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001 Spirit, like God, denotes an object of psychic experience which cannot be proved to exist in the external world and cannot be understood rationally. This is its meaning if we use the word “spirit” in its best sense.  ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Page 329, par. 626.

After this more general discussion I would now like to come back to the concept of spirit, which we were unable to grasp from our former realistic standpoint.

Spirit, like God, denotes an object of psychic experience which cannot be proved to exist in the external world and cannot be understood rationally.

This is its meaning if we use the word “spirit” in its best sense.

Once we have freed ourselves from the prejudice that we have to refer a concept either to objects of external experience or to a priori

categories of reason, we can turn our attention and curiosity wholly to that strange and still unknown thing we call “spirit.”

It is always useful in such cases to take a glance at the probable etymology of the word, because it often happens that a word’s history throws a surprising light on the nature of the psychic fact underlying it. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Page 329, par. 626.

002 But if you want to go your individual way, it is the way you make for yourself, which is never prescribed, which you do not know in advance, and which simply comes into being of itself when you put one foot in front of the other. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 133

There is no single, definite way for the individual which is prescribed for him or would be the proper one.

If that’s what you want you had best join the Catholic Church where they tell you what’s what.

Moreover this fits in with the average way of mankind.

But if you want to go  your individual way, it is the way you make for yourself, which is never prescribed, which you do not know in advance, and which simply comes into being of itself when you put one foot in front of the other.

If you always do the next thing that needs to be done, you will go most safely and sure-footedly along the path prescribed by your unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 132-133

003 Every transformation demands as its precondition ” the ending of a world” — the collapse of an old philosophy of life. ~Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols, Page 295

Every transformation demands as its precondition ” the ending of a world” — the collapse of an old philosophy of life.

As Dr. Henderson has pointed out earlier in this book, at ceremonies of initiation a youth must suffer a symbolic death before he can be

reborn as a man and be taken into the tribe as a full member.

Thus the scientific, logical attitude of the engineer must collapse to make room for a new attitude. ~Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols, Page 295

 

004 When I comprehended my darkness, a truly magnificent night came over me and my dream plunged me into the depths of the millennia, and rom my phoenix ascended. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 274.

005 Individuation does not shut one out from the world but gathers the world to oneself. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 432.

To one familiar with our psychology, it may seem a waste of time to keep harping on the long-established difference between becoming conscious and the coming-to-be of the self (individuation).

But again and again I note that the individuation process is confused with the coming of the ego into consciousness and that the ego is in consequence identified with the self, which naturally produces a hopeless conceptual muddle.

Individuation is then nothing but ego-centredness and autoeroticism.

But the self comprises infinitely more than a mere ego, as the symbolism has shown from of old.

It is as much one’s self, and all other selves, as the ego. Individuation does not shut one out from the world, but gathers the world to oneself. Individuation does not shut one out from the world but gathers the world to oneself. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 432.

And thus I went out in that night (it was the second night of the year 1914), and anxious expectation filled me.

I went out to embrace the future.

The path was wide and what was to come was awful. It was the enormous dying, a sea of blood.

From it the new sun arose, awful and a reversal of that which we call day

We have seized the darkness and its sun will shine above us, bloody and burning like a great downfall.

When I comprehended my darkness, a truly magnificent night came over me and my dream plunged me into the depths of the millennia, and from it my phoenix ascended. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 274.

006 A symbol does not disguise, it reveals in time. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 483

If the contents of dreams agree with a sex theory, then we know their essence already, but if they are symbolic we at least know that we do not understand them yet.

A symbol does not disguise, it reveals in time.

It is obvious that dream interpretation will yield one result when you consider the dream to be symbolic, and an entirely different one when you assume that the essential thought is merely disguised but already known in principle.

In the latter case, dream interpretation makes no sense whatever, for you find only what you know already.

Therefore I always advise my pupils: “Learn as much as you can about symbolism and forget it all when you are analysing a dream.”

This advice is so important in practice that I myself have made it a rule to admit that I never understand a dream well enough to interpret it correctly.

I do this in order to check the flow of my own associations and reactions, which might otherwise prevail over my patient’s uncertainties and hesitations.

As it is of the highest therapeutic importance for the analyst to get the message of the dream as accurately as possible, it is essential for him

to explore the context of the dream-images with the utmost thoroughness.

I had a dream while I was working with Freud that illustrates this very clearly. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 483

006 A symbol does not disguise, it reveals in time. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 483

If the contents of dreams agree with a sex theory, then we know their essence already, but if they are symbolic we at least know that we do not understand them yet.

A symbol does not disguise, it reveals in time.

It is obvious that dream interpretation will yield one result when you consider the dream to be symbolic, and an entirely different one when you assume that the essential thought is merely disguised but already known in principle.

In the latter case, dream interpretation makes no sense whatever, for you find only what you know already.

Therefore I always advise my pupils: “Learn as much as you can about symbolism and forget it all when you are analysing a dream.”

This advice is so important in practice that I myself have made it a rule to admit that I never understand a dream well enough to interpret it correctly.

I do this in order to check the flow of my own associations and reactions, which might otherwise prevail over my patient’s uncertainties and hesitations.

As it is of the highest therapeutic importance for the analyst to get the message of the dream as accurately as possible, it is essential for him

to explore the context of the dream-images with the utmost thoroughness.

I had a dream while I was working with Freud that illustrates this very clearly. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 483

007 The underlying, primary psychic reality is so inconceivably complex that it can be grasped only at the farthest reach of intuition… ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Para 345

The word “mother,” which sounds so familiar, apparently refers to the best-known, the individual mother—to “my mother.”

But the mother-symbol points to a darker background which eludes conceptual formulation and can only be vaguely apprehended as the hidden, nature-bound life of the body.

Yet even this is too narrow and excludes too many vital subsidiary meanings.

The underlying, primary psychic reality is so inconceivably complex that it can be grasped only at the farthest reach of intuition, and then but

very dimly.

That is why it needs symbols. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Para 345

008

Synchronicity therefore means the simultaneous occurrence of a certain psychic state with one or more external events
which appear as meaningful parallels to the momentary subjective state—and, in certain cases, vice versa.

My two examples illustrate this in different ways. In the case of the scarab the simultaneity is immediately obvious, but not in the second example. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para

 

009 The body is merely the visibility of the Soul. Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Pages 355

Of course, it sounds funny, but I start from the conviction that man has also a living body and if something is true for one side, it must be true for the other.

