Black Books

A point exists at about the thirty-fifth year when things begin to change, it is the first moment of the shadow side of life, of the going down to death. It is clear that Dante found this point and those who have read Zarathustra will know that Nietzsche also discovered it. When this turning point comes people meet it in several ways: some turn away from it; others plunge into it; and something important happens to yet others from the outside. If we do not see a thing Fate does it to us. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 11

What of Jung’s fantasies did he regard as precognitive?

It is important to note that there were around twelve separate events:

1-2. October 1913: Repeated vision of flood and death of thousands, and the voice that said that this will become real.

  1. Vision of the sea of blood covering the northern lands.
  2. December 12, 1913: Image of a dead hero.
  3. December 15, 1913: Slaying Siegfried in a dream.
  4. December 25, 1913: Image of the foot of a giant stepping on a state, and images of murder and bloody cruelty.
  5. January 2, 1914: Image of a sea of blood and enormous dying.
  6. January 22, 1914: His soul comes up from the depths and asks him if he will accept war and destruction. She shows him images of destruction, military weapons, human remains, sunken ships, destroyed states, and so forth.
  7. May 21, 1914: He hears a voice saying that the sacrificed fall left and right.

10-12. June-July 1914: Dream (repeated three times) of being in a foreign land and having to return quickly by ship, and the descent of the icy cold. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 38-39

I had achieved everything that I had wished for myself. I had achieved honor, power, wealth, knowledge, and every human happiness. Then my desire for the increase of these trappings ceased, the desire ebbed from me and horror came over me. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 11

The paintings from 1916 onward in the Red Book relate to Jung’s continued explorations in the later Black Books. Liber Novus and the Black Books are thus closely intertwined. The Black Books cover the period before, during, and after Liber Novus. ~ The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 12

Jung’s continued explorations of the visionary imagination in the Black Books from 1916 chart his evolving understanding and demonstrate how he sought to develop and extend the insights he had gained and embody them in life. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 12

His [Jung] retreat from the Burgholzli coincided with a shift in his research interests to the study of mythology, folklore, and religion, and he assembled a vast private library of scholarly works. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 13

He [Jung] found the mythological work exciting and intoxicating. “It seemed to me I was living in an insane asylum of my own making,” he recalled in 1925. “I went about with all these fantastic figures: centaurs, nymphs, satyrs, gods and goddesses, as though they were patients and I was analyzing them. I read a Greek or a Negro myth as if a lunatic were telling me his anamnesis.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 13

… Jung noted that the work [CW 5] was written in 1911, his thirty-sixth year: “The time is a critical one, for it marks the beginning of the second half of life, when a metanoia, a mental transformation, not infrequently occurs.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 15

He [Jung] was conscious of the loss of his collaboration with Freud and was indebted to his wife [Emma] for her support. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 15

One without a myth “is like one uprooted, having no true link either with the past, or with the  ancestral life which continues within him, or yet with contemporary human society.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 15

The study of myth had revealed to Jung his mythlessness. He then undertook to get to know his myth, his “personal equation.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 15

Jung used to say in later years that his tormenting doubts as to his own sanity should have been allayed by the amount of success he was having at the same time in the outer world especially in America” ~Barbara Hannah, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 19, fn 26

Permitting fantasy in myself had the same effect as would be produced on a man if he came into his workshop and found all the tools flying about doing things independently of his will. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 20

On September 20, 1910, at the age of twenty-three, Toni Wolff was brought by her mother to see Jung According to her sister Erna, he had successfully treated the son of a friend of her mother’s, who consequently recommended Jung. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 27-28

In November 1912, Jung returned from his New York lectures. In a diary entry of December 29, 1924, Toni Wolff noted that twelve years before, on Jung’s return from America, she went to him and “spoke of relationship.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 29

In the November 15, 1913, entry in Book 2, following his account of the dream around December 1912 of the dove that transformed itself into a small girl and then back into the dove, Jung noted, “My decision was made. I had to give all my faith and trust to this woman [Toni].” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 29

In March 1913 he went to America again for five weeks. Decades later, Toni Wolff noted in her diary, “The feeling is somehow similar to 1913, when C[arl] went to America and we separated-and yet we couldn’t do it afterward.” This suggests a separation may have taken place at this time. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 29-30

Years later, Jung spoke to Aniela Jaffe concerning the relationship with Toni Wolff He said that he was faced with the problem of what to do with her after her analysis, which he said he had ended, despite feeling involved with her. A year later, he dreamed that they were together in the Alps in a valley of rocks, and that he heard elves singing, and that she was disappearing into a mountain, which filled him with dread. After this, he wrote to her. He noted that after this dream, he knew that a relationship with her was unavoidable, and that his life was in danger. On a later occasion, while swimming, he found himself with a cramp and vowed that if it went away and he survived, he would give in to the relationship. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

In a diary entry of March 4, 1944, Toni Wolff referred to “31 years of relationship and 34 years of acquaintance.” This confirms that her relationship with Jung began sometime in 1913. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

At the beginning of her analysis T.W. had the most incredible fantasies, a whole eruption of the wildest fantasies , some even of cosmic nature. But at that point I was so preoccupied with my own material that I was scarcely able to take on hers. But her fantasies entered exactly into my line of thought. ~Aniela Jaffe, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

On April 26, 1936, Wolff noted in her diary: “I still transfer father symbols onto C.[Jung] That is why I am never entirely with myself and am no counter-weight to him” (Toni Wolff, Diary’ J, p. 101). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30, fn 86

Concerning her attraction to Jung, toward the end of her life Toni Wolff recalled that she had her first transference to Friedrich Schiller, in 1905, then to Goethe, and then to Jung, as a “productive genius.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 30

When C[arl] begins to participate with my psychic material perhaps I have got what I need- the nurturing and supporting substance? I suspect myself of having insufficient confidence in him, because my analysis back then was intermingled with his problems- although it was also good for me. ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31

At the inception of their relationship, Toni Wolff was not interested in marriage and having children. She was critical of what she had observed of marriage: it seemed to make men less active and less enterprising- merely content with being fathers. It made both men and women less interested in culture. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31

After having children, women often didn’t need their husbands, and their own problems tended to return. Her mother hadn’t learned to work and had consequently plagued her children with unused libido. Toni Wolff was also critical of the bondage of marriage. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31

  1. W. was experiencing a similar stream of images. I had evidently infected her, or was the declencheur [trigger] that stirred up her imagination. My phantasies and hers were in a participation mystique. It was like a common stream, and a common task. Gradually I became conscious and gradually I became the center; and in the measure to which I attained these insights, she also found her center. But then she got stuck somewhere along the way, I remained too much the center that functioned for her. Therefore I was never permitted to be other than she wanted me to be, or than she needed to have me be. At that time she was entirely drawn into this terrible process in which I was involved, and she was just as helpless as I was. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 31-32

In letters dated September and October Jung wrote to Sabina 10, 1917, Spielrein commenting on the significance of certain hieroglyphs in a dream she had sent him, saying that “with your hieroglyphics we are dealing with phylogenetic engrams of an historical symbolic nature. Referring to the contempt meted out to Transformations and Symbols the Libido by the Freudians, he described himself as “clinging to his runes,” which he would not hand over to those who would not understand them. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

Referring to the contempt meted out to Transformations and Symbols of the Libido by the Freudians, he described himself as “clinging to his runes,” which he would not hand over to those who would not understand them. ~Sonu Shamdasani, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

In the autumn of 1917, Jung’s soul forces the black magician Ha to read and explain a series of cryptic runes that he had sent.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 115

In response to the request of Jung’s soul, Ha takes on the task of translating the runes, literally spelling them out. It is boot camp in Code City: he gives cues to Jung’s soul about how this or that shape corresponds to the sun, or a roof, or a tilted passageway, or even how one ought to feel physically while navigating this curve or that crevice.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

Much of your [Jung] material you said has come to you as runes & the explanation of those runes sounds like the veriest nonsense, but that does not matter if the end product is sense.  ~Cary Baynes, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 116

A symbol in rune yoga is nearly the same as what it pictures, once it is understood as the mimicry of a right attitude on the levels of both spirit and instinct, both being archaically rooted.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 117

Ezra Pound’s Chinese ideograms connect with Jung’s runes only for a moment, across a wide, swift stream; Jung’s magic/ runic dialect has no home among the living. The magician’s black rod becomes Jung’s Hermes-wand-an aid in navigating the way of life redeemed from redeemers, or saved from salvation; the signs, unlike “the solid letter” in Holderlin’s “Patmos,” a poem long close to Jung’s heart, bring up their own dark ground with them. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 117

The text [Secret of the Golden Flower] gave me an undreamed-of confirmation of my ideas about the mandala and the circumambulation of the center. This was the first event which broke through my isolation. I became aware of an affinity; I could establish ties with someone and something. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 104

On May 25, 1929, he [Jung] wrote to Wilhelm: “Fate appears to have given us the role of two bridge pillars which carry the bridge between East and West. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 104

Jung’s commentary on The Secret of the Golden Flower was a turning point. It was his first public discussion of the significance of the mandala. For the first time, he anonymously presented three of his own paintings from Liber Novus as examples of European mandalas and commented on them. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 105

When I had arrived at this central point (Tao), the confrontation with the world began: I began to give many lectures and to write small essays. At that time I gave lectures in many places. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 105

Since I’m getting dangerously famous in this old continent I’ve no peace and leisure anymore. The Negro spiritual says, ‘Steal away to Jesus,’ and I say, ‘Steal away to Bollingen’ if I can help it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 106

For example, Jung’s vision of the God Abraxas bore striking parallels to the figure of Mercurius in alchemy. He noted in retrospect that “my encounter with alchemy was decisive for me, as it provided me with the historical basis which I had hitherto lacked.”  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 108

The Gnostic material he [Jung] had studied had been too remote from the present, and he believed that alchemy formed the historical bridge between Gnosticism and the psychology of the unconscious. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 108-109

For something like fifteen years long I read books, to find a sort of clothing material for this primal revelation, that I myself could not manage. It cost me forty-five years, so to speak to bring the things that I once wrote down somewhat under control in the vessel of my work.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 110

While Liber Novus had been an attempt to present the meaning of the revelation, he [Jung] now had to come back from the “human side” -from science. The cost was considerable: “I paid with my life, and I have paid with my science.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 110

In his 1926 revision of The Psychology of the Unconscious Processes, he highlighted the significance of the midlife transition. He argued that the first half of life could be characterized as the natural phase, in which the prime aim was establishing oneself in the world, earning an income, and raising a family. The second half, the cultural phase, involved a reevaluation of earlier values.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 99

