not know it. It even seemed to me as if my soul herself was the God, although he lived only in her body. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 244.

And thus the image of the ancients is fulfilled: I pursued my soul to kill the child in it. For I am also the worst enemy of my God. But I also recognized that my enmity is decided upon in the God. He is mockery and hate and anger, since this is also a way of life. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 244.

I see in splendor the mother of God with the child. Peter stands in front of her in admiration-then Peter alone with the key-the Pope with a triple crown-a Buddha sitting rigidly in a circle of fire-a many-armed bloody Goddess-it is Salome desperately wringing her hands-it takes hold of me, she is my own soul, and now I see Elijah in the image of the stone. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 248.

The word becomes your God, since it protects you from the countless possibilities of interpretation. The word is protective magic against the daimons of the unending, which tear at your soul and want to scatter you to the winds. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 270.

The daimon of sexuality approaches our soul as a serpent. She is half human soul and is called thought-desire. The daimon of spirituality descends into our soul as the white bird. He is half human soul and is called desire-thought. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 354.

If I am not conjoined through the uniting of the Below and the Above, I break down into three parts: the serpent, and in that or some other animal form I roam, living nature daimonically, arousing fear and longing. The human soul, living forever within you. The celestial soul, as such dwelling with the Gods, far from you and unknown to you, appearing in the form of a bird. ~Carl Jung’s Soul to him, Black Books, Appendix C., Page 370.

The God appears to us in a certain state of the soul. Therefore we reach the God through the self. Not the self is God, although we reach the God through the self. The God is behind the self above the self the self itself when he appears. But he appears as our sickness, from which we must heal ourselves. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 338.

Dreams are the guiding words of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 233.

Scholarliness belongs to the spirit of this time, but this spirit in no way grasps the dream, since the soul is everywhere that scholarly knowledge is not. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 233.

May man rule in the human world. May his laws be valid. But treat the souls, daimons, and Gods in their way; offering what is demanded. But burden no man, demand and expect nothing from him, with what your devil-souls and God-souls lead you to believe, but endure and remain silent and do piously what befits your kind. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 343.

You are blessed, virgin soul, praised be your name. You are the chosen one among women. You are the God-bearer. Praise be to you! Honor and fame be yours in eternity. ~Philemon to Carl Jung’s Soul, Liber Novus, Page 344.

I bow, my soul, before unknown forces- I’d like to consecrate an altar to each unknown God. I must submit. The black iron in my heart gives me secret power. It’s like defiance and like contempt for men. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 308.

My soul leads me into the desert, into the desert of my own self. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 235.

But man must recognize his complicity in the act of evil. He must bear witness to this recognition by eating from the bloody sacrificial flesh. Through this act he testifies that he is a man, that he recognizes good as well as evil, and that he destroys the image of the God’s formation through withdrawing his life force, with which he also dissociates himself from the God. This occurs for the salvation of the soul, which is the true mother of the divine child. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

When it bore and gave birth to the God, my soul was of human nature throughout; it possessed the primordial powers since time immemorial, but only in a dormant condition. They flowed into forming the God without my help. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

True, what the soul imagines happens only in the mind, but what God imagines happens in reality. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 280.

If we now recall to what a degree the soul has humanized and realized itself, we can judge how very much it today expresses the body also, with which it is coexistent. ~Carl Jung, Mysterium Coniunctionis, Page 544.

Since the soul animates the body, just as the soul is animated by the spirit, she tends to favour the body and everything bodily, sensuous, and emotional. She lies caught in “the chains” of Physis, and she desires “beyond physical necessity.” She must be called back by the “counsel of the spirit” from her lostness in matter and the world. ~Carl Jung, Mysterium Coniunctionis, Page 472.

You live inasmuch as these Mendelian units are living. They have souls, are endowed with psychic life, the psychic life of that ancestor; or you can call it part of an ancestral soul. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 1401.

We are immortalized in memory. Oh, yes, it is so. The soul has become immortal if we leave something behind for others. Psychology can affirm no other immortality. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff-A collections of Remembrances, Page 7.

The angels are a strange genus: they are precisely what they are and cannot be anything else. They are in themselves soulless beings who represent nothing but the thoughts and intuitions of their Lord. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Pages 327-328.

Only those remain living who are willing to die with life. Since what happens in the secret hour of the midday of life is the reversal of the parabola, the birth of death. ~Carl Jung, The soul and death, CW 8, § 800.

The soul possesses in some degree a historical stratification, whereby the oldest stratum of which would correspond to the unconscious. ~Carl Jung. CW8, § 51.

It would also be the task of the confessor zealous in the cure of souls, were it not that his office inevitably obliges him to apply the yardstick of his denominational bias at the critical moment. ~Carl Jung, The Undiscovered Self, Page 37.

However we may picture the relationship between God and soul, one thing is certain: The soul cannot be “nothing but. ” On the contrary it has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. Even if it were only the relationship of a drop of water to the sea … ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

So long as religion is only faith and outward form, the religion’s function is not experienced in our souls, nothing of any importance has happened. ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 12.

Dogma represents the soul more completely than a scientific theory, for the latter gives expression to and formulates the conscious mind alone. ~Carl Jung, CW8, Psychology and Religion, Page 46.

A saying of the alchemist is, “God is a circle whose centre is everywhere and whose circumference is nowhere.” The saying holds for God, for the anima mundi and for the soul of man. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 35.

The animus which is not realized by the mother is like a part of a soul with a relative existence of its own. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 29.

Archetypes are images in the soul that represent the course of one’s life. ~Carl Jung; Conversations with C.G. Jung; Archetypes; Page 21.

Certain souls, I imagine, feel the state of three-dimensional existence to be more blissful than that of Eternity. But perhaps that depends upon how much of completeness or incompleteness they have taken across with them from their human existence. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 321.

Others restrict spirit to certain psychic capacities or functions or qualities, such as the capacity to think and reason in contradistinction to the more “soulful” sentiments. Here spirit means the sum-total of all the phenomena of rational thought, or of the intellect, including the will, memory, imagination, creative power, and aspirations motivated by ideals. ~ Carl Jung, CW 9i, para. 386.

The spiritual man says to the worldly man, “Are you capable of knowing your soul in a complete manner? If you knew it, as is fitting, and if you knew what makes it better, you would be able to recognize that the names the philosophers formerly gave it are not its true names. O dubious names that resemble the true names, what errors and agonies you have provoked among men!” The names refer in turn to the philosopher’s stone. ~Carl Jung; “Psychology and Religion”; CW 11, par. 153.

The sun… is the only truly ‘rational’ image of God, whether we adopt the standpoint of the primitive savage or of modern science. In either case the sun is the father-god from whom all living things draw life; he is the fructifier and creator, the source of energy for our world. The discord into which the human soul has fallen can be harmoniously resolved through the sun as a natural object which knows no inner conflict. ~Carl Jung; CW 5; Symbols of Transformation; Para 176.

All religions are therapies for the sorrows and disorders of the soul.” ~Carl Jung; “Commentary to The Secret of the Golden Flower”, 1929.

Christian civilization has proved hollow to a terrifying degree: it is all veneer, but the inner man has remained untouched, and therefore unchanged. His soul is out of key with his external beliefs; in his soul the Christian has not kept pace with external developments. Yes, everything is to be found outside-in image and in word, in Church and Bible-but never inside. Inside reign the archaic gods, supreme as of old. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Alchemy, Page 11.

An understanding heart is everything, in a teacher. … One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child. ~Carl Jung; “The Gifted Child,”1942.

Therefore the sun is perfectly suited to represent the visible God of this world, i.e., the creative power of our own soul, which we call libido, and whose nature it is to bring forth the useful and to bring forth the useful and the harmful, the good and the bad. ~Carl Jung; CW 5; Symbols of Transformation; para 176.

[The incorporeal spirits lie] beyond our empirical present. [He continues] There is a spiritual world from which the soul receives knowledge of spiritual things whose origins cannot be discovered in this visible world. ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

There are incorporeal spirits with which the soul associates. ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

It was universally believed in the Middle Ages as well as in the Greco-Roman world that the soul is a substance. Indeed, mankind as a whole has held this belief from its earliest beginnings, and it was left for the second half of the nineteenth century to develop a “psychology without the soul.” ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

[The soul] is of divine nature and therefore immortal; that there is a power inherent within it which builds up the body, sustains its life, heals its ills. ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

It all depends on how we look at things, and not on how they are themselves. Thinking is an act of the soul whereby it becomes conscious of itself and of other things outside itself. ~Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; Footnote 2.

Language, in its origin and essence, is simply a system of signs or symbols that denote real occurrences or their echo in the human soul. Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; para. 13.

In alchemy the egg stands for the chaos apprehended by the artifex, the prima materia containing the captive world-soul. Out of the egg — symbolized by the round cooking vessel — will rise the eagle or phoenix, the liberated soul, which is ultimately identical with the Anthropos who was imprisoned in the embrace of Physis. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Alchemy; Page 202.

The reality of evil and its incompatibility with good cleave the opposites asunder and lead inexorably to the crucifixion and suspension of everything that lives. Since ‘the soul is by nature Christian’ this result is bound to come as infallibly as it did in the life of Jesus: we all have to be ‘crucified with Christ,’ i.e., suspended in a moral suffering equivalent to veritable crucifixion. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Alchemy; Paragraph 470.

Every psychic advance of man arises from the suffering of the soul. ~Carl Jung; Psychotherapists or the Clergy; CW 11: Page 497

Instead of being at the mercy of wild beasts, earthquakes, landslides, and inundations, modern man is battered by the elemental forces of his own psyche. This is the World Power that vastly exceeds all other powers on earth. The Age of Enlightenment, which stripped nature and human institutions of gods, overlooked the God of Terror who dwells in the human soul. ~Carl Jung; The Development of Personality.

Whoever carries over into the afternoon the law of the morning, or the natural aim, must pay for it with damage to his soul, just as surely as a growing youth who tries to carry over his childish egoism into adult life must pay for this mistake with social failure. ~Carl Jung; In CW 8: The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche; The Stages of Life; Page 787.

There is nothing without spirit, for spirit seems to be the inside of things … inside is spirit, which is the soul of objects. Whether this is our psyche or the psyche of the universe we don’t know, but if one touches the earth one cannot avoid the spirit. ~Carl Jung; The Vision Seminars; Pages 164-165.

For what is the body? The body is merely the visibility of the soul, the psyche; and the soul is the psychological experience of the body. So it is really one and the same thing. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 355.

This spirit is an autonomous psychic happening, a hush that follows the storm, a reconciling light in the darkness of man’s mind, secretly bringing order into the chaos of his soul. ~Carl Jung; CW 11; Paragraph 260.

The great problem of our time is that we do not understand what is happening to the world. We are confronted with the darkness of our soul, the unconscious. Carl Jung; Letters, Volume 2; Page 590.

I have been compelled, in my investigations into the structure of the unconscious, to make a conceptual distinction between soul and psyche. By psyche I understand the totality of all psychic processes, conscious as well as unconscious. By soul, on the other hand, I understand a clearly demarcated functional complex that can best be described as a “personality.” ~Carl Jung; [Definitions,” CW 6, par. 797]

It would be blasphemy to assert that God can manifest Himself everywhere save only in the human soul. Indeed the very intimacy of the relationship between Cod and the soul automatically precludes any devaluation of the latter. It would be going perhaps too far to speak of an affinity; but at all events the soul must contain in itself the faculty of relation to God, i.e. a correspondence, otherwise a connection could never come about This correspondence is, in psychological terms, the archetype of the God-image [q.v.]” ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Pages 399-400 and Psychology and Alchemy, CW 12, par. 11.

We still attribute to the other fellow all the evil and inferior qualities that we do not like to recognize in ourselves, and therefore have to criticize and attack him, when all that has happened is that an inferior “soul” has emigrated from one person to another. The world is still full of betes noires and scapegoats, just as it formerly teemed with witches and werewolves. ~Carl Jung; Civilization in Transition Page 130.

Whatever explanation or interpretation does to it, we do to our own souls as well, with corresponding results for our own well-being. ~Carl Jung; CW 9; Page 160

The sea is like music, it has all the dreams of the soul within itself and sounds them over. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 369.

People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. They will practice Indian yoga and all its exercises, observe a strict regimen of diet, learn theosophy by heart, or mechanically repeat mystic text from the literature of the whole world – all because they cannot get on with themselves and have not slightest faith that anything useful could ever come out of their own souls. Thus the soul has been turned into a Nazareth Gradually from which nothing good can come. Therefore let us fetch it from the four corners of the earth – the more far-fetched and bizarre it is the better. ~ Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 99.

The mystery of the Eucharist transforms the soul of the empirical man, who is only a part of himself, into his totality, symbolically expressed by Christ. In this sense, therefore, we can speak of the Mass as the rite of the individuation process. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Religion

The God-image in man was not destroyed by the Fall but was only damaged and corrupted (‘deformed’) and can be restored through God’s grace. The scope of the integration is suggested by the descent of Christ’s soul to hell, its work of redemption embracing even the dead. The psychological equivalent of this is the integration of the collective unconscious which forms an essential part of the individuation process. ~Carl Jung; Aion; Page 39; Para 72.

The dream gives a true picture of the subjective state, while the conscious mind denies that this state exists, or recognizes it only grudgingly ~Carl Jung; Modern Man in Search of a Soul; Page 5.

Nobody should play with analysis as with an easy tool. Those who write superficial and cheap books about the subject are either unconscious of the far-reaching effects of analytical treatment or else ignorant of the real nature of the human soul. ~Carl Jung; Contributions to Analytical Psychology.

Through reflection, “life” and its “soul” are abstracted from Nature and endowed with a separate existence.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Religion, Page 158.

I did not attribute a religious function to the soul, I merely produced the facts which prove that the soul is naturaliter religiosa, i.e., possesses a religious function. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 14.

This primary substance [the chaos] is round (massa globosa, rotundum), like the world and the world-soul; it is in fact the world-soul and the world-substance in one. ~Carl Jung, Aion CW 9 II: §376

Our souls as well as our bodies are composed of individual elements which were all already present in the ranks of our ancestors. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 235.

He [the psychotherapist] is not just working for this particular patient, who may be quite insignificant, but for himself as well and his own soul, and in so doing he is perhaps laying an infinitesimal grain in the scales of humanity’s soul. Small and invisible as this contribution may be, it is yet an opus magnum. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, par. 449.

It was universally believed in the Middle Ages as well as in the Greco-Roman world that the soul is a substance. Indeed, mankind as a whole has held this belief from its earliest beginnings, and it was left for the second half of the nineteenth century to develop a “psychology without the soul.” ~Carl Jung; CW 8; Page 338

Every psychic advance of man arises from the suffering of the soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, par. 497.

I had to understand that I was unable to make the people see what I am after. I am practically alone. There are a few who understand this and that, but almost nobody sees the whole….I have failed in my foremost task: to open people’s eyes to the fact that man has a soul and there is a buried treasure in the field and that our religion and philosophy are in a lamentable state. Quoted by Gerhard Adler in “Aspects of Jung’s Personality,” in Psychological Perspectives 6/1 (Spring 1975), p. 14.

Because they are so closely akin to us and share our unknowingness, I loved all warm-blooded animals who have souls like ourselves and with whom, so I thought, we have an instinctive understanding. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 67.

It is a fact that the body very often apparently survives the soul, often even without a disease.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 437-438.

As far as we know at all there seems to be no immediate decomposition of the soul.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 437-438.

The infantile soul is no tabula rasa at all, as presumed by modern psychology, but the ancient images are always already there a priori.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 369.

Carl Jung never said: “There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own Soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.”

What Dr. Jung said in two separate and unrelated statements was:

People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 99.

If the supreme value (Christ) and the supreme negation (sin) are outside, then the soul is void: its highest and lowest are missing.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 8.

On the contrary it [The Soul] has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

On the contrary it [The Soul] has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

As the eye to the sun, so the soul corresponds to God. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

So long as religion is only faith and outward form, and the religious function is not experienced in our own souls, nothing of any importance has happened. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 12.

If the theologian really believes in the almighty power of God on the one hand and in the validity of dogma on the other, why then does he not trust God to speak in the soul? ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 17.

You see, in spite of being a man in advanced age, you still have a young soul, a lovely anima, and she is confronted with the dangerous lizard. In other words, your soul is threatened by’ chthonic poison. Now this is exactly the situation of our Western mind. We think we can deal with such problems in an almost rationalistic way, by conscious attempts and efforts, imitating Yoga methods and such dangerous stuff, but we forget entirely that first of all we should establish a connection between the higher and the lower regions of our psyche ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages  95-97.

Such a thing is possible only when there is a detachment of the soul from the body. When that takes place and the patient lives on, one can almost with certainty expect a certain deterioration of the character inasmuch as the superior and most essential part of the soul has already left.  Such an experience denotes a partial death.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 435-437.

Do not forget that the original meaning of all letters and numbers was a magical one! Hence the “perils of the soul.”  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 528-529.

The ethical problem of sexual freedom really is enormous and worth the sweat of all noble souls. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 17-19.

There is another possibility, that of the subtle body, a fine material veil of the soul, which cannot exist so to speak without a body.  This is the “corpus glorificationis” (glorified body), the transfigured body, which is our future portion. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Lecture XIV, Page 115.

Mercury is the anima mundi, the soul of the world, and entered matter as an emanation of God, and since then it is concealed in it. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 180.

Therefore the trans-substantiated wine, which becomes the blood of Christ in the Mass, is the anima, that is the soul, of Christ. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 189.

He says directly that man has two lights: the one is the spirit and the other the light of nature. Man has a spirit in order to be able to understand the divine revelation, and a soul in order to recognise the world in the light of nature. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 193.

Intellect does, in fact, harm the soul when it dares to possess itself of the heritage of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 81.

Apparently God the Father is thought of here as the soul, the anima mundi, which is the centre of the world, and which at the same time enfolds the whole world, or rather the universe including the starry heavens. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 198.

“Go to the streams of the river Nile and there thou wilt find a stone which has a spirit. Take this stone, divide it and put thy hand inside it and draw out its heart: for its soul is in its heart.” ~Ostanes cited by Carl Jung, ETH, Page 205.

And this being has body, soul and spirit, and is, therefore, the principle of life itself, as well as the principle of individuation. Its nature is spiritual, it cannot be seen, and it contains an invisible image. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 221.

Psychologically this means that the souls of the ancestors (potential factors, qualities, talents, possibilities, and so on, which we have inherited from all the lines of our ancestry) are waiting in the unconscious and are ready at any time to begin a new growth. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 230.

These are, so to speak, the re-animated souls of the ancestors which have been lying dormant in the unconscious, and the alchemists call these units or souls the sleepers or the dead in Hades who are resurrected by the “holy waters” (that is the miraculous water of alchemy, the fertilising Mercury). ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 230.

Thus hun [Animus] means ‘cloud-demon,’ a higher ‘breath-soul’ belonging to the yang principle and therefore masculine. After death, hun rises upward and becomes shen, the ‘expanding and self-revealing’ spirit or god. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 114.

‘Anima’, called p’o, and written with the characters for ‘white’ and for ‘demon’, that is, ‘white ghost’, belongs to the lower, earth-bound, bodily soul, the yin principle, and is therefore feminine. After death, it sinks downward and becomes kuei (demon), often explained as the ‘one who returns’ (i.e. to earth), a revenant, a ghost.  ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 114.

In any case, animus (hun) is the light, yang-soul, while anima (p’o) is the dark, yin-soul. ~Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 16.

If man does not reverence and submit to the unconscious, which created his consciousness, he loses his soul, that is, he loses his connection with soul and unconscious. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures, Page 214.

He has a secret purpose: to free the world soul (the Deus absconditus) bound in matter.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture V. Page 166.

It is a great blessing for mankind when the soul is contained in the dogma and there is always a great deal of misery when this is not the case. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27Jan1939, Pages 69.

Where there are no forms and ceremonies, rites in which they can express their souls, people become moody and caught in conflicts. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27Jan1939, Pages 69.

I do not know why India was not able to keep Buddhism, but I think probably its present polytheistic religion is a better expression of the Indian soul today than the one perfect Buddha.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27Jan1939, Pages 69.

If we seek our connection with the snake we come to the spinal cord and that points to the animal soul of man which leads him down into the darkness of the body, into the instinct which one meets in animal form in the outer world. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 8March1935, Pages 199-200.

Complexes can also be called fragmentary souls. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 1May1935, Pages 201.

They [Intuitives] draw the souls out of things and act according to what they discover by this process, just as if what they discovered were ordinary every day facts. ~Carl Jung, Lecture IV, 18May1934, Page 102.

I am personally of the opinion that not only people, but even animals have souls. I am also deeply convinced of the truth of all creeds. No logical standard of comparison exists, they all contain genuine and real psychological experience and it is merely stupid to criticize them with the aim of establishing one truth. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture III, Page 18.

[Soul:] “Tame your impatience. Only waiting will help you here.” [I:] “Waiting-I know this word. Hercules also found waiting troublesome when he carried the weight of the world on his shoulders.” [Soul:] “He had to await Atlas’s return and carried the weight of the world for the sake of the apples” ~The Black Books, Page 60.

By psyche I understand the totality of all psychic processes, conscious as well as unconscious. By soul, on the other hand, I understand a clearly demarcated functional complex that can best be described as a “personality.” ~Carl Jung; [Definitions,” CW 6, par. 797]

If the supreme value (Christ) and the supreme negation (sin) are outside, then the soul is void: its highest and lowest are missing.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 8.

As the eye to the sun, so the soul corresponds to God. Since our conscious mind does not comprehend the soul it is ridiculous to speak of the things of the soul in a patronizing or depreciatory manner. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 11.

Too few people have experienced the divine image as the innermost possession of their own souls. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 12.

My whole life I have worked to know the soul and these people [Valentinian Gnostics] already knew it. ~Carl Jung to Gilles Quispel, Meeting with Jung, Page 150.

Being that has soul is living being. Soul is the living thing in [us], which lives of itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Par. 56.

When we suffer from lack of psychic energy, we say we have a depression or an inhibition, not realising that part of our mental hierarchy has one away beyond our control, that we have, in fact, lost our soul. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Seminar, Page 13.

She is legendary, that is to say, the anima-fact is unknown, the anima is that part of the soul which is unknown to our age. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Seminar, Page 25.

But the real anima of a man is shown by psychological experience to be like the primitive idea of soul; something between earth and heaven, as black as it is white; ghostlike; ill defined. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Lecture, Page 25.

The “Soul” which accrues to ego-consciousness during the Opus has a feminine character in the man and a masculine character in a woman.  His anima wants to reconcile and unite; her animus tries to discern and discriminate. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Par. 522.

Actually the word adhista in Elgonyi means sun as well as God, although they deny that the sun is God. Only the moment when it rises is mungu or adhista. Spittle and breath mean soul-substance. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 411.

The first beginnings of all analytical treatment of the soul are to be found in its prototype, the confessional. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Par 123.

Archetypes are images in the soul that represent the course of one’s life. One part of the archetypal content is of material and the other of spiritual origin. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski, Page 21.

God the Father became the Son and His own soul, the Word that became flesh. Each son of God must awaken this new reality in himself. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski, Page 42.

On the contrary it [The Soul] has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. Even if it were only the relationship of a drop of water to the sea … ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Page 10.

Language is originally and essentially nothing but a system of signs or symbols, which denote real occurrences, or their echo in the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Page 15.

I am an orphan, alone; nevertheless I am found everywhere. I am one but opposed to myself. I am youth and old man at one and the same time. I have known neither father nor mother, because I have had to be fetched out of the deep like a fish or fell like a white stone from heaven. In woods and mountains I roam, but I am hidden in the innermost soul of man. I am mortal for everyone, yet I am not touched by the cycle of eons. ~Carl Jung, Quoting an Alchemical Text, MDR 227.

If you prove receptive to this “call of the wild,” the longing for fulfilment will quicken the sterile wilderness of your soul as rain quickens the dry earth. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 190.

Although there is no way to marshal valid proof of continuance of the soul after death, there are nevertheless experiences which make us thoughtful. I take them as hints, and do not presume to ascribe to them the significance of insights. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 312.

Considering that the light of Christ is accompanied by the “dark night of the soul” that St. John of the Cross spoke about, and by what the Gnostics of lrenaeus called the umbra Christi, which is identical with the chthonic aspect mentioned above, the life of Christ is identical in us, from the psychological point of view, with the unconscious tendency toward individuation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 268.

I quite agree with you that those people in our world who have insight and good will enough should concern themselves with their own “souls” more than with preaching to the masses or trying to find out the best way for them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 549-550

I’m inclined to believe that something of the human soul remains after death, since already in this conscious life we have evidence that the psyche exists in a relative space and in a relative time, that is in a relatively non-extended and eternal state. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 29-30.

I am not engaged in philosophy, but merely in thinking within the framework of the special task that is laid upon me: to be a proper psychiatrist, a healer of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 69-71

God is something unknowable. An old German mystic has said: “God is a sigh in our souls.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 86-87.

Every country or people has its own angel, just as the earth has a soul. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 432.

The dream of the horse represents the union with the animal soul, which you have missed for a long time. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 145-146

People hate the human soul; it is nothing but “psychological.” They don’t understand that it has needs, and they throw its treasures into the street without understanding them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 208-210.

Transitions between the aeons always seem to have been melancholy and despairing times, as for instance the collapse of the Old Kingdom in Egypt (“The Dialogue of a World; Weary Man with His Soul”) between Taurus and Aries, or the melancholy of the Augustinian age between Aries and Pisces. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 229-230

Knowing more about the soul and its mysteries you could free yourself from the fascination which makes you suffer. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 402.

The soul is father and mother of all the apparently unanswerable difficulties that are building themselves up into the heavens before our eyes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 497-498

I own the first English edition of Bohme’s 40 Questions Concerning the Soul, 1647. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 465-466

“My dear Dr. Jung, Father Victor’s beloved soul has returned to God. He died this morning between 11- 12 a.m. from a sudden thrombosis. He was fully awake, and praying before he became unconscious, and they say he had no great pain.” ~The Mother Prioress, 8 May 1960.

The outer opposition is an image of my inner opposition. Once I realize this, I remain silent and think of the chasm of antagonism in my soul. Outer oppositions are easy to overcome. They indeed exist, but nevertheless you can be united with yourself. They will indeed burn and freeze your soles, but only your soles. It hurts, but you continue and look toward distant goals. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 279.

As you know, Plato laid down the principle that it is impossible to look at something ugly without taking something of it into the soul, and it is equally impossible to be in contact with what is beautiful without reacting to it. ~Carl Jung, 1925 Seminar, Page 10

The author shows an amazingly sympathetic knowledge of the introvert of the thinking type, and hardly less for the other types. Jung has revealed the inner kingdom of the soul marvelously well and has made the signal discovery of the value of phantasy.  His book has a manifold reach and grasp, and many reviews with quite different subject matter could be written about it.” ~Sonu Shamdasani, Introduction 1925 Seminar, Page xi

On August 22, 1922, Jaime de Angulo wrote to Chauncey Goodrich issuing “a challenge to all brother-neurotics—go, my brethren, go to the Mecca, I mean to Zürich, and drink from the fountain of life, all ye who are dead in your souls, go and seek new life.” ~Sonu Shamdasani, Introduction 1925 Seminar, Page xv

I was especially interested in palaeontology; you see, my life work in historical comparative psychology is like palaeontology. That is the study of the archetypes of the animals, and this is the study of the archetypes in the soul. The Eohippus is the archetype of the modern horse, the archetypes are like the fossil animals. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking; Interviews and Encounters, Pages 205-218

The dream is a little hidden door in the innermost and most secret recesses of the soul, opening into that cosmic night which was psyche long before there was any ego consciousness, and which will remain psyche no matter how far our ego-consciousness extends. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Pages 144-145

One might almost say that man himself, or his innermost soul, is the prisoner or the protected inhabitant of the mandala ~Carl Jung, CW 11, par. 157).

Thinking is an act of the soul whereby it becomes conscious of itself and of other things outside itself. ~Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; Page 11, Footnote 2.

But the soul suffers great need, since outer freedom is of no use to it.  ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 311.

But humankind is masculine and feminine, not just man or woman. You can hardly say of your soul what sex it is. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 263.

