Until now I have smoked 1 pipe with water condensation on beginning work in the morning, a miniature cigar after lunch, equal to 1-2 cigarettes, another pipe at 4 o’clock, after supper another little cigar, and generally another pipe about 9:30. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 103.

For a time I faithfully observed the rigorous rules of abstinence until my impatience drove me again to a few pipes . Of the 2 evils the pipe seems to me the lesser. Everything went very well from the moment I gave up the digitalis . . ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 105

Although I have never made a statistique of this kind I have always been impressed by the fact that pipe-smokers are usually introverted. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 564-565

The typical extravert is too much of a busybody to bother and fuss with the pipe which demands infinitely more nursing than a cigarette that can be lighted or thrown away in a second. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages, 564-565

That does not prevent me from having found heavy cigarette-smokers among my introverts and not a few pipe-smokers among the extraverts, but normally with empty pipes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 564-565

Now and then Jung prepared his own mixture [Tobacco] – a solemn performance at which I had to assist. ~Aniela Jaffe, From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 88

The mixture [Tobacco] was kept in a dark bronze box, which for some unaccountable reason bore the name “Habbakuk.” ~Aniela Jaffe, From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 88

Jung was no cigarette smoker, but after luncheon he allowed himself a Brazilian cigar, which he would offer also to his friends. ~Aniela Jaffe, From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 88

I had to see that the supply of cigarillos called “Grüner Heinrich” did not run out. ~Aniela Jaffe, From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 88

Occasionally he smoked a Brissago, or a strange, snake-like, dark, exotic cigar the name of which I unfortunately never learned. ~Aniela Jaffe, From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 88

Smoking was one of the pleasures of the day. “A little tobacco assists concentration and contributes to one’s peace of mind,” was his justification to his doctor. ~Aniela Jaffe, From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung, Page 88

“Jung smoked a water-cooled pipe.” “By choice he smoked Granger tobacco.” ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 129.
 
The [Tobacco] mixture was kept in a dark bronze box, which for some unaccountable reason bore the name “Habbakuk.” ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 129.
 
Jung was no cigarette smoker, but after luncheon he allowed himself a Brazilian cigar, which he would offer also to his friends. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 129.
 
He [Jung] had grown thinner but that was mainly due to their forced vegetarian diet and lack of fat. He could smoke and they still had decent tobacco. If she could send something like English tobacco or “Granger” from the United States, however, it would be most welcome. ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 40