Black Books

 

On January 5, 1922, Jung’s soul advised as follows:

“You should not break up a marriage, namely the marriage with me, no person should supplant me, least of all Toni. I want to rule alone.”

“You must let Toni go until she has found herself and is no longer a burden to you.”

On the next day, his soul elucidated the symbolic significance of the relations between Jung, Emma Jung, and Toni Wolff in terms of Egyptian mythology. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

She [Toni Wolff] felt that his fame and success were increasingly taking him away from her and resented “his works, ideas, patients, lectures, E. [Emma], children.”

This was cause for bitterness:

“Again some resistance, when I think how he realized all his famous ideas through the relationship with me (which he only admits occasionally) and how famous he is now, and that E. is with him instead of me, and how I can never accompany him there.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 97

On November 25, 1922, Jung, Emma Jung, and Toni Wolff left the Club. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 82

Jung had some powerful experiences: on June 27, 1917, he wrote to Emma Jung that three days prior, he was on Pointe de Cray (a mountain just northwest of Chateau d’Oex),

“It was a glorious day.

On the summit I had a wonderful ecstatic feeling. Last evening I had a most remarkable mystical experience, a feeling of connection of many millennia.

It was like a transfiguration.

Today I’m probably going down to hell again for this.

I want to cling to you, since you are my center, a symbol of the human, a protection against all daimons.”

This letter underscores the centrality of Emma Jung in his life. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 68-69

A critical chapter in Jung’s self-experimentation was what he termed the integration of the anima.

Toni Wolff saw this as one side of the story, as it also involved the process by which he had “introjected” her. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 95

In 1944, apropos a dream, she [Toni] noted that Jung placed undue stress on the subjective level, “because he had to realize the anima, but he thereby introjected me and took my substance.”  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 95

On January 5, 1922, Jung’s soul advised as follows:

“You should not break up a marriage, namely the marriage with me, no person should supplant me, least of all Toni. I want to rule alone.”

“You must let Toni go until she has found herself and is no longer a burden to you.”

On the next day, his soul elucidated the symbolic significance of the relations between Jung, Emma Jung, and Toni Wolff in terms of Egyptian mythology. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

In contrast to a marriage, Toni Wolff saw her relationship with Jung as an “individual relation.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

Marriage is socially, legally, psychologically accepted. Nothing new can come from there; it can only be transformed, also individually, through individual relationships. That is why the individual relationship is a symbol of the soul.  ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

On September 13, 1925, she [Toni] noted that their [w/Jung] relationship stood under the “sign of Philemon.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

What C. [Jung] has achieved now is all based on me.

Through my faith, love, understanding and loyalty I have kept him and brought him out.

I was his mirror, as he told me right at the beginning. / But my entire feeling, phantasy, mind, energy, responsibility worked for him.

I have an effect-but I don’t have substance. I didn’t know how to “play.”

I gave him his life. Now he should give me mine and be a mirror to me. ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

“Through my medial side, I am like C.’s hollow form and therefore I always wanted to be filled in by him.” ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

On April 10, 1926, she [Toni] noted, “Had a psychological scurvy through C.’s absence of vitamin C.

“It is the same with me as with the Elgonyi: C . is not only vitamin. Also, when I am with him the rising sun is good, relaxing, everything destructive has gone. When I am on my own, it eats away at me.”  The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96-97

She [Toni Wolff] felt that his fame and success were increasingly taking him away from her and resented “his works, ideas, patients, lectures, E. [Emma], children.”

This was cause for bitterness:

“Again some resistance, when I think how he realized all his famous ideas through the relationship with me (which he only admits occasionally) and how famous he is now, and that E. is with him instead of me, and how I can never accompany him there.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 97

In dedicated copies of his books, Jung gave private acknowledgment of her involvement.

Her copy of Psychological Types bears the dedication:

This book, as you know, has come to me from that world which you [Toni] have brought to me.

Only you know out of which misery it was born and in which spirit it was written.