But if you pay close attention, you will see that the most masculine man has a feminine soul, and the most feminine woman has a masculine soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 263.

The outer opposition is an image of my inner opposition. Once I realize this, I remain silent and think of the chasm of antagonism in my soul.  ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 279.

Soul and body are not two things. They are one. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 355

Natural life is the nourishing of the Soul ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 800.

The animus when on his way, on his quest, is really a psychopompos, leading the soul back to the stars whence it came. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1229

On the way back out of the existence in the flesh, the psychopompos [Animus] develops such a cosmic aspect, he wanders among the constellations, he leads the soul over the rainbow bridge into the blossoming fields of the stars. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1229

In the redemption of the individual, the whole past will be redeemed, and that includes all the inferior things as well, the animals, and all the ancestral souls, everything that has not been completed; all creation will be redeemed in the apokatastasis [at the time of the Last Judgement], there will be a complete restoration of things as they have been. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1280

When someone is able to perform the art of touching on the archetypal, he can play on the souls of people like on the strings of a piano. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dream Seminar, Page 150

But my eyes were opened, and I saw that you are a lover of your soul, who anxiously and jealously guards its treasure. Carl Jung to Philemon, The Red Book, Page 315

All knowledge of the psyche is itself psychic; in spite of all this the soul is the only experient of life and existence. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Para 344.

People accuse psychology of dealing in squalid fantasies, and yet even a cursory glance at ancient religions and the history of morals should be sufficient to convince them of the demons hidden in the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Para 106

The soul gives birth to images that from the rational standpoint of consciousness are assumed to be worthless.  And so they are, in the sense that they cannot immediately be turned to account in the objective world. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 426

Just as the unconscious world of mythological images speaks indirectly, through the experience of external things, to the man who surrenders wholly to the outside world, so the real world and its demands find their way indirectly to the man who has surrendered wholly to the soul; for no man can escape both realities. ~Carl Jung, CW  6, Para 280

It should never be forgotten—and of this the Freudian school must be reminded—that morality was not brought down on tables of stone from Sinai and imposed on the people, but is a function of the human soul, as old as humanity itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 30.

It [Dreams] leads straight to the deepest personal secrets, and is, therefore, an invaluable instrument in the hand of the physician and educator of the soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 25

The deposit of man’s whole ancestral experience—so rich in emotional imagery—of father, mother, child, husband and wife, of the magic personality, of dangers to body and soul, has exalted this group of archetypes into the supreme regulating principles of religious and even of political life, in unconscious recognition of their tremendous psychic power. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 337

Childhood is important not only  because various warpings of instinct have their origin there, but because this is the time when, terrifying or encouraging, those far-seeing dreams and images appear before the soul of the child, shaping his whole destiny, as well as those retrospective intuitions which reach back far beyond the range of childhood experience into the life of our ancestors. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 98

It is the world of water, where all life floats in suspension; where the realm of the sympathetic system, the soul of everything living, begins; where I am indivisibly this and that; where I experience the other in myself and the other-than myself experiences me. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 45.

The souls or spirits of the dead are identical with the psychic activity of the living; they merely continue it. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 38

They [Religions] express the whole range of the psychic problem in mighty images; they are the avowal and recognition of the soul, and at the same time the revelation of the soul’s nature. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 367

For when the soul vanished at death, it was not lost; in that other world it formed the living counterpole to the state of death in this world. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Para 493

Enlightenment, which stripped nature and human institutions of gods, overlooked the God of Terror who dwells in the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 17, Para 302

Therefore our Lord himself is a healer; he is a doctor; he heals the sick and he deals with the troubles of the soul; and that is exactly what we call psychotherapy.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 370

It seems to me to be the Holy Spirit’s task and charge to reconcile and unite the opposites in the human individual through a special development of the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1553

But when we penetrate the depths of the soul and when we try to understand its mysterious life, we shall discern that death is not a meaningless end, the mere vanishing into nothingness—it is an accomplishment, a ripe fruit on the tree of life. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

But if we listen to the quieter voices of our deeper nature we become aware of the fact that soon after the middle of our life the soul begins its secret work, getting ready for the departure. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

Alchemy represents the projection of a drama both cosmic and spiritual in laboratory terms. The opus magnum [the great work] had two aims: the rescue of the human soul and the salvation of the cosmos. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking, Page 228

With her cunning play of illusions the soul lures into life the inertness of matter that does not want to live. She makes us believe incredible things, that life may be lived. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

Were it not for the leaping and twinkling of the soul, man would rot away in his greatest passion, idleness. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

But to have soul is the whole venture of life, for soul is a life-giving daemon who plays his elfin game above and below human existence, for which reason-in the realm of dogma he is threatened and propitiated with superhuman punishments and blessings that go far beyond the possible deserts of human beings.  ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

Heaven and hell are the fates meted out to the soul and not to civilized man, who in his nakedness and timidity would have no idea of what to do with himself in a heavenly Jerusalem. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

If you have committed a mistake at all, it consisted in your having striven too hard to understand your wife completely and not reckoning with the fact that in the end people don’t want to know what secrets are slumbering in their souls. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 27.

Have your congregation understood that they must close their ears to the traditional teachings and go through the darknesses of their own souls and set aside everything in order to become that which every individual bears in himself as his individual task, and that no one can take this burden from him?  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 76.

These constituents of the personality—which one may call functions, or Mendelian units, or the primitives would call them remnants of ancestral —these constituents don’t always fit. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 453

Probably in absolute reality there is no such thing as body and mind, but body and mind or soul are the same, the same life, subject to the same laws, and what the body does is happening in the mind. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 20

It is death to the soul to become unconscious. People die before there is death of the body, because there is death in the soul. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 90.

You can succeed in going away from your problems, you need only to look away

from them long enough. You may escape, but it is the death of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 90.

I loved the old man

who touched my

life with outstretched

hand

and left his

mark

upon my soul.

[Gilda Franz, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff: A Collection of Remembrances]

A man likes to believe that he is master of his soul. ~Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols, Page 83.

Your dream unquestionably refers to the archetypal problem of the extrusion of the soul from the body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 306-307

One is forced to conclude ‘that in your case the soul is only loosely seated in your body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 306-307

However, the friendly lion in the dream seems to indicate that the looseness of the soul is not exactly desirable, since the lion compensates your condition in a very obvious way: the Zurich lion  represents your localized instinct, firmly rooted in your earth, just as the lion’s soul-as with all animals -is securely fixed in its body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 306-307

We find the idea of the soul as the form giving principle already in the Middle Ages, it is the soul which forms the body and the outer life. So in meditating on the Anima Christi you are meditating on Christ’s form. The same idea is to be found in the East. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture17th Nov 1939

Rama Krishna is not worshipped; his photograph is there to remind the worshippers of his form. This is, therefore, totally different to the worship of Christ but the basic ide a of soul as form is common to both. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture ETH Lecture17th Nov 1939

It is a great blessing for mankind when the soul is contained in the dogma and there is always a great deal of misery when this is not the case. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27 Jan 1939

Where there are no forms and ceremonies, rites in which they can express their souls, people become moody and caught in conflicts. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27 January 1939

No, the Virgin was the archetypal figure of the soul of man, the anima, and it is only in the soul of man that God can be born, where else could it be? ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 32

Unfortunately only too often no further knowledge reaches us of the things that are being played out on the dark side of the soul [in the insane], because all the bridges have broken down which connect that side with this ~Carl Jung, CW 3, Para 385

On august 22, 1922, Jaime de Angulo wrote to Chauncey Goodrich issuing “a challenge to all brother-neurotics—go, my brethren, go to the Mecca, i mean to Zürich, and drink from the fountain of life, all ye who are dead in your souls, go and seek new life.” ~Sonu Shamdasani, Introduction to Jungian Psychology, Page xv

We have a maid who is a medium and has heard voices all of her life. I have never touched her psychologically.

She is an anachronism. Her soul was born in the Stone Age and by mistake it got into the present age, and that was a rather difficult situation for her to cope with, but she managed very well.

Once she realized that she was having conversations with voices, she discovered on her own how to handle them. ~Marie-Louise von Franz, Psychological Perspectives, Page 309-310

In earthly union wants to form.

Without connection to the body, spiritual progress is simply nonsense. Where a soulful connection exists, we should think: ‘Beware, you are in higher presence!’

A God or a Goddess is present.

It doesn’t matter who it is.

It is a sacred mystery that belongs wholly to oneself. It is pure experience, and the freedom of the soul!” ~Carl Jung, Sabi Tauber: Encounters with Jung, Page 102

Soul-connections outside the marriage are absolutely legitimate in the second half of life. ~Carl Jung, Sabi Tauber: Encounters with Jung, Page 102

A woman who cannot include her soul in intercourse is mere anatomy. Women must have an enormous claim.  Sexual intercourse in the second phase of life can oftentimes feel deeply humiliating for the wife in a marriage, if she functions as the legitimate prostitute of her husband. One must see it absolutely as it is. The real marriage begins where adultery seems to take place. At that point a true, real relationship may begin, actual love begins! ~Carl Jung, Sabi Tauber: Encounters with Jung, Page 101

Precisely because you are much too reasonable and realistic, the life of the soul (the psychic world) becomes so intense and vehement – all rubeus and puella, which elicits identification with them.

Live more in the ‘psychic world,’ apparently unreasonably and irrationally, and you will integrate rubeus and puella.

In this way they will loosen their intensity and at the same time become real.

This closes the circle. ~Carl Jung, Sabi Tauber: Encounters with Jung, Page 55

Jung answered mildly, telling me matter- of-factly about the almost unbearable challenge of his destiny:

For the past 150 years, the ancestors on his mother’s side had been ministers, on father’s side physicians.

He had to take on the issues from both sides and solve them!

In addition, there was the problem of the body and soul. ~Sabi Tauber, Sabi Tauber: Encounters with Jung, Page 29

You have to be more honest! Pay attention to every movement of the soul, look at it, and be lovingly creative with it.

A noli me tangere attitude makes one dumb and unrelated. True relationship enriches.

To engage in a short-circuited sexual liaison leaves one poor and dumb – one has cheated oneself. ~Carl Jung, Sabi Tauber: Encounters with Jung, Page 26

The Adech is our interior and invisible man, which prefigures the unique visible man in our soul, and which serves the visible man’s nature. ~Gerhard Dorn, Dictionarium, Page 56

The art of achieving a voluntary withdrawal from the Body of a well-composed Mind is called Speculative Philosophy.

By this method the Rational Soul may more easily concern itself with the cognition of all aspects of the Truth. ~Gerhard Dorn, Speculative Philosophy, Page 11 [Note: Rational Soul = Animus]

Whatever is not from heaven cannot be said to be a virtue, but merely its false simulacrum. ~Gerhard Dorn, Speculative Philosophy, Page 68

It is precisely this unification of our image of the material world with the deepest levels of our being that makes synchronicity such a revolutionary idea, with repercussions far beyond

psychology. Whatever the archetypal meaning in a synchronicity experience, the expression of unity is always paramount.

As von Franz (1975) says:

The most essential and certainly the most impressive thing about synchronicity occurrences … is the fact that in them the duality of soul and matter seems to be eliminated.

They are therefore an empirical indication of an ultimate unity of all existence, which Jung, using the terminology of medieval natural philosophy, called the Unus Mundus.” (p. 247) ~Victor Mansfield, Rhine-Jung Letters, Page 10

We should be skeptical about attempts to relate some of these “souls” or “daimons” to the Jungian concepts of shadow, anima, animus, and Self.

It would be a great mistake, as Jung himself often emphasized, to suppose that the shadow, the anima (or animus), and the Self appear separately in a person’s unconscious, neatly timed and in definable order.

In the reality of everyday practice it is much more likely that a person in depth psychological analysis will first meet with something psychically “absolutely other” in himself, a dark, chaotic something, appearing to him in complicated dream images in which, little by little, he begins to discover his alter ego.  ~Marie-Louise Von Franz, Projection and Re-Collection, Page 144-145

The flare-up of or invasion by passion is separately experienced as something inner, while the lost soul-fragment is considered as something different, attached to the outer figure. ~Marie-Louise Von Franz, Projection and Re-Collection, Page 32

In the case of a powerful love projection (that is, a projection of the inner partner-images of animus and anima), a double process sometimes takes place and one experiences it both as being struck by an arrow (invasion by a complex) and as loss of soul, as utter dependence on the presence of the other.

Inwardly one feels as if invaded by a passionate disquiet and fantasy activity, and at the same time as if one’s own life has flowed out to the other in the outer world.

This explains a curious mythological motif that has so far gone unexplained.

For the most part we assume that when a man falls in love with a woman as a result of a sudden anima projection, he looks upon her as the sender of love’s arrow, not the god Amor.

In antiquity, however, such a man felt that he had been shot by the god Eros or hit by the mater saeva cupidinum, that is, by Venus.

The flare-up of or invasion by passion is separately experienced as something inner, while the lost soul-fragment is considered as something different, attached to the outer figure. ~Marie-Louise Von Franz, Projection and Re-Collection, Page 32

The intuitive art of deciphering the hidden script in-dwelling things and traditions is the very boon which Analytical Psychology and its Master bestow on us and our professions. In this way Dr. Jung’s teachings have opened a new era of how to understand and enjoy the rich, everlasting tradition of the mythology of the human soul and how to put it to use in modern therapy. ~Heinrich Zimmer, The Impress of Dr. Jung in my Profession, Page 6

One has to use one’s intuition in deciphering these dreams of the collective genius of a great civilization. In fact, Hindu mythical tradition, instead of explaining its amazing features to the understanding, unfolds them to the pious intuition of the Hindu masses; it impresses their imagination and guides their souls by an immediate impact on the unconscious which is stirred to correspond to the dreamlike features and events of the mythological tales as they evolve in being told. ~Heinrich Zimmer, The Impress of Dr. Jung in my Profession, Page 3

The democritean formula arises from the ancient feeling for nature in which the physical world was not yet devoid of soul. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 267

More recently, the spirit has also been portrayed as the “antagonist of the soul” and as an anti-life principle (Klages). Inasmuch as the spirit forfeited its spontaneous revelatory activity, nature also became nothing but matter, the cpucm; (physis) became physics. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 266

… by this kingdom of God we understand the soul, for the soul is of like nature with the Godhead. Hence all that has been said here of the kingdom of God, how God is himself the kingdom, may be said with equal truth of the soul. St. John says: “All things were made by him.” This refers to the soul, for the soul is all things. The soul is all things in that she is an image of God and as such she is also the kingdom of God; as God is essentially in himself without beginning so in the kingdom of the soul he is, as essence, without end. “God,” says one philosopher, “is in the soul in such a fashion that his whole Godhead hangs upon her.” It is far better for God to be in the soul than for the soul to be in God. The soul is not happy because she is in God, she is happy because God is in her. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 242-243

These ideas about the soul as the kingdom of God, these surely already existed in the early Christian period; they were certainly heretical and gnostic in nature, for in them primal man, Adam Kadmon, is sometimes depicted in the soul.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 244

When anyone asks me, why do we pray or why do we fast or do our work withal, I say, so that God may be born in our souls. What were the scriptures written for and why did God create the world and the angelic nature? Simply that God might be born in the soul. All cereal nature means wheat, all treasure nature means gold, all generation means man. ~Meister Eckhart, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 243

There is an extraordinary relationship between Eastern ideas and the ideas of Meister Eckhart, which is yet to be fathomed.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 244

These ideas about the soul as the kingdom of God, these surely already existed in the early Christian period; they were certainly heretical and gnostic in nature, for in them primal man, Adam Kadmon, is sometimes depicted in the soul.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 244

At the same time, it is simply the general being of the world. So the purusha is also the individual being, but at the same time the maha-purusha, i.e., the great soul of the world, exactly like the atman.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 223

Remarkably, in Buddhism the dominant belief is that karma is not personal in nature. I can accumulate merit in my life, but because I do not have a soul, when my life ends my karma survives and requires a new existence. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 215

Whoever has achieved enough merit will have their soul enclosed in a lotus blossom for countless aeons. Then it blossoms one day in the miraculous kingdom of the Amitabha. This is the child being raised from the coniunctio. In Chinese, it is a diamond being. In medieval philosophy it is the incorruptible body, the subtle body, which is seen as the result of this coniunctio.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 212

Whoever has achieved enough merit will have their soul enclosed in a lotus blossom for countless aeons. Then it blossoms one day in the miraculous kingdom of the Amitabha. This is the child being raised from the coniunctio. In Chinese, it is a diamond being. In medieval philosophy it is the incorruptible body, the subtle body, which is seen as the result of this coniunctio.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 212

Namely, this union has a remarkable consequence: in the Gretchen tragedy the biological union leads to a pregnancy and in time a child is born. This ordinary event becomes essential symbolism in alchemy, which is not present in the Eastern series. Such is the secret pregnancy, the soul pregnancy. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 211

In samkhya philosophy, or in Vedanta altogether, the lingam means the subtle body containing the ancient idea of the anima. The subtle body is thought of as half matter. The soul has a fine subtle body, and it is called lingam. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 184

What arises from the alchemical retort is the soul, and its ascent is called “blossoming.” Comarius, the archpriest, instructed Cleopatra that the dead who dwell in Hades, i.e., in chaos, will become spring blossoms by sprinkling chaos with the divine water.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 172

Hippolytus informs us that there used to be Gnostics who spoke of walls and a castle in which the human soul resides. There is in fact such a text in the Bodleian library in Oxford, the Codex Brucianus. There, a Coptic text has been discovered that is a proper gnosis. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 167

It can happen that you might wake out of sleep with the feeling that half your soul has wandered off. It must be found again. Among primitives the medicine men have their ways and means of reclaiming lost souls. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 141

Rupaloka, i.e., the world of forms or ideas, corresponding to the Platonic world of ideas. According to Plato there is “a place beyond the skies” when the soul lifts above heaven and leaves behind the outer surface of the world, thus arriving at that place where one sees the forms, the eternal ideas; so, that is the world of the manifold ideas, or forms ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 137

Herakleitos of Ephesos, pre-Socratic philosopher, who lived around 500 BCE, is reported to have said: “For it is death to souls to become water, and death to water to become earth. But water comes from earth; and from water, soul” ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 125, fn 332

And hermetic philosophy itself is not without blame in this. They practiced chemistry in their own way and sought the soul of the world in matter, thereby becoming the fathers of modern science. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 115

For the medieval philosopher, spiritual man is a microcosm. Thus, the individual human soul is of the

same roundness as the soul of all-being that surrounds the entire universe. The Platonic notion is identical to the Eastern philosophy of the atman or purusha who surrounds the whole world two bandwidths high and yet still lives in the heart of every individual person; he is the size of a thumb, a thumb ling.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 115

The idea of roundness, however, is not conceived of as being present from the beginning, but is to be created by the yogi. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 115

Through this invocation he seeks to place himself at one with that being containing within itself the entire cosmos as a transpersonal atman. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 115

And hermetic philosophy itself is not without blame in this. They practiced chemistry in their own way and sought the soul of the world in matter, thereby becoming the fathers of modern science. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 115

Whereas if the unconscious can be contained in a dogmatic form, then we have those forms of life, ceremonies, and rituals in which the soul’s activity can find expression. For example, the central Australians spend two-thirds of their time in ceremonies of a symbolic nature.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 112

Whereas if the unconscious can be contained in a dogmatic form, then we have those forms of life, ceremonies, and rituals in which the soul’s activity can find expression. For example, the central Australians spend two-thirds of their time in ceremonies of a symbolic nature.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 112

But the fact is that polytheism, this unending richness in the form of the divine essence, is somehow a more exact expression of the Indian soul than that of the perfected Buddha.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 112

Souls are flying around and seeking places where sexual intercourse is happening and then they are caught. The Bardo Thodol considers souls in the same way. When they fall into erotic fantasies, they are suddenly snapped up by the uterus. One is in the prison of the sensual world of Maya, the dancing Shakti. It is the goddess Maya who creates the visible realm. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 95

1 Corinthians 15:41-46: “There is one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars: for one star differeth from another star in glory. So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: It is sown in dishonor; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in power: It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body. And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. Howbeit that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual” [KJV]. On the discussion of this infallible Christian doctrine in eighteenth-century psychology, see Vidal (2011), pp. 325-350.   ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page Fn 283

This is a technique used by the ancient Egyptian priests, for example, who stared into a bowl of water. There is nothing present in the water, but the intense gazing arouses the soul into seeing something. It has a hypnotic and fascinating effect. For this purpose, the ancient magicians used a glass button or jewel, or Egyptian priests a beautiful blue crystal, in order to impart unconscious perceptions to their clientele. It was not understood in this way back then but was employed for the purposes of prophecy, divination, and healing. The ancients were well aware that to heal the soul, or even the body, a certain assistance from psychic experiences was necessary. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 4

By concentrating on the chemical matter, the image that is within us is imprinted upon matter. This image within us is the soul, and it is round. Roundness is perfection, therefore gold has a round form because it is a perfect body. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 8

St. Victor had such a conversation with his own soul. The Middle Ages thus already had the inner counterpart in contrast to the external counterpart; and that inner counterpart possesses a meaning in its own right, so that one can, in a sense, have a conversation with this other. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 7-8

By concentrating on the chemical matter, the image that is within us is imprinted upon matter. This image within us is the soul, and it is round. Roundness is perfection, therefore gold has a round form because it is a perfect body. ~Carl Jung, Psychology of Yoga and Meditation, Page 8

You unite yourself with Abraxas through me. First you give me your heart, and then you live through me. I am the bridge to Abraxas. Thus the tree of light arises in you and you become the tree of light and Phanes arises from you. You have anticipated, but not understood this. At the time you had to separate from Abraxas to become individual, opposed to the drive. Now you become one with Abraxas. This happens through me. You cannot do this. Therefore you must remain with me. unification with the physical Abraxas occurs through the human woman, but that with the spiritual Abr. occurs through me; that is why you must be with me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 261

“I always want a great deal from you. Women are my most dangerous opponents, since they have my qualities. That’s why you can confuse me so easily with the black one [Toni Wolff]. I also have golden goat eyes and a black coat. I place myself between her and you. The white one [Maria Moltzer] is less dangerous to you, since she is completely unlike me and of such an adverse nature that you can’t at all lose yourself there. You just suffer too much from her. She was dangerous before, but no longer. She is just embittered against you because I am stronger than her. But the black one is dishonestly clever. I understand that you love her, but I would like to get rid of her. It’s unclear whether I will succeed. There are human matters which I cannot master. But I will always be against her. So pay attention. Not too far away from me!” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

You [Soul] are like the chicken that has hatched ducklings. You don’t listen to what I say. You are unreasonable. You don’t come to humane terms with me, though you always claim that you do. You work against me and you are in love with me. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 216

This star is the God, the goal of man. This is his one guiding God. In him man goes to his rest. Toward him goes the long journey of the soul after death. In him everything that man withdraws from thew greater world shines resplendently. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 227

The daimon of sexuality approaches our soul as a serpent. She is half human soul and is called thought-desire. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

But the soul became the steps of its ladder, closest, nearest, near, far, further, furthest. First she is my own being, then she is a serpent and a bird, then she is mother and father, then even further away Salome and Elijah. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 238

But the soul became the steps of its ladder, closest, nearest, near, far, further, furthest. First she is my own being, then she is a serpent and a bird, then she is mother and father, then even further away Salome and Elijah. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 238

A dream told me that you were suffering, you Elijah, you Salome, you elders, and you, my maternal soul that cannot forget me. You, maternal soul, tell me why should I, who had been your lover, appear to you now as your unbeloved man? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 235

I am astonished, Elijah. Do you not know what happened? Do you not know that the world has put on a new garb? That the one God and the one soul have gone away and in turn a multitude of Gods and soul daimons have moved back into the world? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 237

What is, gives no pleasure. Pleasure comes only from the new. Your maternal soul would also like a new husband-ha ha! She loves change. Her bourgeois man is not pleasurable enough for her. In that respect she is unteachable and therefore you believe she is mad. We love only what is coming, that gives pleasure. ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 237

I believe that our lord Jesus Christ has completed his work, since the one who has given his life, his entire truth, and his entire soul, has completed his work. Therefore I believe that our lord Jesus Christ has indeed improved mankind. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 234-235

Jung’s Soul: “Yes, he is the ultimate and highest. What comes after him is development, preservation, and decline.” ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 268

What are you whining about? Men are mortal. Nothing saved your friend Gilgamesh from losing his brother. That is the law of the earth. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 270

Jung’s Soul: “Yes, he is the ultimate and highest. What comes after him is development, preservation, and decline.” ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 268

I carry with me all the highest greatest suffering and all the highest joy. The measurable and the measured alone belong to men, not the reverse, as the devils always want to teach you. Give me your fidelity and I will help you. You know that I can bring about much. I give you power and keep disturbances far from you. That way you will rise up to what is further.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 256

After all, I sit right at the source of life. You must come to me, otherwise you won’t live. You live through me, through the disgust that I exude. Don’t you know that life feeds on corpses? Take heed. Whoever fails to overcome revulsion toward the grub of corpses does not live. The world will become a corpse for him. Rather let everything else lie and come to me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

I am your woman, who can give you life. In the long run no earthly woman is capable of the same. You selected the 7 lights, receive therefore your life from me and not from an earthly woman. This is painful, but true. You’ll always give life only to them; they can’t give it to you. Only I can do that. Therefore, every time the emptiness and disgust seize you, come to me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

So no more letters to women, no moaning. They can’t give it you. You should have known this for a long time. You are the source of life to them, until they have found their own source. Moaning letters are misfires. You must give but must receive only from me. Human women are always jealous of me, in that they confuse themselves with your soul. That is their devilry, from which they suffer and make you suffer. You have caught me and forced me to be faithful. I am your woman, no one else is. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

At this time, Jung was corresponding with Maria Moltzer and Toni Wolff.  ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257, fn 261

I will give you strength, if you go only with me. I will keep others away from you but come to me. You must be lonely with me. Much silence, and do not bind yourself. Take the human aspects that you need. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

Yes, it is jealousy, womanly jealousy. Do you think that it has no significance? It is self-preservation. Consequently I must malign the black one. I am against her not because she is somewhat not good, but because she takes too much away from me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 258

I always want a great deal from you. Women are my most dangerous opponents, since they have my qualities. That’s why you can confuse me so easily with the black one. I also have golden goat eyes and a black coat. I place myself between her and you. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 258

The white one is less dangerous to you, since she is completely unlike me and of such an adverse nature that you can’t at all lose yourself there. You just suffer too much from her. She was dangerous before, but no longer. She is just embittered against you because I am stronger than her. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

But the black one is dishonestly clever. I understand that you love her, but I would like to get rid of her. It’s unclear whether I will succeed. There are human matters which I cannot master. But I will always be against her. So pay attention. Not too far away from me!”    ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 258-259

Precisely that is dark to me. I don’t know how I work. It can become only clear through men, since nature recognizes herself only through men. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

The golden bird is no soul; it is your entire nature. Men are also golden birds as well; not all; some are worms and rot in the earth. But many are also golden birds. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

Unification with the physical Abraxas occurs through the human woman, but that with the spiritual Abr. Occurs through me; that is why you must be with me.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 261

Jung: That’s what I need: cooling, fresh air. Enough suffocating sultriness. Too much anxiety and too little breathing room. Give me the 7 lights.

Soul: “The first light designates the Pleroma.

The second light designates Abraxas.

The third light, the sun.

The fourth light, the moon.

The fifth light, the earth.

The sixth light, the phallus.

The seventh light, the star.

Why are the bird, the heavenly mother, and heaven missing?

