Black Books

The inner voice speaks: “The evil one cannot make a sacrifice, he cannot sacrifice his eye.

Victory is with the one who can sacrifice.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 133

Evil? I thought too little about evil. Evil exists, too. Evil, the abysmal evil is not to be forgotten.

There is no scientific cover-up for it.

Even the word “evil” is commonplace, but not the thing per se. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 133

There has been much debate on the precise relation between Philo’s concept of the Logos and John’s gospel.

On June 23, 1954, Jung wrote to James Kirsch, “

The gnosis from which John the Evangelist emanated is definitely Jewish, but in its essence is Hellenistic, in the style of Philo Judaeus, from whom the conception of Logos also stems” ~Sonu Shamdasani, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 103, fn 14

But Philo Judeaus, if this is who you mean, was a serious philosopher and a great thinker.

Even John the theologian did not disdain including some of Philo’s thoughts in the gospel. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 103

“I want to answer this question within the scope of your understanding: if for God the human had not become important above everything, he would not have appeared as the son in the flesh, but in the Logos.” ~Ammonius, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 105

Let me give you a small example of my preoccupation.

I’ve spent many years alone with the process of unlearning.

Have you ever unlearned anything? — Well, then you should know how long it takes. And I was a successful teacher.

As you know, for such people to unlearn is difficult or even impossible. ~Ammonius, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

But what did he [Ammonius] say?

That the sequences of words have many meanings, and that John brought the Logos up to man, elevated it to man.

But that does not sound properly Christian.

Is he perhaps a Gnostic?

No, that seems impossible to me, since they were really the worst of all the idolators of words, as he would probably put it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

“Stranger, you may well stand by me, if it is not too cold for you.

As you can see, I am cold and my heart has never beaten.

” I know, you [Death] are ice and the end. You are the cold silence of the stones; and you are the most extreme highest snow on the mountains and the most extreme frost of outer space. I must feel this and that’s why I stand near you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

“What leads you here to me?, you living matter?

The living are never guests here.

Well, they all flow past here in dense crowds, black, with mourning bands, all those above in the land of the clear day who have taken their departure, never to return again.

But the living never come here. What do you seek here?” ~Death, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

We are in need of light.

Of lights we have enough—will-o’-the-wisps—but too little light.

How dark is the path of a man when he reaches the new world, the world in between!

Beyond us there is unending darkness.

Where is this “beyond”? Probably deep in ourselves. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Volume III, Page 116

The way of life leads farther beyond, even beyond the laws that were holy.

The way is solitary and full of secret torment. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 119

Jung: Oh Izdubar, most powerful one, what you call poison is science. In our country we are nurtured on it from youth, and that may be one reason why we haven’t properly flourished and remain so dwarfish.

When I see you, however, it seems to me as if we are all somewhat poisoned ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page. 250

Jung: We’ve grown accustomed to this over time, because men get used to everything.

But we’re still somewhat lamed.

On the other hand, this science also has great advantages, as you’ve seen.

What we’ve lost in terms of force, we’ve rediscovered many times through mastering the force of nature. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 251

Jung: Now you perhaps see that we had no choice.

We have to swallow the poison of science.

Otherwise we meet the same fate as you have—we will be completely lamed, if we encounter it unsuspecting and unprepared.

This poison is so insurmountably strong that everyone, even the strongest, and even the eternal Gods, perish because of it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 251

Izdubar:  Most terrible day of my life—unending—so long—so long—wretched magical art—our priests know nothing, or else they could have protected me from it—Even the Gods die, he said. Have you no Gods anymore?

Jung: No, words are all we have left. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol III, Page 251

Jung:  Science has taken from us the capacity of belief.

Izdubar: What, you have lost that, too? How then do you live?

Jung: We live so-so, with one foot in the hot and one foot in the cold, and for the rest, come what may! ~The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 252

What lies in the middle is the truth.

It has many faces; one is certainly comical, another sad, a third evil, a fourth tragic, a fifth funny, a sixth is a grimace, and so forth. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130

It is a murderous task to write the wisdom of real life, particularly if one has committed many years to serious scientific research.