For what is the body? The body is merely the visibility of the soul, the psyche; and the soul is the psychological experience of the body.

So it is really one and the same thing.

Therefore, a good truth must be true for the whole system, not only for half of it.

According to my imagination, something seems to be good-it f-its in with my imagination-but it proves to be entirely wrong for my body.

And something might apparently be quite nice for the body, but it is very bad for the experience of the soul, and in that case I have a metaphysical enteritis.

So I must be careful to bring the two systems together; the only criterion is that both are balanced.

The body is merely the visibility of the Soul. Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Pages 355

 

010 The transcendent function does not proceed without aim and purpose, but leads to the revelation of the essential man. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 186

The transcendent function does not proceed without aim and purpose, but leads to the revelation of the essential man.

It is in the first place a purely natural process, which may in some cases pursue its course without the knowledge or assistance of the individual, and can sometimes forcibly accomplish itself in the face of opposition.

The meaning and purpose of the process is the realization, in all its aspects, of the personality originally hidden away in the embryonic germ-plasm; the production and unfolding of the original, potential wholeness.

The symbols used by the unconscious to this end are the same as those which mankind has always used to express wholeness, completeness,

and perfection: symbols, as a rule, of the quaternity and the circle.

For these reasons I have termed this the individuation process. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 186

011 It is therefore far better to take things as they come along, with patience and equanimity. ~Carl Jung; C.G. Jung Speaking: Interviews and Encounters, Page 451

The most elusive of intangibles! Be that as it may, one thing is certain: there are as many nights as days, and the one is just as long as the other in the year’s course.

Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word “happy” would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness.

Of course it is understandable that we seek happiness and avoid unlucky and disagreeable chances, despite the fact that reason teaches us that such an attitude is not reasonable because it defeats its own ends—the more you deliberately seek happiness the more sure you are not to find it.

It is therefore far better to take things as they come along, with patience and equanimity.

After all, perhaps once in a while there will be something good, lucky or enjoyable for you in Fortune’s bag of relevant and gifts. ~Carl Jung; C.G. Jung Speaking: Interviews and Encounters, Page 451

 

012 With her cunning play of illusions the soul lures into life the inertness of matter that does not want to live. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 56.

Being that has soul is living being. Soul is the living thing in man, that which lives of itself and causes life … With her cunning play of illusions the soul lures into life the inertness of matter that does not want to live. She makes us believe incredible things, that life may be lived. She is full of snares and traps, in order that man should fall, should reach the earth, entangle himself there, and stay caught … ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 56.

013 The greatest danger about unconsciousness is proneness to suggestion. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Page 247

Most people do not have sufficient range of consciousness to become aware of the opposites inherent in human nature.

The tensions they generate remain for the most part unconscious, but can appear in dreams.

Traditionally, the snake stands for the vulnerable spot in man: it personifies his shadow, i.e., his weakness and unconsciousness.

The greatest danger about unconsciousness is proneness to suggestion.

The effect of suggestion is due to the release of an unconscious the opposites are so to speak united, but with a visible seam or suture, namely the symbol of the hermaphrodite.

This mars the idea of the lapis just as much as the all-too-human element mars Homo sapiens.

In the higher Adam and in the rotundum the opposition is invisible.

But presumably the one stands in absolute opposition to the other, and if both are identical as Indistinguishable transcendental entities, this is one of those paradoxes that are the rule: a statement about something metaphysical can only be antinomial.

The arrangement in the uroboros gives the following picture:

Anthropos-Rotundum

Lapis

Homo

Serpent

This arrangement shows the stronger tension between Anthropos-rotundum and serpens on the one hand, and the lesser dynamic, and the more unconscious this is, the more effective it will be.

Hence the ever-widening split between conscious and unconscious increases the danger of psychic infection and mass psychosis.

With the loss of symbolic ideas the bridge to the unconscious has broken down.

Instinct no longer affords protection against unsound ideas and empty slogans.

Rationality without tradition and without a basis in instinct is proof against no absurdity. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Page 247

014 The creative process, so far as we are able to follow it at all, consists in the unconscious activation of an archetypal image, and in elaborating and shaping this image into the finished work. ~Carl Jung, CW 15, Para 129-130

The impact of an archetype, whether it takes the form of immediate experience or is expressed through the spoken word, stirs us because it summons up a voice that is stronger than our own.

Whoever speaks in primordial images speaks with a thousand voices; he enthralls and overpowers, while at the same time he lifts the idea he is seeking to express out of the occasional and the transitory into the realm of the ever-enduring.

He transmutes our personal destiny into the destiny of mankind, and evokes in us all those beneficent forces that ever and anon have enabled humanity to find a refuge from every peril and to outlive the longest night.

That is the secret of great art, and of its effect upon us.

The creative process, so far as we are able to follow it at all, consists in the unconscious activation of an archetypal image, and in elaborating and shaping this image into the finished work.

By giving it shape, the artist translates it into the language of the present, and so makes it possible for us to find our way back to the deepest springs of life.

Therein lies the social significance of art: it is constantly at work educating the spirit of the age, conjuring up the forms in which the age is most lacking.

The unsatisfied yearning of the artist reaches back to the primordial image in the unconscious which is best fitted to compensate the inadequacy and one-sidedness of the present

The artist seizes on this image, and in raising it from deepest unconsciousness he brings it into relation with conscious values, thereby transforming

it until it can be accepted by the minds of his contemporaries according to their powers. ~Carl Jung, CW 15, Para 129-130

015 The key is this: we must be able to let things happen in the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 90-91

What then did these people do in order to achieve the progress that freed them ?

As far as I could see they did nothing (wu wei), but let things happen, for, as Master Lao Tzu teaches in our text, the Light circulates according to its own law, if one does not give up one’ s accustomed calling.

The art of letting things happen, action in non-action, letting go of oneself, as taught by Master Eckhart, became a key to me with which I was able to open the door to the “Way.”

The key is this: we must be able to let things happen in the psyche.

For us, this becomes a real art of which few people know anything.

Consciousness is forever interfering, helping, correcting, and negating, and never leaving the simple growth of the psychic processes in peace.

It would be a simple enough thing to do, if only simplicity were not the most difficult of all things.

It consists solely in watching objectively the development of any fragment of fantasy.

Nothing could be simpler than this, and yet right here the difficulties begin.

Apparently no fantasy fragment is at hand-yes there is one, but it is too stupid!