They are all enclosed in the star. When you look toward the star, you will look through them. They are the bridges to the star. They make up the single 7th light, the highest, the floating, which rises with roaring flapping of wings, released from the embrace of the tree of light with 6 branches and I blossom, in which the star God lay slumbering. The 6 lights are singular and form the multiplicity. The one light is one and forms the unity, it is the blossoming crown of the tree, the holy egg, the seed of the world endowed with wings so it can reach its place. The one gives rise to the many again and again, and the many entails the one.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 254-255

If you yourself are frugal, you teach others frugality-and thankfulness for the meagre. Above all, one is thankful only for the meagre, never for the abundant. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 250

The Buddha appeared in a circle of flames in a fantasy of December 22, 1913, in Book 2, p. 186. In a dialogue on February 5, 1916, the soul informed the “I” that he needed abstention from suffering and joy in men; the “I” described this as Eastern wisdom. The reference appears to be to the Buddhist doctrine of nonattachment (see above, Book 6, p. 221). ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 249, fn 235

So listen then: much is loaded on you and much is still expected from you, for the living and the dead. Strange things are yet to be fulfilled. Do not resist. Good grows out of evil. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 250

Become good, Christianity has fully made you into a monster. The witch trials could already have taught us that. Damned foolishness of these people: they should have roasted their souls, instead they grilled their own flesh and with this they fed the paunch of their souls. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 251

You [Jung’s Soul] must not lose the connection with me. But I believe that you should try to speak with the one on the side of the light. Perhaps he can tell you things that I don’t get. It will not be Phanes, but the one who lives in the flame. [“] ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 271

You [Jung’s Soul] must not lose the connection with me. But I believe that you should try to speak with the one on the side of the light. Perhaps he can tell you things that I don’t get. It will not be Phanes, but the one who lives in the flame. [“] ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 271

Soul: “You want to deify man?”

Jung: Not man, but man’s primordial kernel. That deserves worship. I gave you enough. I want to give you some more, as much as you deserve. But I deserve human freedom. You should give it to me. Man deserves it. You Gods want slaves. But man wants to be a law himself.  This must be. This will be accomplished. ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 273

Thrice five towers surround the castle. Thrice six gates are in the walls. Thrice seven great halls are in the castle. The green stream flows below. The dark cloud is above, over it the fire, the eternal one that you drew. There are caves in the mountain, there lies the stacked gold, the solidified fire. Where are the men? The castle is empty. Perhaps they left. I see Philemon in the golden house of splendor-alone. Where is Baucis? Did she die, no, she lives, I am Baucis. She stands behind the wise one, her hand touches his throne. They are alone. Where are the men? Who lives in the palaces? No one. Everything is ready. Does no one come? Call now, Philemon! Your voice is weak. And I have no voice that human ears could hear. Do men not see the castle? Is the cloud covering it? Yes, it is, it hides the fire. What grief, this black cloud! Where did it come from- smoke below the fire! How strange! Are you a mourner, a hermit, Philemon? Do you grieve that your fire is hidden? Green water flows around your castle. Where is a bridge? There is no bridge there, Oh Philemon. How can people get across? You, pontiff, should build a bridge, a wide bridge from rare and precious stones. Why do you grieve? Why do you hide the fire with the cloud? Do you grieve because of your solitude? You are not alone; I am with you. Build the bridge, I accompany you.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 287-288

Light must be created. You must create it out of raw matter that you’ve received. It must still be uttered. Words! The light has shown itself only as matter. It will only become luminous when it has been lifted on high. What the Cabiri carried up must still be pulled up. It must pass through your highest light, through the highest lights: science and art. All powers must combine for this work.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 282

So listen-a golden serpent is the way, a shimmering serpent bridge over a black grave-a dark gate behind splendor-a red light in the darkness of the background-that is evil. I make it out. You did well in not taking this way. Should I take it? So may the eye of evil take me-to a red cave-serpents of blood on the walls -a white gate- a long passage upward in wide halls, countless gates- up onto the roof on narrow steps-above is a worldwide prospect-I blossom like a fire on a mountain top-I glow through eternities-can you still see me- a distant light-itself a star lost in infinities-but, behold a thread-many threads spun from star to star-on a dizzying bridge infinitely long-it is reached, the first star-also a world. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 286

You [Soul] didn’t believe in me, therefore you went astray. Why did you go astray? Because I believed more in you than in myself. Therefore the radiant one rose in my self. The source of the eternal fire is with me. Come to me and live in me and love the fire and the eternal splendor. My self has the highest wisdom, the hottest fire. My self lives in the gate of splendor. My self draws the fire of the star to it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 286

That was the spirit of and the error of Atmaviktu. He is still erring and hasn’t flown into my throat yet. When he comes near me, I swallow him, so that I become full and my stony heaviness and immobility dwindle. I lack Atmaviktu’s soul. If I possess it, I will enter into the gate of splendor. I will lay myself over the gorge. I am the bridge, the living arch that leads over to the land of men and from the land of men into the golden castle. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 290

That was the spirit of and the error of Atmaviktu. He is still erring and hasn’t flown into my throat yet. When he comes near me, I swallow him, so that I become full and my stony heaviness and immobility dwindle. I lack Atmaviktu’s soul. If I possess it, I will enter into the gate of splendor. I will lay myself over the gorge. I am the bridge, the living arch that leads over to the land of men and from the land of men into the golden castle. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 290

That was the spirit of and the error of Atmaviktu. He is still erring and hasn’t flown into my throat yet. When he comes near me, I swallow him, so that I become full and my stony heaviness and immobility dwindle. I lack Atmaviktu’s soul. If I possess it, I will enter into the gate of splendor. I will lay myself over the gorge. I am the bridge, the living arch that leads over to the land of men and from the land of men into the golden castle. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 290

What are you thinking of? He is the Abraxas of the earth. No one bestows joy on the earthly ones as he does. He is the hermaphrodite, who for joy unites what is separated. He makes you strong and happy on earth. He preserves the life and happiness of men. How could you grow without him? You poor fools! If you don’t know how to serve the Gods, at least serve yourselves.  ~Jung Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 279

! come, my light is with you. Your path leads straight. Your feet do not err. Disaster is warded off The way is secure. Disunity is removed from you. The Lord of light is born. He lifted himself up and white steeds go before him. Flowers spring up from beneath his feet. The sagacity of the earth and the goodness of the blessing light have prepared the path to joy for you. Lay worry aside. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 280

The Lord has come. Mortals may be happy. The soul gave herself to the evil one. The evil one is lamed by love. One of his eyes is blinded. Henceforth he doesn’t drink the radiance of the light. He embraced and was embraced. You are secure. Enjoy the leveled way. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 280

You will go to men as one veiled. Your light shines at night. Your solar nature departs from you and your star begins.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 223

The daimon of spirituality descends into our soul as the white bird. He is half human soul and is called desire-thought. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

The multiplicity of the Gods corresponds to the multiplicity of Gods men. Numberless Gods await the human state. Numberless Gods have been men. Man shares in the nature of the Gods. He comes from the Gods and goes unto the Gods the God. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 221

You didn’t want to obey, you resisted. But you should not resist any humiliation. You should accept the injustice, since Abraxas wants to knead you into people like yeast into flour.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 217

4 is the number of the principal Gods, as 4 is the number of the world’s measurements.

1 is the beginning, the God.

2 is Eros, for he spreads himself out in brightness.

3 is the Tree of life, for it fills space with bodies.

4 is the devil, for he opens all that is closed, he dissolves everything formed and physical; he is the destroyer in whom everything becomes nothing.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 220

But woe unto you, who replace this incompatible multiplicity with a single God! In so doing you produce the torment of doubt for the sake of the one God and the mutilation of the creation whose nature and aim is differentiation.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 220

The multiplicity of the Gods corresponds to the multiplicity of Gods men. Numberless Gods await the human state. Numberless Gods have been men. Man shares in the nature of the Gods. He comes from the Gods and goes unto the Gods the God. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 221

In 1921, Jung noted, “For a man, a woman is best fitted to be the real bearer of his soul-image, because of the feminine quality of his soul” ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 256, fn 259.

[Pray]To your God, that he bring you the light, otherwise it can’t come along. It needs the bridge of prayer. You ought to leave no means untried. Where nothing helps, prayer helps. Prayer helps your God. He has the light; I don’t have it. 273 I can see only from the distance, through you. But you don’t see it.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 264

In 1921, Jung noted, “For a man, a woman is best fitted to be the real bearer of his soul-image, because of the feminine quality of his soul” ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 256, fn 259

Since you do not deserve to be suffocated by women, as you were not suffocated by me. You see in me what woman is for man-a snare and a ladder to heaven.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 255

Jung’s Soul: Restlessness is my essence and the foundation of my life.  ~ The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 211

Jung: What is harder? Truly the struggle with the dead!”

Soul: One dies of life.

Jung: Yes, then one dies of life. Why, then?

Soul: If one does not live with life.

Jung: Do I not live with life?

My God, what else do you want?

Soul: I demand your life.”

Jung: Are you shooting off to God again, my soul? ~ The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 211

I want to vanish from your sight, you ought to live in darkest solitude. Human lights should illumine your darkness. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 212

Pregnant women belong to fate.” Release me, I rise to the eternal realm. Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 213

He who is pregnant with chaos is fortunate. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 206

Why should you not be horrified? Horror belongs to loneliness, and loneliness is your way. You have enough people in your outer life. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 206

How should you be powerful? We are children of chaos, inextricably intertwined with it. Our deepest nature is disorder. That is the beginning of all things. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

“Straightforward direct love.” love inside-out is better described as indirect love. To my way of thinking loving someone indirectly is to love their obverse. Love the generosity of the miser, the ugly of the beautiful, the rationality of the crazy and the badness of good. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

My soul, do you still exist? You, whom I ridiculed and abused, who appeared to me in a foolish form? Woe betide those who have seen their soul and felt it with hands! I am powerless in your hand, my God! ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 213

Such is my language and to you I leave the understanding. No one besides you has your soul. It is always with you, yet you see it in others, and thus it is never with you. You strive to draw to yourself those who seem to possess your soul. You will come to see that they do not possess it, and that you alone have it. Thus you are alone among men-in the crowd and yet alone. Solitude in multitude-ponder this. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 213

I believe and accept that my soul is something different from me. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 215

Don’t ask in such a direct way, it’s disturbing. Don’t disturb the development of nonsense. It’s salutary. This is what you need to learn today. let the nonsensical grow. How else could you discern meaning?” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 210

Yes, uncertain, by God. We have to speak of “uncertain”.  I think this is an important point. “Uncertain” is the word of words for everyone who must consort with his beloved and revered soul. I tend toward contempt of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 210

I rise again-I had become flesh-now I return to eternal glitter and shimmer, to the eternal embers of the sun, and leave you to your life and earthliness. You will remain with men. You have been in immortal company long enough. Your work belongs to the earth. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 211

Whoever does not value his own life will lose it. Now you must live. Others ought to look after themselves and not stand where your knife stabs. You shouldn’t become a monkey and fool to others- for the sake of tomfoolery. Everything has a limit. They will be insolent to you because you have laid down your weapons. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 205-206

Jung: Should one refrain from teaching truth to others?

Jung’s Soul: Yes, one should. Restrict yourself to teaching the way to subjective truth. Objective truth in these matters comes down to a delusional system. Ultimate things ought to be subjective truths.” ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

You don’t know the significance of the subjective. It is of cosmic significance. It reaches to the kernel of things. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

It [the subjective] is related to the chaos, the deep essence of the world. The law is surface, order is the outer side. Chaos is your mother. You rest in uncertainty as in the mother’s womb, eternally becoming and in a seminal state. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 208

A number of times I read in Nietzsche the expression “ultimate solitude.” This is the phrase that stands before me. My soul, do you hear this expression? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 203

The phallus is not the foundation but the summit of a building, of a church that still lies sunken, like a tower erected over a dome. We need this church since we can live in it with you and take part in your life. You have excluded us to your own detriment. Hence for you the phallus is the first sign of the church in which you hope for community with the living. Speak, why do you hesitate? ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 244

Soul: But you can change inwardly. You need to become stronger and more affirmative. That way you will make it turn out well.”

Jung: I’ll remember that. You mean the “man” inside me.

Soul: You need to stand in for the Divine. Don’t forget. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 234

If you were not my soul who rose to the eternal realm, I would call you the most terrible scourge of men. But who moves you? I know that divinity is not humanity. The divine consumes the human. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 227

As you already know, I [Soul] have long predicted solitude for you. You need not be afraid of madness. You won’t be so lonely that you must fear madness. You see that your work prospers and bears marvelous fruits. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 229

Your [Jung’s Ego [ soul, my brother ass, has risen to the light. You are not your soul, you only belong to your soul, and it belongs to the great light that never goes out. The life of man does not extend to your soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 224 [error]

You must melt down all your feeling, which has been worn out by the day, through inward retrieval into the mounting heat, in order to purge rust and breakage in the fire’s heat, so you can renew the work of the day with restored tools. The ancestors prayed and practised the holy ceremonies. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 268

Embellish yourself with the gold of the Gods, but not with the meager treasures of earthbound human beings. May you taste heavenly poverty after you have preached earthly poverty to men for so long, like a true and proper cleric full of lies, who fills his belly and purse and preaches poverty. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 265

I’ve learned how one behaves as a soul, perfectly ambiguous, mysteriously untruthful and hypocritical. But above all one must start with betrayal. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 263

You [Jung] carry us up as your soul and set yourself before the son of God, maintaining your immortal right as an ensouled being. We are joyful, good things will follow you, we lend you strength. We are in the land of men and we are alive. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 264

Know that the daimons would like to inflame you to embrace their work, which is not yours. And you fool, you believe that it is you, because you can’t distinguish yourself from your soul. But you are distinct from her, you are not a soul-God-Devil, but instead you are a powerless man who need not foster the regenerated Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 260-261

For you are the prison guard of your soul, the eunuch of your soul, who protects her from Gods and men. You must equally protect men from her- yes, perhaps even the Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

But your soul, this extract of human essence, could by way of that poison endanger even the Gods. So put the dangerous one under wraps, since not only your fellow men but also the Gods must live. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

Of course, here I have peace and can collect myself. Your human world makes me drunk so much human blood-I could get intoxicated on it to the point of madness. Doors of iron, walls of stone, cold darkness and the rations of penance-that is the bliss of redemption. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

Haven’t you had enough of beholding the fiery fullness, my soul? Do you still want to emerge entire into the glaring white light of the Godhead? Into what shades of horror are you plunging me? Is the stinking devil’s pool so deep that its mud sullies even your glowing robe? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 257

Remove, Oh man, the divine, too, from your soul, as far as you can manage. What a devilish foolish farce she carries on with you, as long as she still arrogates divine power over you! She’s an unruly child, a bloodthirsty daimon, a tormentor of humans without equal, precisely because she has divinity. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 258

Shield men from her [Soul], and her from men. Listen to what she wails and sings in prison but don’t let her escape, as she will immediately turn whore. As her husband you are blessed through her, and therefore cursed. let her be with the dead as her playmates, since she belongs to their kind more than to yours. She is smaller and larger than a man. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 259

For if you do not see your soul, you see her in fellow men and this will drive you mad, since this devilish mystery and hellish spook can hardly be seen through. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 259

Look at man, the weak one in his wretchedness and torment, whom the Gods have singled out as their quarry- tear to pieces the bloody veil that the lost soul has woven around you, the cruel nets woven by the death-bringing, and take hold of the divine whore who still cannot recover from her fall from grace and in raving blindness craves filth in which to throw herself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 259

You need to recognize the multiplicity of the Gods. You cannot unite all into one being. As little as you are one with the multiplicity of men, just so little is the one God one with the multiplicity of the Gods. This one God is the kind, the loving, the leading, the healing. To him all your love and worship is due. To him you should pray, you are one with him, he is near you, nearer than your soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

You see that it almost surpasses the power of a man. I want to accept and suffer it for your sake-and never for mine. To be crucified on the tree of life, Oh bitterness! Oh painful silence! If it weren’t you, my soul, who touched the fiery Heaven and the eternal fullness, how could I? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 257

The dead who besiege us are souls who have not fulfilled the principium individuationis, or else they would have become distant stars. Insofar as we do not fulfill it, the dead have a claim on us and besiege us and we cannot escape them. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

The Gods are favorable and unfavorable, impersonal, the souls of stars, influences, forces, grandfathers of souls, rulers in the heavenly world, both in space and in force. They are neither dangerous nor kind, strong, yet humble, clarifications of the Pleroma and of the eternal emptiness, configurations of the eternal qualities. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 271

I bind the Above with the Below. I bind God and animal. Something in me is part animal, something part God, and a third part human. Below you serpent, within you man, and above you God. Beyond the serpent comes the phallus, then the earth, then the moon, and finally the coldness and emptiness of outer space. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

Above you comes the dove or the heavenly soul, in which love and foresight are united, just as poison and shrewdness are united in the serpent. Shrewdness is the devil’s understanding, which always detects smaller things and finds chinks where you suspect none. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

If I am not conjoined through the uniting of the Below and the Above, I break down into three parts: the serpent, and in that or some other animal form I roam, living nature daimonically, arousing fear and longing. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

The human soul, living forever within you. The heavenly soul, as such dwelling with the Gods, far from you and unknown to you, appearing in the form of a bird. Each of these three parts then is independent. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

I bind the Above with the Below. I bind God and animal. Something in me is part animal, something part God, and a third part human. Below you serpent, within you man, and above you God. Beyond the serpent comes the phallus, then the earth, then the moon, and finally the coldness and emptiness of outer space. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

Do you call it just, when you do not live? Who shall live at all, if you don’t?’ Everyone should live. You act in self-defense. Your kindness borders almost on the absurd. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 206

The works of Abraxas are to be fulfilled, for consider that in your world you yourself are Abraxas and force your creature to fulfil your work. Here, where you are the creature subjugated to Abraxas, you must learn to fulfill the work of life. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

So live life, do not flee Abraxas, provided that he compels you and you can recognize his necessity. In one sense I say to you: do not fear him, do not love him. In another sense I say: fear him, love him. He is the life of the earth, that says enough. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

You need to recognize the multiplicity of the Gods. You cannot unite all into one being. As little as you are one with the multiplicity of men, just so little is the one God one with the multiplicity of the Gods. This one God is the kind, the loving, the leading, the healing. To him all your love and worship is due. To him you should pray, you are one with him, he is near you, nearer than your soul. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

I, your soul, am your mother, who tenderly and frightfully surrounds you, your nourisher and corrupter; I prepare good things and poison for you. I am your intercessor with Abraxas. I teach you the arts that protect you from Abraxas. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

You should call me if you want to live with men, but the one God if you want to rise above the human world to the divine and eternal solitude of the star. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

My soul, I call upon you- I fear something terrible and dreadful-nameless fear fills my heart, since the things that you announced beforehand were awful-must everything be broken, burned, and destroyed? Does no cry of despair reach you?  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 278

The uncertain way is the good way; upon it lie possibilities. Be unwavering and create. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 226

Should I speak to the above or the below? Below are you, my brother I, above, my soul, are you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 228

Leave him [Man] compassion. Compassion binds life and death and is a bridge from death to life. There are also the apparently dead and the collapsed. With compassion they might keep up. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 227

Is the excrement of the earth not sacred? “Yes and no. The soil of the earth is sacred, but not its excrement. Excrement is excrement,” earth is earth.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 228

There is a divine and a human intention. They cross each other in stupid and godforsaken people, who also include you from time to time.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 228

How now, you want to speak? But I won’t let you, otherwise in the end you will claim that you are my soul; but know the magic word. My soul has risen to the sky, to the sources of the eternal light. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 217

So listen, dear I, we are together alone and our being together threatens to become unbearably boring. Hence I would like to do something, for example, educate you. Your main flaw is, that you have no proper self-esteem. You see, other people have it in abundance. You have a number of good qualities that you can be proud of. You believe that being capable is an art. Of course that is the art. But one can also learn such skills to some extent. Please, do so. You find it difficult- well, all beginnings are difficult. Soon you will be able to do it better. Do you doubt this? -That is of no use; you must be able to do it, or else I cannot exist with you. Ever since my soul has flown to heaven we have depended upon one another; you therefore need to be reasonable and present yourself acceptably or else our life together will become wretched. So pull yourself together and value yourself, admire yourself, tell yourself that you have incomparable merits and admirable virtues. Don’t you want to? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 215-216

Jung’s Soul: “Think about it, please.” Why ask? You can guess for yourself. Fear makes you dull. Everything is way too obvious. But you don’t want to believe. No more proofs! That will do. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 230

That is your disbelief, your doubt. You don’t want to believe in the magnitude of the sacrifice that is required. But it will go on to the bitter end. Greatness requires greatness. You still want to be too cheap. This only causes misunderstanding. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 230

So, it is love that you claim as a natural right, although you still ought to beg for it. You get drunk on the blood of man and let him starve-love belongs to me. You’ll crawl and beg for it like a dog. You’ll raise your hands. You will fawn, in order to get it. I possess the key and I will be a more just administrator than you half-beings, you soulless souls and you godless Gods, and you godforsaken God. You will gather around the source of blood, and you will come bearing gifts so that you may receive what you need. Oh, men, protect the holy source so that no God can seize it for himself. The Gods know no measure and no mercy. They get drunk on the most precious of draughts. They waste it in drunkenness, since they know neither God nor soul. Presumptuousness and excessiveness, severity and callousness are their essence. Greed for the sake of greed, power for the sake of power, pleasure for the sake of pleasure, immoderation and insatiableness, this is how you recognize the daimons. Ha, you have yet to learn, you devils and Gods, to crawl in the dust for the sake of love so that from someone somewhere you snatch a drop of the living sweetness. learn humility and pride from men for the sake of love. You Gods, your first-born son is man. He bore a terribly beautiful-ugly son of God. But this mystery, too, is accomplished with you. You bore a son of men, no less splendid-terrible, and you will also serve under his rule. Both God and man are disappointed victims of deception, blessedly blessed, powerlessly powerful. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 266

I understand, yet you know that it is the same. Both are valid for me. like all natural women, form matters less to me than having everything belong to me or else to no one. I am even jealous of the hate you give others. I want everything, since I need everything for the great journey that I intend to begin after your disappearance. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

Of course, here I have peace and can collect myself. Your human world makes me drunk so much human blood-I could get intoxicated on it to the point of madness. Doors of iron, walls of stone, cold darkness and the rations of penance-that is the bliss of redemption. You do not suspect my torment when the bloody intoxication seizes me, I would like to hurl myself again and again into living matter from a dark fearful creative urge that formerly brought me close to the lifeless and ignited the terrible lust for procreation in me. Remove me from conceiving matter, the rutting feminine of yawning emptiness. Force me into confinement where I can find resistance and my own law. Where I can think about the journey, the rising sun and the buzzing, melodious golden wings. Be thankful-you wanted to thank me? You are deluded.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 262

Oh this bitterness! You [Jung’s Soul] have dragged me through sheer and utter Hell, you have tormented me nearly to death- and I long for your thanks. Yes, I am moved that you thank me. The hound’s nature lies in my blood. Therefore I am bitter. For my sake, since-how does it move you! You are divine and devilishly great, wherever and howsoever you are. I am only your prison guard, your eunuch doorkeeper, no less imprisoned than you. Thrice damned marriage! Speak, you concubine of Heaven, you divine monster! Have I not fished you from the swamp? How do you like the black hole? Speak without blood, sing from your own force, you have gorged yourself on men.  You deserve my thanks, my deepest thanks. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Page 262-263

I understand, yet you know that it is the same. Both are valid for me. like all natural women, form matters less to me than having everything belong to me or else to no one. I am even jealous of the hate you give others. I want everything, since I need everything for the great journey that I intend to begin after your disappearance. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

Will you learn to revere the torment of the human animal? What would you souls and Gods want without man? Why do you long for him? You cannot be without him! Speak! The eternally rich universe should unfold again in the earthly Heaven and the Heaven of the Gods, in the underworlds and in the worlds above. Separation once more comes to the agonizingly united and yoked. Endless multiplicity takes the place of what has been forced together. Since diversity alone is wealth, blossom, and harvest. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 263

Just like the sun, which is also such a star, which is a God and grandfather of souls, the star of the individual is also like the sun, a God and grandfather of the souls. He is visible from time to time, just as I have described him. His light is blue, like that of a distant star.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

To attain individuality, we need a large share of death. Therefore it is called “Ye are Gods”, since just as an innumerable number of men rule the earth, so a countless number of stars and of Gods rule the heavenly world. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

But you have in you the one God, the wonderfully beautiful and kind, the solitary, starlike, unmoving, he who is older and wiser than the father, he who has a safe hand, who leads you among all the darknesses and death scares of dreadful Abraxas.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 275

As a God, you are the great Abraxas in your world. But as a man you are the heart of the one God who appears to his world as the great Abraxas, the feared, the powerful, the donor of madness, he who dispenses the water of life, the spirit of the tree of life, the daimon of the blood, the death bringer. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 275

Pain and disappointment fill the world of Abraxas with coldness, all of your life’s warmth slowly sinks into the depths of your soul, into the midpoint of man, where the far blue starlight of your one God glimmers. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 276

I will gratefully accept what you give, my soul. I do not have the right to judge or to reject. Fate will separate the wheat from the chaff. We have to subjugate ourselves also to the judgment of valuelessness and destruction in majorem vitae gloriam [to the greater glory of life]. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 220

“My soul, in everything and yet beyond everything, you must find your rest in the lord, for he is the eternal rest of the saints.” I read this sentence aloud-putting an astonished question mark by every word. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 217

You know that I value science extraordinarily highly, but there are actually moments in life where science also leaves us empty and sick. In such moments a book like Thomas’s [Kempis] means very much to me since it is written from the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 204

I know where your [Elijah] serpent is. I have her. My soul fetched her for me from the underworld. She gives me hardness, wisdom, and magical power. We needed her in the upperworld, since otherwise the underworld would have had the advantage, to our detriment. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 254

Exactly, the commonplace is effectively true and thoroughly appropriate for you [Soul]. Don’t be so snobby. The commonplace is a rule of universal truth and a substantial certainty. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 263

Love is the most sensitive organ of perception. Only love lets you read your own soul and the souls of others. Nothing else will do. It is will be, it is, and it passes, hiding an infinite meaning in itself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 274

It demands the sacrifice only of your male prejudices. You need to intensify the longing in others. That way they become modest.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 276

I am begging you [Jung’s Soul], be your own master and your own slave, do not belong to me but to yourself. Do not bear my burden, but your own. Thus you leave me my human freedom, a thing that’s worth more to me than the right of ownership over another person. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 252

  1. What is it, then, with this “personal quality”? Yesterday Satan made a most “personal” impression on me.

Jung:  What is it, then, with this “personal quality”? Yesterday Satan made a most “personal” impression on me.