I put it in your hands as a sign of gratitude, which I cannot express through words ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 97

Likewise, her [Toni’s] copy of Psychology and Alchemy (1944) bears a dedication to his “soror mystica.”

In public, he acknowledged her active role in all the phases of analytical psychology in his introduction to her collected papers.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 97

“Introduction to Toni Wolff, Studies in C.G. Jung’s Psychology” (1959 ) , CW 10, 887

Last evening I had a most remarkable mystical experience, a feeling of connection of many millennia. It was like a transfiguration.

Today I’m probably going down to hell again for this.

I want to cling to you [Emma Jung], since you are my center, a symbol of the human, a protection against all daimons. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 69

At the same time, Emma Jung continued to play a central role in Jung’s life.

She ran the household, raised their children, and maintained the human dimension for him, while also facilitating and accompanying him in his self-experimentation. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

In 1910, she [Emma] began an analysis with Jung, and she worked with Leonhard Seif in 191197 and later with Hans Trub (who was married to Toni Wolff’s sister Susanne). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

She [Emma] played an active role in the Association for Analytical Psychology and later practiced analysis, also studying physics, mathematics, Greek, and Latin. the languages later enabled her (in contrast to Toni Wolff) to accompany Jung in his explorations into alchemy. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

She [Emma] undertook her own research, which culminated in her work on the Grail legend.

From around 1914, she began to do active imagination in the form of dialogues, paintings, and poems. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

Ximena Roelli de Angulo, Cary Baynes’s daughter, recalled,

“I think that Emma must have always played just as large a part in his creative life as Toni did- just a different part” (interview with Gene Nameche, Jung biographical archive, CLM, p. 54). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 34

Emma Jung commented,

“The concept of God does precisely not match a known image or an imago,” to which Jung replied,

“That is already the case with the primitives (the God is not the father, but the Grandfather, etc.).

This shows that it is not a revaluation of the father and that it is only concept by proxy that could be replaced by any other.

God is everything that is xx and creates emotion.” ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 280, fn 417

Jung also painted two portraits of Phanes, giving one to Emma Jung and one to Toni Wolff (The Art of C. G. Jung, cats. 50, 51, pp. 122–23).

Phanes also figures in two further paintings (Ibid., cats. 52, 53, pp. 124–25). In cat. 53, the background figures on the left and right respectively are Ka and Philemon. ~Carl Jung, Vol. VI, Page 277, fn 267

A triumvirate, you, Emma, and Toni, the symbolic bearers, the Egyptian symbol, indicated in the word “FANDRAGYPTI,” pheasant of the Egyptians, Isis, Osiris, Nephthys.

Nephthys-Toni therefore receives both the fish, i.e., the night or unconscious side.

Both the fish fertilize the mother and cause the birth, the Christian-Antichristian follows behind as the afterbirth.

This prediction is good. You can calm down. ~Jung Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 215

Dream: Emma, the 2 oldest daughters and I are sort of guests of a rich peasant in southern Siberia or South Africa.

He practices ostrich breeding. low thatched building.

I prepare a lemonade with ice to combat the heat. Emma reaches with her hand into it and spills the stuff.

I am furious and throw all the glasses against the wall.

They don’t break but fall like a rubber ball to the ground. I leave the room and go into a type of barn.

There is a low wide table, on which remarkably old books lie.

I take one in brown leather: “Acta Thomasina.”

The pages are of brown pressed leather. In the middle of each page is an archaic figure of a prophet with his words in hieroglyphic signs alongside. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 202

On September 20, 1910, at the age of twenty-three, Toni Wolff was brought by her mother to see Jung

According to her sister Erna, he had successfully treated the son of a friend of her mother’s, who consequently recommended Jung. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 27-28

In November 1912, Jung returned from his New York lectures.