Thousands of good excuses are brought against it: one cannot concentrate on it; it is too boring; what could come out of it ? It is ” nothing but, etc..

The conscious raises prolific objections, in fact, it often seems bent Upon blotting out the spontaneous fantasy-activity despite the intention, nay, the firm determination of the individual, to allow the psychic processes to go forward without interference.

In many cases there exists a veritable spasm of the conscious. ~Carl Jung, Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 90-91

016 The “mystery” he beholds represents the stock of primordial images which everybody brings with him as his human birthright, the sum total of inborn forms peculiar to the instincts. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Para 631

These words show that the libido has now sunk to a depth where “the danger is great” (Faust, “The Mothers”).

There God is near, there man would find the maternal vessel of rebirth, the seeding-place where he could renew his life.

For life goes on despite loss of youth; indeed it can be lived with the greatest intensity if looking back to what is already moribund does not hamper your step.

Looking back would be perfectly all right if only it did not stop at externals, which cannot be brought back again in any case; instead, it ought to consider where the fascination of the past really springs from.

The golden haze of childhood memories arises not so much from the objective facts as from the admixture of magical images which are more intuited than actually conscious.

The parable of Jonah who was swallowed by the whale reproduces the situation exactly.

A person sinks into his childhood memories and vanishes from the existing world.

He finds himself apparently in deepest darkness, but then has unexpected visions of a world beyond.

The “mystery” he beholds represents the stock of primordial images which everybody brings with him as his human birthright, the sum total of inborn forms peculiar to the instincts.

I have called this “potential” psyche the collective unconscious.

If this layer is activated by the regressive libido, there is a possibility of life being renewed, and also of its being destroyed.

Regression carried to its logical conclusion means a linking back with the world of natural instincts, which in its formal or ideal aspect is a kind of prima materia.

If this prima materia can be assimilated by the conscious mind it will bring about a reactivation and reorganization of its contents.

But if the conscious mind proves incapable of assimilating the new contents pouring in from the unconscious, then a dangerous situation arises in which they keep their original, chaotic, and archaic form and consequently disrupt the unity of consciousness.

The resultant mental disturbance is therefore advisedly called schizophrenia, since it is a madness due to the splitting of the mind. ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Para 631

017 The descent into the depths always seems to precede the ascent. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 40

Water is the commonest symbol for the unconscious.

The lake in the valley is the unconscious, which lies, as it were, underneath consciousness, so that it is often referred to as the “subconscious,” usually with the pejorative connotation of an inferior consciousness.

Water is the “valley spirit,” the water dragon of Tao whose nature resembles water—a yang embraced in the yin.

Psychologically, therefore, water means spirit that has become unconscious.

So the dream of the theologian is quite right in telling him that down by the water he could experience the working of the living spirit like a miracle of healing in the pool of Bethesda.

The descent into the depths always seems to precede the ascent.

Thus another theologian dreamed that he saw on a mountain a kind of Castle of the Grail.

He went along a road that seemed to lead straight to the foot of the mountain and up it.

But as he drew nearer he discovered to his great disappointment that a chasm separated him from the mountain, a deep, darksome gorge with underworldly water rushing along the bottom.

A steep path led downwards and toilsomely climbed up again on the other side.

But the prospect looked uninviting, and the dreamer awoke.

Here again the dreamer, thirsting for the shining heights, had first to descend into the dark depths, and this proves to be the indispensable condition for climbing any higher.

The prudent man avoids the danger lurking in these depths, but he also throws away the good which a bold but imprudent venture might bring. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 40

Just as we tend to assume that the world is as we see it, we naively suppose that people are as we imagine them to be.

In this latter case, unfortunately, there is no scientific test that would prove the discrepancy between perception and reality.

Although the possibility of gross deception is infinitely greater here than in our perception of the physical world, we still go on naively projecting our own psychology into our fellow human beings.

In this way everyone creates for himself a series of more or less imaginary relationships based essentially on projection.

Among neurotics there are even cases where fantasy projections provide the sole means of human relationship.

A person whom I perceive mainly through my projections is an imago or, alternatively, a carrier of imagos or symbols.

All the contents of our unconscious are constantly being projected into our surroundings, and it is only by recognizing certain properties of the objects as projections or imagos that we are able to distinguish them from the real properties of the objects.

But if we are not aware that a property of the object is a projection, we cannot do anything else but be naively convinced that it really does

belong to the object.

All human relationships swarm with these projections; anyone who cannot see this in his personal life need only have his attention drawn to the psychology of the press in wartime. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 507

020 To live oneself means: to be one’s own task. ~Carl Jung; Red Book, Pages 249

Never say that it is a pleasure to live oneself It will be no joy but a long suffering, since you must become your own creator. If you want to create yourself then you do not begin with the best and the highest, but with the worst and the deepest. Therefore say that you are reluctant to live yourself The flowing together of the stream of life is not joy but pain, since it is power against power, guilt, and shatters the sanctified. ~Carl Jung; Red Book, Pages 249

021 Neurosis is thus nothing less than an individual attempt, however unsuccessful, to solve a universal problem; indeed it cannot be otherwise, for a general problem, a “question,” is not an ens per se, but exists only in the hearts of individuals. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 438

We always find in the patient a conflict which at a certain point is connected with the great problems of society.

Hence, when the analysis is pushed to this point, the apparently individual conflict of the patient is revealed as a universal conflict of his environment and epoch.

Neurosis is thus nothing less than an individual attempt, however unsuccessful, to solve a universal problem; indeed it cannot be otherwise, for a general problem, a “question,” is not an ens per se, but exists only in the hearts of individuals.

[“The question” that troubles the patient is — whether you like it or not—the “sexual” question, or more precisely, the problem of present-day sexual morality.

His increased demand for life and the joy of life, for glowing reality, can stand the necessary limitations that reality itself imposes, but not the

arbitrary, ill-supported prohibitions of present-day morality, which would curb too much the creative spirit rising up from the depths of the animal darkness.]

The neurotic has the soul of a child who bears ill with arbitrary restrictions whose meaning he does not see; he tries to make this morality his own, but falls into profound division and disunity with himself: one side of him wants to suppress, the other longs to be free—and this struggle goes by the name of neurosis.

Were the conflict clearly conscious in all its parts, it would never give rise to neurotic symptoms; these occur only when we cannot see the other side of our nature and the urgency of its problems.