When the conscious mind participates actively and experiences each stage of the process … then the next image always starts off on the higher level that has been won, and purposiveness develops. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 100

The first bearer of the soul-image is always the mother; later it is borne by those women who arouse the man’s feelings, whether in a positive or negative sense. Because the mother is the first bearer of the soul-image, separation from her is a delicate and important matter of the greatest educational significance. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 100

For a man, the mother “protects him against the dangers that threaten from the darkness of his soul.” Subsequently, the anima, in the form of the mother imago, is transferred to the wife: “his wife has to take over the magical role of the mother. Under the cloak of the ideally exclusive marriage, he is really seeking his mother’s protection, and thus he plays into the hands of his wife’s protective instincts.” What is ultimately required is the “objectification of the anima.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 100-101

…the overcoming of the anima as an autonomous complex, and her transformation into a function of relationship between consciousness and the unconscious. Through this process the anima forfeits the daemonic power of an autonomous complex; that means she can no longer exercise possession, since she is depotentiated. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 101

He [Jung] argued that one should treat the fantasies completely literally while one was engaged in them, but symbolically when one interpreted them. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 101

Jung noted that this process [Integration of Fantasies] had three effects:

The first effect is that the range of consciousness is increased by the inclusion of a great number and variety of unconscious contents. The second is a gradual diminution of the dominating influence of the unconscious. The third is an alteration in the personality.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 102

Jung argued that when the anima lost her “mana,” or power, the man who assimilated it must have acquired this and so become a “mana-personality,” a being of superior will and wisdom. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 102

Thus in integrating the anima and attaining her power, one inevitably identified with the figure of the magician, and one faced the task of differentiating oneself from this.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 102

If one gave up the claim to victory over the anima, possession by the figure of the magician ceased, and one realized that the mana truly belonged to the “midpoint of the personality”-that is, the self. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 102

…[Jung] wrote a paper on “Soul and death,” characterizing religions as systems for the preparation for death. He argued that, given the collective soul of humanity, death might be regarded as the fulfilment of life’s meaning. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 103

In 1926, Christiana Morgan came to Jung for analysis. She had read Psychological Types and turned to him for assistance with her problems with relationships and with depression.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 92-93

Why are there no worldly cloisters for men, who should live outside the times! ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 95

A critical chapter in Jung’s self-experimentation was what he termed the integration of the anima. Toni Wolff saw this as one side of the story, as it also involved the process by which he had “introjected” her. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 95

In 1944, apropos a dream, she [Toni] noted that Jung placed undue stress on the subjective level, “because he had to realize the anima, but he thereby introjected me and took my substance.”  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 95

On January 5, 1922, Jung’s soul advised as follows: “You should not break up a marriage, namely the marriage with me, no person should supplant me, least of all Toni. I want to rule alone.” “You must let Toni go until she has found herself and is no longer a burden to you.” On the next day, his soul elucidated the symbolic significance of the relations between Jung, Emma Jung, and Toni Wolff in terms of Egyptian mythology. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

In contrast to a marriage, Toni Wolff saw her relationship with Jung as an “individual relation.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

Marriage is socially, legally, psychologically accepted. Nothing new can come from there; it can only be transformed, also individually, through individual relationships. That is why the individual relationship is a symbol of the soul.  ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

On September 13, 1925, she [Toni] noted that their [w/Jung] relationship stood under the “sign of Philemon.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

What C. [Jung] has achieved now is all based on me. Through my faith, love, understanding and loyalty I have kept him and brought him out. I was his mirror, as he told me right at the beginning. / But my entire feeling, phantasy, mind, energy, responsibility worked for him. I have an effect-but I don’t have substance. I didn’t know how to “play.” I gave him his life. Now he should give me mine and be a mirror to me. ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

Through my medial side, I am like C.’s hollow form and therefore I always wanted to be filled in by him. ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96

On April 10, 1926, she [Toni] noted, “Had a psychological scurvy through C.’s absence of vitamin C.  “It is the same with me as with the Elgonyi: C . is not only vitamin. Also, when I am with him the rising sun is good, relaxing, everything destructive has gone. When I am on my own, it eats away at me.”  The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 96-97

She [Toni Wolff] felt that his fame and success were increasingly taking him away from her and resented “his works, ideas, patients, lectures, E. [Emma], children.” This was cause for bitterness: “Again some resistance, when I think how he realized all his famous ideas through the relationship with me (which he only admits occasionally) and how famous he is now, and that E. is with him instead of me, and how I can never accompany him there.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 97

In dedicated copies of his books, Jung gave private acknowledgment of her involvement. Her copy of Psychological Types bears the dedication:

This book, as you know, has come to me from that world which you [Toni] have brought to me. Only you know out of which misery it was born and in which spirit it was written. I put it in your hands as a sign of gratitude, which I cannot express through words ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 97

Likewise, her [Toni’s] copy of Psychology and Alchemy (1944) bears a dedication to his “soror mystica.” In public, he acknowledged her active role in all the phases of analytical psychology in his introduction to her collected papers.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 97

“Introduction to Toni Wolff, Studies in C.G. Jung’s Psychology” (1959 ) , CW 10, 887

The work on the unconscious has to happen first and foremost for us ourselves. Our patients profit from it indirectly. The danger consists in the prophet’s delusion, which often is the result of dealing ·with the unconscious. It is the devil who says: Disdain all reason and science, mankind ‘s highest powers. That is never appropriate even though we are forced to acknowledge (the existence of) the irrational” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 69, fn 205

He [Jung] also noted that the soul gave rise to images that were assumed to be worthless from the rational perspective. There were four ways of using them: The first possibility of making use of them is artistic, if one is in any way gifted in that direction; a second is philosophical speculation; a third is quasi-religious, leading to heresy and the founding of sects; and a fourth way of employing the dynamis of these images is to squander it in every form of licentiousness. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 75

On August 22, 1922, Jaime de Angulo wrote to Chauncey Goodrich issuing “a challenge to all brother-neurotics- go, my brethren, go to the Mecca, I mean to Zurich, and drink from the fountain of life, all ye who are dead in your souls, go and seek new life.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 81

Three days later, his soul informed him that the new religion expresses itself visibly only in the transformation of human relations. Relations do not let themselves be replaced even by the deepest knowledge. Moreover, a religion doesn’t consist only in knowledge, but at its visible level in a new ordering of human affairs. Therefore expect no further knowledge from me. You know everything that is to be known from the revelation offered to you, but you are not yet living out everything that is to be lived at this time. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 81

On November 25, 1922, Jung, Emma Jung, and Toni Wolff left the Club. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 82

There was heated discussion within the Club. In February 1924, Hans Trub stepped down as president, and a letter was sent to Jung asking him to return, which he did a month later. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 85

Around Eckhart grew up a group of Brethren of the Free Spirit who lived licentiously. The problem we face is: Is analytical psychology in the same boat? Are the second generation like the Brethren of the Free Spirit? If so, it is the open way to Hell, and analytical psychology has come too soon and it will have to wait for a century or two. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 83

As his soul had explained to him the previous year, this new religion would manifest itself through transformed human relations. Evidently Jung’s relations with his wife [Emma] and Toni Wolff, the “experimentum crucis,” was related to this. Decades later, he would write, “The unrelated human being lacks wholeness, for he can achieve wholeness only through the soul, and the soul cannot exist without its other side, which is always found in a ‘You.’ ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 83-84

In the mid-twenties, publication of Liber Novus seems to have been one of the foremost issues in Jung’s mind. At the beginning of 1924, he asked Cary Baynes to make a fresh typed transcription of the text and discussed publication. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 85

By contrast, the mythic and cosmological embeddedness of the Pueblo Indians showed us precisely what we had lost, he believed, and our spiritual poverty. Of the Pueblo Indian, he said, “Such a man is in the fullest sense of the word in his place.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 87

There are indications that he [Jung] was ambivalent about publication of the Sermones. Barbara Hannah claims that he regretted publishing it and that “he felt strongly that it should only have been written in the Red Book.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 88

The myth of Horus is the story of the newly risen divine light. It would have been told after the deliverance out of the primordial darkness of prehistoric times through culture, that is to say through the revelation of consciousness. Thus the journey from the interior of Africa to Egypt became for me like a drama of the birth of light, which was intimately connected with me, with my psychology. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 90

In Jung’s fantasies in 1922, Egyptian mythology had played a significant part in formulating the role and the tasks that he, his wife, and Toni Wolff had to fulfill. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 90

the figure of Atmavictu went through a number of incarnations, as an old man, a bear, an otter, a newt, a serpent, then simultaneously a man and an earth serpent. He was Izdubar, and became Philemon. The black magician, Ha, was the father of Philemon. Ka was the father of Salome, and also the brother of the Buddha. Ka was Philemon’s shadow. Philemon further identified himself with Elijah and Khidr and claimed that he would become Phanes. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 70

On March l, 1918, his soul informed him that what was necessary was maintaining simultaneously a respect and disdain for the Gods, and that this began with respect and disdain for oneself. This was critical not only for humanity; Jung now realized that “man would be the mediator in the transformation process of God.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 71

That is the meaning of divine service, of the service which man can render to God, that light may emerge from the darkness, that the Creator may become conscious of his creation, and man conscious of himself. / That is the goal, or one goal, which fits man meaningfully into the scheme of creation, and at the same time confers meaning upon it. It is an explanatory myth which has slowly taken shape within me in the course of the decades.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 71

I am of the opinion that the union of rational and irrational truth is to be found not so much in art as in the symbol per se; for it is the essence of the symbol to contain both the rational and irrational. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 72

He [Jung] equated the Hindu notion of Brahman/Atman with the self. At the same time, he provided a definition of the soul. He argued that the soul possessed qualities that were complementary to the persona, and in that sense had what the conscious attitude lacked.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 74-75

Now I was sure that no schizophrenia was threatening me. I understood that my dreams and my visions came to me from the subsoil of the collective unconscious. What  remained for me to do now was to deepen and validate this discovery. And this is what I have been trying to do for forty years.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 37-38

Thus Jung’s revisions, in which he now differentiated the soul into serpent, human soul, and bird, here can be seen to reflect his understanding of the tripartite nature of his soul. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 69

I can grasp for you only what you already have but don’t know. The beyond from which I bring knowledge to you is your beyond. I am able to grasp what you have. But you aren’t. That’s why you need me.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 70

Years later, recalling his encounter with this figure and describing it as a dream, Jung noted, “I suddenly knew: the Wild Huntsman had commanded it to carry away a human soul.” A few days later he heard the news that his mother had died. He realized that “It was Wotan, the god of my Alemannic forefathers, who had gathered my mother to her ancestors negatively to the ‘wild horde,’ but positively to the ‘salig hit,’ the blessed folk.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 79