Soul: “I guess he does. Since he is the eternal adversary, and because you can never reconcile personal life with absolute life.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 247

I give you payment in images. Behold! ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 249

My soul, I found you again, I would like to, no, I will stay with you. My journey should continue with you. I will wander with you and ascend to my solitude, no longer alone as before and greedy and impatient, but with comforting courage and quiet delight. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 150

You [Jung] write to be printed and circulated among people. You want to cause a stir through the unusual. Nietzsche did this better than you. You are aping Saint Augustine. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 157

My child, you are not God, how could you be God? You are my soul and I am not allowed-not yet-to know, why you call yourself “child” – and why a girl?  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 153

Why must I tell you all that, my soul? Why do you chain me to this book? And why do you drive my pen so furiously, as if it had to go a long way and hurry to cover it? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 154

I live first in the upper world, but in your inner world, my soul, I am like a shadow without substance, trembling and blown away by every breeze. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 170

Forgive me, my heart is full, because I have come from far wandering. wandered for eleven years, so long that I forgot that I possessed a soul that I could call my own. I belonged to men and things. I did not belong to myself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 151

I am thinking of this first vision that you gave me in a dream, where I saw You [Jung’s Soul] hovering. (Is it 14 years since then?) ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 152

What a deception! I have avoided myself, no, actually my self, the place of my soul, where she dwelled and lived. I have never returned to this place except while dreaming. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 164

Perhaps I ensnare myself in self-deceit and hellish monkey business, and I am a rascal grinning at myself in a mirror, a fool in my own madhouse. Perhaps, my soul, you stumble over my folly. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 172-173

Keep interpretation far from me, that bad prison master of science who binds the soul and imprisons it in a lightless cell, but above all protect me from the venomous serpent of critique, which is a healing serpent only on the surface, yet in your depths is infernal poison and agonizing death. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 170

The air shook with the anthem of blaspheming souls, when the God plunged you into my heart. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 177

Do you believe that all that struggle and all these blood sacrifices left no mark on the soul of the Christian? And do you believe that one who has not experienced this struggle most intimately can still partake of its fruit? No one can flout the spiritual development of many centuries and then reap what they have not sowed. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 201

My soul, you are terribly real. You have set me with hard thrust on the sharp stones of misery and death. I grow weak and miserable-my blood, my precious lifeblood trickles away between these stones. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 214

Without talking back from now on, I will continue to tell you [Jung’s Soul] how I caught sight of a woman [Toni Wolff] three years ago, whose soul seemed to me more valuable than my marital anxiety. I conquered my fear out of love for her. But you wanted it that way and gave me a dream, which rendered a decision…: ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 155

Wolff, Diary E, January 11, 1926, p. 17. Regarding the Egyptian concept of the Ba, E. A. Wallis Budge noted, “To that part of man which beyond all doubt was believed to enjoy an eternal existence in heaven in a state of glory, the Egyptians gave the ·name ba, a word which means something like ‘sublime,’ ‘noble’ and which has always hitherto been translated by ‘soul.’ The ba is not incorporeal, for although it dwells in the ka, and is in some respects, like the heart, the principle of life in man, still it possesses both substance and form: in form it is depicted as a human-headed hawk, and in nature and substance it is stated to be exceedingly refined or ethereal. It revisited the body in the tomb and re-animated it and conversed with it; it could take upon itself any shape that it pleased; and it had the power of passing into heaven and of dwelling with the perfected souls there. It was eternal” (The Book of the Dead: The Papyrus of Ani in the British Museum [London: Longmans & Co, 1895], p. lxiv). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 32, fn 93

Philemon brought with him an Egyptian-Gnostic-Hellenistic atmosphere, a really Gnostic hue, because he really was a pagan. He was simply a superior knowledge, and he taught me psychological objectivity and the actuality of the soul. He had showed this dissociation between me and my intellectual object …He formulated this thing which I was not and formulated and expressed everything which I had never thought. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 34

In a critical entry of January 16, 1916, his soul presented an elaborate thiogenic cosmogony.’ She described her own nature, the nature of the daimons, the heavenly mother, and the Gods. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 48

The overall theme of Liber Novus is how Jung regains his soul and overcomes the contemporary malaise of spiritual alienation. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 41

But whereas Zarathustra proclaimes the death of God, Liber Novus depicts the rebirth of God in the soul. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 40

At immeasurable distance a lonely star stands in the zenith. This is the one God of this one man, this is his world, his Pleroma, his divinity. In this world man is Abraxas, the creator and destroyer of his own world. This star is the God and the goal of man, this is his one guiding God, in him man goes to his rest, toward him goes the long journey of the soul after death, in him everything that man withdraws from the greater world shines resplendently. To this one God man shall pray. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 59

Thus Jung’s revisions, in which he now differentiated the soul into serpent, human soul, and bird, here can be seen to reflect his understanding of the tripartite nature of his soul. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 69

I can grasp for you only what you already have but don’t know. The beyond from which I bring knowledge to you is your beyond. I am able to grasp what you have. But you aren’t. That’s why you need me.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 70

Years later, recalling his encounter with this figure and describing it as a dream, Jung noted, “I suddenly knew: the Wild Huntsman had commanded it to carry away a human soul.” A few days later he heard the news that his mother had died. He realized that “It was Wotan, the god of my Alemannic forefathers, who had gathered my mother to her ancestors negatively to the ‘wild horde,’ but positively to the ‘salig hit,’ the blessed folk.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 79

He [Jung] equated the Hindu notion of Brahman/Atman with the self. At the same time, he provided a definition of the soul. He argued that the soul possessed qualities that were complementary to the persona, and in that sense had what the conscious attitude lacked.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 74-75

On March l, 1918, his soul informed him that what was necessary was maintaining simultaneously a respect and disdain for the Gods, and that this began with respect and disdain for oneself. This was critical not only for humanity; Jung now realized that “man would be the mediator in the transformation process of God.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 71

As his soul had explained to him the previous year, this new religion would manifest itself through transformed human relations. Evidently Jung’s relations with his wife [Emma] and Toni Wolff, the “experimentum crucis,” was related to this. Decades later, he would write, “The unrelated human being lacks wholeness, for he can achieve wholeness only through the soul, and the soul cannot exist without its other side, which is always found in a ‘You.’ ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 83-84

He [Jung] also noted that the soul gave rise to images that were assumed to be worthless from the rational perspective. There were four ways of using them: The first possibility of making use of them is artistic, if one is in any way gifted in that direction; a second is philosophical speculation; a third is quasi-religious, leading to heresy and the founding of sects; and a fourth way of employing the dynamis of these images is to squander it in every form of licentiousness. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 75

On August 22, 1922, Jaime de Angulo wrote to Chauncey Goodrich issuing “a challenge to all brother-neurotics- go, my brethren, go to the Mecca, I mean to Zurich, and drink from the fountain of life, all ye who are dead in your souls, go and seek new life.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 81

Three days later, his soul informed him that the new religion expresses itself visibly only in the transformation of human relations. Relations do not let themselves be replaced even by the deepest knowledge. Moreover, a religion doesn’t consist only in knowledge, but at its visible level in a new ordering of human affairs. Therefore expect no further knowledge from me. You know everything that is to be known from the revelation offered to you, but you are not yet living out everything that is to be lived at this time. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 81

Marriage is socially, legally, psychologically accepted. Nothing new can come from there; it can only be transformed, also individually, through individual relationships. That is why the individual relationship is a symbol of the soul.  ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

On January 5, 1922, Jung’s soul advised as follows: “You should not break up a marriage, namely the marriage with me, no person should supplant me, least of all Toni. I want to rule alone.” “You must let Toni go until she has found herself and is no longer a burden to you.” On the next day, his soul elucidated the symbolic significance of the relations between Jung, Emma Jung, and Toni Wolff in terms of Egyptian mythology. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

…[Jung] wrote a paper on “Soul and death,” characterizing religions as systems for the preparation for death. He argued that, given the collective soul of humanity, death might be regarded as the fulfilment of life’s meaning. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 103

The first bearer of the soul-image is always the mother; later it is borne by those women who arouse the man’s feelings, whether in a positive or negative sense. Because the mother is the first bearer of the soul-image, separation from her is a delicate and important matter of the greatest educational significance. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 100

For a man, the mother “protects him against the dangers that threaten from the darkness of his soul.” Subsequently, the anima, in the form of the mother imago, is transferred to the wife: “his wife has to take over the magical role of the mother. Under the cloak of the ideally exclusive marriage, he is really seeking his mother’s protection, and thus he plays into the hands of his wife’s protective instincts.” What is ultimately required is the “objectification of the anima.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 100-101

In the autumn of 1917, Jung’s soul forces the black magician Ha to read and explain a series of cryptic runes that he had sent.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 115

In response to the request of Jung’s soul, Ha takes on the task of translating the runes, literally spelling them out. It is boot camp in Code City: he gives cues to Jung’s soul about how this or that shape corresponds to the sun, or a roof, or a tilted passageway, or even how one ought to feel physically while navigating this curve or that crevice.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

January 22, 1914: His soul comes up from the depths and asks him if he will accept war and destruction. She shows him images of destruction, military weapons, human remains, sunken ships, destroyed states, and so forth.

“Among all my patients beyond mid-life …, there is not a single one whose ultimate problem was not that of the religious attitude.… Here, gentlemen, a tremendous area is unfolding for the pastor.… It is high time that the pastor and the doctor of the soul join forces to overcome this enormous task.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung-Keller Correspondence, Page 32-33

I would like to speak of life processes that are accessible both in history and in personal experience to the awareness of every individual. With this deliberate qualification, I am speaking of the gospel as an impulse towards new life which was mysteriously visited upon man in the unfolding of history. It is a new powerful surge of life that burst out of the depths of the soul and the spirit and went out among the nations and has continued without ceasing even to this day.… Essential to this phenomenon is a new psychic life force, a dynamism, an élan vital, a breakthrough of new life forces that gave a new direction to the thoughts and energy of humanity. Seen from the perspective of the human soul, the gospel is a powerful tremor, running through the hearts, minds, and spirit of men and damming up their entire energy, creating the most powerful tension. It is a new intuition of the invisible from which man gained a new position in relation to the moral world. It is a state of emotional turmoil and a sanctification of the mind, which cannot be achieved by any old borrowing or possessing another good. At the same time it is an impetus of moral strength creating for the first time the vision of a complete triumph over all demonic powers. ~Adolf Keller, Jung-Keller Correspondence, Page 51-52

“Through consciousness one purifies oneself and is liberated from the constraints of the unconscious = the ascent of the mountain of salvation = union with his soul = the liberated individual can integrate his being (his soul).… When the union with the soul occurs man is also united with the cosmos reflected in the unconscious. In this way he becomes godlike, and not clearly defined. What is individual is felt, but man is undifferentiated from the world, in mystical participation with it.… For the first part of an analysis the psychology of the Christian worldview should be used. Later we come up against the problem of the one-sided definition of the concept of God.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung-Keller Correspondence, Page 36

Physiologists are struggling to explain life in terms of natural laws.… They try desperately to force life into the system of natural laws, when life contradicts every law of nature.…The vital principle extends far beyond our consciousness.… Or as Schopenhauer says: “Consciousness is the object of a transcendental idea.” … Let us boldly assign to this transcendental subject the name of soul.  ~Carl Jung, Jung-Keller Correspondence, Page 11

But fundamentally, the kingdom of the soul is also the kingdom of God. And souls have limits, notably that ultimate boundary before which you and I stand, hoping confidently to cross it when the time comes. ~Adolf Keller, Jung-Keller Correspondence, Page 153

For us, you have been one of these forces of destiny, and I call you friend even if we only rarely see each other, and in our contact we seldom enter that splendid and fearful chamber, for the soul not only speaks to another soul, but simply is.  ~Adolf Keller, Jung-Keller Correspondence, Page 123

“It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body. And so it is written, the first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. Howbeit that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual. The first man is of the earth, earthy: the second man is the Lord from heaven.”  I. Cor. 15:44–47, Jung-Keller Correspondence, Page 119

Apart from doctors, they are the only people who are professionally concerned with the human soul, with the exception perhaps of teachers. ~Carl Jung, God and the Unconscious, Page 17

Man himself has ceased to be the microcosm and eidolon of the cosmos, and his ‘anima’ is no longer the consubstantial scintilla, or spark of the Anima Mundi, the World Soul. ~Carl Jung, Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation, Page 48

… “soul has become lonely; it is extra ecclesiam and in a state of no salvation.”  “No, evidently we no longer have any myth.”  ~Carl Jung, The End of Meaning and the Birth of Man, Page 9

This love of Psyche for her divine lover is a central motif in the love mysticism of all times, and Psyche’s failure, her final self-abandonment, and the god who approaches as a savior at this very moment correspond exactly to the highest phase of mystical ecstasy, in which the soul commends itself to the godhead.  ~Erich Neumann, Life and Work of Erich Neumann, Page 243

The proficient person will constantly find, either because of unfavorable circumstances, technical errors, or seemingly demonic incidents, that the completion of the process is hindered, and that he, therefore, must begin anew. Whoever attempts to establish his security in the everyday world by following an analogous psychological journey, will have similar experiences. More than once he will find that what he has achieved falls to pieces in the collision with reality. However, he must tirelessly examine the inadequacies in his orientation and the blind spots in his psychological visual field. Just as the philosopher’s stone, with its wondrous powers, has never been actually produced, so psychic totality will never be reached empirically. Consciousness is too narrow to ever comprehend the full inventory of the soul. We will always have to begin again. The adept in alchemy always knew that it was ultimately a matter of the “res simplex” [ the simple thing]. Human beings today will learn by experience that the process will not prosper without the greatest possible simplicity. The simple, however, is also the most difficult.  ~Carl Jung, Anima as Fate, Page 277

“Deification always follows the baptism with water,” “The new person who has a new name is born at this point. We can observe this quite well in the Catholic sacrament, where the priest holds a candle during the baptism, saying: Dono tibi lucem aeternam-I give you the eternal light. The candle light represents the sunlight, for after the baptism we are related to the sun. We obtain an immortal soul; we are ‘twice born.”‘  ~Carl Jung, Anima as Fate, Page 160

“The happy state is the creative state.” Jung quotes Blake, saying that we feel bliss, ecstasy, “energy as eternal delight.” This gives rise to a “feeling of intense vitality, a new potential.”  For God, “life at its most intense, resides in the soul.” Here we feel alive, real, and living creatively.  ~Ann Ulanov, Spirit in Jung, Page 41

Jung writes early on that the soul “is a function of relation between the subject and the inaccessible depths of the unconscious. The determining force (God) operating from these depths is reflected by the soul, that is, it creates symbols and images.” ~Ann Ulanov, Spirit in Jung, Page 26

when God is in the soul, i.e., when the soul becomes a vessel for the unconscious and makes itself an image or symbol for it, this is truly a happy state …[which] is a creative state … ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 27

 

“The happy state is the creative state.” Jung quotes Blake, saying that we feel bliss, ecstasy, “energy as eternal delight.” This gives rise to a “feeling of intense vitality, a new potential.”  For God, “life at its most intense, resides in the soul.” Here we feel alive, real, and living creatively.  ~Ann Ulanov, Spirit in Jung, Page 41

The abstract God “beyond all human experience leaves me cold,” “We do not affect each other. But if I know that he is a powerful impulse of my soul, at once I must concern myself with him …” ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 23

The psychotherapist … must be absolutely clear that the treatment of the soul of a patient is a relationship in which the doctor is just as much involved as the patient. …” and “The personality of the patient demands the personality of the doctor …” ~Carl Jung, Spiritual Aspects of Clinical Work, Page 266

I recommend reading S. Mahdihassan’s book Indian Alchemy or Rasayana. The author still ‘believes’ in alchemy and with it that certain substances have a soul. ~Marie-Louise Von Franz, Symbols Kitab Hall ar-Rumuz, Page 16

In a letter to William H. Kennedy (March 28, 1973), she referred to the Americans as “soul tourists”: “Summer is anyhow the time of the ‘soul tourists’ where I am always overburdened.” ~Homage to MLVF, Page 82, fn 4

He [Emilii Medtner] saw Jung’s writings as the answer to the sickness of the soul overcoming Russia. Through his friendship with Edith Rockefeller McCormick, he was able to persuade her to finance the translations and publications of Jung’s works into Russian. ~Thomas Kirsch, The Jungians, 206-207

Certain heretics in early Christianity assumed that at the day of resurrection the soul with its glorified body would be spherical. According to the Symposium of Plato, the original man was round, spherogenous, meaning perfect. ~Carl Jung, Dream Symbols of the Individuation Process, Page 237

The unconscious is something quite different; it is the life of the soul, yet it is doing something very similar to that which the world does. For the unconscious also is a movement, due to the circumambulation of images, a constant change of images. ~Carl Jung, Dream Symbols of the Individuation Process, Page 219

What are ancestral souls psychologically? The souls of which we consist…Somewhere out of your ancestral tree, often reaching back for many centuries, certain elements may remain. ~Carl Jung, Dream Symbols of the Individuation Process, Page 202

The Egyptians could not conceive of an entirely bodiless spirit, they assumed that the soul is partially body, and they named it Ka. The ka was a sort of semi-material soul that dwelt in the tomb with the mummy. ~Carl Jung, Dream Symbols of the Individuation Process, Page 90

That concept of the soul has nothing to do with the Christian concept of a metaphysical soul, which is rather a philosophical notion than anything else. This term anima is more a primitive notion, namely, it is a soul; it is not the soul, it is a soul; and I call it a primitive notion because primitives hold that you have more than one soul. ~Carl Jung, Dream Symbols of the Individuation Process, Page 85

You have several, up to six, or perhaps more [Souls], and at times a soul can leave you and wander away in the night and get lost, and in the morning you discover that you have lost a soul, not the soul, but a soul, a part of yourself, a part of your personality. ~Carl Jung, Dream Symbols of the Individuation Process, Page 85

There have always been great individuals who knew about this divine aspect of the soul: St. Augustine, Meister Eckhart, Ruysbroeck, Tauler and numerous others even Giordano Bruno called the soul “God’s light.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 218

Thus he [Mercurius] is always a paradox containing within himself the most incompatible possible opposites. The alchemists at least suspected the psychic origin of this symbol and therefore defined Mercurius as “spirit” and “Soul.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 208

There have always been great individuals who knew about this divine aspect of the soul: St. Augustine, Meister Eckhart, Ruysbroeck, Tauler and numerous others even Giordano Bruno called the soul “God’s light.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 218

One might also say that man himself, or his innermost soul, is the prisoner or the protected inhabitant of the mandala. Since modern mandalas are amazingly close parallels to the ancient magical circles, which usually have a deity in the center, it is clear that in the modern mandala man the deep ground, as it were, of the Self is not a substitute but a symbol for the deity. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 154

If the process of robbing cosmic nature of its soul by the withdrawal of the gods or of God into the human being continues as at present, “then everything of a divine or daemonic character outside us must return to the psyche, to the inside of the unknown man, whence it apparently originated.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 153

Only heedless fools will wish to destroy [the Christian dogma]: the lover of the soul, never. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 188

Psychology as the science of the soul has to confine itself to its subject and guard against overstepping its proper boundaries by metaphysical assertions or other professions of faith. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 188

He [Eckhart] too made a distinction between an “evening knowledge,” in which the creature is known in himself and a “morning knowledge” in which creature and the human self are known “in the One which is God Himself.” This morning knowledge, however, is discovered only by the man who is ”detached,” who has forgotten his ego and all creatures and who lives in a psychic condition “in which God is nearer the soul than the soul is to itself.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 177

The Anthropos, seen as mankind’s “group soul” is, namely, an image of the bond uniting all men, or of inter-human Eros, the preconscious ground of all communication and community among men, as well as being that psychic element which, through its power to compensate and limit, stands opposed to the boundless or one-sided drive to live out any single instinct. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 138

The future will show whether a psychic process of development will arise from the psychological “binding-back” (religion), whether the scientific path of subjective knowledge can lead without a break into the heartening universe of objective faith. In the fact … that it is no longer exclusively ‘psychology’ in the scientific sense intended by Freud but is already in a position to claim to be a theory of the soul in this fact lies the real meaning of complex psychology. ~Jean Gebser, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 129

From ancient Iran there are accounts of such celestial journeys in which the ecstatic experiences what, under normal conditions, would be in store for the soul after death. In the Book of Artay Viraf there is a description of the suffering of Viraf for seven days from tetanus. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 104

It is generally agreed today that Jung’s greatest and most characteristic discovery was the empirical proof that there is in fact such a ”collective soul” or collective psyche the collective unconscious, to use the name he gave it. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 123-124

“The shaman,” says Eliade, “is the great specialist in the human soul; he alone ‘sees’ it, for he knows its ‘form’ and its destiny.” ~Mircea Eliade, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 99

The most essential and certainly the most impressive thing about synchronicity occurrences…is the fact that in them the duality of soul and matter seems to be eliminated. They are therefore an empirical indication of an ultimate unity of all existence, which Jung, using the terminology of medieval natural philosophy, called the Unus Mundus. ~Marie-Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 247

Man’s soul is a complicated thing, and it takes sometimes half a lifetime to get somewhere in one’s psychological development. You know, it is by no means always a matter of psychotherapy or treatment of neuroses. Psychology has also the aspect of a pedagogical method in the widest sense of the word. It is something.  ~Carl Jung (quoted), A Matter of Heart, Film Transcript

All of these symbols [on Jung’s Ring] are absolutely alive within me [Jung], and each one of them creates a reaction within my soul. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Hesse A Friendship, Page 101

The Jungian way to individuation, which leads to the formation and knowledge of the human self, is contemporary to the degree that in the post-confessional age it guides both Christians and non-Christians, religious and nonreligious, to the reality of the soul and the spirit, without ruling out external-for example, church-forms of piety. ~Gerhard Wehr, Modern Esoteric Spirituality, Page 388

Go not outside, look into thyself: Truth dwells in the inner man… For the soul is created equal with the Godhead.  ~Meister Eckhart, Was Jung a Mystic, Page 10

Rabbi Elimelekh said the Prayer of Sanctification on the Sabbath, he occasionally took out his watch and looked at it. For in that hour, his soul threatened to dissolve in bliss, and so he looked at his watch in order to steady himself in Time and the world. ” ~Gerhard Adler, Dynamics of the Self, Page 161

Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting; The Soul that’ rises with us, our life’s Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar:

Not in entire forgetfulness,

And not in utter nakedness,

But trailing clouds of glory do we come

From God, who is our home … ~Wordsworth, Dynamics of the Self, Page 133

One could say in a sense that Mussolini ruled Italy, but one could not say that Hitler rules Germany.  Hitler is Germany. He is more of a myth than a man. He is the loudspeaker that makes audible all the inaudible murmurings of the German soul. ~Carl Jung, From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 68

Wherever Jung looked he saw a world sickening more and more because of a loss of soul, and because of a loss of soul deprived of meaning.  ~ Laurens van der Post, Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 212

But it is significant testimony to the natural antiquity of the young Jung that he discovered his old man within so early· and kept his company so faithfully from then on that he became not a hindrance but source of purpose to the No. r personality, for all its love-hate relationship with this ancient other, causing such acute tensions at times that Goethe’s great cry of “Two souls, alas, are housed within my breast!” might have been Jung’s own. ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 76

For Jung’s own primitive, intuitive self knew as clearly as any African witch-doctor in charge of the “soul” of his tribe how perilous if not mortal a task the absorption of a whole new culture could be to the men and people called upon to promote it.  ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 56

I can almost hear the· tall, red-headed Knickerbocker saying, “Jung told me never to forget for a moment that Hitler has the power he has, not because he rules Germany but because he is Germany. He is more of a myth than a man. He is the loudspeaker that makes audible all the inaudible murmurings of the German soul.”  ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 23

And the slumber of the body seems to be but the waking of the soul. ~Laurens van der Post citing Sir Thomas Browne; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 37

I can almost hear the· tall, red-headed Knickerbocker saying, “Jung told me never to forget for a moment that Hitler has the power he has, not because he rules Germany but because he is Germany. He is more of a myth than a man. He is the loudspeaker that makes audible all the inaudible murmurings of the German soul.”  ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 23

“A single spark of the fire of justice, fallen into the soul of a learned man, is enough to irradiate, purify, and consume his life and endeavors, so that he no longer has any peace and is forced to abandon forever that tepid or cold frame of mind in which run-of-the-mill savants carry out their chores.”  ~Carl Jung citing Nietzsche, Zofingia Lectures, Page 293

The image in memory consists of two distinct objects. The first is the image of the original event, and the second is the image of the feeling aroused in us by the original event.  ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 253

One hears the Gospel, but one lacks the faith! Faith is the dearest child of miracle!’  ~Carl Jung citing anonymous source, Zofingia Lectures, Para 265

Te soul must be independent of space and time. The concepts of space and time are categories of the understanding and for this reason are not compelling with regard to the Ding an sick. The soul The vital principle, which as long as life lasts confers on the body its power of resistance, is the enduring factor in the phenomenal realm. As we know, all the molecules in the body are renewed approximately every seven years. Thus the substance of the body is continually changing. If the life-organizing, life-shaping force resided in matter, nothing would be more natural than a continual transformation of the appearance of the body. But this does not actually occur, for the external traits of a man remain the same. All down to the smallest details are preserved. All the images in his memory remain constant, and his intellectual faculties maintain eludes all sense perception and thus cannot constitute any form of material force. Only forces in a material form constitute objects of perception. But within the categories of space and time, judgment is based on sense perceptions. Accordingly only forces in a material form can serve as objects of judgment, i.e., only forces in a material form move within the boundaries of space and time. For example, let us consider the concept of velocity, which is equivalent to the space-time quotient. Or think of any of the basic mechanical laws of physics. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 98

The soul does not represent a force in a material form, and thus there can be no judgment concerning it. But everything that cannot be judged subsists outside the concepts of space and time. Accordingly the soul is independent of space and time. Thus sufficient reason exists for us to postulate the immortality of the soul. approximately the same level. In short, despite the change in his substance the individual remains the same. Thus it appears that the principium vitae constitutes, so to speak, the scaffolding on which matter is built up. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 99

And people do show what fools they are when they use Kant’s ideas to attack the spiritualists, when Kant himself said: “It will be demonstrated in the future, I know not where or when-that even in this life the human soul dwells in an indissoluble communion with all the immaterial natures of the spirit world, alternately affecting these natures and receiving impressions from them …. “! ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 106-107

Elsewhere Kant states: “All these immaterial natures, I say, regardless of whether or not they exercise their influence in the corporeal world; all rational beings which happen to exist in an animal state, whether here on earth or on other heavenly bodies, regardless of whether they animate the raw stuff of matter now, will do so in the future, or have done so in the past, would, by these terms, exist in a communion suitable to their nature, not determined by those conditions which limit the relations of corporeal entities, and in which the distances separating places and times, that in the visible world create a vast gulf abolishing all communion, simply disappear. Accordingly it would be necessary to regard the human soul as already, in this present life, linked with two worlds of which, it being joined in personal union with a body, it clearly perceives only the material; whereas on the other hand, as a member of the spirit world, it receives the pure influences of immaterial natures and distributes these influences in turn, so that as soon as its union with the body has ended, nothing remains but the communion in which it continually dwells with spiritual natures, and which must reveal itself to consciousness as an object of clear contemplation.”  Finally, in a third passage, casting his prophetic gaze far beyond his own age, Kant states: “Accordingly it has in effect been demonstrated, or could easily be demonstrated if we took a broad view or better yet, it will be demonstrated in the future, I know not where or when-that even in this life the human soul dwells in an indissoluble communion with all the immaterial natures of the spirit world, alternately affecting these natures and receiving from them impressions of which, in its human nature, it is not conscious as long as all goes well.” ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 80-81

Nowhere do we feel as keenly as here that we are living at the boundary between two worlds. Our body formed from matter, our soul gazing toward the heights, are joined into a single living organism. We see our lives coming in contact with a higher order of being. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 142

The soul, as the metaphysical presupposition of the phenomenon of organic life, likewise transcends space and time, and for this reason its emancipation from sensory manifestation must be expressed in the fact that the soul appears as the basic force of actiones in distans. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 122

One of the principal tasks of empirical psychology is to provide detailed authentication of the definition of the soul laid down by rational psychology. We have already noted that the soul is an intelligence independent of space and time. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 115

  1. The soul is intelligent. The principal proof in support of this principle is the purposeful activity of the soul, its power of organization. Its organizational activity is manifested in the phenomenon of materialization. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 116

The soul is imperceptible to the senses because it exists outside space. It would have to assume a spatial, i.e., a material form in order to become perceptible to the senses. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 117

Every representation of the soul that is perceptible to the senses is a materialization. The most wondrous and incredible materialization which has ever occurred is man himself. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 117

But most people are incapable of marveling at their own existence and thus cannot properly appreciate the notion of man as a materialization of soul, and thus we must look about for other phenomena whose spontaneous and instantaneous manifestation compels us to deduce an intelligent being as their spiritus rector.  ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 117

The soul is independent of space and time. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 119

“Consciousness is the object of a transcendental idea.” Thus we see that animal and vegetative functions are embraced in a common root, the actual subject. Let us boldly assign to this transcendental subject the name of “soul.” What do we mean by “soul”? The soul is an intelligence independent of space and time. ~Carl Jung citing Schopenhauer, Zofingia Lectures, Para 96

“I confess that I am strongly inclined to assert the existence of immaterial natures in the world, and to class my own soul among these beings.”  ~Carl Jung Citing Kant, Zofingia Lectures, Para 79

The soul must be intelligent. The criterion of intelligence is the purposefulness of its acts. Undeniably our bodies impress us as highly purposeful, and thus we postulate the intelligence of the soul. If the law of causality did not possess an a priori status, this postulate would be proven. ~Carl Jung, Zofingia Lectures, Para 97

Then Jung adds to these quotations the idea of the existence of a non-physiological “intellectual being” or “life force” which some contemporary vitalistic physiologists also postulated.

This life-principle, i.e., the soul, he says, “extends far beyond our consciousness”-here Jung first mentions indirectly the idea of an unconscious psyche.

This soul is intelligent (purposeful in its acts) and independent of space-time.