Only under these conditions does the symptom appear, and it helps to give expression to the unrecognized side of the psyche.

The symptom is therefore an indirect expression of unrecognized desires which, when conscious, come into violent conflict with our moral convictions.

As already observed, this shadow-side of the psyche, being withdrawn from conscious scrutiny, cannot be dealt with by the patient.

He cannot correct it, cannot come to terms with it, nor yet disregard it; for in reality he does not “possess” the unconscious impulses at all.

Thrust out from the hierarchy of the conscious psyche, they have become autonomous complexes which can be brought under control again through the analysis of the unconscious, though not without great resistances.

There are very many patients who boast that for them the erotic conflict does not exist; they assure us that the sexual question is all nonsense,

for they say they possess no sexuality whatever.

These people do not see that other things of unknown origin cumber their path — hysterical moods, underhand tricks which they play on themselves and their neighbours, a nervous catarrh of the stomach, pains in various places, irritability for no reason, and a whole host of nervous symptoms.

[That is where the trouble lies. Only a few especially favoured by fate escape the great conflict of modern man; the majority are caught in it from sheer necessity.] ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 438

The collective unconscious contains the whole spiritual heritage of mankind’s evolution, born anew in the brain structure of every individual.

His conscious mind is an ephemeral phenomenon that accomplishes all provisional adaptations and orientations, for which reason one can best compare its function to orientation in space.

The unconscious, on the other hand, is the source of the instinctual forces of the psyche and of the forms or categories that regulate them, namely the archetypes.

All the most powerful ideas in history go back to archetypes.

This is particularly true of religious ideas, but the central concepts of science, philosophy, and ethics are no exception to this rule.

In their present form they are variants of archetypal ideas, created by consciously applying and adapting these ideas to reality.

For it is the function of consciousness not only to recognize and assimilate the external world through the gateway of the senses, but to translate into visible reality the world within us. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 342

The light that gradually dawns on him consists in his understanding that his fantasy is a real psychic process which is happening to him personally.

Although, to a certain extent, he looks on from outside, impartially, he is also an acting and suffering figure in the drama of the psyche.

This recognition is absolutely necessary and marks an important advance.

So long as he simply looks at the pictures he is like the foolish Parsifal, who forgot to ask the vital question because he was not aware of his own participation in the action.

Then, if the flow of images ceases, next to nothing has happened even though the process is repeated a thousand times.

But if you recognize your own involvement you yourself must enter into the process with your personal reactions, just as if you were one of the fantasy figures, or rather, as if the drama being enacted before your eyes were real.

It is a psychic fact that this fantasy is happening, and it is as real as you —as a psychic entity—are real.

If this crucial operation is not carried out, all the changes are left to the flow of images, and you yourself remain unchanged.

As Dorn says, you will never make the One unless you become one yourself.

It is, however, possible that if you have a dramatic fantasy you will enter the interior world of images as a fictitious personality and thereby prevent any real participation; it may even endanger consciousness because you then become the victim of your own fantasy and succumb to the powers of the unconscious, whose dangers the analyst knows all too well.

But if you place yourself in the drama as you really are, not only does it gain in actuality but you also create, by your criticism of the fantasy, an effective counterbalance to its tendency to get out of hand.

For what is now happening is the decisive rapprochement with the unconscious.

This is where insight, the unio mentalis, begins to become real.

What you are now creating is the beginning of individuation, whose immediate goal is the experience and production of the symbol of totality. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 753

Self-reflection or—what comes to the same thing—the urge to individuation gathers together what is scattered and multifarious, and exalts it to the original form of the One, the Primordial Man.

In this way our existence as separate beings, our former ego nature, is abolished, the circle of consciousness is widened, and because the paradoxes have been made conscious the sources of conflict are dried up.

This approximation to the self is a kind of repristination or apocatastasis, in so far as the self has an “incorruptible” or “eternal” character on account of its being pre-existent to consciousness.

This feeling is expressed in the words from the henedictio fontis: “Et quos aut sexus in corpore aut aetas discernit in tempore, omnes in unam pariat gratia mater infantiam” (And may Mother Grace bring forth into one infancy all those whom sex has separated in the body, or age in time). ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 401

025 As understanding deepens, the further removed it becomes from knowledge. ~C.G. Jung, CW10, para. 532.

026 In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship. ~Carl Jung and Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 326

The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not? That is the telling question of his life.

Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interest upon futilities, and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance.

Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities which we regard as personal possessions: our talent or our beauty.

The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life.

He feels limited because he has limited aims, and the result is envy and jealousy.

If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change.

In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship.

The feeling for the infinite, however, can be attained only if we are bounded to the utmost.

The greatest limitation for man is the “self”; it is manifested in the experience: “I am only that!” Only consciousness of our narrow confinement in the self forms the link to the limitlessness of the unconscious.

In such awareness we experience ourselves concurrently as limited and eternal, as both the one and the other.

In knowing ourselves to be unique in our personal combination that is, ultimately limited we possess also the capacity for becoming conscious of the infinite. But only then!

In an era which has concentrated exclusively upon extension of living space and increase of rational knowledge at all costs, it is a supreme challenge to ask man to become conscious of his uniqueness and his limitation.

Uniqueness and limitation are synonymous.

Without them, no perception of the unlimited is possible–and, consequently, no coming to consciousness either–merely a delusory identity with it which takes the form of intoxication with large numbers and an avidity for political power.

Our age has shifted all emphasis to the here and now, and thus brought about a daemonization of man and his world.

The phenomenon of dictators and all the misery they have wrought springs from the fact that man has been robbed of transcendence by the shortsightedness of the super-intellectuals.

Like them, he has fallen a victim to unconsciousness.

But man’s task is the exact opposite: to become conscious of the contents that press upward from the unconscious.

Neither should he persist in his unconsciousness, nor remain identical with the unconscious elements of his being, thus evading his destiny, which is to create more and more consciousness.

As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being.

It may even be assumed that just as the unconscious affects us, so the increase in our consciousness affects the unconscious. ~Carl Jung and Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 326

The difference between the “natural” individuation process, which runs its course unconsciously, and the one which is consciously realized, is tremendous.

In the first case consciousness nowhere intervenes; the end remains as dark as the beginning.

In the second case so much darkness comes to light that the personality is permeated with light, and consciousness necessarily gains in scope and insight.