Jung described Wotan’s attributes as follows: He is the god of oracles, of secret knowledge, of sorcery, and he is also the equivalent of Hermes psychopompos. And you remember he has, like Osiris, only one eye; the other eye is sacrificed to the underworld. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 80

The immediate sources that Jung drew on for his concept of the self appear to be the Atman/ Brahman conception in Hinduism, which he discussed in Psychological Types, and certain passages in Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 66, fn 204

The Self also seeks with the eyes of sense, it listens too with the ears of the spirit. The Self is always listening and seeking: it compares, subdues, conquers, destroys. It rules and is also the l’s ruler. Behind your thoughts and feelings, my brother, stands a mighty commander, an unknown sage- he is called Self. ~Nietzsche, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 66, fn 204

I was already very interested in the concept of the self, but I was not sure how I should understand it. I made my marks when I came across these passages, and they seemed very important to me … . The concept of the self continued to recommend itself to me …. I thought that Nietzsche meant a sort of thing-in-itself behind the psychological phenomenon … . I saw then also that he was producing a concept of the self which was like the Eastern concept; it is an Atman idea. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 66, fn 204

I very much agree with you that we have to grapple with the knowledge content of Gnosticism and Neo-Platonism. These are the systems that contain the materials which are destined to become the foundation of a theory of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 67

Jung had some powerful experiences: on June 27, 1917, he wrote to Emma Jung that three days prior, he was on Pointe de Cray (a mountain just northwest of Chateau d’Oex), “It was a glorious day. On the summit I had a wonderful ecstatic feeling. Last evening I had a most remarkable mystical experience, a feeling of connection of many millennia. It was like a transfiguration. Today I’m probably going down to hell again for this. I want to cling to you, since you are my center, a symbol of the human, a protection against all daimons.” This letter underscores the centrality of Emma Jung in his life. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 68-69

From the beginning of August to the end of September, he [Jung] drew a series of mandalas in pencil in his army notebook, which he preserved. The first is titled “Phanes” and bears the legend “transformation of matter in the individual.” This image may be seen as an attempt to depict the “newly arising God” and his relation to the individual. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 61

Beginning on August 20 [1917], he [Jung] drew a mandala on most days. This gave him the feeling that he had taken a photograph of each day, and he observed how these figures changed. He recalled that he received a letter from “this Dutch woman”-Moltzer- “that got on my nerves terribly.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 61

On April 14, 1918, Jung wrote to Josef Lang regarding a letter he had received from Moltzer in which she had accused him of trying to destroy her relationship with Lang in a “thirst for revenge.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 64

I know that one could look back with regrets or a certain longing on those unconscious times which were still pregnant with the future.  But those times have since given birth, the covers are torn, and new realities have come into being whose immediacy does not allow me to look backward. Nothing from the past can be brought back unless it has been reborn in a creative life. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 66-67

The God I experienced is more than love; he is also hate, he is more than beauty, he is also the abomination, he is more than wisdom, he is also meaninglessness, he is more than power, he is also powerlessness, he is more than omnipresence, he is also my creature. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 68

Last evening I had a most remarkable mystical experience, a feeling of connection of many millennia. It was like a transfiguration. Today I’m probably going down to hell again for this. I want to cling to you [Emma Jung], since you are my center, a symbol of the human, a protection against all daimons. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 69

He [Jung] defined the anima as “how the subject is seen by the collective unconscious.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 53

There are few dreams noted in the Black Books. A recently recovered dream book contains a series of dreams from 1917 to 1925.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 54

Jung described his technique for inducing spontaneous fantasies: “The training consists: first of all in systematic exercises for eliminating critical attention, thus producing a vacuum in consciousness.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 54

…man must necessarily stand upon firm feet in his I-function; that is, he must fulfil his duty toward life completely, so that he may in every respect be a vitally living member of society. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 57

The seventh sermon had culminated in an evocation of a star God:

At immeasurable distance a lonely star stands in the zenith. This is the one God of this one man, this is his world, his Pleroma, his divinity. In this world man is Abraxas, the creator and destroyer of his own world. This star is the God and the goal of man, this is his one guiding God, in him man goes to his rest, toward him goes the long journey of the soul after death, in him everything that man withdraws from the greater world shines resplendently. To this one God man shall pray. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 59

In 1919, Jung painted his portrait in Liber Novus as a divine child, noting, “I called him PHANES, because he is the newly appearing God.” He considered the emergence of this figure as denoting a spiritual transformation that was occurring in the world. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 59

in the last sermon you find the beginning of individuation, out of which, the divine child arises. Please don’t speak of these things to other people. It could do harm to the child. The child is fate and amor fati & guidance and necessity-and peace and fulfillment (lsaiah 9:6). But don’t allow yourself to be dispersed into people and opinions and discussions. The child is a new God, actually born in many individuals, but they don’t know it. He is a “spiritual” God. A spirit in many people, yet one and the same everywhere. Keep to your time and you will experience His qualities. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 50-60

The outbreak of the war had given Jung a completely new understanding of his fantasies. In Liber Novus, he wrote: “And then the War broke out. This opened my eyes about what I had experienced before, and it also gave me the courage to say all of that which I have written in the earlier part of this book. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 39

But whereas Zarathustra proclaimes the death of God, Liber Novus depicts the rebirth of God in the soul. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 40

There are also indications that Jung read Dante’s Commedia, which also informs the structure of the work. Liber Novus depicts Jung’s descent into hell. But whereas Dante could utilize an established cosmology, Lib er Novus is an attempt to shape an individual cosmology. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 40

The overall theme of Liber Novus is how Jung regains his soul and overcomes the contemporary malaise of spiritual alienation. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 41

In this way salvation is given to us in the un-openable and un-sayable symbol, for it protects us by preventing the devil from swallowing the seed of life…We must understand the divine within us, but not the other, insofar as he is able to go and stand on his own … We should be confidants of our own mysteries, but chastely veil our eyes before the mysteries of the other, insofar as he does not need “understanding” because of his own incapability. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 45-46

I must find the way through the unconscious. People who have trusted me need my insight, not only I myself. Therefore I had to exclusively dedicate myself to this work, which was very time-consuming and terribly demanding. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 46

Jung had come to see that chaos was not formless but filled with the dead, “not just your dead, that is, all the images of the shapes you took in the past, which your ongoing life has left behind, but also the thronging dead of human history, the ghostly procession of the past.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 47

When the time has come and you open the door to the dead, your horrors will also afflict your brother, for your countenance proclaims the disaster.  Hence withdraw and enter solitude, since no one can give you counsel if you wrestle with the dead. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 47

In a critical entry of January 16, 1916, his soul presented an elaborate thiogenic cosmogony.’ She described her own nature, the nature of the daimons, the heavenly mother, and the Gods. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 48

In early 1913, he [Jung] read Dieterich’s Abraxas, still from the perspective of his libido theory. In January and October 1915, while doing military service, he studied the works of the Gnostics intensively. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 50

“This little book [Septem Sermones], that I entrust to your well meaning and friendly forbearance, brings a wish with it: it would like to have a good cover in this cold world weather. The non-author and copyist.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 50

I could not presume to put my name to it, but chose instead the name of one of those great minds of the early Christian era which Christianity obliterated. It fell quite unexpectedly into my lap like a ripe fruit at a time of great stress and has kindled a light of hope and comfort for me in my bad hours. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 51

Philemon brought with him an Egyptian-Gnostic-Hellenistic atmosphere, a really Gnostic hue, because he really was a pagan. He was simply a superior knowledge, and he taught me psychological objectivity and the actuality of the soul. He had showed this dissociation between me and my intellectual object …He formulated this thing which I was not, and formulated and expressed everything which I had never thought. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 34

In Memories, he [Jung] recalled that he felt that he was in an exposed position at the university, and that he had to find a new orientation, as it would otherwise be unfair to teach students. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 34

During 1913 and 1914, he [Jung] had between one and nine consultations per day, five days a week, with an average of five to seven patients. He also worked on Saturdays, having no or few patients on Thursdays. In 1918, he switched his free day to Saturday. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 35

In Memories, Jung recalled that during this period [1914] his family and profession “always remained a joyful reality and a guarantee that I was normal and really existed.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 36

Attempting to understand Goethe’s Faust using Freud’s method would be like trying to understand a Gothic cathedral through its mineralogical aspect. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 36

The meaning “only lives when we experience it in and through ourselves.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 36

As a psychiatrist I became worried, wondering if I was not on the way to “doing a schizophrenia,” as we said in the language of those days . … I was just preparing a lecture on schizophrenia to be delivered at a congress in Aberdeen, and I kept saying to myself: “I’ll be speaking of myself! Very likely I’ll go mad after reading out this paper.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 37

In 1954, while discussing active imagination, Jung said that “the reason why the involvement looks very much like a psychosis is that the patient is integrating the same fantasy material to which the insane person falls victim because he cannot integrate it but is swallowed up by it.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 38

“And then the War broke out. This opened my eyes about what I had experienced before, and it also gave me the courage to say all of that which I have written in the earlier part of this book.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 39

“I wanted to understand it all as personal experiences within me, and consequently I could neither understand nor believe it all, since my belief is weak.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 39

The sequence of Liber Novus nearly always corresponds exactly to that of the Black Books. Jung maintained a “fidelity to the event.” What he was writing was not to be mistaken as fiction.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 39

In November 1914, Jung closely studied Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883-91), which he had first read in his youth. He later recalled that “then suddenly the spirit seized me and carried me to a desert country in which I read Zarathustra.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 40

An important figure in Jung’s fantasies was that of Ka, from Egyptian mythology. Wolff had her own figure of Ka, and also had dialogues with Jung’s Ka. In an active imagination on January 11, 1926, Wolff’s “I” had a dialogue with Thot, the Egpytian God of writing.  ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 32

Thoth instructed her [Toni Wolff] how to invoke someone’s “Ka”: “So call loudly thrice, You Ka, you Ka, you Ka of so and so, come here and move into my heart. Space has been made for you. Your Ba expects you and you should move in.” She followed his instructions: “You Ka, you Ka, you Ka of C., come here, move into my heart. Space has been made for you. Your Ba expects you and you should move in.” ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 32

On January 30, she [Toni] noted: earlier:

C.’s [Carl’s] Ka to me mine not received by him C.’s Ka speaks about the abyss and the death he sees.

