Psychology of Yoga and Meditation

Quotations from the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali as found in Carl Jung’s “Psychology Yoga Meditation”:

Ignorance is misperceiving permanence in transience, purity in impurity, pleasure in suffering, an essential self where there is no self. [YS 2.5, p. 45]

 From perfect discipline of the heart, one has full consciousness of one’s thought. [YS 3.4, p. 67]

 Knowledge of the past and future comes from perfect discipline of the three transformations of thought. [YS 3.16, p. 64]

 … knowledge of the cries of all creatures comes through perfect discipline of the distinctions between them. [YS 3.17, p. 64]

 … one has knowledge of former births. [YS 3.18, p. 64]

 Through direct perception of the cognitive process, one has knowledge of the thoughts of others. [YS 3.19, p. 64]

 From perfect discipline of the strength of an animal such as an elephant, one gains that strength. [YS 3.24, p.66]

 “When each sense organ severs contact with its objects, withdrawal of the senses corresponds to the intrinsic form of thought. From this comes complete control of the senses” [YS 2.54–55, p. 59].

 Ignorance is the field where the other forces of corruption develop, … [YS 2.4, p. 45]

 Ignorance is misperceiving permanence in transience, purity in impurity, pleasure in suffering, an essential self where there is no self [YS 2.5, p. 45].

 “Worldly experience is caused by a failure to differentiate between the lucid quality [sattva-guna] of nature [prakriti] and the spirit [purusha]. From perfect discipline of the distinction between spirit as the subject of itself and the lucid quality of nature as a dependent object, one gains knowledge of the spirit.” [YS 3.35, p. 68]

 From perfect discipline of the receptive, intrinsic, egoistic, relational, and purposive functions of the sense organs, one attains mastery over them. [YS 3.47, p. 71]

 From perfect discipline of moments and their sequence in time, one has the knowledge born of discrimination. [YS 3.52, p. 72]

 From this one acquires quickness of mind, perception without the aid of the senses, and mastery over primordial matter. [YS 3.48, p. 71]

 From perfect discipline of moments and their sequence in time, one has the knowledge born of discrimination. [YS 3.52, p. 72]

 Through discrimination one comprehends differences of origin, characteristic, or position that distinguish two seemingly similar things. [YS 3.53, p. 73]

 One who sees the distinction between the lucid quality of nature and the observer ceases to cultivate a personal reality. [YS 4.25, p. 80]

 Then, deep in discrimination, thought gravitates toward freedom. [YS 4.26, p. 80]

 This infinite knowledge means an end to the sequence of transformations in material things, their purpose now fulfilled. [YS 4.32, p. 82]

 Sequence corresponds to a series of moments perceivable at the end of a process of transformation. [YS 4.33, p. 83]

 Freedom is a reversal of the evolutionary course of material things, which are empty of meaning for the spirit; it is also the power of consciousness in a state of true identity. [YS 4.34, p. 83]