These three aspects of the psyche are concepts that Jung retained throughout his life. ~Marie-Louise von Franz, Zofingia Lectures Introduction, Page xviii

If people only knew what an advantage it is to find our own guilt, what a dignity and elevation of soul!” ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Contribution to our Time, Page 246

It [Individuation] is not a withdrawal from life but life itself-a way between man-the-seen and his soul-the-unseen. It is a way of death-and-rebirth transformation toward experiencing wholeness. ~Maud Oakes, The Stone Speaks, Page 69

Venus was also an initiating goddess of the mysteries, and as the soul-temptress of man she was an enchanting, seducing, orgiastic woman. Venus is an important symbol for me. She stands for much of what was left out of my earlier sense of identity.  ~Maud Oakes, The Stone Speaks, Page 95

Jung once said that though we cannot quite accept the Indian doctrine of reincarnation due to the lack of scientific evidence, it is actually a psychological fact that people seem to have souls of different ages. ~Barbara Hannah, The Animus: The Spirit of Inner Truth in Women II Page 92

Whereas other people, who seem to have gone through a great many reincarnations and experience Deja vu-like memories, seem to be compelled by super personal destinies. (It does seem generally true in analysis that one should try to find out the age of the soul that you are dealing with.) ~Barbara Hannah, The Animus: The Spirit of Inner Truth in Women II Page 92-93

It would be blasphemy to assert that God can manifest Himself everywhere save only in the human soul. Indeed the very intimacy of the relationship between God and the soul automatically precludes any devaluation of the latter. ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Para 11

Emma Jung used to emphasize how necessary it was to differentiate carefully between the anima and the animus. The anima, as you all know, is Jung’s term for the feminine soul of man, whereas the word animus means “spirit” or “mind.” ~Barbara Hannah, The Animus: The Spirit of Inner Truth in Women II Page 3

By the term animus. l understand the masculine. spirit or unconscious mind of woman. Emma Jung pointed out recently that one should differentiate very carefully here between the anima and the animus. The anima, as is well known, is Jung’s term for the feminine soul of man. But it is really a contradiction in terms to speak of the animus as the masculine soul woman. (This error was made in the early days of Jungian psychology and is still often done today.) In Latin the word animus means intellect, memory, consciousness, character and spirit. It is often equated with “mind” and is also used to mean. courage, vivacity, bravery, and will. In Jungian psychology it is used primarily to denote the phenomenon of “spirit” in women, and the contrast between the feminine soul (anima) and the masculine spirit (animus) gives us a valuable hint as to the difference between these two figures. ~Barbara Hannah, The Animus, The Spirit of Inner Truth in Women, Page 2

Forgive me that I did not react immediately. But what can you do when such an avalanche rolls over you unexpectedly? Your book is not only most unforeseen as regards volume but also as to contents. I already got drowned in it. Your foreword is almost overgenerous at least such a thing has never happened to me – most unexpected, most unforeseen! You will forgive me, if I say nothing about the contents yet. But I must give you my most hearty praise for the excellent way, in which your book is written. I wonder how your contemporaries will swallow this mighty pill. It may do something to them, however. Well, the war will be a welcome excuse. I think the title of the book is aptly chosen, since the knowledge of the myth producing soul will be, or is already, a new and transfigured mythology. I beg you not to be impatient, as I have to read the book conscientiously. It will take a while until I can say more about it. I have been a bit ill lately, which is the reason why I am so slow. God, what a time! We all hope and pray for England’s victory St George slaying once more the dragon. Many thanks! Yours cordially, C.G.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 304-305

Anne is my wife. This morning I felt the faint knock of the child against the wall of the womb. Our boat has a keel and there is a steady breeze. In two weeks’ time we shall be going into our new home, Reed House. The dream is being realised. And what of the book I am trying to bring forth? I have chosen the notion of attempting to describe the soul as a positive function of the autonomous psyche. Side by side with this conception there runs the reality of the anima as a negative destructive demon. To write a natural history of the soul must involve both aspects. The soul has a daemonic nature and every daemon is potential god and devil. In other words out of chaos life emerges. My own life nearly foundered in chaos and bitterness before I could trust myself to the slender promptings of the divine child. When I think, I lose my way, and the light goes out. But when I hear the voice of the child I believe again in simple truth and cleareyed beauty.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 255

‘There was a little village square with a butcher, baker and a little shop with rather sophisticated hats in it with a name over the door, “Madame Soul”. This appealed to C.G. very much- the idea that he should find the anima in such a place.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 286

Can I show Jung all the intimate, revealing and terrible contents of my soul? Must he read this very book that I am writing in now? Must the soul stand utterly naked, stripped off every vestige of honour and decency and fair-seeming?  ~H.G. Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 144

He [H.G. Baynes] writes: ‘Jung stands for the parting of the ways at this rebirth of my soul.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 142

The early weeks with Jung in Zurich led to some profound soul searching. Perhaps the discovery of his own inner world and the deeper truths that he discovered within himself, as a result of this totally new experience of introversion, was, for Godwin, like a religious experience.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 122

He [Baynes] remembered how this first meeting had given him some inkling of that vision of the human soul which arrested me in my talk with Dr Jung on a summers evening by the lake of Zurich. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 121

The Self is a collective idea, which the Hindus call ‘conglomerate soul,’ consisting of many souls – built out of many souls as it were, both masculine and feminine ones.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

The Self is a collective idea, which the Hindus call ‘conglomerate soul,’ consisting of many souls – built out of many souls as it were, both masculine and feminine ones.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

Onkel [Jung] said that de Nerval had real talent but would not accept the ANIMA (his soul) and so he killed himself.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 470

In it [Bollingen], I felt my ancestral souls, and it was just like paradise. It was cold, uncomfortable and dark at night, yet something in me felt well beyond measure. I had finally seen what I was lacking, because when I was a boy, everything was cold – snow was drifting in the window, the water froze in the pitcher, ants were in the room, and the stove smoked. It was an 13th century house and never rebuilt.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 238

He [Priestly] also told Jung that he had just read a new edition of H. G. Baynes’ Mythology of the Soul. He enjoyed it but he wished that somebody would publish case histories in which there was less mythology.  ~William Schoenl, C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 70

He concluded by saying that Europeans were now in prison [WWII]: God save our souls. That was more important than butter!  ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 9

With Johann Jakob Bachofen I learned to read mythology as expressing in its symbols the rise and decline of social and religious orders. It proved to be a most inspiring lesson for interpreting Hindu mythological tradition.” Since Bachofen was dead, “the major task, to decipher mythology as the everlasting romance of the soul, as ‘le

drame interieur,’ as the play staged in the playhouse of the psyche-this task was left for Dr. Jung. ~Heinrich Zimmer, Bollingen: An Adventure, Pages 173-174

Jung’s attention was always riveted to the long-term of the soul, many souls, generations of souls. The great stream of life seemed to be his absorbing interest. ~Jane Wheelwright, Contact with Jung, Page 226

I believe Jung’s myth is the realization of his creative urge to follow each new fact to its origin in the roots of his own psyche, and to draw from there the knowledge he formulated and lived as a new vision of the human soul. ~Renee Brand, Contact with Jung, Page 233

No experimental methodology ever has or ever will succeed in capturing the essence of the human soul, or even so much as tracing out an approximately faithful picture of its complex manifestations. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 211

In the great dualism of day and dark, of glittering sunlight and deep black night, Jung recognized the primal yearning of the soul to free itself from the darkness and enter the light, an “inexpressible longing for light.” He could perceive it in the glance of the primitive, indeed even in the eyes of animals. That sadness also reflects the mood of Africa, the experience of its solitudes. It is a maternal mystery, this primordial darkness. That is why the sun’s birth in the morning strikes the natives as so overwhelmingly meaningful. The moment in which light comes is God. That moment brings redemption, release. To say that the sun is God is to blur and forget the archetypal experience of that moment. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 240.

At this numinous instant the men would hurry out of their huts, spit into their hands, and hold their palms up to the sun with great emotion. Why they did this they could not say. For them it was enough to perform the rite of worship. The act of worship evidently no longer required any theological explanation. And just as the rising dawn represented the divine presence, so too did the first, equally golden, shimmering crescent of the new moon. Jung translated the wordless prayer thus: “I offer to God my living soul.” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 239-40

Jung read the Bible, and the Book of Job with it, as “utterances of the soul.” ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 387

The words fell heavily on my soul. Once upon a time he too had been an enthusiastic student in his first year, as I was now; the world had opened out for him, as it was doing for me; the infinite treasures of knowledge had spread before him, as now before me. How can it have happened that everything was blighted for him, had turned to sourness and bitterness? I found no answer, or too many. The speech he delivered that summer evening over the wine was the last chance he had to live out his memories of the time when he was what he should have been.  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 58

One looks out silently, surrendering all self-importance, and many old sayings and images scurry through the mind; a low voice says something about the age-oldness and infinitude of the “far-swelling, murmurous sea,” of “the waves of the sea and of love,” of Leukothea, the lovely goddess who appears in the foam of the seething waves to travel-weary Odysseus and gives him the pearly veil which saves him from Poseidon’s storm. The sea is like music; it has all the dreams of the soul within itself and sounds them over. The beauty and grandeur of the sea consist in our being forced down into the fruitful bottom lands of our own psyches, where we confront and re-create ourselves. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 126.

In Time, and then in the Houston Post of 16 September 1957, one read what effect the Swiss professor had had on his American guest: “The old gentleman with the white hair and the knowingly flashing eyes leaned back in his armchair and thoughtfully smoked his pipe. Seeming not to notice the microphone around his neck and the camera lens pointed at him, C. G. Jung spoke through the cloud of smoke that wreathed his head. His voice was loud and powerful. ‘The world,’ said Jung, ‘hangs by a thin thread, and that thread is the human soul. It is not the reality of the hydrogen bomb that we need to fear, but what man will do with it. If certain people in Moscow lose their nerve, then the world will be plunged into fire and flames. As never before the world depends on the soul of man.’ This, the old wise man explains, is why the exploration and understanding of the human soul is more important than ever. Gently guided by his interviewer Richard Evans, Jung wandered through the whole wide realm of his convictions and theories of the psyche. Jung’s presentation was as incomparable as it was fascinating. It was the first time he had ever been in front of a television camera, the first time he had spoken to American listeners since his lectures on “Psychology and Religion” at Yale in 1938, and apart from a few lectures in Zurich, it was his only public appearance in ten years Jung scintillated and joked, the whole thing seemed to give him the greatest enjoyment. In the studio his eyes sparkled behind his steel-rimmed spectacles, and his bristly white mustache moved when he laughed.  “And Jung’s laugh spoke for itself. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 438-439

Wherever there exists an absolutely magical relationship, as it were, between the two sexes, it is a matter of projection of the soul-image [in this case the anima]. Now since these relationships are so common, the psyche must frequently be unconscious; that is, many people must be unconscious of how they are related to their inner psychic processes. If the soul-image is projected, an unconditional affective tie to the object of the projection appears. If it is not projected, a relatively unadapted condition arises which Freud described in part as “narcissism.” The projection of the soul-image is a release from concern with the inner processes, so long as the behavior of the object corresponds to the soul-image. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 186

If the doctors in communist Russia had sought his help, he said, he would have defended them in the same way without hesitation, “for the sake of the human soul.” Furthermore, we do not consider as a traitor to his country one who as a doctor,. in time of war, proffers help to a wounded enemy, for: As doctors we are firs. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 316

In view of this necessity, any over narrow restriction to artificial boundaries of whatever kind, be they of national, political, linguistic, doctrinal, or philosophical nature, would be a catastrophe for our science. The nations of Europe form a European family, which like every family has its own distinctive spirit. Far apart as our political aims may lie, they rest in the last analysis on a common European soul, of whose aspects and facets a practical psychology cannot afford to remain unaware. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 313

We are menaced to a terrifying degree by wars and revolutions that are nothing other than psychic epidemics. At any time several million people can be stricken with madness, and then we have another world war or a devastating revolution. Rather than wild animals, falling rocks, and flooding waters, man is now exposed to the elemental powers of his own soul. The psyche holds a great power, one that surpasses by many times all the forces of the earth. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 307

In view of this necessity, any over narrow restriction to artificial boundaries of whatever kind, be they of national, political, linguistic, doctrinal, or philosophical nature, would be a catastrophe for our science. The nations of Europe form a European family, which like every family has its own distinctive spirit. Far apart as our political aims may lie, they rest in the last analysis on a common European soul, of whose aspects and facets a practical psychology cannot afford to remain unaware. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 313

We are menaced to a terrifying degree by wars and revolutions that are nothing other than psychic epidemics. At any time several million people can be stricken with madness, and then we have another world war or a devastating revolution. Rather than wild animals, falling rocks, and flooding waters, man is now exposed to the elemental powers of his own soul. The psyche holds a great power, one that surpasses by many times all the forces of the earth. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 307

In view of Picasso’s bewildering diversity one hardly dares suggest it; I would rather say what I have found in my material. The nekyia is not an aimless, purely destructive, titanic crash, but a meaningful katabasis eis antron, a descent into the cave of initiation and secret knowledge. The journey through the history of the soul of humankind has as its goal the restoration of the person as a whole. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 483

The “reality of the soul,” as Jung learned to see it, consists in the fact that it cannot be adequately described by the categories of the inside, or the depths. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 469

  1. G. Jung discussed “The Significance of the Father in the Destiny of the Individual.” He remarked, among other things: If ever we wish to see the workings of a demonic power of fate, we see them here, in these dark, silent tragedies that are played out slowly and painfully in the diseased psyches of our neurotics. If we who are “normal” investigate our lives, we see how a powerful hand guides us unfailingly to our destinies, and this hand cannot always be called a kindly one. Often we call it the hand of God or the devil, thereby expressing more correctly than we know an extremely important psychological factor, namely the fact that the impulse that shapes the life of our souls has the nature of an autonomous personality, or at least is experienced in this way, so that from time immemorial, as still in modern idiom, the source of such fates appears as a demon, a good or evil spirit. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 49-50

Now he [Carl Jung] gathered up all his courage to consider an unheard-of blasphemy, as if it meant jumping into the abyss of hellfire and thereby forfeiting his soul’s eternal salvation. In his imagination he saw before him the cathedral in Basel on a bright summer day, the cathedral, the blue sky. God sits on His golden throne, high above the world-and from under the throne an enormous turd falls upon the sparkling new roof, shatters it, and breaks the walls of the cathedral asunder. So that was it!  Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 45

Not only Christianity with its salvation symbolism, but all religions, down to the forms of magical religion of primitives, are psychotherapies, which treat and heal the sufferings of the soul, and those of the body that come from the soul. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 293

If thou wouldst into the infinite stride,

Explore the finite on every side. ~Goethe, cited in Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 4

The world hangs by a thin thread, and that thread is the human soul. It is not the reality of the hydrogen bomb that we need to fear, but what man will do with it. – ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 438-439

Thinking is an act of the soul whereby it becomes conscious of itself and of other things outside itself. ~Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; Page 11, Footnote 2.

 

The earth has a spirit of her own, a beauty of her own. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 133

“My dear Dr. Jung, Father Victor’s beloved soul has returned to God. He died this morning between 11- 12 a.m. from a sudden thrombosis. He was fully awake, and praying before he became unconscious, and they say he had no great pain.” ~The Mother Prioress, 8 May 1960.

My whole life I have worked to know the soul and these people [Valentinian Gnostics] already knew it. ~Carl Jung to Gilles Quispel, Meeting with Jung, Page 150.

[Soul:] “Tame your impatience. Only waiting will help you here.” [I:] “Waiting-I know this word. Hercules also found waiting troublesome when he carried the weight of the world on his shoulders.” [Soul:] “He had to await Atlas’s return and carried the weight of the world for the sake of the apples” ~The Black Books, Page 60.

I had to understand that I was unable to make the people see what I am after. I am practically alone. There are a few who understand this and that, but almost nobody sees the whole. I have failed in my foremost task: to open people’s eyes to the fact that man has a soul and there is a buried treasure in the field and that our religion and philosophy are in a lamentable state. Quoted by Gerhard Adler in “Aspects of Jung’s Personality,” in Psychological Perspectives 6/1 (Spring 1975), p. 14.

Whatever explanation or interpretation does to it, we do to our own souls as well, with corresponding results for our own well-being. ~Carl Jung; CW 9; Page 160

Language, in its origin and essence, is simply a system of signs or symbols that denote real occurrences or their echo in the human soul. Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; para. 13.

People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. They will practise Indian yoga and all its exercises, observe a strict regimen of diet, learn theosophy by heart, or mechanically repeat mystic texts from the literature of the whole world—all because they cannot get on with themselves and have not the slightest faith that anything useful could ever come out of their own souls. ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Page 99

Dr.  Jung never said: “There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own Soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.”

Many souls are young; they are promiscuous;. they are prostitutes in the unconscious and sell themselves cheaply. They are like flowers that bloom and die and come again. Other souls are older, like trees or palms. They find,. or must seek, one complete animus, who shall perhaps be many in one. And when they find him it is like the closing of an electric circuit. Then they know the meaning of life. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking, Page 29

While lying in a trance, the young medium would utter the words of “personalities” which Jung interpreted as personifications of unconscious· “part-souls.” This suggested that the psyche was a plurality, or rather, a multiple unity; the part-souls or unconscious parts of the personality anticipated the concept of “autonomous complexes” in the unconscious. ~Aniela Jaffe, The Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 4

The phenomenon is in accord with the alchemical conception of imaginatio as a half corporeal, half spiritual being, whereby the soul is enabled to bring about “many things of the utmost profundity outside the body” by imagining them. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 76.

Michael Sendivogius says: “Moreover the soul by which man differs from other animals operates inside his body, but it has greater efficacy outside the body, for outside the body it rules with absolute power.” ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 76.

Jung died in his house in Kusnacht, amid the great images that filled his soul. As the thought of death had been his familiar for many decades, it did not come as an enemy, although he was familiar also with the pain caused by the finite11ess of life. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 135.

But the real anima of a man is shown by psychological experience to be like the primitive idea of soul; something between earth and heaven, as black as it is white; ghostlike; ill defined. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Lecture, Page 25.

But the real anima of a man is shown by psychological experience to be like the primitive idea of soul; something between earth and heaven, as black as it is white; ghostlike; ill defined. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Lecture, Page 25.

When we suffer from lack of psychic energy, we say we have a depression or an inhibition, not realising that part of our mental hierarchy has one away beyond our control, that we have, in fact, lost our soul. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Seminar, Page 13.

She is legendary, that is to say, the anima-fact is unknown, the anima is that part of the soul which is unknown to our age. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Seminar, Page 25.

That is beautifully expressed by Meister Eckhart where he says that God in his very divinity is not God, he must be born through the soul of man again and again. “Without me God cannot live.” ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis Seminar, Page 612

The Rosicrucians probably represented a half-baked attempt to make up for the dry Protestantism of that day with its lack of imagination.  ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis Seminar, Page 240

Heraclitus, the Dark One, the most intelligent of the old philosophers, said, “It is death to the soul to become water.” ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis Seminar, Page 90

It is death to the soul to become unconscious. People die before there is death of the body, because there is death in the soul. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis Seminar, Page 90

Those are old Egyptian concepts: the ka soul is the substantial terrestrial soul; and

the ba soul, represented as a bird-man, or a bird with a human head, is the spiritual soul.

They are like the kuei and the shen in Chinese metaphysics, which separate after death, the kuei being the physical soul and the shen the spiritual soul.

The kuei is the ghost-being that precedes or follows death, and the shen disappears into the Yang principle, one could say; it goes up to the light, to the spiritual worlds. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 778

Everything is broken up because the vessel has a soul which goes to heaven when they break it, to meet the dead and to serve them again.

That was the origin of those terrible human sacrifices when one of the prehistoric kings of Ur died.

They discovered, in excavating, about fifty corpses of soldiers, women of the court, and slaves, who were killed in order to accompany the soul of the dead king.

The kings of the Huns were always accompanied by soldiers, slain with their horses, and buried near the king.

In Egypt human sacrifices were substituted by ushabti, small clay figures of workmen. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 688

And so the symbol of stars falling down has the eternal meaning of the soul of man descending.

The star that appeared at the birth of Christ announced a cosmic phenomenon, a cosmic soul had descended. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 636

The idea of souls becoming stars, or descending from the stars, is very old.

The star of Bethlehem was the soul of Christ that descended upon the earth. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 635

Man as he is, is the frog form of the superior man to be, of the beautiful being that is in man but that has not yet revealed itself.

We are the ugly repulsive husks that surround the golden kernel, the divine soul of man. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 544

So the serpent is a soul demon, and the idea is that when the doctor prepares his medicine it is human work, and it is quite nice, perfectly all right, yet it has no virtue-until the doctor’s soul demon puts at least a drop of that poison into it; then it works, then there is magic power in it. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 539

Only when we learn that the soul or psyche is really a world with its own laws, like the world in which we live and move, can we reduce to our natural proportions. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 531

Yes, so the tree is really the soul of the sphinx, and it is that thing which solves the riddle of the sphinx.

It is the union of opposites which is interrupted in a way in animal and human life, but which is expressed by the symbol of the tree. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 513

The medicine man in primitive tribes is the first form of the leader of souls, and then later on the healer, or the priest, or the analyst.

In modern times every analyst is in the very disagreeable situation of being a psychopompos, or being understood as such even if he is not at all what he seems to be; it is an effect of the transference of that archetypal figure. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 506

There is nothing without spirit, for spirit seems to be the inside of things. Dionysus is concerned with the outside of things, with tangible forms, with everything that is made of earth, but inside is the spirit, which is the soul of objects.

Whether that is our own psyche or the psyche of the universe we don’t know, but if one touches the earth one cannot avoid the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 458

Wine has soul, wine is something living, and it is spiritual. To her that was a great discovery, and the spiritual effect that good wine could have was a discovery too.

I am not trying to persuade you to become alcoholics, but there really is something special about wine. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 435

The spleen has also been regarded as a place in which the soul lived, and in old English that word designated a mood; it was thought that when the spleen went wrong, one was affected by particular moods, just as the liver, which is also an abdominal organ, is supposed to be connected with the emotions. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 407

The animus assumes again the role of the leader of souls, the Hermes psychopompos.

He takes her by the hand, leaves the river, and enters a temple which is on the bank. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 383

Now why are those men standing on the bank? Why are they not all in that chaotic river?

Mrs. Schlegel: Perhaps they are conscious.

Remark: They are individuated.

Dr. Jung: Yes, these are the people of detached consciousness, people who are conscious of themselves and of life.

And that they call to the struggling masses in the rushing water produces the effect that a few souls are cast upon the bank-they wake up and leave the great river. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 321

I would say that the only way in which we are able to perceive anything that has anything whatever to do with religious experience must be in the soul. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 299

The snake is called the soul of the abdomen.

In the Kundalini yoga, which is a branch of the Tantric system, the Kundalini serpent is supposed to be coiled up in the lower basin. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 276

So the serpent usually symbolizes the darkness of the human soul that is connected with the earth. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 276

Many of the old Greek heroes were supposed to have snakes’ souls.

The soul of the hero appeared after death in the form of a snake that dwelt near his tomb.

Therefore the famous serpent of Erechtheus, and the snake of Cecrops on the Acropolis at Athens. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 276

And a similar cult was celebrated in Eleusis; there the initiate had to kiss a huge snake.

Kissing means a very close and intimate acquaintance, and it means also a certain assimilation, either the assimilation of the snake to the human being, or perhaps the assimilation of the human being to the snake, since the snake was supposed to be a heroic soul. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 275

The soul is always supposed to come out of the mouth, the spirit comes out of words.

Words are air-bodies, invisible sounds, so they are assumed to be spirit.

But those are all animal misconstructions, for the true spiritual things are absolutely invisible to us, they are the antipodal principle to us, the principle of plant life which is entirely contrary, a different form of life. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 249

Yes, blood always means the life force, it is the symbol of the soul. According to primitive belief, blood is the real seat of life; therefore drinking the blood of an enemy is supposed to give one his mana. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 231

The entrails and the liver, then, were supposed to be the seat of psychic life and of secret knowledge; they were the seat of the abdominal soul, as the brain to us represents the seat of consciousness.

You see, we identify brain and consciousness more or less; we assume that our consciousness is located in the brain, but the consciousness of those very primitive people was located decidedly below the brain.

In the time of Homer-astonishingly enough to us as boys-the psychical centre was located in the diaphragm, as I told you recently. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 228

We are bewildered by the concept of the collective unconscious, and therefore I say: You should not begin at those abstract ideas of functions and archetypes; in order to have a correct idea of its nature, you should begin at the very simple idea of ghosts, or the souls of objects, say, or thought forms. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 205

The eyes of very primitive and unconscious men have the same strange expression of a mental state before consciousness, which is neither pain nor pleasure; one doesn’t know exactly what it is.

It is most bewildering, but undoubtedly here she sees into the very soul of the animal, and that is the experience she should have. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 154

Christianity is the last word of mankind in the tremendous attempt to formulate the mysteries of the soul, and knowing nothing better we should acknowledge that we are still there; whether we like it or dislike it makes no difference at all, we are still there. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 135

It is death to the soul to become unconscious. People die before there is death of the body, because there is death in the soul. They are mask-like leeches, walking about like spectres ~~dead but sucking.  ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 90

Probably in absolute reality there is no such thing as body and mind, but body and mind or soul are the same, the same life, subject to the same laws, and what the body does is happening in the mind. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 22.

There is nothing without spirit, for spirit seems to be the inside of things … inside is spirit, which is the soul of objects. Whether this is our psyche or the psyche of the universe we don’t know, but if one touches the earth one cannot avoid the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminars; Pages 164-165.

In the redemption of the individual, the whole past will be redeemed, and that includes all the inferior things as well, the animals, and all the ancestral souls, everything that has not been completed; all creation will be redeemed in the apokatastasis [at the time of the Last Judgement], there will be a complete restoration of things as they have been. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1280

The animus when on his way, on his quest, is really a psychopompos, leading the soul back to the stars whence it came. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1229

On the way back out of the existence in the flesh, the psychopompos [Animus] develops such a cosmic aspect, he wanders among the constellations, he leads the soul over the rainbow bridge into the blossoming fields of the stars. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1229

The animus which is not realized by the mother is like a part of a soul with a relative existence of its own. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 29.

The animus which is not realized by the mother is like a part of a soul with a relative existence of its own. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 29.

Archetypes are images in the soul that represent the course of one’s life. ~Carl Jung; Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 21.