I want to let myself drop down. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 32

Wolff, Diary E, January 11, 1926, p. 17. Regarding the Egyptian concept of the Ba, E. A. Wallis Budge noted, “To that part of man which beyond all doubt was believed to enjoy an eternal existence in heaven in a state of glory, the Egyptians gave the ·name ba, a word which means something like ‘sublime,’ ‘noble’ and which has always hitherto been translated by ‘soul.’ The ba is not incorporeal, for although it dwells in the ka, and is in some respects, like the heart, the principle of life in man, still it possesses both substance and form: in form it is depicted as a human-headed hawk, and in nature and substance it is stated to be exceedingly refined or ethereal. It revisited the body in the tomb and re-animated it, and conversed with it; it could take upon itself any shape that it pleased; and it had the power of passing into heaven and of dwelling with the perfected souls there. It was eternal” (The Book of the Dead: The Papyrus of Ani in the British Museum [London: Longmans & Co, 1895], p. lxiv). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 32, fn 93

On several subsequent occasions, Toni Wolff referred to their [w/Carl]relationship as an “experimentum crucis.” As such, it was clearly linked to Jung’s self-experimentation. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

At the same time, Emma Jung continued to play a central role in Jung’s life. She ran the household, raised their children, and maintained the human dimension for him, while also facilitating and accompanying him in his self-experimentation. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

In 1910, she [Emma] began an analysis with Jung, and she worked with Leonhard Seif in 191197 and later with Hans Trub (who was married to Toni Wolff’s sister Susanne). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

She [Emma] played an active role in the Association for Analytical Psychology and later practiced analysis, also studying physics, mathematics, Greek, and Latin. the languages later enabled her (in contrast to Toni Wolff) to accompany Jung in his explorations into alchemy. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

She [Emma] undertook her own research, which culminated in her work on the Grail legend. From around 1914, she began to do active imagination in the form of dialogues, paintings, and poems. ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 33

Ximena Roelli de Angulo, Cary Baynes’s daughter, recalled, “I think that Emma must have always played just as large a part in his creative life as Toni did- just a different part” (interview with Gene Nameche, Jung biographical archive, CLM, p. 54). ~The Black Books, Vol. I, Page 34

Without talking back from now on, I will continue to tell you [Jung’s Soul] how I caught sight of a woman [Toni Wolff] three years ago, whose soul seemed to me more valuable than my marital anxiety. I conquered my fear out of love for her. But you wanted it that way and gave me a dream, which rendered a decision…: ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 155

A huge task lay before me—I saw its enormous size—and its value and meaning escaped me. I got into the dark, and I groped along my path. That path led inward and downward. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 149

The more uncommon these highest truths are, the more inhuman must they be and the less they speak to you as something valuable or meaningful concerning human essence and being. Only what is human and what you call banal and hackneyed contains the wisdom that you seek.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 208

One must not improve others, it seems. To do things oneself in minutest detail, that is what is needful. No longer should it be said, “you should,” but rather “I should” if I have not already thought “I will.”  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 209

What a burden and danger is vanity! There is nothing about which one could not be vain. Nothing is more difficult than to define the limits of vanity. One who creates should be especially wary of success, though needs it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 209

My soul, you are terribly real. You have set me with hard thrust on the sharp stones of misery and death. I grow weak and miserable-my blood, my precious lifeblood trickles away between these stones. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 214

What shadows over the earth! All lights gutter out in final despondency and loneliness. Death has entered, and there is no one left to grieve. This is a final truth and no riddle. The most extreme human truths are no riddles. Why did we think they were riddles What delusion could make us believe in riddles? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 214

This night begins with the feeling of ignorance and incapacity. Only expectancy is on the lookout as if from a high tower that dominates the surrounding country. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 197

What shadows over the earth! All lights gutter out in final despondency and loneliness. Death has entered, and there is no one left to grieve. This is a final truth and no riddle. The most extreme human truths are no riddles. Why did we think they were riddles What delusion could make us believe in riddles? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 214

This night begins with the feeling of ignorance and incapacity. Only expectancy is on the lookout as if from a high tower that dominates the surrounding country. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 197

Death, does it not uncover the terrible deceit of life? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 213

Do you believe that all that struggle and all these blood sacrifices left no mark on the soul of the Christian? And do you believe that one who has not experienced this struggle most intimately can still partake of its fruit? No one can flout the spiritual development of many centuries and then reap what they have not sowed. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 201

I know that there are those who are always in heat, and those who also want to dance for their Gods; some are ridiculous jubilant old men and women and others posture at antiquity, instead of honestly admitting their utter incapacity for religious expression.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 201

The more uncommon these highest truths are, the more inhuman must they be and the less they speak to you as something valuable or meaningful concerning human essence and being. Only what is human and what you call banal and hackneyed contains the wisdom that you seek. ~Scholar’s Maiden, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 208

After that I had this dream around l 1/2 years ago: I am lying on a bed with my wife [Emma] in a chamber with an open ceiling (similar to the roofless houses of Pompeii.) All at once my wife startles and climbs the wall rapidly and disappears upward. She wears a long white dress with mystical figures, such as witches or heretics, who are burnt at the stake. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 160

You may call us symbols for the same reason that you can also call your real fellow men symbols, if you wish to. But we exist and are just as real as your fellow men. You invalidate nothing and solve nothing by calling us symbols. ~Elijah, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 189

It seems as if compulsory realities exist here. What forced me to come here if not those “other” realities? Apparently they are somehow superior to me as I did not know anything about them, whereas they knew about me and forced me-could force me-to come to them on a way unknown to me, that I must have flown through unconsciously. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 190

Introduction to Psychology, 191 fn

I see around me the mighty walls that form the horizon-jagged crenellations. Gray and yellow lichen grows on the stones, apart from this not a blade of grass. What is it with this place? I think it could be a Druidic sacred place of worship. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 192

Your work is fulfilled here. Other things will come, of which you do not know yet. But seek untiringly, and above all write exactly what you see. ~Elijah, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 196

I am the one who, when love

Breathes on me, notices, and in the manner

That he dictates within, I utter words.”

Dante. Purgatorio.

And then, in the same manner as a flame

Which follows whatever shape it takes,

The new form follows the spirit exactly.

Dante. [Purgatorio]. ~Dante, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 197

So, I have come to absolutely the right place. I have wandered a long time through the world, seeking those like you who sit upon a high tower on the lookout for things unseen. ~The Red One, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 198

I believe I have learned that no one is allowed to avoid the mysteries of the Christian religion unpunished. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 200

I thought after waking: a men’s cloister. Ever since then many new thoughts about new forms of society.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page163

The air shook with the anthem of blaspheming souls, when the God plunged you into my heart. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 177

You new spark of an eternal fire, into which night, into what kind of mud. were you born! Fires of madness are blazing toward you as sacrificial fires. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 177

You will wring truthful prayers from your believers, and they must invoke your glory in tongues that are atrocious to them. You will fall on them in the hour of their disgrace and humiliation, and will become known to them in what they hate, fear, and abhor. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 178

Oh I know that the salvation of mercy is given only to those who believe in the highest and faithlessly betray themselves for thirty pieces of silver. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 178

You do me wrong, Elijah is my father, and he knows the deepest mysteries, the walls of his house are made of precious stones, his wells hold healing water and his deep eye sees the things of the future-And what wouldn’t you give for a single look into the infinite unfolding of what is to come? Are these not worth a sin for you?” ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 181

We [Elijah/Salome] are really together and are not symbols. We are real and together. ~Carl

Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 182

I do not love her, I fear her. My knees tremble.  A voice says: “Therein you acknowledge her divine power.” Must I love Salome? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 183

Turn all your anger against yourself, because only you can hinder yourself from looking. The mystery play is delicate as air and thin smoke and you are brutal matter that itself is already disturbingly heavy. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 185

Yet let all your hope, which is your greatest good and highest ability, precede and serve you as a leader in the world of the dark, because it is of similar substance as the creations of this world. let your hope swell toward it into the indeterminable. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 185

“To see a World in a Grain of Sand / And a Heaven in a Wild Flower, / Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand / And Eternity in an hour” (Auguries of Innocence).  ~William Blake, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 185, fn 186

You have not forgotten it. It burned deep inside you. But you are afraid of megalomania? Are you that cowardly? Or can you not differentiate this thought from your own self, from your human nature, enough so that you wished to claim it for yourself? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 188

I think it would be obvious that your thoughts are just as much outside your mind: self as trees and animals are outside your body. ~Elijah, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 188

Keep interpretation far from me, that bad prison master of science who binds the soul and imprisons it in a lightless cell, but above all protect me from the venomous serpent of critique, which is a healing serpent only on the surface, yet in your depths is infernal poison and agonizing death. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 170

Book of my most difficult experiments, I open you with inner resistance! Everything in me balks at the immediacy of this experience! I want to coax myself like a nervous horse. I shy away from myself as if I were a nocturnal monster. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 171

But on the fourth night I cried, “To journey to Hell means to become Hell oneself.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 171

Anyone who fights with monsters should take care that he does not in the process become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes back into you. ~Nietzsche, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 171, fn 113

Perhaps I ensnare myself in self-deceit and hellish monkey business, and I am a rascal grinning at myself in a mirror, a fool in my own madhouse. Perhaps, my soul, you stumble over my folly. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 172-173

Gradually it dawned on me that the highest truth is one and the same with the absurd. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 175

The first step in individuation is tragic guilt. The accumulation of guilt demands expiation ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page on” 176, fn 142

This sounds like religion, but it is not. I am speaking just as a philosopher. People sometimes call me a religious leader. I am not that. I have no message, no mission; I attempt only to understand. We are philosophers in the old sense of the word, lovers of wisdom. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung Speaking, Page 98

With inner resistance I approach this book. I ceaselessly devalue it and yet something forces me to dive into it, actually into myself. Why?- It wants to follow this way. Strange- ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 163

What a deception! I have avoided myself, no, actually my self, the place of my soul, where she dwelled and lived. I have never returned to this place except while dreaming. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 164

Is it solitude, to be with oneself? Solitude is true only when the self is a desert. I hear the words: “An anchorite in his own desert.” The monks in the Syrian desert occur to me. My dream? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 164

Only life is true. And only life leads me into the desert, truly not my thinking, which would like to return to thoughts, to men and events, since it feels uncanny in the desert. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 164

I hear the cruel word “Wait.” This is the devil’s most horrible punishment of hell, he lets people wait. Torment belongs to the desert- I actually know it, but I didn’t want to know. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 165

After a hard struggle I have come a piece of the way nearer to you. How hard this struggle was! I had fallen into an undergrowth of doubt, confusion, and scorn. Only the love of those, to whom I gave love, saved me from the darkness. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 165

Do you still not know yet that the way to truth stands open only to those without intentions? Do you still not know that fulfilment comes only to the one who does not desire, to the one who is not greedy. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 166

