The Catholic Church is liberal enough to look upon the Osiris-Horus-Isis myth, or at any rate suitable portions of it, as a prefiguration of the Christian legend of salvation. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Paragraph 178.

There is also a connection with the symbolism of Horus: On the one hand we have Christ enthroned with the four emblems of the evangelists three animals and an angel; on the other, we have Father Horus with his four sons, or Osiris with the four sons of Horus (fig. 102).

Horus is also the (rising sun), and Christ was still worshipped as such by the early Christians. ~Carl Jung, CW 12 Para 314

Formulas and prayers are repeated four times, etc.

It is evident from this that the quaternity was of special importance for the dead man: the four sons of Horus had to see to it that the four parts (i.e., the wholeness) of the body were preserved.

Horus begot his sons with his mother Isis.

The incest motif, which was continued in Christian tradition and extended into late medieval alchemy, thus begins far back in Egyptian antiquity.

The four sons of Horus are often shown standing on a lotus before their grandfather Osiris: ~Carl Jung, CW 13 Para 360

The analogy with the vision of Ezekiel (chapters 1 and 10) is at once apparent.

There the four cherubim had “the likeness of a man.”

Each of them had four faces, a man’s, a lion’s, an ox’s, and an eagle’s, so that, as with the four sons of Horus, one quarter was human and three quarters animal.

In the love-magic of Astrampsychos, on the other hand, all four forms are animal, probably because of the magic purport of the incantation ~Carl Jung, CW 13 Para 361

The four wings of the cherubim recall the winged female genies who protect the coffin of Pharaoh.

Each of the Horus sons had a female counterpart who fulfilled this same tutelary function.

The cherubim, too, were protective genies, as is apparent from Ezekiel 28:14 and 16.

The apotropaic significance of the quaternity is borne out by Ezekiel 9:4, where the prophet, at the behest of the Lord, sets a cross on the foreheads of the righteous to protect them from punishment.

It is evidently the sign of God, who himself has the attribute of quaternity.

The cross is the mark of his protégés.

As attributes of God and also symbols in their own right, the quaternity and the cross signify wholeness ~Carl Jung, CW 13 Para 363

Mandala means “circle,” more especially a magic circle. Mandalas are found not only throughout the East but also among us.

The early Middle Ages are especially rich in Christian mandalas; most of them show Christ in the centre, with the four evangelists, or their symbols, at the cardinal points.

This conception must be a very ancient one, because Horus and his four sons were represented in the same way by the Egyptians.

It is known that Horus with his four sons has close connections with Christ and the four evangelists. ~Carl Jung, CW 13, Para 31

A remarkable instance of this can be found in the Eleusinian mysteries, which were finally suppressed in the beginning of the seventh century of the Christian era.

They expressed, together with the Delphic oracle, the essence and spirit of ancient Greece.

On a much greater scale, the Christian era itself owes its name and significance to the antique mystery of the god-man, which has its roots in the archetypal Osiris-Horus myth of ancient Egypt. ~Carl Jung; Man and His Symbols; Page 68.

The point is that she touches here upon the archetype of mother love, the mother with child.

That is the archetype which underlies the Christian idea.

As you know, Isis and Osiris were often taken for Christian symbols.

The analogy between the Horus-Isis myth and the Jesus mystery was so obvious that the Catholic church was really forced to account for it by the official teaching that the whole Horus myth was a legitimate anticipation of the coming of Christ; God allowed that good news to filter through several thousand years before it actually came off. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 65

You know the dove is relatively weak and harmless, but the hawk is a wicked bird of prey.

Yet it is also a divine bird, it is the bird of Horus, the Egyptian Christ, and the official Catholic teaching is that the Egyptian myth was an anticipation of Christ. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 135-136

Miss Wolff In Catholic churches one often sees the Trinity with the eye of God in the center.

Dr. Jung: Yes, you see that in every Catholic church practically.

It is the eye of Horus again.

It is the creative eye that sees everything and creates everything. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 307

The spiritual contents of the cult of Attis, for instance, and of Mithra, and of the Great Mother, were taken over into Christianity.

The Great Mother became first Isis and then Mother Mary.

And Horus, and the old Asiatic priest-kings, and the Roman emperor, were all sons of God; those mystical kings were kings by the grace of God. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 536

In medieval manuscripts, usually of an early time, the seventh or eighth century—well, I know one that is even twelfth century—the Evangelists appear as human figures with animal heads, exactly like the four sons of Horus. ~Carl Jung, Dream Symbols of the Individuation Process, Page 271