This is hot stuff, and since the 17Th century, as far as my knowledge goes, nobody has dared to touch it, but we are interested in the soul of man and therefore we are not blindfolded by foolish confessional prejudices. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 145

The German word ‘Seele’, which by no means is the same as the English word ‘Soul’, is an old word, sanctioned by Tradition, used by the greatest German mystics like Eckhart and poets like Goethe to signify the Ultimate Reality, but experienced under a feminine aspect. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 179

Moreover, it was not I who invented the entire complication of the soul, nor did Freud succeed in removing it from the world. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 141

It is a human being’s eternally impossible attempt to direct the soul away from the earth, to adapt collective energy and its specific formation to his soul, and to tum the Eternally Becoming into the only content of this soul. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

The Jew’s homeland is the Torah, and the only content of his soul is God. And yet deep in every Jew is the yearning for oasis, for the earth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

The soul of the Jew was bound up with this single-singular principle; his soul was not permitted to open itself to the land where he traveled. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

For that reason the final sentence of my essay was as follows: “In Jung’s personality as well as in his psychology and psychotherapy, something is contained which speaks to the depth of the ailing Jewish soul and which may lead to its liberation.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 56

The great contribution of Jung (and this is clearly expressed in the essay in question) is that he has declared that the unconscious is also the creative foundation of the soul, and that he thus sees both aspects, the negative and the positive. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

The fact that the Jews repressed their Jewishness during the era of assimilation explains – besides the Christ-complex – also the psychological break of personalities like Heine, as well as the soulless materialism of such inspiring but destructive individuals as Marx and Freud. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

As far as I can judge the Chinese intellectual, the Chinese path led to a whole – “completion” not “perfection”. Jewish consciousness, on the other hand, has the characteristic that something essential is missing; something suppressed lives in the Jewish soul, which induces even in the educated Jew the most peculiar affects and hysterical reactions. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

One of these days a situation may very well arise when we Jews will have to ask for your [Jung’s]help for the sake of our soul! – James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 41

As you know, Freud previously accused me of anti-Semitism because I could not tolerate his soulless materialism. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

… To me, life without science is completely senseless. What else is there for me if there is no science? Get married? But that thought fills me with dread: at times my heart aches for tenderness, love; but that is but a deceptive, passing, external display that hides the most pitiful prose. The price is subjugation of the personality…. No! I do not want such love: I want a good friend to whom I can bare my soul; I want the love of an older man so that he would love me the way parents love and understand their child (spiritual affinity). But my parents – they are not it – If only I were as wise a human being as my Junga! … And how stupid that I am not a man: men have it easier with everything. It is a shame that everything in life goes their way. I do not want to be a slave! ~Sabina Spielrein, Comments on the Burghölzli hospital records of Sabina Spielrein, Page 8

She is afraid however that he will publish first, that he will steal her ideas. Generously, Jung writes that these are secret penetrations of thoughts … ‘perhaps I borrowed from you too; certainly I have unwittingly absorbed a part of your soul as you doubtless have of mine. What matters is what each of us has made of it. And you have made something good of it’ – ~Carl Jung Letters to Sabina, 25 March 1912, Page 185

The paper that I have written for the clinic about the value of reaction (Spielrein 1909),4 makes me think that we see our own pain in the soul of the other, that is objectively – hence the relief. ~Sabina Spielrein, Unedited extracts from a diary, Page 4

She [Sabina] had a crush on the history teacher, a man of high intelligence and a sad expression in his black eyes, but with a habit of odd grimaces, who “has opened up to her previously unknown vistas by leaps and bounds. I wanted to make sacrifices for him, to suffer for him. I was looking for a friend to whom I could bare my soul.” Later the poor man fell in love with her mother and when she left for Paris he jumped out of a window. ~Henry Zvi Lothane, MD, The real story of Sabina Spielrein: or fantasies vs. facts of a life, Page 4

I fear for my work, for my life’s task, for all the lofty perspectives that are being revealed to me by this new Weltanschauung as it evolves.  How shall I, with my sensitive soul, free myself from all these questions? ~Carl Jung to Sabina Spielrein, December 4, 1908

Understanding is a terribly binding power, possibly a veritable soul murder when it levels out vitally important differences. ~Carl Jung, Schmid-Guisan Letters, Page 140

Alchemy represents the projection of a drama both cosmic and spiritual in laboratory terms. The opus magnum [the great work] had two aims: the rescue of the human soul and the salvation of the cosmos. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking, Page 228

I was especially interested in palaeontology; you see, my life work in historical comparative psychology is like palaeontology. That is the study of the archetypes of the animals, and this is the study of the archetypes in the soul. The Eohippus is the archetype of the modern horse, the archetypes are like the fossil animals. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking; Interviews and Encounters, Pages 205-218

According to another primitive view the soul is regarded as fire or flame, because warmth also is a sign of life. A very curious, but by no means rare, primitive conception identifies the soul with the name. The name of an individual is his soul, and hence arises the custom of using the ancestor’s name to reincarnate the ancestral soul in the new-born child.  We can infer from this that the ego-consciousness was recognized as an expression of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Modern Man is Search of a Soul, Page 181-182

I lend the strange myths of the soul an attentive ear, ~Carl Jung, MDR , Page 303

Because they are so closely akin to us and share our unknowingness, I loved all warm-blooded animals who have souls like ourselves and with whom, so I thought, we have an instinctive understanding. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 67

The “pisciculi Christianorum” show that those who imitate Christ are themselves fish that is, unconscious souls who require the cura animarum. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 216

Thus both my parents appeared burdened with the problem of the “cure of souls,” which in fact was really my task. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 214

There is a sadness in animals’ eyes, and we never know whether that sadness is bound up with the soul of the animal or is a poignant message which speaks to us out of that still unconscious existence. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 269

The question of karma is obscure to me, as is also the problem of personal rebirth or of the transmigration of souls. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 319

They [Angels] are in themselves soulless beings who in the original sense of the Greek iheorein, ‘looking about the world,” or they represent nothing but the thoughts and intuitions of their Lord. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 327-328

People have the idea that the dead know far more than we, for Christian doctrine teaches that in the hereafter we shall “see face to face.” Apparently, however, the souls of the dead “know” only what they knew at the moment of death, and nothing beyond that. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 308

Thus the dream says that the soul of my mother was taken into that greater territory of the self which lies beyond the segment of Christian morality, taken into that wholeness of nature and spirit in which conflicts and contradictions are resolved. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 313-314

I had another experience of the evolution of the soul after death when about a year after my wife’s death I suddenly awoke one night and knew that I had been with her in the south of France, in Provence, and had spent an entire day with her.  ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 309

The angels are a strange genus: they are precisely what they are and cannot be anything else. They are in themselves soulless beings who represent nothing but the thoughts and intuitions of their Lord. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Pages 327-328.

The self, I thought, was like the monad which I am, and which is my world. The mandala represents this monad and corresponds to the microcosmic nature of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 206 and MDR, Page 221.

Although there is no way to marshal valid proof of continuance of the soul after death, there are nevertheless experiences which make us thoughtful. I take them as hints, and do not presume to ascribe to them the significance of insights. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 312.

I am an orphan, alone; nevertheless I am found everywhere. I am one but opposed to myself. I am youth and old man at one and the same time. I have known neither father nor mother, because I have had to be fetched out of the deep like a fish or fell like a white stone from heaven. In woods and mountains I roam, but I am hidden in the innermost soul of man. I am mortal for everyone, yet I am not touched by the cycle of eons. ~Carl Jung, Quoting an Alchemical Text, MDR 227

Our souls as well as our bodies are composed of individual elements which were all already present in the ranks of our ancestors. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 235

The sea is like music, it has all the dreams of the soul within itself and sounds them over. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 369.

Certain souls, I imagine, feel the state of three-dimensional existence to be more blissful than that of Eternity. But perhaps that depends upon how much of completeness or incompleteness they have taken across with them from their human existence. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 321.

If the human [soul] is anything, it must be of unimaginable complexity and diversity, so that it cannot possibly be approached through a mere psychology of instinct. I can only gaze with wonder and awe at the depths and heights of our psychic nature. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 399

If the human [soul] is anything, it must be of unimaginable complexity and diversity, so that it cannot possibly be approached through a mere psychology of instinct. I can only gaze with wonder and awe at the depths and heights of our psychic nature. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 399

“Go to the streams of the river Nile and there thou wilt find a stone which has a spirit. Take this stone, divide it and put thy hand inside it and draw out its heart: for its soul is in its heart.” ~Ostanes cited by Carl Jung, ETH, Page 205.

He says directly that man has two lights: the one is the spirit and the other the light of nature. Man has a spirit in order to be able to understand the divine revelation, and a soul in order to recognise the world in the light of nature. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 193

Apparently God the Father is thought of here as the soul, the anima mundi, which is the centre of the world, and which at the same time enfolds the whole world, or rather the universe including the starry heavens. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 198.

What affects the body has its influence on the soul, and vice versa. In a very difficult case of illness psycho-therapy is always called in. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 236.

The soul and the body are indeed one, so, at any rate theoretically, any illness can be approached from either side; for even if an illness has not a psychic cause it still has a psychic side. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 235.

What affects the body has its influence on the soul, and vice versa. In a very difficult case of illness psycho-therapy is always called in. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 236.

The soul and the body are indeed one, so, at any rate theoretically, any illness can be approached from either side; for even if an illness has not a psychic cause it still has a psychic side. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 235.

He has a secret purpose: to free the world soul (the Deus absconditus) bound in matter. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture V. Page 166.

If man does not reverence and submit to the unconscious, which created his consciousness, he loses his soul, that is, he loses his connection with soul and unconscious. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures, Page 214.

These are, so to speak, the re-animated souls of the ancestors which have been lying dormant in the unconscious, and the alchemists call these units or souls the sleepers or the dead in Hades who are resurrected by the “holy waters” (that is the miraculous water of alchemy, the fertilising Mercury). ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 230.

Psychologically this means that the souls of the ancestors (potential factors, qualities, talents, possibilities, and so on, which we have inherited from all the lines of our ancestry) are waiting in the unconscious and are ready at any time to begin a new growth. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 230.

And this being has body, soul and spirit, and is, therefore, the principle of life itself, as well as the principle of individuation. Its nature is spiritual, it cannot be seen, and it contains an invisible image. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 221.

He says directly that man has two lights: the one is the spirit and the other the light of nature. Man has a spirit in order to be able to understand the divine revelation, and a soul in order to recognise the world in the light of nature. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 193.

I do not know why India was not able to keep Buddhism, but I think probably its present polytheistic religion is a better expression of the Indian soul today than the one perfect Buddha. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27Jan1939, Pages 69.

I am personally of the opinion that not only people, but even animals have souls. I am also deeply convinced of the truth of all creeds. No logical standard of comparison exists, they all contain genuine and real psychological experience and it is merely stupid to criticize them with the aim of establishing one truth. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture III, Page 18.

They [Intuitives] draw the souls out of things and act according to what they discover by this process, just as if what they discovered were ordinary every day facts. ~Carl Jung, Lecture IV, 18May1934, Page 102.

If we speak of the atom we are not moved by it, but when we speak of the soul everyone is personally touched, it always awakes an emotion. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures, Vol. 2, Pages 140-142.

Rama Krishna is not worshipped; his photograph is there to remind the worshippers of his form.  This is, therefore, totally different to the worship of Christ but the basic ide a of soul as form is common to both. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture ETH Lecture 17th Nov 1939

If we seek our connection with the snake we come to the spinal cord and that points to the animal soul of man which leads him down into the darkness of the body, into the instinct which one meets in animal form in the outer world. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 8March1935, Pages 199-200.

Complexes can also be called fragmentary souls. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 1May1935, Pages 201.

Therefore the trans-substantiated wine, which becomes the blood of Christ in the Mass, is the anima, that is the soul, of Christ. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 189.

He says directly that man has two lights: the one is the spirit and the other the light of nature. Man has a spirit in order to be able to understand the divine revelation, and a soul in order to recognise the world in the light of nature. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 193.

Mercury is the anima mundi, the soul of the world, and entered matter as an emanation of God, and since then it is concealed in it. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 180.

Christian August Wolff (1679–1754) 72 initiated another line of thinking. Wolff limited his discussion entirely to consciousness, and divided his psychology into two parts: firstly, empirical psychology, which considers in particular the cognitive faculty and the activity of consciousness; and secondly, rational or speculative psychology, which centers on desire and the interrelations between body and soul. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 112

“modern” psychology, that is, to psychology “as a conscious science,” as he puts it in these lectures. As he wrote elsewhere, the projections falling back into the human soul caused such a terrific activation of the unconscious that in modern times man was compelled to postulate the existence of an unconscious psyche. The first beginnings of this can be seen in Leibniz and Kant, and then, with mounting intensity, in Schelling, Carus, and von Hartmann, until finally modern psychology discarded the last metaphysical claims of the philosopher-psychologists and restricted the idea of the psyche’s existence to the psychological statement, in other words, to its phenomenology (1941, § 375). ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 51

The notion that souls wander from the moon to the stars is not new, either: stars have been associated with birth and death since time immemorial. Meteors are souls. Or when a Roman Caesar died the astronomers had to find a new star in the sky to account for his soul.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 179

We find the idea of the soul as the form giving principle already in the Middle Ages, it is the soul which forms the body and the outer life. So in meditating on the Anima Christi you are meditating on Christ’s form. The same ide a is to be found in the East. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture17th Nov 1939

The actual soul, the objectively psychic, thus possesses qualities that border on nonspatiality and atemporality.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 200

Manichaeism explains the waxing and waning of the moon each month as its filling with the souls of the deceased until it is filled completely, turns towards the sun, gives the souls to it and thus is on the wane again. Then a new circle begins. This idea was brought from Beijing to southern France through the heretic teachings of the Albigenses. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 179

It will be proved . . . that the human soul also in this life forms an indissoluble communion with all immaterial natures of the spirit world, that, alternately, it acts upon and receives impressions from that world of which nevertheless it is not conscious while it is still man and as long as everything is in proper condition. ~Emmanuel Kant, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 157

Carus [1789-1869[ was the first to speak of the “unconscious,” and his writings comprise highly modern points of view on it. For instance, he observed that the “key to the knowledge of the nature of the conscious life of the soul lies in the region of the unconscious.” ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 143

The highest, omniscient essence of the Godhead is the soul of the universe.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 143

For instance, Mother Earth is animated and possesses a soul, which is a by far more comprehensive being than the human soul. She conducts herself like the soul of an angel that embraces all human souls. The totality of human brains thus constitutes the brain of the Earth soul. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 143

Rama Krishna is not worshipped; his photograph is there to remind the worshippers of his form.  This is, therefore, totally different to the worship of Christ but the basic ide a of soul as form is common to both. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture ETH Lecture 17th Nov 1939

Personally, I am convinced that not only people but also animals have souls. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 141

This strange fact—namely, that phenomena of the soul were still contained within the religious sphere—holds true wherever religion is still alive.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 108

This strange fact—namely, that phenomena of the soul were still contained within the religious sphere—holds true wherever religion is still alive.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures 1933-1934, Page 108

It is the soul which, by the divine creative power inherent in it, makes the metaphysical assertion; it posits the distinctions between metaphysical entities. Not only is it the condition of all metaphysical reality, it is that reality.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture17th Nov 1939

It is a great blessing for mankind when the soul is contained in the dogma and there is always a great deal of misery when this is not the case. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27 Jan 1939

Where there are no forms and ceremonies, rites in which they can express their souls, people become moody and caught in conflicts. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27 January 1939

On August 22, 1922, Jaime de Angulo wrote to Chauncey Goodrich issuing “a challenge to all brother-neurotics—go, my brethren, go to the Mecca, I mean to Zürich, and drink from the fountain of life, all ye who are dead in your souls, go and seek new life.” ~Sonu Shamdasani, Introduction 1925 Seminar, Page xv

The author shows an amazingly sympathetic knowledge of the introvert of the thinking type, and hardly less for the other types. Jung has revealed the inner kingdom of the soul marvelously well and has made the signal discovery of the value of phantasy. His book has a manifold reach and grasp, and many reviews with quite different subject matter could be written about it.” ~Sonu Shamdasani, Introduction 1925 Seminar, Page xi

As you know, Plato laid down the principle that it is impossible to look at something ugly without taking something of it into the soul, and it is equally impossible to be in contact with what is beautiful without reacting to it. ~Carl Jung, 1925 Seminar, Page 10

God the Father became the Son and His own soul, the Word that became flesh. Each son of God must awaken this new reality in himself. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski, Page 42.

Archetypes are images in the soul that represent the course of one’s life. One part of the archetypal content is of material and the other of spiritual origin. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski, Page 21

At all events, the moon is always understood as the receptacle of the souls of the dead.

They migrate to the moon after death, and the moon gives birth to the souls in the sun.

She first gets quite full of dead souls—that is the pregnant full moon—and then she gives them to the sun, where the souls attain new life (a Manichean myth).

So the moon is a symbol of rebirth. ~Carl Jung, Kundalini Seminar, Page 22

I am quite inclined to attribute immortal souls to animals; they are just as dignified as the inferior man. That we should deal with the inferior man on our own terms is all wrong. To treat the inferior man as you would treat a superior man is cruel; worse than cruel, it is nonsensical, idiotic. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 1002

Testament, the Acts of St. Thomas, where the Holy Ghost is called Sophia and where she is the blessed mother. So already in its origins, Christianity was so closely surrounded by Gnostic and by Alexandrian wisdom that it is more than probable that Christ received a Gnostic initiation and possessed a rather profound understanding of the human soul and the peculiarities of spiritual development.  1031-1032.

If I don’t know whether I should assume the human soul to be immortal, I simply take it in: I eat immortality, and see what the influence is on my digestion. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 980

Soul and body are not two things. They are one. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 355

You live inasmuch as these Mendelian units are living. They have souls, are endowed with psychic life, the psychic life of that ancestor; or you can call it part of an ancestral soul. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 1401.

For what is the body? The body is merely the visibility of the soul, the psyche; and the soul is the psychological experience of the body. So it is really one and the same thing. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 355.

Alongside this representation of the psychic structure, there is another one, actually the reverse; namely, the soul as a shell enveloping the spherically shaped cosmos, in the innermost part of which lies the earth as the heaviest and most dead part. ~Carl Jung, Atom and Archetype, Pages 12-14

As to the interpretation: for a naive observer, the worms eat earth and transform earth into life, into movement, into greed. They transform matter into soul. They are life originating in death. Worms symbolize the first, unreflected movements of the soul—contents that are still colorless, still completely undifferentiated and incoherent, without feeling, without reason, the stirrings of the blind life instinct. Worms are the most primitive forms of psychical reality, hidden in matter. They belong to an unconscious level, in which the soul is still completely projected onto the outside, onto objects, and in which we experience the world only by blind devouring, by the resistance of the matter, and by involuntary innervation. Soul is here still little more than a physical-chemical substrate. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 347

We do not have to look far to find such universal images. They are already found in language, not to mention those that probably rest at the bottom of our souls. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 27

We have shown the connection between the nature of the girl and the elves. Elves don’t have souls. In her playful way, the girl now does something very significant: she washes her hands.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 302

Yes, there is a split. The dreamer has never really known who he is, where he actually belongs. You will find such a doubleness in those numerous people in whose soul prenatal remnants still exist. These may rise in visions or dreams, but mostly sink back into the unconscious again. It is only in a psychological treatment that these images are again remembered. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 298

The dreamer has never really known who he is, where he actually belongs. You will find such a doubleness in those numerous people in whose soul prenatal remnants still exist.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 298

When he was told the meaning of the dream, both currents flowed together. Up to then they had never come together, and he had never really known: am I in this one or in the other one? Now he became a whole. He had found his soul. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 298

In India the sweating corresponds to the tapas. This is a kind of self-brooding. By the concentration of the soul powers on this one point, on the central point of the self, it is hatched like an egg. One is enclosed in it oneself, as in the retort or in the uterus. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 298-299

Thus we may hope that this tension between the two souls will lead the dreamer—or has led him already—to the place where he will be able to tolerate the dichotomy, that is, to himself. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 290

Then, in the revealing look up to the high ego on the pyramid, however, he will be fascinated like a Narcissus by his own mirror image and by inner reality, blinded by the boundless possibilities of the soul. In fantasies and daydreams he will, for instance, climb heights that are denied to him by reality. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 290

From the image, in which he sees this soul out there, far away, split off from him, and nearly unreachable, we might conclude that later on in life he will identify too one-sidedly with the conscious ego. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 290

When, in the development of this child, the great amnesia will have obscured the Bardo world with its primeval images, such a dream will shine like a spark from the lost paradise, and remind him that he, who lives down on earth, also has an immortal, versatile soul of divine nature. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 290

Basically, however, his adaptation to reality is only superficial, a pseudo-adaptation, because his soul is somewhere else entirely. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 289

The result is an image of the insoluble tension between limitedness and eternity, reality and dream, actuality and ideal, body and soul, mortality and immortality. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 287

When we apply this to our dream we could say that the Ka soul, the sidereal or subtle body of the child, sits on top of the pyramid: in general terms, the desire for perfection and boundlessness, for salvation and immortality, embodied in the dreamer. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 287

“The soul is an example of this: it too imagines many things [ . . .] outside the body, just as God does.”  ~Carl Jung citing Ruland, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 287

The Egyptians, according to whose belief the soul consisted of about fourteen parts or forces, know a part of the soul they called the Ka soul. It was immortal and its body, conceived as half physical and half spiritual, was absolutely identical with the person, even after his death.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 286

In fairy tales this vessel also appears as a glass casket, in which the soul slumbers, waiting for salvation (Snow White in the casket of glass). In the Visio Arislei, an alchemical text, a triple glass house is the place where the heroes are condemned to death in great heat, only to find new life again.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 284

To conclude, the symbol of the pyramid provides the following indications for our dream: it is an archetypal image, a body mandala, in whose depths the body of the king rests as a mummy, and at whose summit the glorification of the soul takes place. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 282

Often the tops of Egyptian pyramids were gilded or made of a specially gleaming stone. It was assumed that after the Pharaoh’s death his soul, that is, his image, the Ka soul, would travel through the underworld and then be transformed into the god Osiris, or rise to Atum, the highest god of light, exactly at this top of his grave. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Pages 281-282

When this part of the soul becomes conscious it can cause immense disturbance. That is why one may touch this encapsulated world only with utmost caution, because otherwise there is the danger that all of a sudden a second personality erupts. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 254

It was also generally assumed that the souls of the dead would live on as chthonic snake gods, as inhabitants of the underworld where they became guardians of a treasure.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 244

The author goes on to say that the name lion was chosen because of the soul substance, and that dog or camel could have been chosen just as well, just as any other name of an animal, simply because it represents that living being which is drawn out of the first matter. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 226

One alchemical passage reads: “In this way the stone has been compared to the animals, because of the blood being their life substance, for the soul of each animal is in the blood.” ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 226

This snake simply replaces the source; it symbolizes the water of life. It is an alchemical idea that dragons or serpents—serpens mercurii—live in the middle of the earth, the imperfect metal, and are, so to speak, the anima, the soul of the metal.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 216

The child had a premonition of the instinctual hell into which she will enter. In alchemy, this state of instinctual hell is represented as a snake with three heads, the so-called serpens mercurii. It leads the soul into the afterworld and is identical with the Gnostic Nous.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 203

This means in our own nature, in the unconscious, in the natural soul, there is such a figure, and it is clearly expressed in our dream. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 198

Without doubt, the fairy is the superior, enigmatic, magical being, a kind of helpful spirit. Fairies, like elves, are beings of nature; they do not have Christian souls but are beings of nature who come from nature and live in nature. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 198

In the visions of Zosimos, too, the philosopher is only a bystander, watching. There, too, the figure of the guide burns himself, to show the alchemist the

way. The soul guide appears in the dream and shows him: this will have to happen to bring about what you are looking for. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 197

A very little child who dies before baptism is not condemned, not stigmatized as some hellish brute, but simply deprived of the Visio Dei. It is up to the mercy of God what to do with this unfinished soul.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 188

The Bardo lifespan is forty-nine days. The souls live, so to speak, in a collective world, and are confronted with spirits and other images of life, “images of all creatures,” as Goethe says in Faust. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 183

And if she lets herself be seized, and suffers the fire’s heat, the soul will be formed out of the unconscious body and spirit, the soul that is able to float, as the body’s essence of light, between heaven and earth with the wings of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 178

In the mirror we see our true nature, the image of our soul; reflection brings about insight and knowledge. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 176

In the hidden fire above heaven, all things are preserved. Through fire, which consumes the material form, the soul becomes the pure image, godlike and immortal. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 175

In Heraclitus we find the idea that the souls turn into water. In recent years, one Gurdjieff claimed that the moon was so fertilized by the many souls of soldiers killed during the last World War that a green spot appeared on it. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 167

The moon actually is sometimes the place of departed souls, absorbing the souls. If it absorbs many souls, it is said to become humid. The psyche is, after all, the humid breath— “psychros” is cold, and is related to “to blow.”  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 167

And it may come to mind that the same idea is found in Egypt, the idea of the burial chambers, above which there is the Ka, the semi-material soul of the Egyptian. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 165

The motif of multiplicity indicates a splitting of the soul. We find this motif particularly often in the dreams of schizophrenics. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 156

All cults of cremation have an idea in common, to assist the dead person on his way to the hereafter, that is, to assist in resurrection by freeing the soul through destruction of the mortal remains: the soul can thus float into the next world, into heaven. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 154

After death follows the resurrection. It can take place only if the form of the deceased’s body has been preserved by embalming. Ba, the soul, often rendered as a bird, has to be able to visit the embalmed body; its way goes through the tomb shaft, situated in the pyramid. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 153

The pyramid [ . . .] is entirely based on the Egyptians’ ideas on life after death: man is composed of at least three parts, the body, the soul (Ba), and the Ka, a being of its own, for whom it is hard to find a translation. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 153

At noon the shadow is shortest, giving rise to the fear that it might disappear altogether. This would be uncanny, for then one would have lost the shadow, the connection to the earth; one has suffered a loss of soul. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 129

The dream shows a typical process in the infantile soul that is so subtle, however, that the usual education does not notice it at all. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 123

For the monster is actually the soul of the doll/pupa in herself, the primal being, the dark abyss in man, which playfully creates life and creation. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 122

We also find this triad in the development of Goethe’s Faust: the boy charioteer, the homunculus, and Euphorion. The boy charioteer is the soul-guiding function. Here we find the motif of “puer aeternus.” ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 120

Just like a primitive man, the child brings the doll to life with the images of her unconscious, and so animates, “en-souls,” it. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 113

The problem is how to fill him with soul and thus make him into a real human being. But the vial of the homunculus is smashed to pieces on Galatea’s chariot and pours out into the sea waves, whereupon the homunculus rises again as a living man out of the waters of the unconscious.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 113

The notion of the soul is connected to the fur, the skin, the shirt, the outer form, for shirt (e.g., the swan shirt) and fur stand for a great potential of transformation in the Teutonic tradition. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 106

The staff represents guidance; it will become a guide as an inner law when someone came into the inner ring of fire and remains suspended in the soul fire.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 102

The soul oscillates between air and water. It is always the go-between for the two principles marking the extremes: below there is earth, the material matter; above there is pneumatikos (spirit), air, and fire. Dry, hot air—this is the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 101

The word “psyche” (soul) is connected to “physein” (Greek, to blow); psychos corresponds with psychros (Greek, cold, damp). “The soul of a drunkard is moist,” says Heraclitus. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 100-101

Here Hermes also has to be mentioned, the thief of the sun cattle of Helios, also the escort of the souls in the underworld. So the man mentioned in the dream can probably be interpreted as a fatherly archetype.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 93

A Celtic legend tells of a bridge of horrors, not broader than a string. Moreover, in a Persian collection of legends there appears the so-called Chinvat bridge, on which angels and demons fight over the souls of the people crossing it.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 90

If consciousness is weak, it can get into the wake of that content from the collective unconscious and be towed away by it. This is possession, “the peril of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 80

When you have pictures from your ancestors, you can single out parts of your face and detect them in the various pictures of the ancestors. The same is true for the whole body, and likewise with the soul. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 73

The student from Prague, who sells his own reflection to the devil, no longer has any image, that is, the soul has left the body, and this means disaster.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 67

That is why the primitives do not want to be photographed, out of fear that their double, their soul image, be taken away from them, thus causing a loss of soul. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 67

The ancient Greeks, too, found the mirror, when it appeared in a dream, uncanny. It meant the death of a person; this is so because the image one sees in the mirror is one’s own double. It is the Ka of the Egyptians. It is an image of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 67

That is why one avoids speaking about certain things or thinking of something particular—because then one can be robbed of one’s soul or devoured by the fantasies.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 66

We feel it may be justified to assume that this problem is not a conscious problem of the infantile soul, but rather a general one that finds expression in this dream: the fight of the spirit against physical matter, the longing of the creature to be saved from the bonds of the flesh, the fight of the higher against the lower powers. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 62

In Goethe’s poem Erlking, the king tries to lure the soul of a boy away from his real father, to become a playmate for his own daughters! In the end, he takes it with force. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 55-56

In Persia, the dog is the companion of the dead. To give it bread is a ceremony: one gives it bread instead of the body, meaning, don’t tear me apart, don’t tear my soul apart, but guide it to the destination through the desert of Hades. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 52

The inevitable inner growth of the animal soul creates the big, dark spots in human life: “To earth, this weary earth, ye bring us, To guilt ye let us heedless go.”  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 52

The human soul is something we only educate, but we are not interested at all in what it is! —Well, this is a critical age insofar as the child approaches school between the age of five and six. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 432

Yes, the lice are vampires, often also spirits. When a child is born in the Caucasus Mountains, they take a louse from the grandfather’s head and plant it on the head of the grandchild. By this the soul has been transferred, because in the primitive view the spirits always accompany us, buzz around us like bats or like vampires; they suck the blood from us.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 465

It is surely her duty to feed the little pigs, to take care, that is, of these very primitive needs, or, in other words: sacrifices have to be made also to Aphrodite and the chthonic gods in the hierarchy of the soul powers, because otherwise they can make themselves felt in a very unpleasant way.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 459

Yes, this is the deity. Ignatius of Loyola, too, had such visions in which a globe appeared. This is the all-round, cosmic being, the world soul, the rotundum, the round one. And what would you say about the fact that the ball in the dream is red?  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 441

A first step toward that has already been made; nevertheless, the child is still detained by a force effective in the unconscious, which probably does not originate in the child’s own soul alone but creates an oppressive situation around him.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 428

Such events do not take place naturally but are caused by the atmosphere resulting from the unresolved unconscious of the parents. A thick wall separates these persons from their own souls, and the child then falls into it, is born out of this atmosphere and then bewitched by it, possessed by the darkness of which the parents have never wanted to be aware—and also have not been able to. Such dreams result from such conditions.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 422-423

An anima type would probably develop, a woman who always knows how to twist the father round her little finger so that he opens his fatherly arms and protects the poor little soul from the world.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 418-419

What has happened by this? Well, look for us the child is actually unity par excellence. With the eaten tiger, however, conflict moves into the soul of the child. The conflict had hitherto still been in the unconscious, but now it jumps at the child’s consciousness.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 416

Above there is the anima rationalis, to use the medieval term, and below the anima vegetativa, only life as such. The moment it becomes conscious, the two aspects will reveal themselves. So what enters into the soul of the child? A whole tiger or a half tiger?  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 416

In his book The “Soul” of the Primitive, Lucien Lévy-Bruhl gives a number of examples as evidence of the mystical view of primitives that certain humans and animals are actually one and the same. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 399

The child has been told a truth, the absolute, basic truth of humankind, for which there is no proof, of course. The proof lies in the truth itself. It is expressed by the soul and by what human beings have thought since time immemorial. These are the truths that live forever.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 378.