Then, listen, you think little of me. Do you still not know that you are not writing a book to feed your vanity, but that you are speaking with me? How can you suffer from scorn if you address me with those words that I give you? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 167

I have learned that one must give one’s heart to men, but one’s intellect to the spirit of humanity, God. Then its work can be beyond vanity, since there is no more hypocritical whore than the intellect when it replaces the heart. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 168

I live first in the upper world, but in your inner world, my soul, I am like a shadow without substance, trembling and blown away by every breeze. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 170

Forgive me, my heart is full, because I have come from far wandering. wandered for eleven years, so long that I forgot that I possessed a soul that I could call my own. I belonged to men and things. I did not belong to myself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 151

I am thinking of this first vision that you gave me in a dream, where I saw You [Jung’s Soul] hovering. (Is it 14 years since then?) ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 152

Life tore me away, and I deliberately moved away from you and I have done so for all these years. But I remained with you minimally until the love for women tore me completely off and away from you.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 152

My child, you are not God, how could you be God? You are my soul and I am not allowed-not yet-to know, why you call yourself “child” – and why a girl?  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 153

Why must I tell you all that, my soul? Why do you chain me to this book? And why do you drive my pen so furiously, as if it had to go a long way and hurry to cover it? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 154

You [Jung] write to be printed and circulated among people. You want to cause a stir through the unusual. Nietzsche did this better than you. You are aping Saint Augustine. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 157

What is it I shall do? Tell you more about my inner matters? Shall I overcome the daimon of my interior? Is it the hundred-headed dragon? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 159

My pen bristles-regardless. Oh what impotence of the intellect! Life pushes me beyond criticism. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 160

But one thing you must know, the one thing I have learned is that one must live this life. This life is the way, the long sought after way to the unfathomable, which we call “divine.”  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 149

My soul, I found you again, I would like to, no, I will stay with you. My journey should continue with you. I will wander with you and ascend to my solitude, no longer alone as before and greedy and impatient, but with comforting courage and quiet delight. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. II, Page 150

Volume III:

The inner voice speaks: “The evil one cannot make a sacrifice, he cannot sacrifice his eye. Victory is with the one who can sacrifice.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 133

Evil? I thought too little about evil. Evil exists, too. Evil, the abysmal evil is not to be forgotten. There is no scientific cover-up for it. Even the word “evil” is commonplace, but not the thing per se. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 133

There has been much debate on the precise relation between Philo’s concept of the Logos and John’s gospel. On June 23, 1954, Jung wrote to James Kirsch, “The gnosis from which John the Evangelist emanated is definitely Jewish, but in its essence is Hellenistic, in the style of Philo Judaeus, from whom the conception of Logos also stems” ~Sonu Shamdasani, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 103, fn 14

But Philo Judeaus, if this is who you mean, was a serious philosopher and a great thinker. Even John the theologian did not disdain including some of Philo’s thoughts in the gospel. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 103

“I want to answer this question within the scope of your understanding: if for God the human had not become important above everything, he would not have appeared as the son in the flesh, but in the Logos.” ~Ammonius, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 105

Let me give you a small example of my preoccupation. I’ve spent many years alone with the process of unlearning. Have you ever unlearned anything? — Well, then you should know how long it takes. And I was a successful teacher. As you know, for such people to unlearn is difficult or even impossible. ~Ammonius, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

But what did he [Ammonius] say? That the sequences of words have many meanings, and that John brought the Logos up to man, elevated it to man. But that does not sound properly Christian. Is he perhaps a Gnostic? No, that seems impossible to me, since they were really the worst of all the idolators of words, as he would probably put it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

“Stranger, you may well stand by me, if it is not too cold for you. As you can see, I am cold and my heart has never beaten.” I know, you [Death] are ice and the end. You are the cold silence of the stones; and you are the most extreme highest snow on the mountains and the most extreme frost of outer space. I must feel this and that’s why I stand near you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

“What leads you here to me?, you living matter? The living are never guests here. Well, they all flow past here in dense crowds, black, with mourning bands, all those above in the land of the clear day who have taken their departure, never to return again. But the living never come here. What do you seek here?” ~Death, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

We are in need of light. Of lights we have enough—will-o’-the-wisps—but too little light. How dark is the path of a man when he reaches the new world, the world in between! Beyond us there is unending darkness. Where is this “beyond”? Probably deep in ourselves. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Volume III, Page 116

The way of life leads farther beyond, even beyond the laws that were holy. The way is solitary and full of secret torment. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 119

Oh Izdubar, most powerful one, what you call poison is science. In our country we are nurtured on it from youth, and that may be one reason why we haven’t properly flourished and remain so dwarfish. When I see you, however, it seems to me as if we are all somewhat poisoned ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page. 250

  1. We’ve grown accustomed to this over time, because men get used to everything. But we’re still somewhat lamed. On the other hand, this science also has great advantages, as you’ve seen. What we’ve lost in terms of force, we’ve rediscovered many times through mastering the force of nature. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 251
  2. Now you perhaps see that we had no choice. We have to swallow the poison of science. Otherwise we meet the same fate as you have—we will be completely lamed, if we encounter it unsuspecting and unprepared. This poison is so insurmountably strong that everyone, even the strongest, and even the eternal Gods, perish because of it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 251

Izdubar:  Most terrible day of my life—unending—so long—so long—wretched magical art—our priests know nothing, or else they could have protected me from it—Even the Gods die, he said. Have you no Gods anymore?

Jung: No, words are all we have left. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol III, Page 251

Jung:  Science has taken from us the capacity of belief.

Izdubar: What, you have lost that, too? How then do you live?

Jung: We live so-so, with one foot in the hot and one foot in the cold, and for the rest, come what may! ~The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 252

What lies in the middle is the truth. It has many faces; one is certainly comical, another sad, a third evil, a fourth tragic, a fifth funny, a sixth is a grimace, and so forth. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130

It is a murderous task to write the wisdom of real life, particularly if one has committed many years to serious scientific research. What proves to be most difficult is to grasp the playfulness of life (the childish, so to speak). ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130

All the manifold sides of life, the great, the beautiful, the serious, the black, the devilish, the good, the ridiculous, the grotesque are fields of application which each strive. We tend to wholly absorb the beholder or describer. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130

Our time requires something capable of regulating the mind. Just as the concrete world has expanded from the limitedness of the ancient human out look to the immeasurable diversity of our modern outlook, the world of intellectual possibilities has developed to unfathomable diversity. Infinitely long distances paths, paved with thousands of thick volumes, lead from one specialization to another. Soon no one will be able to walk down these paths anymore. And then only specialists will remain. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 130-131

More than ever we require the living truth of the life of the mind, of some thing capable of providing firm guidance.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 131

You are right: It is to Philo’s credit that he furnished language like so many other philosophers. He belongs to the language artists. But words should not become idols. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 104

I take up my task. Pleasure is permissible. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 106

In the background to the right sits a small thin man of pale complexion about 40 years old, apparently the librarian- The atmosphere is troubling- scholarly ambitions-scholarly conceit-wounded scholarly vanity- scholarly anxieties of the malicious critic, the luckier competitor, and being wrong. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 137

I am a man: nothing human is alien to me. ~Terence As a medical psychologist I do not merely assume, but I am thoroughly convinced, that nil humanum a me alienumm esse is even my duty. ~Carl Jung  – The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 136

Damned one, where do you get such knowledge? So there is no immortal land where the sun goes down to be reborn? Are you speaking the truth? ~Izdubar, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 121

You call poison truth? Is poison truth? Or is truth poison? Do not our astrologers and priests also speak the truth? And yet theirs does not act like poison. ~Izdubar, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 122

Izdubar: Don’t you want to go to this town?

I. No, the enlightened live there. They’re actually dangerous, since they cook the strongest poisons from which even we must protect ourselves. ~The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 129

Slowly, with stifled breath, and with the great and anxious expectation of one gliding downward wildly on the foam and pouring himself into endlessness, I follow my brother, the sea. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 113

Stranger, you [Jung] may well stand by me, if it is not too cold for you. As you can see, I am cold and my heart has never beaten. ~Death, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

I know, you are ice and the end. You are the cold silence of the stones; and you are the most extreme highest snow on the mountains and the most extreme frost of outer space. I must feel this and that’s why I stand near you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

What leads you here to me-?, you living matter The living are never guests here. Well, they all flow past here in dense crowds, black, with mourning bands, all those above in the land of the clear day who have taken their departure, never to return again. But the living never come here. ~Death, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

How dark is the path of a man when he reaches the new world, the world in between! Beyond us there is unending darkness. Where is this “beyond”? Probably deep in ourselves. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 114

I ask you, was this Logos a concept, a word? It was a light, indeed a man, and lived among men. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 104

Until now it always seemed to me as if it were exactly that which was meaningful in John, namely that the son of man is the logos, in that he thus elevates the lower to the higher spirit[,] to the world of the logos. But you lead me to see the matter conversely, namely that John brings the meaning of logos down to man. “I learned to see that John has in fact even done the great philosophical service of having brought the meaning of logos up to man.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 105

I’ve spent many years alone with the process of unlearning. Have you ever unlearned anything? -Well, then you should know how long it takes. ~Anchorite, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 105

It seems to me as if I had seen this white horse on the Eastern sky over the rising sun. The horse spoke to me: What did it say? “Hail him who is in darkness. The day is over him.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 106

Do not forget to say your morning prayer when the sun rises. ~Anchorite, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

Now I have prayed to the sun. But the anchorite really meant that I should ray to God at the break of day. He probably does not know-we have no more prayers. How should he know about our nakedness and poverty? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 107

“Dear beetle, where have you gone, I can no longer see you!?-Oh, you’re already over there with your mythical ball.” These little animals stick to things, quite unlike us-no doubt, no change of mind, no hesitation. Is this.so because they live their myth?