The encounter between conscious and unconscious has to ensure that the light which shines in the darkness is not only comprehended by the darkness, but comprehends it.

The filiiis solis et lunae is the symbol of the union of opposites as well as the catalyst of their union.

It is the alpha and omega of the process, the mediator and intermedins.

“It has a thousand names,” say the alchemists, meaning that the source from which the individuation process rises and the goal towards which it aims is nameless, ineffable. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 756

“When a summit of life is reached, when the bud unfolds and from the lesser the greater emerges, then, as Nietzsche says, “One becomes Two,” and the greater figure, which one always was but which remained invisible, appears to the lesser personality with the force of a revelation.

He who is truly and hopelessly little will always drag the revelation of the greater down to the level of his littleness, and will never understand that the day of judgment for his littleness has dawned. But the man who is inwardly great will know that the long expected friend of his soul, the immortal one, has now really come, “to lead captivity captive”: that is, to seize hold of him by whom this immortal had always been confined and held prisoner, and to make his life flow into that greater life-a moment of deadliest peril!

Nietzsche’s prophetic vision of the Tightrope Walker reveals the awful danger that lies in having a “tightrope-walking” attitude towards an event to which St. Paul gave the most exalted name he could find.” ~Carl Jung; CW 9i; Page 121.

The complete human being, the hermaphrodite, is never visible.

He is indescribable, always a mystical experience.

That which shows itself is always paradoxical so there is no uniform image of the personality.

Biographies seem so unreal because they attempt to give a consistent picture of someone’ s personality.

The visible image of man is that he is both Christ and the Devil at the same time; the image is truthful only when it is ambiguous and paradoxical.

That is why we can also say that doubt is a higher state than certainty.

He who doubts can see both possibilities.

It is pleasant for us when certainty is attained, but is must not last too long for certainty is not life. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski Sachs, Page 40

 

019 As you know, Wilhelm translated the central concept of Tao by Meaning. To translate Meaning into life, that is, to realize Tao, would be the task of the pupil. ~Carl Jung, The Secret of the Golden Flower, Page 147

020 To live oneself means: to be one’s own task. ~Carl Jung; Red Book, Pages 249

Never say that it is a pleasure to live oneself It will be no joy but a long suffering, since you must become your own creator. If you want to create yourself then you do not begin with the best and the highest, but with the worst and the deepest. Therefore say that you are reluctant to live yourself The flowing together of the stream of life is not joy but pain, since it is power against power, guilt, and shatters the sanctified. ~Carl Jung; Red Book, Pages 249

021 Neurosis is thus nothing less than an individual attempt, however unsuccessful, to solve a universal problem; indeed it cannot be otherwise, for a general problem, a “question,” is not an ens per se, but exists only in the hearts of individuals. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 438

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We always find in the patient a conflict which at a certain point is connected with the great problems of society.

Hence, when the analysis is pushed to this point, the apparently individual conflict of the patient is revealed as a universal conflict of his environment and epoch.

Neurosis is thus nothing less than an individual attempt, however unsuccessful, to solve a universal problem; indeed it cannot be otherwise, for a general problem, a “question,” is not an ens per se, but exists only in the hearts of individuals.

[“The question” that troubles the patient is — whether you like it or not—the “sexual” question, or more precisely, the problem of present-day sexual morality.

His increased demand for life and the joy of life, for glowing reality, can stand the necessary limitations that reality itself imposes, but not the arbitrary, ill-supported prohibitions of present-day morality, which would curb too much the creative spirit rising up from the depths of the animal darkness.]

The neurotic has the soul of a child who bears ill with arbitrary restrictions whose meaning he does not see; he tries to make this morality his own, but falls into profound division and disunity with himself: one side of him wants to suppress, the other longs to be free—and this struggle goes by the name of neurosis.

Were the conflict clearly conscious in all its parts, it would never give rise to neurotic symptoms; these occur only when we cannot see the other side of our nature and the urgency of its problems.

Only under these conditions does the symptom appear, and it helps to give expression to the unrecognized side of the psyche.

The symptom is therefore an indirect expression of unrecognized desires which, when conscious, come into violent conflict with our moral convictions.

As already observed, this shadow-side of the psyche, being withdrawn from conscious scrutiny, cannot be dealt with by the patient.

He cannot correct it, cannot come to terms with it, nor yet disregard it; for in reality he does not “possess” the unconscious impulses at all.

Thrust out from the hierarchy of the conscious psyche, they have become autonomous complexes which can be brought under control again through the analysis of the unconscious, though not without great resistances.

There are very many patients who boast that for them the erotic conflict does not exist; they assure us that the sexual question is all nonsense,

for they say they possess no sexuality whatever.

These people do not see that other things of unknown origin cumber their path — hysterical moods, underhand tricks which they play on themselves and their neighbours, a nervous catarrh of the stomach, pains in various places, irritability for no reason, and a whole host of nervous symptoms.

[That is where the trouble lies. Only a few especially favoured by fate escape the great conflict of modern man; the majority are caught in it from sheer necessity.] ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 438

022 The collective unconscious contains the whole spiritual heritage of mankind’s evolution, born anew in the brain structure of every individual. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 342

The collective unconscious contains the whole spiritual heritage of mankind’s evolution, born anew in the brain structure of every individual.

His conscious mind is an ephemeral phenomenon that accomplishes all provisional adaptations and orientations, for which reason one can best compare its function to orientation in space.

The unconscious, on the other hand, is the source of the instinctual forces of the psyche and of the forms or categories that regulate them, namely the archetypes.

All the most powerful ideas in history go back to archetypes.

This is particularly true of religious ideas, but the central concepts of science, philosophy, and ethics are no exception to this rule.

In their present form they are variants of archetypal ideas, created by consciously applying and adapting these ideas to reality.

For it is the function of consciousness not only to recognize and assimilate the external world through the gateway of the senses, but to translate into visible reality the world within us. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 342

023 But if you recognize your own involvement you yourself must enter into the process with your personal reactions, just as if you were one of the fantasy figures, or rather, as if the drama being enacted before your eyes were real. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 753

The light that gradually dawns on him consists in his understanding that his fantasy is a real psychic process which is happening to him personally.

Although, to a certain extent, he looks on from outside, impartially, he is also an acting and suffering figure in the drama of the psyche.

This recognition is absolutely necessary and marks an important advance.

So long as he simply looks at the pictures he is like the foolish Parsifal, who forgot to ask the vital question because he was not aware of his own participation in the action.