Thus our dream not only concerns the soul of this single child, but it pertains to much more, namely, to her parents, siblings, and the whole environment. I have to add that the child is from a German family, and that the father was very active politically. So there is no doubt that there is a great emphasis on the environment, and when exciting things happen there the child will be forced to take part in the emotional state of the family.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 371-372

The infantile soul is no tabula rasa at all, as presumed by modern psychology, but the ancient images are always already there a priori ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 369

The ancient historical images, so immensely attractive to children’s fantasy, no longer play any role at all today. This is a loss for our souls, because we don’t give the soul a language to give expression to its contents. In religious instruction, we more and more refrain from making children acquainted with these images, and instead offer them moral teaching, in which the devil is ignored altogether. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 369

Snakes, and particularly red ones, are not only spirits of the dead, but can also represent emotional states, as you have heard in the paper. They stand for the heat of the soul, the fire of passion, and thus represent a more intense stage of development.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 365

The gray mouse is, as Mrs. Brunner has mentioned, an animal that stands in connection to the darkness of the soul; it represents that fleetingly glimpsed, dark nature of man that makes itself unpleasantly felt from time to time, above all at night.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 363

Mrs. Brunner has given you enough evidence that the mouse is a soul animal. She has also quite correctly pointed to the transparency of the mouse and interpreted it as spirituality.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 363

We can assume that the closeness of death has already cast its shadow on the soul of the child, and has raised questions in her such as: “Why did it come into being in the first place, if it will end anyway?” Or: “Why did it come into being? For what reason?”  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 361

We can perhaps draw only one conclusion from the amplification for the inner situation of the girl: that her soul is thirsty—thirsty for living water. And this dream originates in the living water, only she is not able to grasp it. That is why she confides in the father: maybe he can grasp it.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 357

In our amplifications to the mouse we have heard that the soul leaves the body at night in the form of a mouse, to quench its thirst; it is said that in most cases this is the soul of a girl, and that if the mouse does not come back, the girl will die. In our dream, the girl sees her soul mouse, but it does not turn toward her.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 356

Although all the animals that appear in it are considered souls of the dead, they stand in logical connection with the inner development. What is alarming is only the absolute completeness of the archetypal vision, and this at an age when the archetypal images should be covered and suppressed by her own perceptions and experiences.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 356

We know that the little girl died one year after this dream. The dream does not reveal anything pathological to me, it has a lysis. Although all the animals that appear in it are considered souls of the dead, they stand in logical connection with the inner development.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 356

So this is a reversed Bardo Thödol, beginning with what is lowest and smallest, to bring all creatures home to the blessedness of the soul. The Tibetan teachings about the dead, however, incessantly remind us: “Realize that you are looking at yourself. This is you. Everything depends on your reality and that image becoming one.”  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 356

Through greed the soul becomes entangled in the world, it becomes earthen, dark, and evil. It is touched by the objects and the humans, and everything is gray and dark.  Page 355

And about the final transformation: “When the soul has to realize that no creature at all can come into the Kingdom of God, it begins to feel itself, goes its own way and no longer seeks God. Only then does it die its highest death. In this death the soul loses all desire, all capability of thinking, all form, and is deprived of all essence. Now at last it finds itself in the highest primordial image, in which God lives and is active, where He is His own kingdom.” Here the soul has found out that it itself is the “Kingdom of God.”  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 355

The lowest of these mandalas is the earth lotus. It corresponds to the gray mouse. It is the place of the world-bound souls. In its center there is the lingam, colored like a fresh sapling, perhaps reminiscent of a worm. Coiled around the lingam, the Kundalini serpent sleeps. In it sleeps the essence of the highest experience.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 355

Where previously there was fighting and activity, now there is also feeding and passivity. In the blue mouse the soul becomes the anima, which mirrors the contents. Life flows in and assumes a solid form. The thoughts become cool and clear.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 352

Blue coats are worn by the wise women who, as swan virgins, are linked to the water, to the mist, and to the sky. Mist rises from the water, rises up into the blue sky, to fall back on earth as rain. In alchemy and tarot, blue is the color of the moon, of silver, and of the soul.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 351

Let us have a look at their mythology: In the fairy tale “The Fisherman and His Wife,” the flounder appears as a wish-fish. It fulfills all the wishes of Ilsebill.155 But when she wants to be God Himself, she plunges back into her old misery. In Hofmannsthal’s Woman without a Shadow, seven little fish are the souls of unborn children.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 350

The snake symbolizes the freeing of the energy, the aim at an object, aggressiveness, and drive. The turning red of the mouse shows that the heat of the soul develops out of the material soul, so that passionate wishing is no longer experienced as imposed by the outside, but as an inner compulsion. Before, the shadow entered into the mouse, now the animus is revived; the male instinctual force is awakened, which wants to conquer the world to possess it. And each new conquest feeds the fire and the heat.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 349

Regarding the appearance of the snake in mythology: you remember what Ms. von Franz told us about the snake as an earth demon, as soul of the dead or the heroes, as a dark god of the Ophites, as the snake of the river bed, as movement, as vital force, as time, and as the snake of salvation ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 348

The entering worms are the soul of the matter; they take their element, matter, into the transparent mouse. This means that the soul, driven by greed, begins to “eat the world,” to get entangled in the world. The subtle mouse becomes a real, gray mouse. Darkness, impurity, the gray shadow enter into the pure vessel.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 347

As to the interpretation: for a naive observer, the worms eat earth and transform earth into life, into movement, into greed. They transform matter into soul. They are life originating in death. Worms symbolize the first, unreflected movements of the soul—contents that are still colorless, still completely undifferentiated and incoherent, without feeling, without reason, the stirrings of the blind life instinct. Worms are the most primitive forms of psychical reality, hidden in matter. They belong to an unconscious level, in which the soul is still completely projected onto the outside, onto objects, and in which we experience the world only by blind devouring, by the resistance of the matter, and by involuntary innervation. Soul is here still little more than a physical-chemical substrate. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 347

We may probably interpret the transparent mouse, therefore, as the subtle body of the dreamer. The girl sees her own, still hardly born soul. Transparent brings to mind glassy. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 346.

While the girl witch is dancing with Faust on the Brocken, a little red mouse jumps out of her mouth. Innocent children’s souls and the souls of the just appear as white mice, those of the godless as red ones. The souls of unborn children, too, appear as white mice. There is a very widespread notion that the soul leaves the human body during sleep in the form of a mouse, sometimes to quench its thirst, sometimes to cause nightmares in people, animals, and trees— in that case, it is usually the soul of a girl. If the mouse does not return, the girl will die. To whistle after mice means to lure the souls into the afterworld. Mice are often signs of death. Gray and black mice generally indicate disaster. They spread the Black Death and other diseases. The white mouse appears as a fever demon but, on the other hand, also attracts fever. It is said that mice are created out of earth or putrefaction or are made by witches. Because of their gray color they are seen as tempest animals, coming from the clouds or the fog, or being brought by the wind.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 345

Yes, it’s the old story of the nixie or the mermaid who gets caught in his net. It is the being that has no soul and therefore strives after it. And that’s where the problem begins. In the dream, too, the boy’s fishing is a playful occupation with something of which he is not yet aware that this is an adventure and involves danger.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 333.

As Jung has explained in the definitions in Psychological Types, the soul, our inner attitude, is represented in the unconscious by certain persons who show the characteristics that are commensurate with the soul. The character of the soul would in general complement the outer character and contain all those attributes missing in the conscious attitude.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 329

 

In the Tibetan Book of the Dead, this transitional stage is expressed by the symbolic forty-nine days, which is the period of time between death and rebirth. It is significant that the greatest chance of salvation occurs in the direct process of dying. So here we have to conceive of the dead body as the direct expression and the symbol of the magical transformational capacity of the soul, the anima.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 329

This nixie-elf-anima represents the soul in its entirety, uniting the good and the bad; it is moving, iridescent like a butterfly. The soul is a life-giving demon and plays its elfish game beneath and above human existence. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 326

It is the world of water, where all life floats in suspension; where the realm of the sympathetic system, the soul of everything living, begins; where I am indivisibly this and that; where I experience the other in myself and the other-than-myself experiences me. . .. Our concern with the unconscious has become a vital question, a question of spiritual being or non-being.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 325

When someone is able to perform the art of touching on the archetypal, he can play on the souls of people like on the strings of a piano. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dream Seminar, Page 150

The infantile soul is no tabula rasa at all, as presumed by modern psychology, but the ancient images are always already there a priori.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 369.

A man likes to believe that he is master of his soul. ~Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols, Page 83.

The animus, on the other hand, is the higher soul; after death it rises in the air, where at first it is active for a time and then evaporates in ethereal space or flows back into the reservoir of life. In living men, the two correspond in a certain degree to the cerebral and sympathetic nervous system. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 15

In any case, animus (hun) is the light, yang-soul, while anima (p’o) is the dark, yin-soul. ~Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 16.

‘Anima’, called p’o, and written with the characters for ‘white’ and for ‘demon’, that is, ‘white ghost’, belongs to the lower, earth-bound, bodily soul, the yin principle, and is therefore feminine. After death, it sinks downward and becomes kuei (demon), often explained as the ‘one who returns’ (i.e. to earth), a revenant, a ghost.  ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 114.

Thus hun [Animus] means ‘cloud-demon,’ a higher ‘breath-soul’ belonging to the yang principle and therefore masculine. After death, hun rises upward and becomes shen, the ‘expanding and self-revealing’ spirit or god. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 114.

Intellect does, in fact, harm the soul when it dares to possess itself of the heritage of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 81.

Looked at in this light, the bond established by the transference—however hard to bear and however incomprehensible it may seem—is vitally important not only for the individual but also for society, and indeed for the moral and spiritual progress of mankind. So, when the psychotherapist has to struggle with difficult transference problems, he can at least take comfort in these reflections. He is not just working for this particular patient, who may be quite insignificant, but for himself as well and his own soul, and in so doing he is perhaps laying an infinitesimal grain in the scales of humanity’s soul. Small and invisible as this contribution may be, it is yet an opus magnum, for it is accomplished in a sphere but lately visited by the numen, where the whole weight of mankind’s problems has settled. The ultimate questions of psychotherapy are not a private matter—they represent a supreme responsibility. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 209

Therefore both in alchemy and analytical psychology the first stage can be achieved primarily by the mind. The alchemists, however, fully realized that this separation of the soul by intellectual effort was not enough. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 226

Ruth did all this [Sailing with Jung] so gallantly that, though I knew her well, I did not realize for a long time how afraid she had been sometimes in the depth of her own soul. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 237

“His [Nietzsche] soul died in 1889, when his general paralysis began, but he lived on for eleven years more. His body lived, but his soul was dead. So the fate of that rope-dancer symbolizes Nietzsche himself.” ~Carl Jung, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 164

As he was dying, Zarathustra said to him: “Thy soul will be dead even sooner than thy body.” This, Jung said, was the “prophetic word,” for—as is well known—Nietzsche’s soul was dead before his body. ~Carl Jung, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 164

No, the Virgin was the archetypal figure of the soul of man, the anima, and it is only in the soul of man that God can be born, where else could it be? ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 32

The great problem of our time is that we do not understand what is happening to the world. We are confronted with the darkness of our soul, the unconscious. Carl Jung; Letters II; Page 590.

People hate the human soul; it is nothing but “psychological.” They don’t understand that it has needs, and they throw its treasures into the street without understanding them.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 209

Have your congregation understood that they must close their ears to the traditional teachings and go through the darknesses of their own souls and set aside everything in order to become that which every individual bears in himself as his individual task, and that no one can take this burden from him?  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 76.

If you have committed a mistake at all, it consisted in your having striven too hard to understand your wife completely and not reckoning with the fact that in the end people don’t want to know what secrets are slumbering in their souls. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 27.

I own the first English edition of Bohme’s 40 Questions Concerning the Soul, 1647. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 465.

The meaning of events is the way of salvation that you create. The meaning of events comes from the possibility of life in this world that you create. It is the mastery of this world and the assertion of your soul in this world. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 239.

Keep it far from me, science that clever knower, that bad prison master who binds the soul and imprisons it in a lightless cell. But above all protect me from the serpent of judgment, which only appears to be a healing serpent, yet in your depths is infernal poison and agonizing death. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 238

Cleverness couples itself with intention. Simplemindedness knows no intention. Cleverness conquers the world, but simplemindedness, the soul. So take on the vow of poverty of spirit in order to partake of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 237.

When you say that the place of the soul is not, then it is not. But if you say that it is, then it is. Notice what the ancients said in images: the word is a creative act. The ancients said: in the beginning was the Word. Consider this and think upon it. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 236.

Did you not see that when your creative force turned to the world, how the dead things moved under it and through it, how they grew and prospered, and how your thoughts flowed in rich rivers? If your creative force now turns to the place of the soul, you will see how your soul becomes green and how its field bears wonderful fruit. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 236.

I must learn that the dregs of my thought, my dreams, are the speech of my soul. I must carry them in my heart and go back and forth over them in my mind, like the words of the person dearest to me. Dreams are the guiding words of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

From this we learn how the spirit of the depths considers the soul: he sees her as a living and self-existing being, and with this he contradicts the spirit of this time for whom the soul is a thing dependent on man… ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

Therefore the spirit of the depths forced me to speak to my soul, to call upon her as a living and self-existing being. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

Who knows the way to the eternally fruitful climes of the soul? You seek the way through mere appearances; you study books and give ear to all kinds of opinion. What good is all that? There is only one way and that is your way. You seek the path. I warn you away from my own. It can also be the wrong way for you. May each go his own way. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 231

Just as you become a part of the manifold essence of the world through your bodies, so you become a part of the manifold essence of the inner world through your soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 264.

I had to recognize that I am only the expression and symbol of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 234.

The spirit of this time of course allowed me to believe in my reason. He let me see myself in the image of a leader with ripe thoughts. But the spirit of the depths teaches me that I am a servant, in fact the servant of a child: This dictum was repugnant to me and I hated it. But I had to recognize and accept that my soul is a child and that my God in my soul is a child. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 234.

The moon is dead. Your soul went to the moon, to the preserver of souls. Thus the soul moved toward death. I went into the inner death and saw that outer dying is better than inner death. And I decided to die outside and to live within. For that reason I turned away and sought the place of the inner life. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 267.

Every man has a quiet place in his soul, where everything is self-evident and easily explainable, a place to which he likes to retire from the confusing possibilities of life, because there everything is simple and clear, with a manifest and limited purpose. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 295.

My soul: “Who gives you thoughts and words? Do you make them? Are you not my serf a recipient who lies at my door and picks up my alms? And you dare think that what you devise and speak could be nonsense? Don’t you know yet that it comes from me and belongs to me?” ~Carl Jung, Red Book, Page 241.

The soul has its own peculiar world. Only the self enters in there, or the man who has completely become his self, he who is neither in events, nor in men, nor in his thoughts. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, 240.

He whose desire turns away from outer things, reaches the place of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 233.

My friends, it is wise to nourish the soul, otherwise you will breed dragons and devils in your heart. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

The dead who besiege us are souls who have not fulfilled the principium individuationis, or else they would have become distant stars. Insofar as we do not fulfill it, the dead have a claim on us and besiege us and we cannot escape them. ~Carl Jung; The Red Book; Appendix C; Page 370

Man is a gateway, through which you pass from the outer world of Gods, daimons, and souls into the inner world, out of the greater into the smaller world. Small and inane is man, already he is behind you, and once again you find yourselves in endless space, in the smaller or inner infinity. ~Carl Jung; The Red Book; Page 354.

But the spirit of the depths had gained this power, because I had spoken to my soul during 25 nights in the desert and I had given her all my love and submission. But during the 25 days, I gave all my love and submission to things, to men, and to the thoughts of this time. I went into the desert only at night.   ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 238.

The world of the inner is as infinite as the world of the outer. Just as you become a part of the manifold essence of the world through your bodies, so you become a part of the manifold essence of the inner world through your soul. This inner world is truly infinite, in no way poorer than the outer one. Man lives in two worlds. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 264.

My Soul, where are you? Do you hear me? I speak, I call you—are you there? I have returned, I am here again. I have shaken the dust of all the lands from my feet, and I have come to you, I am with you. After long years of long wandering, I have come to you again…. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

And you, my soul, I found again, first in images within men and then you yourself I found you where I least expected you. You climbed out of a dark shaft. You announced yourself to me in advance in dreams.  ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 233.

I had to accept that what I had previously called my soul was not at all my soul, but a dead system that I had contrived. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book Page 232.

Meine Seele, meine Seele, wo bist Du? (My Soul, my Soul, where are You?) …~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Pages 232.

Hence I had to speak to my soul as to something far off and unknown, which did not exist through me, but through whom I existed. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 232.

I am weary, my soul, my wandering has lasted too long, my search for myself outside of myself. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 233.

I am ignorant of your mystery. Forgive me if I speak as in a dream, like a drunkard—are you God?” ~Carl Jung to his Soul, The Red Book, Page 233.

The soul demands your folly; not your wisdom. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 264.

Thus your soul is your own self in the spiritual world.  As the abode of the spirits, however, the spiritual world is also an outer world. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 288.

You have the one God, and you become your one God in the innumerable number of Gods. ~Carl Jung’s Soul, The Red Book, Page 371.

You should call me if you want to live with men, but the one God if you want to rise above the human world to the divine and eternal solitude of the star. ~Carl Jung’s Soul, The Red Book, Page 371.

Here the soul drew near to my ear and whispered, “The Gods are even happy to turn a blind eye from time to time, since basically they know very well that it would be bad for life if there were no exception to eternal law. Hence their tolerance of the devil.  ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 359.

Everything to come was already in images: to find their soul, the ancients went into the desert. This is an image. The ancients lived their symbols, since the world had not yet become real for them. Thus they went into the solitude of the desert to teach us that the place of the soul is a lonely desert. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 236.

Now that white shape of a girl with black hair-my own soul-and now that white shape of a man, which also appeared to me at the time it resembles Michelangelo’s sitting Moses-it is Elijah. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Pages 248-9, Footnote 187.

When my soul fell into the hands of evil, it was defenseless except for the weak fishing rod which it could use, again with its power, to pull the fish from the sea of emptiness. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

But who can withstand fear when the divine intoxication and madness comes to him? Love, soul, and God are beautiful and terrible. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 238.

My soul is my supreme meaning, my image of God, neither God himself nor the supreme meaning. God becomes apparent in the supreme meaning of the human community. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Footnote 92, Page 240.

The self, I thought, was like the monad which I am, and which is my world. The mandala represents this monad and corresponds to the microcosmic nature of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 206 and MDR, Page 221.

But I had to recognize and accept that my soul is a child and that my God in my soul is a child. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 234.

This meaning of events is the supreme meaning, that is not in events, and not in the soul, but is the God standing between events and the soul, the mediator of life, the way, the bridge and the going across. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 239.

This new world appears weak and artificial to me. Artificial is a bad word, but the mustard seed that grew into a tree, the word that was conceived in the womb of a virgin, became a God to whom the earth was subject. ~Carl Jung to his Soul, Liber Novus, Pages 242-243.

But when the mother, my soul, was pregnant with the God, I did not know it. It even seemed to me as if my soul herself was the God, although he lived only in her body. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 244.

And thus the image of the ancients is fulfilled: I pursued my soul to kill the child in it. For I am also the worst enemy of my God. But I also recognized that my enmity is decided upon in the God. He is mockery and hate and anger, since this is also a way of life. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 244.

I see in splendor the mother of God with the child. Peter stands in front of her in admiration-then Peter alone with the key-the Pope with a triple crown-a Buddha sitting rigidly in a circle of fire-a many-armed bloody Goddess-it is Salome desperately wringing her hands-it takes hold of me, she is my own soul, and now I see Elijah in the image of the stone. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 248.

The word becomes your God, since it protects you from the countless possibilities of interpretation. The word is protective magic against the daimons of the unending, which tear at your soul and want to scatter you to the winds. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 270.

The daimon of sexuality approaches our soul as a serpent. She is half human soul and is called thought-desire. The daimon of spirituality descends into our soul as the white bird. He is half human soul and is called desire-thought. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 354.

If I am not conjoined through the uniting of the Below and the Above, I break down into three parts: the serpent, and in that or some other animal form I roam, living nature daimonically, arousing fear and longing. The human soul, living forever within you. The celestial soul, as such dwelling with the Gods, far from you and unknown to you, appearing in the form of a bird. ~Carl Jung’s Soul to him, Black Books, Appendix C., Page 370.

The God appears to us in a certain state of the soul. Therefore we reach the God through the self. Not the self is God, although we reach the God through the self. The God is behind the self above the self the self itself when he appears. But he appears as our sickness, from which we must heal ourselves. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 338.

Dreams are the guiding words of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 233.

Scholarliness belongs to the spirit of this time, but this spirit in no way grasps the dream, since the soul is everywhere that scholarly knowledge is not. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 233.

May man rule in the human world. May his laws be valid. But treat the souls, daimons, and Gods in their way; offering what is demanded. But burden no man, demand and expect nothing from him, with what your devil-souls and God-souls lead you to believe, but endure and remain silent and do piously what befits your kind. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 343.

You are blessed, virgin soul, praised be your name. You are the chosen one among women. You are the God-bearer. Praise be to you! Honor and fame be yours in eternity. ~Philemon to Carl Jung’s Soul, Liber Novus, Page 344.

I bow, my soul, before unknown forces- I’d like to consecrate an altar to each unknown God. I must submit. The black iron in my heart gives me secret power. It’s like defiance and like contempt for men. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 308.

My soul leads me into the desert, into the desert of my own self. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 235.

But man must recognize his complicity in the act of evil. He must bear witness to this recognition by eating from the bloody sacrificial flesh. Through this act he testifies that he is a man, that he recognizes good as well as evil, and that he destroys the image of the God’s formation through withdrawing his life force, with which he also dissociates himself from the God. This occurs for the salvation of the soul, which is the true mother of the divine child. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

When it bore and gave birth to the God, my soul was of human nature throughout; it possessed the primordial powers since time immemorial, but only in a dormant condition. They flowed into forming the God without my help. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

True, what the soul imagines happens only in the mind, but what God imagines happens in reality. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 280.

If we now recall to what a degree the soul has humanized and realized itself, we can judge how very much it today expresses the body also, with which it is coexistent. ~Carl Jung, Mysterium Coniunctionis, Page 544.

Since the soul animates the body, just as the soul is animated by the spirit, she tends to favour the body and everything bodily, sensuous, and emotional. She lies caught in “the chains” of Physis, and she desires “beyond physical necessity.” She must be called back by the “counsel of the spirit” from her lostness in matter and the world. ~Carl Jung, Mysterium Coniunctionis, Page 472.

You live inasmuch as these Mendelian units are living. They have souls, are endowed with psychic life, the psychic life of that ancestor; or you can call it part of an ancestral soul. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 1401.

We are immortalized in memory. Oh, yes, it is so. The soul has become immortal if we leave something behind for others. Psychology can affirm no other immortality. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff-A collections of Remembrances, Page 7.

The angels are a strange genus: they are precisely what they are and cannot be anything else. They are in themselves soulless beings who represent nothing but the thoughts and intuitions of their Lord. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Pages 327-328.

Only those remain living who are willing to die with life. Since what happens in the secret hour of the midday of life is the reversal of the parabola, the birth of death. ~Carl Jung, The soul and death, CW 8, § 800.

The soul possesses in some degree a historical stratification, whereby the oldest stratum of which would correspond to the unconscious. ~Carl Jung. CW8, § 51.

It would also be the task of the confessor zealous in the cure of souls, were it not that his office inevitably obliges him to apply the yardstick of his denominational bias at the critical moment. ~Carl Jung, The Undiscovered Self, Page 37.

However we may picture the relationship between God and soul, one thing is certain: The soul cannot be “nothing but. ” On the contrary it has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. Even if it were only the relationship of a drop of water to the sea … ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

So long as religion is only faith and outward form, the religion’s function is not experienced in our souls, nothing of any importance has happened. ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 12.

Dogma represents the soul more completely than a scientific theory, for the latter gives expression to and formulates the conscious mind alone. ~Carl Jung, CW8, Psychology and Religion, Page 46.

A saying of the alchemist is, “God is a circle whose centre is everywhere and whose circumference is nowhere.” The saying holds for God, for the anima mundi and for the soul of man. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 35.

The animus which is not realized by the mother is like a part of a soul with a relative existence of its own. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 29.

Archetypes are images in the soul that represent the course of one’s life. ~Carl Jung; Conversations with C.G. Jung; Archetypes; Page 21.

Certain souls, I imagine, feel the state of three-dimensional existence to be more blissful than that of Eternity. But perhaps that depends upon how much of completeness or incompleteness they have taken across with them from their human existence. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 321.

Others restrict spirit to certain psychic capacities or functions or qualities, such as the capacity to think and reason in contradistinction to the more “soulful” sentiments. Here spirit means the sum-total of all the phenomena of rational thought, or of the intellect, including the will, memory, imagination, creative power, and aspirations motivated by ideals. ~ Carl Jung, CW 9i, para. 386.

The spiritual man says to the worldly man, “Are you capable of knowing your soul in a complete manner? If you knew it, as is fitting, and if you knew what makes it better, you would be able to recognize that the names the philosophers formerly gave it are not its true names. O dubious names that resemble the true names, what errors and agonies you have provoked among men!” The names refer in turn to the philosopher’s stone. ~Carl Jung; “Psychology and Religion”; CW 11, par. 153.

The sun… is the only truly ‘rational’ image of God, whether we adopt the standpoint of the primitive savage or of modern science. In either case the sun is the father-god from whom all living things draw life; he is the fructifier and creator, the source of energy for our world. The discord into which the human soul has fallen can be harmoniously resolved through the sun as a natural object which knows no inner conflict. ~Carl Jung; CW 5; Symbols of Transformation; Para 176.

All religions are therapies for the sorrows and disorders of the soul.” ~Carl Jung; “Commentary to The Secret of the Golden Flower”, 1929.

Christian civilization has proved hollow to a terrifying degree: it is all veneer, but the inner man has remained untouched, and therefore unchanged. His soul is out of key with his external beliefs; in his soul the Christian has not kept pace with external developments. Yes, everything is to be found outside-in image and in word, in Church and Bible-but never inside. Inside reign the archaic gods, supreme as of old. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Alchemy, Page 11.

An understanding heart is everything, in a teacher. … One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child. ~Carl Jung; “The Gifted Child,”1942.