“Dear scarab, my father, I honor you, blessed be your work-in eternity. Amen.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. III, Page 108

As I said, there seem to be all sorts of things in Christianity that maybe one would do well to keep. Nietzsche is too oppositional. like everything healthy and long-lasting, truth unfortunately adheres more to the middle way, which we unjustly abhor. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 205

I have to crawl together out of many different corners in which I lost myself. I return to the black serpent rod. It seems like a solid and mighty piece of death. But death appears like a power belonging to me. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 227

Words of life, from the innermost and darkest life”-says another voice. Vanity and seduction blended deceivingly, because power shimmers in many beguiling and seducing colors. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 227

Power likes to subjugate external things, to rope in humans, to accumulate wealth, to commit acts of violence. Power wants to free itself from service, submission, and obedience, wants to harvest where it did not sow, to win where there is nothing to lose. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 227

I understand, it is the miracle of regeneration, the sinking into death, and the overcoming of death. But what does this image aim at? Does it speak of immortality? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 228

The magical rod lies in a cupboard together with the 6 & 7th books of Moses and the wisdom of Hermes Trismegistus. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 228

The sixth and seventh books of Moses (that is, in addition to the five contained in the Torah) were published in 1849 by Johann Schiebel, who claimed that they came from ancient Talmudic sources. The work, a compendium of Kabbalistic magical spells, has proved to be enduringly popular. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 230, fn 104

If magic were still taught today at the university, I would have studied it there. But the last college of magic was closed long ago. Today no professor knows anything anymore about magic. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 231

Ph. But stupidity would perhaps be progress on the way to magic. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 23

Ph. Well, that’s another advantage of magic, not even the devil gets the better of me. You’re beginning to understand magic, so I must assume that you have a good aptitude for it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 235

Banality is my element, a true point of tranquillity. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 236

Loving reaches up to Heaven and resisting reaches just as high. They are entwined and will not let go of each other, since the excessive tension seems to indicate the ultimate and highest possibility of feeling. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 237

My understanding? It is ignorance, nonsense, and wisdom. I no longer have any understanding. Perhaps it will return later, but today it is only a partial phenomenon to me and entirely unsatisfactory. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 238

When God did not proceed further, at least the devil progressed and vice versa. How will it be, now that God and the devil have become one? Are they in agreement to bring the progress of life to a standstill? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 239

I. My reaction is far from personal. I am utterly restless, quickly hurrying life. I am never contented, never unperturbed. I pull everything down and hastily rebuild; I am ambition, greed for fame, lust for action; I am the fizz of new thoughts and action. The absolute is- as the name says already- boring and vegetative. ~Satan, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 243

I. Without knowing it you [Satan] enlighten me. You are personal life-but the apparent standstill is the forbearing life of eternity, the life of divinity. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 244

I. What is it, then, with this “personal quality”? Yesterday Satan made a most “personal” impression on me.

Jung:  What is it, then, with this “personal quality”? Yesterday Satan made a most “personal” impression on me.

Soul: “I guess he does. Since he is the eternal adversary, and because you can never reconcile personal life with absolute life.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 247

I give you payment in images. Behold! ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 249

I Dear Salome, I thank you for your love. It is beautiful to hear love spoken of. It is music and old, far-off homesickness. look, my tears are falling on your good words. I want to kneel before you and kiss your hands a hundred times, because they want to give me the service of love. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 250

I am begging you [Jung’s Soul], be your own master and your own slave, do not belong to me but to yourself. Do not bear my burden, but your own. Thus you leave me my human freedom, a thing that’s worth more to me than the right of ownership over another person. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 252

I’m not sending you away. You must not be far from me. But give to me out of your fullness, not your longing. I cannot satisfy your poverty just as you You possess nothing, so how can you give? Insofar as you give, you demand. Elijah, old man, listen you are a patriarchal Jew, you have an old-fashioned gratitude. Do not give away your daughter, but set her on her own feet. She might dance, sing or play the lute before people, and they might throw flashing coins at her feet and cannot still my longing. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 252

I know where your [Elijah] serpent is. I have her. My soul fetched her for me from the underworld. She gives me hardness, wisdom, and magical power. We needed her in the upperworld, since otherwise the underworld would have had the advantage, to our detriment. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 254

Exactly, the commonplace is effectively true and thoroughly appropriate for you [Soul]. Don’t be so snobby. The commonplace is a rule of universal truth and a substantial certainty. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 263

Love is the most sensitive organ of perception. Only love lets you read your own soul and the souls of others. Nothing else will do. It is will be, it is, and it passes, hiding an infinite meaning in itself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 274

It demands the sacrifice only of your male prejudices. You need to intensify the longing in others. That way they become modest.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 276

. I must confess that I’m also somewhat surprised by this inspiration. But recently I came across a short passage from Thomas a Kempis that made a particular impression on me; why, I can’t really say. It dealt especially with the problem of the Imitation of Christ. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 203

I. You know that I value science extraordinarily highly, but there are actually moments in life where science also leaves us empty and sick. In such moments a book like Thomas’s [Kempis] means very much to me since it is written from the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 204

I. We haven’t come to an end with Christianity by simply putting it aside. It seems to me that there’s more to it than we see. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 204

Incidentally, a host of substitutes now exists for the loss of opportunity for prayer caused by the collapse of religion. Nietzsche, for example, has written a more than veritable book of prayer. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 204

Perhaps from your standpoint you’re right, but I can’t help feeling that Nietzsche speaks for those to those who need more freedom, not to those who clash strongly with life, who bleed from wounds, who have been afflicted by actualities. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 205

I believe one can also follow one’s own nose, that would also be an intuitive method. But the beautiful way in which the Christian does this must nevertheless be of special value. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 207

Let go, daimon, you did not live your animal! ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 208

So long as we live here on earth, we cannot escape temptation?. There is no man who is so perfect, and no saint so sacred, that he cannot be tempted on occasion. Yes, we can hardly be without temptation. ~Thomas Kempis cited, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 208

To me: You see, nowadays, the “Imitatio Christi” leads to the madhouse. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 209

The problem of madness is profound-divine madness-a higher form of the irrationality of the life streaming through us-at any rate a madness that cannot be integrated into present-day society-but what if the form of society gave way to madness? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 210-211

Have you recognized your madness and do you admit it? Have you noticed that you harbor your madness? Have you noticed that all your foundations are completely mired in madness? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 211

Do you not want to recognize your madness and welcome it in a friendly manner? You wanted to accept everything that you find in yourself. So accept madness too. Let the light of your madness shine, and it will suddenly dawn on you. Madness is not to be despised and not to be feared, but instead you should give it life.”  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 211

Our life is the truth that we seek. My life is the path for those who come after me. Only my life is my truth, the truth above all. We create the truth by living it. Only in retrospect life becomes truth. We do not find truth first and then we live it, but the other way around. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 215

Life should proceed, from birth to death and from death to birth-from sense to madness and from madness to sense- unbroken like the path of the sun-Everything should proceed on this path. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 216

“My soul, in everything and yet beyond everything, you must find your rest in the lord, for he is the eternal rest of the saints.” I read this sentence aloud-putting an astonished question mark by every word. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 217

I patiently take off my armor and go to the spring wearing a white penitent’s shirt, where I wash my hands and feet on my own and baptize myself in the name of the one that I am. Then I take off my penitent’s shirt and put on my civilian clothes. I walk out of the scene and approach myself-I who am still kneeling down, ossified. I rise and become one with myself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 219

Thereafter I walk on like a man who is tense, and who expects something new that he has never suspected before. I listen to the depths-warned, instructed, and undaunted-outwardly striving to lead a full human life. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 220

I will gratefully accept what you give, my soul. I do not have the right to judge or to reject. Fate will separate the wheat from the chaff. We have to subjugate ourselves also to the judgment of valuelessness and destruction in majorem vitae gloriam [to the greater glory of life]. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 220

I wanted to laugh, because so much alters in laughter, and resolves itself only there. Here laughter dies in me. Its magic is as solid as iron and as cold as death. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 226

Waiting-I know this word. Hercules also found waiting burdensome when he carried the vault of the heavens on his shoulders. “He had to await Atlas’s return and carried the vault of the heavens for the sake of the apples.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. IV, Page 226

Just like the sun, which is also such a star, which is a God and grandfather of souls, the star of the individual is also like the sun, a God and grandfather of the souls. He is visible from time to time, just as I have described him. His light is blue, like that of a distant star.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

To attain individuality, we need a large share of death. Therefore it is called “Ye are Gods”, since just as an innumerable number of men rule the earth, so a countless number of stars and of Gods rule the heavenly world. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

But you have in you the one God, the wonderfully beautiful and kind, the solitary, starlike, unmoving, he who is older and wiser than the father, he who has a safe hand, who leads you among all the darknesses and death scares of dreadful Abraxas.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 275

As a God, you are the great Abraxas in your world. But as a man you are the heart of the one God who appears to his world as the great Abraxas, the feared, the powerful, the donor of madness, he who dispenses the water of life, the spirit of the tree of life, the daimon of the blood, the death bringer. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 275

Pain and disappointment fill the world of Abraxas with coldness, all of your life’s warmth slowly sinks into the depths of your soul, into the midpoint of man, where the far blue starlight of your one God glimmers. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 276

1035

If Heaven becomes pregnant and can no longer hold its fruit, then it gives birth and a God-man appears from above and sets foot below. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 246

In order to carry the burden and mockery of this sin. The tree of life is heavy, it needs broad shoulders. This time you and mankind should carry it. But I want still more of your blood. ~ Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 246

It is supposed to paralyze you, because your earth-born indignation breaks down like an extinguished fire. The bird is above you. Your supports crumble as if consumed by an inner fire. You sink down into the ash. The bird triumphs over the serpent. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 247

Life becomes a shadow, and the shadow enlivens itself. The shadow that is greater than you. Do you think that your shadow is your son? It is small at midday, and fills the skies at midnight. ~ Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 247

You see-or do you still not see, what the living do with your life? They fritter it away. But with us you live yourself, since we belong to you, we belong to your invisible following and community. ~ Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 248

Am I at your mercy? Should day no longer shine for me? Should I become a shadow with a living body amongst you, invisible ones? You are formless and beyond grasp, and you emanate the coldness of the grave. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 248

lmpetuous one, stop-you take our breath away-we are shadows; become a shadow and you will grasp what we give. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 248

You coax men into megalomania that you cannot deflate and to which you fall victim to your own creation. It is not possible, do you hear at last?  ~ Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 249

Jung: Ridiculous trickery! I’m no parson. Where are the institutions:’

Dead Woman: “Create them! Dig deep, everything is ready. But work on the book of the secrets and the teachings. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 250

Therefore, above all, solitude, if until every softness toward yourself has been burnt out of you. You shall freeze, after the devil has preceded you. Now is not the time for love, but for deeds. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 251

Jung: What do you mean, my work? My science, my book?