Then, if the flow of images ceases, next to nothing has happened even though the process is repeated a thousand times.

But if you recognize your own involvement you yourself must enter into the process with your personal reactions, just as if you were one of the fantasy figures, or rather, as if the drama being enacted before your eyes were real.

It is a psychic fact that this fantasy is happening, and it is as real as you —as a psychic entity—are real.

If this crucial operation is not carried out, all the changes are left to the flow of images, and you yourself remain unchanged.

As Dorn says, you will never make the One unless you become one yourself.

It is, however, possible that if you have a dramatic fantasy you will enter the interior world of images as a fictitious personality and thereby prevent any real participation; it may even endanger consciousness because you then become the victim of your own fantasy and succumb to the powers of the unconscious, whose dangers the analyst knows all too well.

But if you place yourself in the drama as you really are, not only does it gain in actuality but you also create, by your criticism of the fantasy, an effective counterbalance to its tendency to get out of hand.

For what is now happening is the decisive rapprochement with the unconscious.

This is where insight, the unio mentalis, begins to become real.

What you are now creating is the beginning of individuation, whose immediate goal is the experience and production of the symbol of totality. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 753

024 Self-reflection or—what comes to the same thing—the urge to individuation gathers together what is scattered and multifarious, and exalts it to the original form of the One, the Primordial Man. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 401

Self-reflection or—what comes to the same thing—the urge to individuation gathers together what is scattered and multifarious, and exalts it to the original form of the One, the Primordial Man.

In this way our existence as separate beings, our former ego nature, is abolished, the circle of consciousness is widened, and because the paradoxes have been made conscious the sources of conflict are dried up.

This approximation to the self is a kind of repristination or apocatastasis, in so far as the self has an “incorruptible” or “eternal” character on account of its being pre-existent to consciousness.

This feeling is expressed in the words from the henedictio fontis: “Et quos aut sexus in corpore aut aetas discernit in tempore, omnes in unam pariat gratia mater infantiam” (And may Mother Grace bring forth into one infancy all those whom sex has separated in the body, or age in time). ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 401

025 As understanding deepens, the further removed it becomes from knowledge. ~C.G. Jung, CW10, para. 532.

026 In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship. ~Carl Jung and Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 326

 

The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not? That is the telling question of his life.

Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interest upon futilities, and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance.

Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities which we regard as personal possessions: our talent or our beauty.

The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life.

He feels limited because he has limited aims, and the result is envy and jealousy.

If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change.

In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship.

The feeling for the infinite, however, can be attained only if we are bounded to the utmost.

The greatest limitation for man is the “self”; it is manifested in the experience: “I am only that!” Only consciousness of our narrow confinement in the self forms the link to the limitlessness of the unconscious.

In such awareness we experience ourselves concurrently as limited and eternal, as both the one and the other.

In knowing ourselves to be unique in our personal combination that is, ultimately limited we possess also the capacity for becoming conscious of the infinite. But only then!

In an era which has concentrated exclusively upon extension of living space and increase of rational knowledge at all costs, it is a supreme challenge to ask man to become conscious of his uniqueness and his limitation.

Uniqueness and limitation are synonymous.

Without them, no perception of the unlimited is possible–and, consequently, no coming to consciousness either–merely a delusory identity with it which takes the form of intoxication with large numbers and an avidity for political power.

Our age has shifted all emphasis to the here and now, and thus brought about a daemonization of man and his world.

The phenomenon of dictators and all the misery they have wrought springs from the fact that man has been robbed of transcendence by the shortsightedness of the super-intellectuals.

Like them, he has fallen a victim to unconsciousness.

But man’s task is the exact opposite: to become conscious of the contents that press upward from the unconscious.

Neither should he persist in his unconsciousness, nor remain identical with the unconscious elements of his being, thus evading his destiny, which is to create more and more consciousness.

As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being.

It may even be assumed that just as the unconscious affects us, so the increase in our consciousness affects the unconscious. ~Carl Jung and Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 326

027 The difference between the “natural” individuation process, which runs its course unconsciously, and the one which is consciously realized, is tremendous.

In the first case consciousness nowhere intervenes; the end remains as dark as the beginning.

In the second case so much darkness comes to light that the personality is permeated with light, and consciousness necessarily gains in scope and insight.

The encounter between conscious and unconscious has to ensure that the light which shines in the darkness is not only comprehended by the darkness, but comprehends it.

The filiiis solis et lunae is the symbol of the union of opposites as well as the catalyst of their union.

It is the alpha and omega of the process, the mediator and intermedins.

“It has a thousand names,” say the alchemists, meaning that the source from which the individuation process rises and the goal towards which it aims is nameless, ineffable. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 756

028 “When a summit of life is reached, when the bud unfolds and from the lesser the greater emerges, then, as Nietzsche says, “One becomes Two,” and the greater figure, which one always was but which remained invisible, appears to the lesser personality with the force of a revelation. ~Carl Jung; CW 9i; Page 121

“When a summit of life is reached, when the bud unfolds and from the lesser the greater emerges, then, as Nietzsche says, “One becomes Two,” and the greater figure, which one always was but which remained invisible, appears to the lesser personality with the force of a revelation.

He who is truly and hopelessly little will always drag the revelation of the greater down to the level of his littleness, and will never understand that the day of judgment for his littleness has dawned. But the man who is inwardly great will know that the long expected friend of his soul, the immortal one, has now really come, “to lead captivity captive”: that is, to seize hold of him by whom this immortal had always been confined and held prisoner, and to make his life flow into that greater life-a moment of deadliest peril!

Nietzsche’s prophetic vision of the Tightrope Walker reveals the awful danger that lies in having a “tightrope-walking” attitude towards an event to which St. Paul gave the most exalted name he could find.” ~Carl Jung; CW 9i; Page 121.

029 The complete human being, the hermaphrodite, is never visible. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski Sachs, Page 40

The complete human being, the hermaphrodite, is never visible.

He is indescribable, always a mystical experience.

That which shows itself is always paradoxical so there is no uniform image of the personality.

Biographies seem so unreal because they attempt to give a consistent picture of someone’ s personality.

The visible image of man is that he is both Christ and the Devil at the same time; the image is truthful only when it is ambiguous and paradoxical.

That is why we can also say that doubt is a higher state than certainty.

He who doubts can see both possibilities.