Therefore the sun is perfectly suited to represent the visible God of this world, i.e., the creative power of our own soul, which we call libido, and whose nature it is to bring forth the useful and to bring forth the useful and the harmful, the good and the bad. ~Carl Jung; CW 5; Symbols of Transformation; para 176.

[The incorporeal spirits lie] beyond our empirical present. [He continues] There is a spiritual world from which the soul receives knowledge of spiritual things whose origins cannot be discovered in this visible world. ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

There are incorporeal spirits with which the soul associates. ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

It was universally believed in the Middle Ages as well as in the Greco-Roman world that the soul is a substance. Indeed, mankind as a whole has held this belief from its earliest beginnings, and it was left for the second half of the nineteenth century to develop a “psychology without the soul.” ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

[The soul] is of divine nature and therefore immortal; that there is a power inherent within it which builds up the body, sustains its life, heals its ills. ~Carl Jung; CW 8.

It all depends on how we look at things, and not on how they are themselves. Thinking is an act of the soul whereby it becomes conscious of itself and of other things outside itself. ~Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; Footnote 2.

Language, in its origin and essence, is simply a system of signs or symbols that denote real occurrences or their echo in the human soul. Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; para. 13.

In alchemy the egg stands for the chaos apprehended by the artifex, the prima materia containing the captive world-soul. Out of the egg — symbolized by the round cooking vessel — will rise the eagle or phoenix, the liberated soul, which is ultimately identical with the Anthropos who was imprisoned in the embrace of Physis. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Alchemy; Page 202.

The reality of evil and its incompatibility with good cleave the opposites asunder and lead inexorably to the crucifixion and suspension of everything that lives. Since ‘the soul is by nature Christian’ this result is bound to come as infallibly as it did in the life of Jesus: we all have to be ‘crucified with Christ,’ i.e., suspended in a moral suffering equivalent to veritable crucifixion. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Alchemy; Paragraph 470.

Every psychic advance of man arises from the suffering of the soul. ~Carl Jung; Psychotherapists or the Clergy; CW 11: Page 497

Instead of being at the mercy of wild beasts, earthquakes, landslides, and inundations, modern man is battered by the elemental forces of his own psyche. This is the World Power that vastly exceeds all other powers on earth. The Age of Enlightenment, which stripped nature and human institutions of gods, overlooked the God of Terror who dwells in the human soul. ~Carl Jung; The Development of Personality.

Whoever carries over into the afternoon the law of the morning, or the natural aim, must pay for it with damage to his soul, just as surely as a growing youth who tries to carry over his childish egoism into adult life must pay for this mistake with social failure. ~Carl Jung; In CW 8: The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche; The Stages of Life; Page 787.

There is nothing without spirit, for spirit seems to be the inside of things … inside is spirit, which is the soul of objects. Whether this is our psyche or the psyche of the universe we don’t know, but if one touches the earth one cannot avoid the spirit. ~Carl Jung; The Vision Seminars; Pages 164-165.

For what is the body? The body is merely the visibility of the soul, the psyche; and the soul is the psychological experience of the body. So it is really one and the same thing. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 355.

This spirit is an autonomous psychic happening, a hush that follows the storm, a reconciling light in the darkness of man’s mind, secretly bringing order into the chaos of his soul. ~Carl Jung; CW 11; Paragraph 260.

The great problem of our time is that we do not understand what is happening to the world. We are confronted with the darkness of our soul, the unconscious. Carl Jung; Letters, Volume 2; Page 590.

I have been compelled, in my investigations into the structure of the unconscious, to make a conceptual distinction between soul and psyche. By psyche I understand the totality of all psychic processes, conscious as well as unconscious. By soul, on the other hand, I understand a clearly demarcated functional complex that can best be described as a “personality.” ~Carl Jung; [Definitions,” CW 6, par. 797]

It would be blasphemy to assert that God can manifest Himself everywhere save only in the human soul. Indeed the very intimacy of the relationship between Cod and the soul automatically precludes any devaluation of the latter. It would be going perhaps too far to speak of an affinity; but at all events the soul must contain in itself the faculty of relation to God, i.e. a correspondence, otherwise a connection could never come about This correspondence is, in psychological terms, the archetype of the God-image [q.v.]” ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Pages 399-400 and Psychology and Alchemy, CW 12, par. 11.

We still attribute to the other fellow all the evil and inferior qualities that we do not like to recognize in ourselves, and therefore have to criticize and attack him, when all that has happened is that an inferior “soul” has emigrated from one person to another. The world is still full of betes noires and scapegoats, just as it formerly teemed with witches and werewolves. ~Carl Jung; Civilization in Transition Page 130.

Whatever explanation or interpretation does to it, we do to our own souls as well, with corresponding results for our own well-being. ~Carl Jung; CW 9; Page 160

The sea is like music, it has all the dreams of the soul within itself and sounds them over. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 369.

People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. They will practice Indian yoga and all its exercises, observe a strict regimen of diet, learn theosophy by heart, or mechanically repeat mystic text from the literature of the whole world – all because they cannot get on with themselves and have not slightest faith that anything useful could ever come out of their own souls. Thus the soul has been turned into a Nazareth Gradually from which nothing good can come. Therefore let us fetch it from the four corners of the earth – the more far-fetched and bizarre it is the better. ~ Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 99.

The mystery of the Eucharist transforms the soul of the empirical man, who is only a part of himself, into his totality, symbolically expressed by Christ. In this sense, therefore, we can speak of the Mass as the rite of the individuation process. ~Carl Jung; Psychology and Religion

The God-image in man was not destroyed by the Fall but was only damaged and corrupted (‘deformed’) and can be restored through God’s grace. The scope of the integration is suggested by the descent of Christ’s soul to hell, its work of redemption embracing even the dead. The psychological equivalent of this is the integration of the collective unconscious which forms an essential part of the individuation process. ~Carl Jung; Aion; Page 39; Para 72.

The dream gives a true picture of the subjective state, while the conscious mind denies that this state exists, or recognizes it only grudgingly ~Carl Jung; Modern Man in Search of a Soul; Page 5.

Nobody should play with analysis as with an easy tool. Those who write superficial and cheap books about the subject are either unconscious of the far-reaching effects of analytical treatment or else ignorant of the real nature of the human soul. ~Carl Jung; Contributions to Analytical Psychology.

Through reflection, “life” and its “soul” are abstracted from Nature and endowed with a separate existence.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Religion, Page 158.

I did not attribute a religious function to the soul, I merely produced the facts which prove that the soul is naturaliter religiosa, i.e., possesses a religious function. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 14.

This primary substance [the chaos] is round (massa globosa, rotundum), like the world and the world-soul; it is in fact the world-soul and the world-substance in one. ~Carl Jung, Aion CW 9 II: §376

Our souls as well as our bodies are composed of individual elements which were all already present in the ranks of our ancestors. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 235.

He [the psychotherapist] is not just working for this particular patient, who may be quite insignificant, but for himself as well and his own soul, and in so doing he is perhaps laying an infinitesimal grain in the scales of humanity’s soul. Small and invisible as this contribution may be, it is yet an opus magnum. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, par. 449.

It was universally believed in the Middle Ages as well as in the Greco-Roman world that the soul is a substance. Indeed, mankind as a whole has held this belief from its earliest beginnings, and it was left for the second half of the nineteenth century to develop a “psychology without the soul.” ~Carl Jung; CW 8; Page 338

Every psychic advance of man arises from the suffering of the soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, par. 497.

I had to understand that I was unable to make the people see what I am after. I am practically alone. There are a few who understand this and that, but almost nobody sees the whole….I have failed in my foremost task: to open people’s eyes to the fact that man has a soul and there is a buried treasure in the field and that our religion and philosophy are in a lamentable state. Quoted by Gerhard Adler in “Aspects of Jung’s Personality,” in Psychological Perspectives 6/1 (Spring 1975), p. 14.

Because they are so closely akin to us and share our unknowingness, I loved all warm-blooded animals who have souls like ourselves and with whom, so I thought, we have an instinctive understanding. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 67.

It is a fact that the body very often apparently survives the soul, often even without a disease.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 437-438.

As far as we know at all there seems to be no immediate decomposition of the soul.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 437-438.

The infantile soul is no tabula rasa at all, as presumed by modern psychology, but the ancient images are always already there a priori.  ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar, Page 369.

Carl Jung never said: “There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own Soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.”

What Dr. Jung said in two separate and unrelated statements was:

People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 99.

If the supreme value (Christ) and the supreme negation (sin) are outside, then the soul is void: its highest and lowest are missing.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 8.

On the contrary it [The Soul] has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

On the contrary it [The Soul] has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

As the eye to the sun, so the soul corresponds to God. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 10.

So long as religion is only faith and outward form, and the religious function is not experienced in our own souls, nothing of any importance has happened. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 12.

If the theologian really believes in the almighty power of God on the one hand and in the validity of dogma on the other, why then does he not trust God to speak in the soul? ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 17.

You see, in spite of being a man in advanced age, you still have a young soul, a lovely anima, and she is confronted with the dangerous lizard. In other words, your soul is threatened by’ chthonic poison. Now this is exactly the situation of our Western mind. We think we can deal with such problems in an almost rationalistic way, by conscious attempts and efforts, imitating Yoga methods and such dangerous stuff, but we forget entirely that first of all we should establish a connection between the higher and the lower regions of our psyche ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages  95-97.

Such a thing is possible only when there is a detachment of the soul from the body. When that takes place and the patient lives on, one can almost with certainty expect a certain deterioration of the character inasmuch as the superior and most essential part of the soul has already left.  Such an experience denotes a partial death.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 435-437.

Do not forget that the original meaning of all letters and numbers was a magical one! Hence the “perils of the soul.”  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 528-529.

The ethical problem of sexual freedom really is enormous and worth the sweat of all noble souls. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 17-19.

There is another possibility, that of the subtle body, a fine material veil of the soul, which cannot exist so to speak without a body.  This is the “corpus glorificationis” (glorified body), the transfigured body, which is our future portion. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Lecture XIV, Page 115.

Mercury is the anima mundi, the soul of the world, and entered matter as an emanation of God, and since then it is concealed in it. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 180.

Therefore the trans-substantiated wine, which becomes the blood of Christ in the Mass, is the anima, that is the soul, of Christ. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 189.

He says directly that man has two lights: the one is the spirit and the other the light of nature. Man has a spirit in order to be able to understand the divine revelation, and a soul in order to recognise the world in the light of nature. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 193.

Intellect does, in fact, harm the soul when it dares to possess itself of the heritage of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 81.

Apparently God the Father is thought of here as the soul, the anima mundi, which is the centre of the world, and which at the same time enfolds the whole world, or rather the universe including the starry heavens. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Page 198.

“Go to the streams of the river Nile and there thou wilt find a stone which has a spirit. Take this stone, divide it and put thy hand inside it and draw out its heart: for its soul is in its heart.” ~Ostanes cited by Carl Jung, ETH, Page 205.

And this being has body, soul and spirit, and is, therefore, the principle of life itself, as well as the principle of individuation. Its nature is spiritual, it cannot be seen, and it contains an invisible image. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 221.

Psychologically this means that the souls of the ancestors (potential factors, qualities, talents, possibilities, and so on, which we have inherited from all the lines of our ancestry) are waiting in the unconscious and are ready at any time to begin a new growth. ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 230.

These are, so to speak, the re-animated souls of the ancestors which have been lying dormant in the unconscious, and the alchemists call these units or souls the sleepers or the dead in Hades who are resurrected by the “holy waters” (that is the miraculous water of alchemy, the fertilising Mercury). ~Carl Jung, ETH, Alchemy, Page 230.

Thus hun [Animus] means ‘cloud-demon,’ a higher ‘breath-soul’ belonging to the yang principle and therefore masculine. After death, hun rises upward and becomes shen, the ‘expanding and self-revealing’ spirit or god. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 114.

‘Anima’, called p’o, and written with the characters for ‘white’ and for ‘demon’, that is, ‘white ghost’, belongs to the lower, earth-bound, bodily soul, the yin principle, and is therefore feminine. After death, it sinks downward and becomes kuei (demon), often explained as the ‘one who returns’ (i.e. to earth), a revenant, a ghost.  ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 114.

In any case, animus (hun) is the light, yang-soul, while anima (p’o) is the dark, yin-soul. ~Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 16.

If man does not reverence and submit to the unconscious, which created his consciousness, he loses his soul, that is, he loses his connection with soul and unconscious. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures, Page 214.

He has a secret purpose: to free the world soul (the Deus absconditus) bound in matter.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture V. Page 166.

Where there are no forms and ceremonies, rites in which they can express their souls, people become moody and caught in conflicts. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27Jan1939, Pages 69.

I do not know why India was not able to keep Buddhism, but I think probably its present polytheistic religion is a better expression of the Indian soul today than the one perfect Buddha.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27Jan1939, Pages 69.

If we seek our connection with the snake we come to the spinal cord and that points to the animal soul of man which leads him down into the darkness of the body, into the instinct which one meets in animal form in the outer world. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 8March1935, Pages 199-200.

Complexes can also be called fragmentary souls. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 1May1935, Pages 201.

They [Intuitives] draw the souls out of things and act according to what they discover by this process, just as if what they discovered were ordinary every day facts. ~Carl Jung, Lecture IV, 18May1934, Page 102.

I am personally of the opinion that not only people, but even animals have souls. I am also deeply convinced of the truth of all creeds. No logical standard of comparison exists, they all contain genuine and real psychological experience and it is merely stupid to criticize them with the aim of establishing one truth. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture III, Page 18.

[Soul:] “Tame your impatience. Only waiting will help you here.” [I:] “Waiting-I know this word. Hercules also found waiting troublesome when he carried the weight of the world on his shoulders.” [Soul:] “He had to await Atlas’s return and carried the weight of the world for the sake of the apples” ~The Black Books, Page 60.

By psyche I understand the totality of all psychic processes, conscious as well as unconscious. By soul, on the other hand, I understand a clearly demarcated functional complex that can best be described as a “personality.” ~Carl Jung; [Definitions,” CW 6, par. 797]

If the supreme value (Christ) and the supreme negation (sin) are outside, then the soul is void: its highest and lowest are missing.  ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 8.

As the eye to the sun, so the soul corresponds to God. Since our conscious mind does not comprehend the soul it is ridiculous to speak of the things of the soul in a patronizing or depreciatory manner. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 11.

Too few people have experienced the divine image as the innermost possession of their own souls. ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy, Page 12.

My whole life I have worked to know the soul and these people [Valentinian Gnostics] already knew it. ~Carl Jung to Gilles Quispel, Meeting with Jung, Page 150.

Being that has soul is living being. Soul is the living thing in [us], which lives of itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Par. 56.

When we suffer from lack of psychic energy, we say we have a depression or an inhibition, not realising that part of our mental hierarchy has one away beyond our control, that we have, in fact, lost our soul. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Seminar, Page 13.

She is legendary, that is to say, the anima-fact is unknown, the anima is that part of the soul which is unknown to our age. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Seminar, Page 25.

But the real anima of a man is shown by psychological experience to be like the primitive idea of soul; something between earth and heaven, as black as it is white; ghostlike; ill defined. ~Carl Jung, Cornwall Lecture, Page 25.

The “Soul” which accrues to ego-consciousness during the Opus has a feminine character in the man and a masculine character in a woman.  His anima wants to reconcile and unite; her animus tries to discern and discriminate. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Par. 522.

Actually the word adhista in Elgonyi means sun as well as God, although they deny that the sun is God. Only the moment when it rises is mungu or adhista. Spittle and breath mean soul-substance. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 411.

The first beginnings of all analytical treatment of the soul are to be found in its prototype, the confessional. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Par 123.

Archetypes are images in the soul that represent the course of one’s life. One part of the archetypal content is of material and the other of spiritual origin. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski, Page 21.

God the Father became the Son and His own soul, the Word that became flesh. Each son of God must awaken this new reality in himself. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski, Page 42.

On the contrary it [The Soul] has the dignity of an entity endowed with consciousness of a relationship to Deity. Even if it were only the relationship of a drop of water to the sea … ~Carl Jung, CW 12, Page 10.

Language is originally and essentially nothing but a system of signs or symbols, which denote real occurrences, or their echo in the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Page 15.

I am an orphan, alone; nevertheless I am found everywhere. I am one but opposed to myself. I am youth and old man at one and the same time. I have known neither father nor mother, because I have had to be fetched out of the deep like a fish or fell like a white stone from heaven. In woods and mountains I roam, but I am hidden in the innermost soul of man. I am mortal for everyone, yet I am not touched by the cycle of eons. ~Carl Jung, Quoting an Alchemical Text, MDR 227.

If you prove receptive to this “call of the wild,” the longing for fulfilment will quicken the sterile wilderness of your soul as rain quickens the dry earth. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 190.

Although there is no way to marshal valid proof of continuance of the soul after death, there are nevertheless experiences which make us thoughtful. I take them as hints, and do not presume to ascribe to them the significance of insights. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 312.

Considering that the light of Christ is accompanied by the “dark night of the soul” that St. John of the Cross spoke about, and by what the Gnostics of lrenaeus called the umbra Christi, which is identical with the chthonic aspect mentioned above, the life of Christ is identical in us, from the psychological point of view, with the unconscious tendency toward individuation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 268.

I quite agree with you that those people in our world who have insight and good will enough should concern themselves with their own “souls” more than with preaching to the masses or trying to find out the best way for them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 549-550

I’m inclined to believe that something of the human soul remains after death, since already in this conscious life we have evidence that the psyche exists in a relative space and in a relative time, that is in a relatively non-extended and eternal state. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 29-30.

I am not engaged in philosophy, but merely in thinking within the framework of the special task that is laid upon me: to be a proper psychiatrist, a healer of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 69-71

God is something unknowable. An old German mystic has said: “God is a sigh in our souls.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 86-87.

Every country or people has its own angel, just as the earth has a soul. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 432.

The dream of the horse represents the union with the animal soul, which you have missed for a long time. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 145-146

People hate the human soul; it is nothing but “psychological.” They don’t understand that it has needs, and they throw its treasures into the street without understanding them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 208-210.

Transitions between the aeons always seem to have been melancholy and despairing times, as for instance the collapse of the Old Kingdom in Egypt (“The Dialogue of a World; Weary Man with His Soul”) between Taurus and Aries, or the melancholy of the Augustinian age between Aries and Pisces. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 229-230

Knowing more about the soul and its mysteries you could free yourself from the fascination which makes you suffer. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 402.

The soul is father and mother of all the apparently unanswerable difficulties that are building themselves up into the heavens before our eyes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 497-498

I own the first English edition of Bohme’s 40 Questions Concerning the Soul, 1647. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 465-466

“My dear Dr. Jung, Father Victor’s beloved soul has returned to God. He died this morning between 11- 12 a.m. from a sudden thrombosis. He was fully awake, and praying before he became unconscious, and they say he had no great pain.” ~The Mother Prioress, 8 May 1960.

The outer opposition is an image of my inner opposition. Once I realize this, I remain silent and think of the chasm of antagonism in my soul. Outer oppositions are easy to overcome. They indeed exist, but nevertheless you can be united with yourself. They will indeed burn and freeze your soles, but only your soles. It hurts, but you continue and look toward distant goals. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 279.

As you know, Plato laid down the principle that it is impossible to look at something ugly without taking something of it into the soul, and it is equally impossible to be in contact with what is beautiful without reacting to it. ~Carl Jung, 1925 Seminar, Page 10

The author shows an amazingly sympathetic knowledge of the introvert of the thinking type, and hardly less for the other types. Jung has revealed the inner kingdom of the soul marvelously well and has made the signal discovery of the value of phantasy.  His book has a manifold reach and grasp, and many reviews with quite different subject matter could be written about it.” ~Sonu Shamdasani, Introduction 1925 Seminar, Page xi

On August 22, 1922, Jaime de Angulo wrote to Chauncey Goodrich issuing “a challenge to all brother-neurotics—go, my brethren, go to the Mecca, I mean to Zürich, and drink from the fountain of life, all ye who are dead in your souls, go and seek new life.” ~Sonu Shamdasani, Introduction 1925 Seminar, Page xv

I was especially interested in palaeontology; you see, my life work in historical comparative psychology is like palaeontology. That is the study of the archetypes of the animals, and this is the study of the archetypes in the soul. The Eohippus is the archetype of the modern horse, the archetypes are like the fossil animals. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking; Interviews and Encounters, Pages 205-218

The dream is a little hidden door in the innermost and most secret recesses of the soul, opening into that cosmic night which was psyche long before there was any ego consciousness, and which will remain psyche no matter how far our ego-consciousness extends. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Pages 144-145

One might almost say that man himself, or his innermost soul, is the prisoner or the protected inhabitant of the mandala ~Carl Jung, CW 11, par. 157).

Thinking is an act of the soul whereby it becomes conscious of itself and of other things outside itself. ~Carl Jung; Symbols of Transformation; Page 11, Footnote 2.

But the soul suffers great need, since outer freedom is of no use to it.  ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 311.

But humankind is masculine and feminine, not just man or woman. You can hardly say of your soul what sex it is. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 263.

But if you pay close attention, you will see that the most masculine man has a feminine soul, and the most feminine woman has a masculine soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 263.

The outer opposition is an image of my inner opposition. Once I realize this, I remain silent and think of the chasm of antagonism in my soul.  ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 279.

Soul and body are not two things. They are one. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 355

Natural life is the nourishing of the Soul ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 800.

The animus when on his way, on his quest, is really a psychopompos, leading the soul back to the stars whence it came. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1229

On the way back out of the existence in the flesh, the psychopompos [Animus] develops such a cosmic aspect, he wanders among the constellations, he leads the soul over the rainbow bridge into the blossoming fields of the stars. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1229

In the redemption of the individual, the whole past will be redeemed, and that includes all the inferior things as well, the animals, and all the ancestral souls, everything that has not been completed; all creation will be redeemed in the apokatastasis [at the time of the Last Judgement], there will be a complete restoration of things as they have been. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1280

When someone is able to perform the art of touching on the archetypal, he can play on the souls of people like on the strings of a piano. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dream Seminar, Page 150

But my eyes were opened, and I saw that you are a lover of your soul, who anxiously and jealously guards its treasure. Carl Jung to Philemon, The Red Book, Page 315

All knowledge of the psyche is itself psychic; in spite of all this the soul is the only experient of life and existence. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Para 344.

People accuse psychology of dealing in squalid fantasies, and yet even a cursory glance at ancient religions and the history of morals should be sufficient to convince them of the demons hidden in the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Para 106

The soul gives birth to images that from the rational standpoint of consciousness are assumed to be worthless.  And so they are, in the sense that they cannot immediately be turned to account in the objective world. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 426

Just as the unconscious world of mythological images speaks indirectly, through the experience of external things, to the man who surrenders wholly to the outside world, so the real world and its demands find their way indirectly to the man who has surrendered wholly to the soul; for no man can escape both realities. ~Carl Jung, CW  6, Para 280

It should never be forgotten—and of this the Freudian school must be reminded—that morality was not brought down on tables of stone from Sinai and imposed on the people, but is a function of the human soul, as old as humanity itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 30.

It [Dreams] leads straight to the deepest personal secrets, and is, therefore, an invaluable instrument in the hand of the physician and educator of the soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 25

The deposit of man’s whole ancestral experience—so rich in emotional imagery—of father, mother, child, husband and wife, of the magic personality, of dangers to body and soul, has exalted this group of archetypes into the supreme regulating principles of religious and even of political life, in unconscious recognition of their tremendous psychic power. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 337

Childhood is important not only  because various warpings of instinct have their origin there, but because this is the time when, terrifying or encouraging, those far-seeing dreams and images appear before the soul of the child, shaping his whole destiny, as well as those retrospective intuitions which reach back far beyond the range of childhood experience into the life of our ancestors. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 98

It is the world of water, where all life floats in suspension; where the realm of the sympathetic system, the soul of everything living, begins; where I am indivisibly this and that; where I experience the other in myself and the other-than myself experiences me. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 45.

The souls or spirits of the dead are identical with the psychic activity of the living; they merely continue it. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 38

They [Religions] express the whole range of the psychic problem in mighty images; they are the avowal and recognition of the soul, and at the same time the revelation of the soul’s nature. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 367

For when the soul vanished at death, it was not lost; in that other world it formed the living counterpole to the state of death in this world. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Para 493

Enlightenment, which stripped nature and human institutions of gods, overlooked the God of Terror who dwells in the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 17, Para 302

Therefore our Lord himself is a healer; he is a doctor; he heals the sick and he deals with the troubles of the soul; and that is exactly what we call psychotherapy.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 370

It seems to me to be the Holy Spirit’s task and charge to reconcile and unite the opposites in the human individual through a special development of the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1553

But when we penetrate the depths of the soul and when we try to understand its mysterious life, we shall discern that death is not a meaningless end, the mere vanishing into nothingness—it is an accomplishment, a ripe fruit on the tree of life. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

But if we listen to the quieter voices of our deeper nature we become aware of the fact that soon after the middle of our life the soul begins its secret work, getting ready for the departure. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

Alchemy represents the projection of a drama both cosmic and spiritual in laboratory terms. The opus magnum [the great work] had two aims: the rescue of the human soul and the salvation of the cosmos. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking, Page 228

With her cunning play of illusions the soul lures into life the inertness of matter that does not want to live. She makes us believe incredible things, that life may be lived. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

Were it not for the leaping and twinkling of the soul, man would rot away in his greatest passion, idleness. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

But to have soul is the whole venture of life, for soul is a life-giving daemon who plays his elfin game above and below human existence, for which reason-in the realm of dogma he is threatened and propitiated with superhuman punishments and blessings that go far beyond the possible deserts of human beings.  ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

Heaven and hell are the fates meted out to the soul and not to civilized man, who in his nakedness and timidity would have no idea of what to do with himself in a heavenly Jerusalem. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Pages 26-27

If you have committed a mistake at all, it consisted in your having striven too hard to understand your wife completely and not reckoning with the fact that in the end people don’t want to know what secrets are slumbering in their souls. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 27.

Have your congregation understood that they must close their ears to the traditional teachings and go through the darknesses of their own souls and set aside everything in order to become that which every individual bears in himself as his individual task, and that no one can take this burden from him?  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 76.

These constituents of the personality—which one may call functions, or Mendelian units, or the primitives would call them remnants of ancestral —these constituents don’t always fit. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 453

Probably in absolute reality there is no such thing as body and mind, but body and mind or soul are the same, the same life, subject to the same laws, and what the body does is happening in the mind. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 20

It is death to the soul to become unconscious. People die before there is death of the body, because there is death in the soul. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 90.

You can succeed in going away from your problems, you need only to look away

from them long enough. You may escape, but it is the death of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Dream Analysis, Page 90.

I loved the old man

who touched my

life with outstretched

hand

and left his

mark

upon my soul.

[Gilda Franz, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff: A Collection of Remembrances]

A man likes to believe that he is master of his soul. ~Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols, Page 83.

Your dream unquestionably refers to the archetypal problem of the extrusion of the soul from the body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 306-307

One is forced to conclude ‘that in your case the soul is only loosely seated in your body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 306-307

However, the friendly lion in the dream seems to indicate that the looseness of the soul is not exactly desirable, since the lion compensates your condition in a very obvious way: the Zurich lion  represents your localized instinct, firmly rooted in your earth, just as the lion’s soul-as with all animals -is securely fixed in its body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 306-307

We find the idea of the soul as the form giving principle already in the Middle Ages, it is the soul which forms the body and the outer life. So in meditating on the Anima Christi you are meditating on Christ’s form. The same idea is to be found in the East. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture17th Nov 1939

Rama Krishna is not worshipped; his photograph is there to remind the worshippers of his form. This is, therefore, totally different to the worship of Christ but the basic ide a of soul as form is common to both. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture ETH Lecture17th Nov 1939

It is a great blessing for mankind when the soul is contained in the dogma and there is always a great deal of misery when this is not the case. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27 Jan 1939

Where there are no forms and ceremonies, rites in which they can express their souls, people become moody and caught in conflicts. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 27 January 1939

No, the Virgin was the archetypal figure of the soul of man, the anima, and it is only in the soul of man that God can be born, where else could it be? ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 32