The Black Books, Vol. V, Page It’s not your book, it’s the book. Science is what you do. Do it, without hesitation. There is no way back, only forward. Your love belongs there. Ridiculous-your love! You must allow death to occur. The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 251

The will of the God, that is stronger than you, bearer, slave. You have fallen into the hands of the greater. He knows no mercy. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 251

But he who does not fall into the hands of men falls into the hands of the God. May he be well and may woe betide him! There is no escape. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 252

I want the church, it is necessary for you and for others. Otherwise what are you going to do with those whom I force onto you and at your feet? You ought to lovingly receive them, not in your bosom, but in the bosom of the church. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 254

Will you learn to revere the torment of the human animal? What would you souls and Gods want without man? Why do you long for him? You cannot be without him! Speak! The eternally rich universe should unfold again in the earthly Heaven and the Heaven of the Gods, in the underworlds and in the worlds above. Separation once more comes to the agonizingly united and yoked. Endless multiplicity takes the place of what has been forced together. Since diversity alone is wealth, blossom, and harvest. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 263

Eternal fate presides over the Gods also, not only over mortals. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 268

Above all dedicate your prayer to me, so I can convey it to the distant God. Prayer has magical power and compels the Gods. Don’t you feel the influence of the Gods and the daimons? ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 269

I understand, yet you know that it is the same. Both are valid for me. like all natural women, form matters less to me than having everything belong to me or else to no one. I am even jealous of the hate you give others. I want everything, since I need everything for the great journey that I intend to begin after your disappearance. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

Of course, here I have peace and can collect myself. Your human world makes me drunk so much human blood-I could get intoxicated on it to the point of madness. Doors of iron, walls of stone, cold darkness and the rations of penance-that is the bliss of redemption. You do not suspect my torment when the bloody intoxication seizes me, I would like to hurl myself again and again into living matter from a dark fearful creative urge that formerly brought me close to the lifeless and ignited the terrible lust for procreation in me. Remove me from conceiving matter, the rutting feminine of yawning emptiness. Force me into confinement where I can find resistance and my own law. Where I can think about the journey, the rising sun and the buzzing, melodious golden wings. Be thankful-you wanted to thank me? You are deluded.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Page 262

Oh this bitterness! You [Jung’s Soul] have dragged me through sheer and utter Hell, you have tormented me nearly to death- and I long for your thanks. Yes, I am moved that you thank me. The hound’s nature lies in my blood. Therefore I am bitter. For my sake, since-how does it move you! You are divine and devilishly great, wherever and howsoever you are. I am only your prison guard, your eunuch doorkeeper, no less imprisoned than you. Thrice damned marriage! Speak, you concubine of Heaven, you divine monster! Have I not fished you from the swamp? How do you like the black hole? Speak

without blood, sing from your own force, you have gorged yourself on men.  You deserve my thanks, my deepest thanks. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Page 262-263

So, it is love that you claim as a natural right, although you still ought to beg for it. You get drunk on the blood of man and let him starve-love belongs to me. You’ll crawl and beg for it like a dog. You’ll raise your hands. You will fawn, in order to get it. I possess the key and I will be a more just administrator than you half-beings, you soulless souls and you godless Gods, and you godforsaken God. You will gather around the source of blood, and you will come bearing gifts so that you may receive what you need. Oh, men, protect the holy source so that no God can seize it for himself. The Gods know no measure and no mercy. They get drunk on the most precious of draughts. They waste it in drunkenness, since they know neither God nor soul. Presumptuousness and excessiveness, severity and callousness are their essence. Greed for the sake of greed, power for the sake of power, pleasure for the sake of pleasure, immoderation and insatiableness, this is how you recognize the daimons. Ha, you have yet to learn, you devils and Gods, to crawl in the dust for the sake of love so that from someone somewhere you snatch a drop of the living sweetness. learn humility and pride from men for the sake of love. You Gods, your first born son is man. He bore a terribly beautiful-ugly son of God. But this mystery, too, is accomplished with you. You bore a son of men, no less splendid-terrible, and you will also serve under his rule. Both God and man are disappointed victims of deception, blessedly  blessed, powerlessly powerful. ~Carl Jung,  The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 266

That is your disbelief, your doubt. You don’t want to believe in the magnitude of the sacrifice that is required. But it will go on to the bitter end. Greatness requires greatness. You still want to be too cheap. This only causes misunderstanding. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 230

Jung: I see a palace in front of me, with countless windows, and hear: “In my father’s house are many mansions.” What does it mean?

Jung’s Soul: “Think about it, please.” Why ask? You can guess for yourself. Fear makes you dull. Everything is way too obvious. But you don’t want to believe. No more proofs! That will do. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 230

Never forget that you are a man and therefore you must bleed for the goal of humanity. listen, you are still too juvenile for your age. You should get older, the years are dwindling and yet your work has not been accomplished.  ~Anchorite, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 231

Jung: Is it not enough yet? Do I thus not counter the spirit of the time if I dissociate myself from science?

Anchorite: You are not supposed to dissociate yourself, but consider that science is merely your language. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 232

The hand that strikes first, strikes best.

Nonsense streams from the deepest wells, amply like the Nile.

Morning is more beautiful than night.

The flower smells until it fades.

Ripeness comes as late as possible in spring, or else it misses its purpose.

Madness is the most acceptable of all evils; it is misunderstood. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 233

Ha, this book! I have laid hands on you again- banal and pathological and frantic and divine, my written unconscious! You have forced me to my knees again! Here I am, say what you have to say! ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 233

One should buy and sell you. Hermes is your daimon. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 236

You should pass from hand to hand. Self-willing is not for you. You are the will of the whole. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 236

Must gold prove its necessity? It is proven through the longing of men. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 236

Philemon, keeper of the hoard, with ambiguous speech you attend to your duty. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 237

The burden of silence is no greater than the burden of my I that I always like to offload onto the other. Therefore I speak and I teach. May the listener defend himself against my ruse, by means of which I burden him. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 237

The Christian morality of our time goes on producing mutual enchantment. But sin resides in that. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 238

He who falls away from himself has not abandoned himself. He has simply freed himself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 238

It is necessary that we go into ourselves every day to reestablish the connection with the self. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 239

Through constant outward living we lose the self and through this we also become secretly selfish in our best endeavors.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 239

Through uniting with the self we reach the God, who unites heaven and hell in himself. The self is not God, although we reach the God through the self. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 239

It is divine service to serve oneself. We thus relieve humanity of ourselves. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 240

To give all one’s goods to the poor means to educate them to become idle. Pity should not carry another’s load, but it should be a strict educator instead.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 240

They were 3 dead who came to me last night. One woman was especially clear. She bequeathed to me the whirr of her golden wings, this singing grave roofed by sun wings. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 241

Jung: A phallus?

That is it, that is the symbol of the middle. That’s what we wanted, what we needed. It is terribly simple, initially stupid, naturally godlike, the God’s other pole. This is precisely the pole we needed. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 242

He [God’s other Pole] is the flesh spirit, the blood spirit, he is the extract of all bodily juices, the spirit of the sperm, the spirit of menstruating, of the urine and the faeces, of the liver, of the heart, of the lungs, of the eyes, of the ears, of the genitals, of the legs, of the hands, of the bowels, but not of the brain, yes, also of the brain, but of its liquid and fibers, of what is conjoined and not single in the brain. Not the spirit of the cells, not from the nucleus, but from the protoplasm. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 242

We want to share in your life. That way we gain corporeality. Thus we can draw closer to you. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 243

I drink and feel new power. Listen: Build the church. Write the holy books, the age-old new ones, that contain the echo of the eternal being, the mysterious ones- mocked wisdom-the lower and upper truth. ~Dead Woman, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 245

So listen, dear I, we are together alone and our being together threatens to become unbearably boring. Hence I would like to do something, for example, educate you. Your main flaw is, that you have no proper self-esteem. You  see, other people have it in abundance. You have a number of good qualities that you can be proud of. You believe that being capable is an art. Of course that is the art. But one can also learn such skills to some extent. Please, do so. You find it difficult- well, all beginnings are difficult. Soon you will be able to do it better. Do you doubt this?-That is of no use; you must be able to do it, or else I cannot exist with you. Ever since my soul has flown to heaven we have depended upon one another; you therefore need to be reasonable and present yourself acceptably or else our life together will become wretched. So pull yourself together and value yourself, admire yourself, tell yourself that you have incomparable merits and admirable virtues. Don’t you want to? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 215-216

Or do you want love, or what goes by that name? One can also teach with love, if blows do not bear fruit. So I will love you. I embrace you as a visible sign of my love. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 216

How now, you want to speak? But I won’t let you, otherwise in the end you will claim that you are my soul; but know the magic word. My soul has risen to the sky, to the sources of the eternal light. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 217

For I want to get along with you-I must-damn you-you are my I, which I must carry around with me to the grave. Do you think I’d like an embuggerance such as you as a companion for ever? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 218

And then how do you really think? It appears to me that you even think with men, regardless of their human dignity; you dare think by means of them, and use them as figures on your stage, as if they were how you conceive or imagine them? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 221

In LN, the remainder of this entry was replaced by the following: “I want you to speak about your shame, and that instead of speaking great words, you utter a discordant clamor before those whose respect you wanted to exact. You deserve mockery, not respect. / I will burn out of you the contents of which you were proud, so that you will become empty like a poured-out vessel. You should be proud of nothing more than your emptiness and wretchedness. You should be a vessel of life, so kill your idols. / Freedom does not belong to you, but form; not power, but suffering and conceiving. / You should make a virtue out of your self-contempt, which I will spread out before men like a carpet. They should walk over it with dirty feet and you should see to it that you are dirtier than all the feet that step on you” (LN, p. 466). ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 222, fn 93

Ridiculously enough, I did not know at this stage that if I tame my beast the other beasts around me will be tamed at the same time. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 223

An act of violence is disgraceful, sensitivity, too. It is the violent act of the inactive man. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 223

Jung later described the self-criticism depicted in this opening section as the confrontation with the shadow. In 1934 he wrote: “Whoever looks into the mirror of the water will see first of all his own image. Whoever goes to himself risks a confrontation with himself. The mirror does not flatter, it faithfully shows whatever looks into it; namely the face we never show to the world because we cover it with the persona, the mask of the actor. But the mirror lies behind the mask and shows the true face. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page

This confrontation is the first test of courage on the inner way, a test sufficient to frighten off most people, for the meeting with ourselves belongs to the more unpleasant things that can be avoided as long as one can project everything negative into the environment. But if we are able to see our own shadow and can bear knowing about it, then a small part of the problem has already been solved: we have at least brought up the personal unconscious” (“On the Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 224, fn 107

The uncertain way is the good way; upon it lie possibilities. Be unwavering and create. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 226

Should I speak to the above or the below? Below are you, my brother I, above, my soul, are you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 228

Leave him [Man] compassion. Compassion binds life and death and is a bridge from death to life. There are also the apparently dead and the collapsed. With compassion they might keep up. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 227

Is the excrement of the earth not sacred? “Yes and no. The soil of the earth is sacred, but not its excrement. Excrement is excrement,” earth is earth.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 228

There is a divine and a human intention. They cross each other in stupid and godforsaken people, who also include you from time to time.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 228

