Black Books

In response to the request of Jung’s soul, Ha takes on the task of translating the runes, literally spelling them out.

It is boot camp in Code City: he gives cues to Jung’s soul about how this or that shape corresponds to the sun, or a roof, or a tilted passageway, or even how one ought to feel physically while navigating this curve or that crevice.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

In the autumn of 1917, Jung’s soul forces the black magician Ha to read and explain a series of cryptic runes that he had sent.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 115

Much of your [Jung] material you said has come to you as runes & the explanation of those runes sounds like the veriest nonsense, but that does not matter if the end product is sense.  ~Cary Baynes, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

A symbol in rune yoga is nearly the same as what it pictures, once it is understood as the mimicry of a right attitude on the levels of both spirit and instinct, both being archaically rooted.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 117

Ezra Pound’s Chinese ideograms connect with Jung’s runes only for a moment, across a wide, swift stream; Jung’s magic/ runic dialect has no home among the living.

The magician’s black rod becomes Jung’s Hermes-wand-an aid in navigating the way of life redeemed from redeemers, or saved from salvation; the signs, unlike “the solid letter” in Holderlin’s “Patmos,” a poem long close to Jung’s heart, bring up their own dark ground with them. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 117

In letters dated September and October Jung wrote to Sabina 10, 1917, Spielrein commenting on the significance of certain hieroglyphs in a dream she had sent him, saying that “with your hieroglyphics we are dealing with phylogenetic engrams of an historical symbolic nature.

Referring to the contempt meted out to Transformations and Symbols tlie Libido by the Freudians, he described himself as “clinging to his runes,” which he would not hand over to those who would not understand them. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

Referring to the contempt meted out to Transformations and Symbols of the Libido by the Freudians, he described himself as “clinging to his runes,” which he would not hand over to those who would not understand them. ~Sonu Shamdasani, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116