What proves to be most difficult is to grasp the playfulness of life (the childish, so to speak). ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130

All the manifold sides of life, the great, the beautiful, the serious, the black, the devilish, the good, the ridiculous, the grotesque are fields of application which each strive.

We tend to wholly absorb the beholder or describer. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130

Our time requires something capable of regulating the mind.

Just as the concrete world has expanded from the limitedness of the ancient human out look to the immeasurable diversity of our modern outlook, the world of intellectual possibilities has developed to unfathomable diversity.

Infinitely long distances paths, paved with thousands of thick volumes, lead from one specialization to another.

Soon no one will be able to walk down these paths anymore.

And then only specialists will remain. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130-131

More than ever we require the living truth of the life of the mind, of some thing capable of providing firm guidance.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 131

You are right: It is to Philo’s credit that he furnished language like so many other philosophers.

He belongs to the language artists. But words should not become idols. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 104

I take up my task. Pleasure is permissible. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 106

In the background to the right sits a small thin man of pale complexion about 40 years old, apparently the librarian-

The atmosphere is troubling- scholarly ambitions-scholarly conceit-wounded scholarly vanity- scholarly anxieties of the malicious critic, the luckier competitor, and being wrong. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 137

I am a man: nothing human is alien to me. ~Terence As a medical psychologist

I do not merely assume, but I am thoroughly convinced, that nil humanum a me alienumm esse is even my duty. ~Carl Jung  – The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 136

Damned one, where do you get such knowledge?

So there is no immortal land where the sun goes down to be reborn?

Are you speaking the truth? ~Izdubar, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 121

You call poison truth? Is poison truth?

Or is truth poison?

Do not our astrologers and priests also speak the truth? And yet theirs does not act like poison. ~Izdubar, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 122

Izdubar: Don’t you want to go to this town?

Jung: No, the enlightened live there.

They’re actually dangerous, since they cook the strongest poisons from which even we must protect ourselves. ~The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 129

Slowly, with stifled breath, and with the great and anxious expectation of one gliding downward wildly on the foam and pouring himself into endlessness, I follow my brother, the sea. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 113

Stranger, you [Jung] may well stand by me, if it is not too cold for you.

As you can see, I am cold and my heart has never beaten. ~Death, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

I know, you are ice and the end. You are the cold silence of the stones; and you are the most extreme highest snow on the mountains and the most extreme frost of outer space.

I must feel this and that’s why I stand near you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

What leads you here to me-?, you living matter

The living are never guests here.

Well, they all flow past here in dense crowds, black, with mourning bands, all those above in the land of the clear day who have taken their departure, never to return again. But the living never come here. ~Death, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

How dark is the path of a man when he reaches the new world, the world in between!

Beyond us there is unending darkness. Where is this “beyond”? Probably deep in ourselves. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

I ask you, was this Logos a concept, a word? It was a light, indeed a man, and lived among men. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 104

Until now it always seemed to me as if it were exactly that which was meaningful in John, namely that the son of man is the logos, in that he thus elevates the lower to the higher spirit[,] to the world of the logos.

But you lead me to see the matter conversely, namely that John brings the meaning of logos down to man.

“I learned to see that John has in fact even done the great philosophical service of having brought the meaning of logos up to man.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 105

I’ve spent many years alone with the process of unlearning. Have you ever unlearned anything?-Well, then you should know how long it takes. ~Anchorite, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 105

It seems to me as if I had seen this white horse on the Eastern sky over the rising sun.

The horse spoke to me: What did it say? “Hail him who is in darkness. The day is over him.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 106

Do not forget to say your morning prayer when the sun rises. ~Anchorite, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

Now I have prayed to the sun.

But the anchorite really meant that I should ray to God at the break of day.

He probably does not know-we have no more prayers.

How should he know about our nakedness and poverty? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

“Dear beetle, where have you gone, I can no longer see you!?-Oh, you’re already over there with your mythical ball.”

These little animals stick to things, quite unlike us-no doubt, no change of mind, no hesitation. Is this.so because they live their myth?

“Dear scarab, my father, I honor you, blessed be your work-in eternity. Amen.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 108