Black Books

 

Jung had some powerful experiences: on June 27, 1917, he wrote to Emma Jung that three days prior, he was on Pointe de Cray (a mountain just northwest of Chateau d’Oex),

“It was a glorious day.

On the summit I had a wonderful ecstatic feeling. Last evening I had a most remarkable mystical experience, a feeling of connection of many millennia. It was like a transfiguration.

Today I’m probably going down to hell again for this.

I want to cling to you, since you are my center, a symbol of the human, a protection against all daimons.”

This letter underscores the centrality of Emma Jung in his life. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 68-69

Last evening I had a most remarkable mystical experience, a feeling of connection of many millennia.

It was like a transfiguration. Today I’m probably going down to hell again for this.

I want to cling to you [Emma Jung], since you are my center, a symbol of the human, a protection against all daimons. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 69

In a critical entry of January 16, 1916, his soul presented an elaborate thiogenic cosmogony.’

She described her own nature, the nature of the daimons, the heavenly mother, and the Gods. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 48

What is it I shall do? Tell you more about my inner matters? S

hall I overcome the daimon of my interior? Is it the hundred-headed dragon? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 159

Let go, daimon, you did not live your animal! ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 208

If I am not conjoined through the uniting of the Below and the Above, I break down into three parts: the serpent, and in that or some other animal form I roam, living nature daimonically, arousing fear and longing. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

The heavenly mother is a daimon among the order of the Gods, an inhabitant of the heavenly world. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 271

The God of the frogs or toads, the brainless, is the uniting of the Christian God with Satan.

His nature is like the flame; he is like Eros, but a God; Eros is only a daimon. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 274

Remove, Oh man, the divine, too, from your soul, as far as you can manage.

What a devilish foolish farce she carries on with you, as long as she still arrogates divine power over you!

She’s an unruly child, a bloodthirsty daimon, a tormentor of humans without equal, precisely because she has divinity. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 258

Draw the coat of patience and silence over your head, sit down, and leave the daimon to accomplish his work.

If he brings something about, he will work wonders.

Thus will you sit under a fruit-bearing tree. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 260

Know that the daimons would like to inflame you to embrace their work, which is not yours.

And, you fool, you believe that it is you, because you can’t distinguish yourself from your soul.

But you are distinct from her, you are not a soul-God-Devil, but instead you are a powerless man who need not foster the regenerated Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 260-261

I am astonished, Elijah. Do you not know what happened?

Do you not know that the world has put on a new garb?

That the one God and the one soul have gone away and in turn a multitude of Gods and soul daimons have moved back into the world? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 237

For the mother and the Phallus are superhuman daimons that reveal the world of the Gods.

They affect us more than the Gods since they are very closely akin to our essence. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224

Spirituality and sexuality are not your qualities, not things you possess and encompass.

Rather, they possess and encompass you, since they are powerful daimons, manifestations of the Gods, and hence reach beyond you, existing in themselves. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224

No man has a spirituality or a sexuality unto himself. Instead, he stands under the law of spirituality and of sexuality.

Therefore no one escapes these daimons. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224-225

The daimon of sexuality approaches our soul as a serpent.

She is half human soul and is called thought-desire. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

The serpent descends and cunningly lames the phallic daimon, or else goads him on.

She bears up the too-crafty thoughts of the earthly, those thoughts that creep through every hole and cleave to all things with craving and blind desire. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

The daimons reconcile themselves in man, who found himself, who is the source of the four streams and the spring-bearing earth.

Water flows from his peak toward the four winds.

He is the sea that gave birth to the sun, he is the mountain that carries the sun, he is the father of the four great streams, he is the cross that binds the four great daimons. He is the incorruptible seed of the nothing that accidentally fell through space.

This seed is the beginning, younger than all beginnings, older than every end.

I praise the greatness and smallness of man.

His suffering fills the earth, his fate is in the smallest and most secret things. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 184

I piled up the ore-red stones-gold-shining things from ancient shafts.

If you knew what Atmaviktu the ancient brought, which ~ shimmering serpent skin he shed when he became Philemon.

Dangerous poisons, daimonic luminous things-a shimmering ground for the feet of the lovers. ~Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 148