It is pleasant for us when certainty is attained, but is must not last too long for certainty is not life. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Ostrowski Sachs, Page 40

030 The serpent represents magical power, which also appears where animal drives are aroused imperceptibly in us.

They afford the movement of Eros the uncanny emphasis that strikes us as magical.

Magical effect is the enchantment and underlining of our thought and feeling through dark instinctual impulses of an animal nature. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 366

031 If, then, man cannot exist without society, neither can he exist without oxygen, water, albumen, fat, and so forth.

Like these, society is one of the necessary conditions of his existence.

It would be ludicrous to maintain that man lives in order to breathe air.

It is equally ludicrous to say that the individual exists for society. “Society” is nothing more than a term, a concept for the symbiosis of a group of human beings.

A concept is not a carrier of life.

The sole and natural carrier of life is the individual, and that is so throughout nature.

“Society” or “State” is an agglomeration of life-carriers and at the same time, as an organized form of these, an important condition of life. It is therefore not quite true to say that the individual can exist only as a particle in society.

At all events man can live very much longer without the State than without air. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Para 224

032 In this deification mystery you make yourself into the vessel, and are a vessel of creation in which the opposites reconcile. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 253

Salome’s performance was deification.

The animal face which I felt mine transformed into was the famous [Deus] Leontocephalus of the Mithraic mysteries, the figure which is represented with a snake coiled around the man, the snake’s head resting on the man’s head, and the face of the man that of a lion … In this deification mystery you make yourself into the vessel, and are a vessel of creation in which the opposites reconcile.”  In this deification mystery you make yourself into the vessel, and are a vessel of creation in which the opposites reconcile. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 253

 

032a It is not an individual case, it is a general truth that the earth is the depreciated and misunderstood part, and so the unconscious regularly puts great emphasis on the chthonic fact.

Prof Eaton: Is it because her animus is so unearthly-spiritualized, devitalized?

Dr. Jung: Yes, one could say the animus had no body, that leaping youth was too elf-like.

There would be danger of his jumping into heaven.

He has not enough solidity and therefore the earth is peculiarly emphasized.

This is a general truth concerning modern people.

Of course one might come across cases where there was not enough of the spirit and then one would find continual insistence upon the air, the spirit.

But in this case the emphasis is upon the earth, and in our civilization, in the world of our consciousness, the insistence upon the earth is generally more important.

It is not an individual case, it is a general truth that the earth is the depreciated and misunderstood part, and so the unconscious regularly puts great emphasis on the chthonic fact.

Nietzsche has expressed that very beautifully: “!hr sollt wieder Freunde von den nachsten Dingen werden. ” (You shall become friends of the immediate things.)

And the immediate things are this earth, this life.

For quite long enough our ancestors, and we ourselves, have been taught that this life is not the real thing, that it is provisional, and that we only live for Heaven.

Our morality is based upon the negation of the flesh, and so our unconscious often tries to convince us of the importance of living here and now.

In the course of the centuries man has repeatedly experienced the fact that the life that is not lived here, or the life lived provisionally, is utterly unsatisfactory.

It leads into neurosis.  ~The Visions Seminar, Page 192-193

033 We think of a chaos as complete confusion, but to the alchemists it was a confusion of definite qualities and of special factors. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures, 20 June 1941, Page 201-202

We think of a chaos as complete confusion, but to the alchemists it was a confusion of definite qualities and of special factors.

Primal matter consists of matter as such the components or qualities of which are represented in this picture.

Chief among these are the four elements – fire, earth, air and water – the material qualities par excellence.

The planets also appear and the twelve signs o f the Zodiac.

These represent primal qualities, according to the old astrological idea that everything on earth is under the influence of the moment in time in which it was born or created.

The qualities of man, beast and plant are thus determined by the horoscope.

The idea that time should possess qualities is very foreign to our modern scientific attitude, for time has become a mathematical concept to us.

In earlier days, however, both time and numbers had definite qualities.  ~Carl Jung, ETH Lectures, 20 June 1941,Page 201-202

034

Before I enter upon the contents of this second part, it seems necessary to cast a backward glance over the singular train of

thought which the analysis of the poem “The Moth to the Sun” has revealed.

Although this poem is very different from the preceding “Hymn of Creation,” closer investigation of the longing for the sun has led us into a realm of mythological ideas that are closely related to those considered in the first poem: the Creator God, whose dual nature was plainly apparent in the case of Job, has now taken on an astromythological, or rather an astrological, character.

He has become the sun, and thus finds a natural expression that transcends his moral division into a Heavenly Father and his counterpart the devil.

The sun, as Renan has observed, is the only truly “rational” image of God, whether we adopt the standpoint of the primitive savage or of modern science.

In either case the sun is the father-god from whom all living things draw life; he is the fructifier and creator, the source of energy for our world.

The discord into which the human soul has fallen can be harmoniously resolved through the sun as a natural object which knows no inner conflict.

The sun is not only beneficial, but also destructive; hence the zodiacal sign for August heat is the ravaging lion which Samson slew in order to rid the parched earth of its torment.

Yet it is in the nature of the sun to scorch, and its scorching power seems natural to man. It shines equally on the just and the unjust, and allows useful creatures to flourish as well as the harmful.

Therefore the sun is perfectly suited to represent the visible God of this world, i. e., the creative power of our own soul, which we call libido, and whose nature it is to bring forth the useful and the harmful, the good and the bad.

That this comparison is not just a matter of words can be seen from the teachings of the mystics: when they descend into the depths of their own being they find “in their heart” the image of the sun, they find their own life-force which they call the “sun” for a legitimate and, I would say, a physical reason, because our source of energy and life actually is the sun.

Our physiological life, regarded as an energy process, is entirely solar.

The peculiar nature of this solar energy as inwardly perceived by the mystic is made clear in Indian mythology.

The following passages, referring to Rudra, are taken from the Shvetashvatara Upanishad:

There is one Rudra only, they do not allow a second, who rules all the worlds by his powers.  Behind all creatures he stands, the Protector; having created them, he gathers all beings together at the end of time. He has eyes on all sides, faces on all sides, arms on all sides, feet on all sides.

He is the one God who created heaven and earth, forging all things together with his hands and wings. You who are the source and origin of the gods, the ruler of all, Rudra, the great seer, who of old gave birth to the Golden Seed give us enlightenment! ~Carl Jung, CW 5, Para 176

035 If there is really an intention, a plan, behind our psychic existence, the question arises for what purpose?

Therefore Ignatius continues “ut laudet Deum Dominum nostrum”, for the purpose of praising God.