In a diary entry of December 29, 1924, Toni Wolff noted that twelve years before, on Jung’s return from America, she went to him and “spoke of relationship.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 29

In the November 15, 1913, entry in Book 2, following his account of the dream around December 1912 of the dove that transformed itself into a small girl and then back into the dove, Jung noted, “My decision was made. I

had to give all my faith and trust to this woman [Toni].” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 29

In March 1913 he went to America again for five weeks.

Decades later, Toni Wolff noted in her diary,

“The feeling is somehow similar to 1913, when C[arl] went to America and we separated-and yet we couldn’t do it afterward.”

This suggests a separation may have taken place at this time. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 29-30

Years later, Jung spoke to Aniela Jaffe concerning the relationship with Toni Wolff He said that he was faced with the problem of what to do with her after her analysis, which he said he had ended, despite feeling involved with her.

A year later, he dreamed that they were together in the Alps in a valley of rocks, and that he heard elves singing, and that she was disappearing into a mountain, which filled him with dread.

After this, he wrote to her. He noted that after this dream, he knew that a relationship with her was unavoidable, and that his life was in danger.

On a later occasion, while swimming, he found himself with a cramp and vowed that if it went away and he survived, he would give in to the relationship. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

In a diary entry of March 4, 1944, Toni Wolff referred to “31 years of relationship and 34 years of acquaintance.”

This confirms that her relationship with Jung began sometime in 1913. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

At the beginning of her analysis T.W. had the most incredible fantasies, a whole eruption of the wildest fantasies , some even of cosmic nature.

But at that point I was so preoccupied with my own material that I was scarcely able to take on hers.

But her fantasies entered exactly into my line of thought. ~Aniela Jaffe, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

On April 26, 1936, Wolff noted in her diary:

“I still transfer father symbols onto C.[Jung] That is why I am never entirely with myself and am no counter-weight to him” (Toni Wolff, Diary’ J, p. 101). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30, fn 86

Concerning her attraction to Jung, toward the end of her life Toni Wolff recalled that she had her first transference to Friedrich Schiller, in 1905, then to Goethe, and then to Jung, as a “productive genius.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

When C[arl] begins to participate with my psychic material perhaps I have got what I need- the nurturing and supporting substance?

I suspect myself of having insufficient confidence in him, because my analysis back then was intermingled with his problems- although it was also good for me. ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31

At the inception of their relationship, Toni Wolff was not interested in marriage and having children.

She was critical of what she had observed of marriage: it seemed to make men less active and less enterprising- merely content with being fathers.

It made both men and women less interested in culture. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31

After having children, women often didn’t need their husbands, and their own problems tended to return. Her mother hadn’t learned to work and had consequently plagued her children with unused libido. Toni Wolff was also critical of the bondage of marriage. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31

T. W. was experiencing a similar stream of images.

I had evidently infected her, or was the declencheur [trigger] that stirred up her imagination.

My phantasies and hers were in a participation mystique. It was like a common stream, and a common task.

Gradually I became conscious and gradually I became the center; and in the measure to which I attained these insights, she also found her center.

But then she got stuck somewhere along the way, I remained too much the center that functioned for her.

Therefore I was never permitted to be other than she wanted me to be, or than she needed to have me be.

At that time she was entirely drawn into this terrible process in which I was involved, and she was just as helpless as I was. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31-32

He [Jung] was conscious of the loss of his collaboration with Freud and was indebted to his wife [Emma] for her support. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 15

After that I had this dream around l 1/2 years ago:

I am lying on a bed with my wife [Emma] in a chamber with an open ceiling (similar to the roofless houses of Pompeii.)

All at once my wife startles and climbs the wall rapidly and disappears upward.

She wears a long white dress with mystical figures, such as witches or heretics, who are burnt at the stake. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 160

What you will learn from me you must apply to your wife [Emma].

You also speak to me and don’t know what you have to say, nor what I will say.

You should also speak to her like this, and just as I answer your questions, so also will she answer.

You trust me to speak from myself, why do you not also trust your wife?

Much rather you should trust your wife. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 216