We will first ask ourselves: does the feeling of being anticipated engender a feeling of purpose?

In other words, have we the feeling that life has meaning?

I must say here, from the psychological point of view, that the discovery or experience of having been anticipated always brings a feeling of meaning with it.

If I discover that I have been anticipated, it makes an enormous impression upon me; I could not in that moment clearly define the meaning of my life but I feel it as something living.

We could perhaps formulate it: “It must have a meaning.” But what peculiar kind of meaning has it?

A certain line of thought, for instance, is developed through a series of dreams; and I discover that I am the duplicate of my unconscious anticipation of myself; at the same moment I am filled with a sense of purpose as if a secret arrangement of my fate existed.

One no longer asks “What meaning has my life” but one is filled with the meaning itself.

You know that such essential discoveries are not made through clear formulations but are rather feeling experiences which have a far greater influence on human life than intellectual reflections.

It is much more important to be contented and peaceful than to be intellectual.

One living experience is worth a great many intellectual formulations and a psychology must

be founded on this fact. ~Carl Jung, ETH Seminars, 12th Jan. 1940, Page 214

036 … touching the personal unconscious already changes you… ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 483

Well, that, to my idea, is a very important point of view whenever you deal with matters of the collective unconscious; touching the personal unconscious already changes you and touching the collective unconscious changes you all the more: you are a different being, and no longer like the people who have not touched it.

That does not mean that you are better.

On the contrary, you are worse, because from their point of view you are on a lower level; and if you talk from a higher level it is just bluff and you add to your burden by lying and cheating and trying to make a good impression.

So one can only recommend the utmost of discretion and tact in the understanding of the level of other people.

Of course, in Nietzsche’s case you cannot make him responsible: he was utterly overcome by the unconscious and he did not realize that he was lower down than his time.

On the contrary, he assumed that he was higher up, that he was light and easy and marvelous; therefore, he speaks of dancing and flying as a compensation for the fact that he was really weighed down.

If you are concerned with lead, you naturally realize what lightness is and are likely to make the mistake he made.

In his letters, for instance, he says that thought never is difficult to him; it jumps ready-made out of his head as Pallas once jumped from the head of Zeus.

Yet on the next page he complains bitterly about his terrible migraines when working; he doesn’t make the connection, as he doesn’t understand why he feels particularly light when he is weighed down by lead. ~Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar, Page 483-484

037 The mind is like a tree bringing forth its characteristic blossom and fruit; it is just so. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 252

Now when you ask why you so confidently believe in the existence of God, nobody can tell you why.

It is just a fact, a result or a fruit of your living mind. The mind is like a tree bringing forth its characteristic blossom and fruit; it is just so.

As you call something that pleases you beautiful or good, so you confess to believe in God.

As an apple tree that bears no fruit would be all wrong, so you would be all wrong if you didn’t confess your truth.

It just grows in arid through you, and this great unknown thing that makes the universe tick at all, and incidentally causes ourselves to produce such thoughts and convictions, is what man since time immemorial has called “gods” or “God.”

It does not matter what he calls his God, whether he gives Him the name of “first cause,” “matter,” “ether,” “will to be,” “creative urge,” etc.

When somebody says that the thing he suggests is something new or other than God, he is a bit soft in the brain, i .e., he is incapable of thinking clearly.

He still believes in the magic power of words as if he were able to change something in the world by saying : “This is not God, but something else.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 252

038 The depths are stronger than us; so do not be heroes, be clever and drop the heroics, since nothing is more dangerous than to play the hero. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 244

He who journeys to Hell also becomes Hell; therefore do not forget from whence you come.

The depths are stronger than us; so do not be heroes, be clever and drop the heroics, since nothing is more dangerous than to play the hero. The depths want to keep you; they have not returned very many up to now, and therefore men fled from the depths and attacked them. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 244

039 Man knows only a small part of his psyche, just as he has only a very limited knowledge of the physiology of his body. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Para 253

Man knows only a small part of his psyche, just as he has only a very limited knowledge of the physiology of his body.

The causal factors determining his psychic existence reside largely in unconscious processes outside consciousness, and in the same way there are final factors at work in him which likewise originate in the unconscious.

Freud’s psychology gives elementary proof of the causal factors, Adler’s of the final ones.

Causes and ends thus transcend consciousness to a degree that ought not to be underestimated, and this implies that their nature and action are unalterable and irreversible so long as they have not become objects of consciousness.

They can only be corrected through conscious insight and moral determination, which is why self-knowledge, being so necessary, is feared so much.

Accordingly, if we divest the opening sentence of the “Foundation” of its theological terminology, it would run as follows: “Man’s consciousness was created to the end that it may

(i) recognize (laudet) its descent from a higher unity (Deum);

(2) pay due and careful regard to this source (reverentiam exhibeat);

(3) execute its commands intelligently and responsibly (serviat); and

(4) thereby afford the psyche as a whole the optimum degree of life and development (salvet animam suam).” ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Para 253

040 As I have pointed out, the union of opposites on a higher level of consciousness is not a rational thing, nor is it a matter of will; it is a process of psychic development that expresses itself in symbols. ~Carl Jung, CW 13, Para 31

As I have pointed out, the union of opposites on a higher level of consciousness is not a rational thing, nor is it a matter of will; it is a process of psychic development that expresses itself in symbols.

Historically, this process has always been represented in symbols, and today the development of personality is still depicted in symbolic form.

I discovered this fact in the following way.

The spontaneous fantasy products I discussed earlier become more profound and gradually concentrate into abstract structures that apparently represent ”principles” in the sense of Gnostic archai. ~Carl Jung, CW 13, Para 31

041 Nobody seems to have noticed that without a reflecting psyche the world might as well not exist, and that, in consequence, consciousness is a second world-creator, and also that the cosmogonic myths do not describe the absolute beginning of the world but rather the dawning of consciousness as the second Creation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 487

For more than a hundred years the world has been confronted with the concept of an unconscious,15 and for more than fifty years with the empirical investigation of it, but only a very few people have drawn the necessary conclusions.

Nobody seems to have noticed that without a reflecting psyche the world might as well not exist, and that, in consequence, consciousness is a second world-creator, and also that the cosmogonic myths do not describe the absolute beginning of the world but rather the dawning of consciousness as the second Creation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 487