I also dread the madness that befalls the solitary.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 229

Not so much- it comes from solitude. One starts to smell in solitude-and the smell reaches far. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 205

Do you call it just, when you do not live? Who shall live at all, if you don’t?’ Everyone should live. You act in self-defense. Your kindness borders almost on the absurd. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 206

The works of Abraxas are to be fulfilled, for consider that in your world you yourself are Abraxas and force your creature to fulfil your work. Here, where you are the creature subjugated to Abraxas, you must learn to fulfill the work of life. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

So live life, do not flee Abraxas, provided that he compels you and you can recognize his necessity. In one sense I say to you: do not fear him, do not love him. In another sense I say: fear him, love him. He is the life of the earth, that says enough. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

You need to recognize the multiplicity of the Gods. You cannot unite all into one being. As little as you are one with the multiplicity of men, just so little is the one God one with the multiplicity of the Gods. This one God is the kind, the loving, the leading, the healing. To him all your love and worship is due. To him you should pray, you are one with him, he is near you, nearer than your soul. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

I, your soul, am your mother, who tenderly and frightfully surrounds you, your nourisher and corrupter; I prepare good things and poison for you. I am your intercessor with Abraxas. I teach you the arts that protect you from Abraxas. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

You should call me if you want to live with men, but the one God if you want to rise above the human world to the divine and eternal solitude of the star. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

My soul, I call upon you- I fear something terrible and dreadful-nameless fear fills my heart, since the things that you announced beforehand were awful-must everything be broken, burned, and destroyed? Does no cry of despair reach you?  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 278

But we are the Pleroma, for we are enclosed in and part of the eternal and the endless. But we have no share therein, as we are infinitely removed from the Pleroma; not spatially or temporally, but essentially, since we are distinguished from the Pleroma in our essence as creation, which is confined within time and space. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 285

I bind the Above with the Below. I bind God and animal. Something in me is part animal, something part God, and a third part human. Below you serpent, within you man, and above you God. Beyond the serpent comes the phallus, then the earth, then the moon, and finally the coldness and emptiness of outer space. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

Above you comes the dove or the heavenly soul, in which love and foresight are united, just as poison and shrewdness are united in the serpent. Shrewdness is the devil’s understanding, which always detects smaller things and finds chinks where you suspect none. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

If I am not conjoined through the uniting of the Below and the Above, I break down into three parts: the serpent, and in that or some other animal form I roam, living nature daimonically, arousing fear and longing. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

The human soul, living forever within you. The heavenly soul, as such dwelling with the Gods, far from you and unknown to you, appearing in the form of a bird. Each of these three parts then is independent. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 270

The heavenly mother is a daimon among the order of the Gods, an inhabitant of the heavenly world. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 271

The Gods are favorable and unfavorable, impersonal, the souls of stars, influences, forces, grandfathers of souls, rulers in the heavenly world, both in space and in force. They are neither dangerous nor kind, strong, yet humble, clarifications of the Pleroma and of the eternal emptiness, configurations of the eternal qualities. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 271

Man becomes through the principium individuationis. He strives for absolute individuality, through which he ever increasingly concentrates the absolute dissolution of the Pleroma. Through this he makes the Pleroma the point that contains the greatest tension and is itself a shining star, immeasurably small, just as the Pleroma is immeasurably great. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 271-272

The more concentrated the Pleroma becomes, the stronger the star of the individual becomes. It is surrounded by shining clouds, a heavenly body in the making, comparable to a small sun. It emits fire. Therefore it is called: “I am a star, wandering about with you”   ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

To be sure, this God is the one who survives the death of men. To him for whom solitude is Heaven, he goes to Heaven; to him for whom it is Hell, he goes to Hell. Whoever does not follow the principium individuationis to its end becomes no God, since he cannot bear individuality.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

The dead who besiege us are souls who have not fulfilled the principium individuationis, or else they would have become distant stars. Insofar as we do not fulfill it, the dead have a claim on us and besiege us and we cannot escape them. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 272

The God of the frogs or toads, the brainless, is the uniting of the Christian God with Satan. His nature is like the flame; he is like Eros, but a God; Eros is only a daimon. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 274

The more you free yourself from him [Abraxas], the more you approach death, since he is the life of the universe. But he is also universal death. Therefore you fall victim to him again, not in life but in dying. So remember him, do not worship him, but also do not imagine that you can flee him since he is all around you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 275

You must be in the middle of life, surrounded by death on all sides. Stretched out, like one crucified, you hang in him, the fearful, the overpowering.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 275

You yourself are a creator of worlds and a created being. You have the one God, and you become your one God in the innumerable number of Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 275

The suffering of mankind is without end, since its life is without end. Since there is no end where none sees an end. If mankind has come to an end, there is none who would see its end and none who could say that mankind has an end. So it has no end for itself, but it certainly does for the Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 276

The death of Christ took no suffering away from the world, but his life has taught us much; namely, that it pleases the one God if the individual lives his own life against the power of Abraxas. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 276

Only by living life can you free yourself from it. So live it to such a degree that it befits you. To the degree that you live it, you also fall victim to the power of Abraxas and his dreadful deceptions. But to the same degree the star God in you gains in pew longing and power, in that the fruit of deception and human disappointment falls to him. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 276

You need to recognize the multiplicity of the Gods. You cannot unite all into one being. As little as you are one with the multiplicity of men, just so little is the one God one with the multiplicity of the Gods. This one God is the kind, the loving, the leading, the healing. To him all your love and worship is due. To him you should pray, you are one with him, he is near you, nearer than your soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 277

You see that it almost surpasses the power of a man. I want to accept and suffer it for your sake-and never for mine. To be crucified on the tree of life, Oh bitterness! Oh painful silence! If it weren’t you, my soul, who touched the fiery Heaven and the eternal fullness, how could I? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 257

I go and cast myself before human animals, so they can tear me apart. Oh most unmanly torment! I must let my virtues, my best ability be torn apart, because they are still thorns in the side of the human animal. Not death for the sake of the best, but befouling and rending of the most beautiful for the sake of life. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 257

Haven’t you had enough of beholding the fiery fullness, my soul? Do you still want to emerge entire into the glaring white light of the Godhead? Into what shades of horror are you plunging me? Is the stinking devil’s pool so deep that its mud sullies even your glowing robe? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 257

Remove, Oh man, the divine, too, from your soul, as far as you can manage. What a devilish foolish farce she carries on with you, as long as she still arrogates divine power over you! She’s an unruly child, a bloodthirsty daimon, a tormentor of humans without equal, precisely because she has divinity. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 258

Shield men from her [Soul], and her from men. Listen to what she wails and sings in prison but don’t let her escape, as she will immediately turn whore. As her husband you are blessed through her, and therefore cursed. let her be with the dead as her playmates, since she belongs to their kind more than to yours. She is smaller and larger than a man. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 259

For if you do not see your soul, you see her in fellow men and this will drive you mad, since this devilish mystery and hellish spook can hardly be seen through. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 259

Look at man, the weak one in his wretchedness and torment, whom the Gods have singled out as their quarry- tear to pieces the bloody veil that the lost soul has woven around you, the cruel nets woven by the death-bringing, and take hold of the divine whore who still cannot recover from her fall from grace and in raving blindness craves filth in which to throw herself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 259

Draw the coat of patience and silence over your head, sit down, and leave the daimon to accomplish his work. If he brings something about, he will work wonders. Thus will you sit under a fruit-bearing tree. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 260

Know that the daimons would like to inflame you to embrace their work, which is not yours. And, you fool, you believe that it is you, because you can’t distinguish yourself from your soul. But you are distinct from her, you are not a soul-God-Devil, but instead you are a powerless man who need not foster the regenerated Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 260-261

For you are the prison guard of your soul, the eunuch of your soul, who protects her from Gods and men. You must equally protect men from her- yes, perhaps even the Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

But your soul, this extract of human essence, could by way of that poison endanger even the Gods. So put the dangerous one under wraps, since not only your fellow men but also the Gods must live. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

Of course, here I have peace and can collect myself. Your human world makes me drunk so much human blood-I could get intoxicated on it to the point of madness. Doors of iron, walls of stone, cold darkness and the rations of penance-that is the bliss of redemption. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 261

I’ve learned how one behaves as a soul, perfectly ambiguous, mysteriously untruthful and hypocritical. But above all one must start with betrayal. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 263

You [Jung] carry us up as your soul and set yourself before the son of God, maintaining your immortal right as an ensouled being. We are joyful, good things will follow you, we lend you strength. We are in the land of men and we are alive. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 264

Embellish yourself with the gold of the Gods, but not with the meager treasures of earthbound human beings. May you taste heavenly poverty after you have preached earthly poverty to men for so long, like a true and proper cleric full of lies, who fills his belly and purse and preaches poverty. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 265

Ha, you have yet to learn, you devils and Gods, to crawl in the dust for the sake of love so that from someone somewhere you snatch a drop of the living sweetness. learn humility and pride from men for the sake of love. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 266

You must melt down all your feeling, which has been worn out by the day, through inward retrieval into the mounting heat, in order to purge rust and breakage in the fire’s heat, so you can renew the work of the day with restored tools. The ancestors prayed and practised the holy ceremonies. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 268

You are ignorant of the power of matter, just as you know nothing of human power, not even your own. Matter is the counterpole to God. God lures the phallus out of himself. Yes, he lures matter out of the devilish void, which is God himself.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 269

You know that the power of the phallus is great. Did you ever doubt it? Then know that the power of matter is even greater. The earth is more powerful than the phallus, he is the transient son, she is the age-old mother. The hardest, most imperishable matter is the best. It needs to be built into this matter. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 269

The hardest stone is good for the greatest idea. To penetrate deeper into matter endows thought with greater powers. Always erect it in matter. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 269

Should I live with ghosts, instead of with the living? Must all the longing for living men belong to you, the dead? Did you not have your time to live? Did you not use it? Should a living person give his life for your sake, you who did not live the eternal? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 249

The yoke of men is lighter than the yoke of the God. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 252

The highest freedom. Only the God above you, through yourself. Comfort yourself with this and that as well as you can. The God bolts doors that you cannot open. Let your feelings whimper like puppies. The ears on high are deaf. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 252

God is not solemn, he is terrible. Solemnity belongs to you, it is human, not divine. God has no need of theatre. I am the highest of the dead and resurrected. I was dead, you gave me life, my life. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 252

Revenge is human. God does not know revenge. He knows only power and creation. He commands and you act. Your anxieties are laughable, there is only one road, the military road of the Godhead. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 252

You should not serve your personal devil. That leads to superfluous pain. True joy is simple and comes and exists from itself, and is not to be sought here and there. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 253

At the risk of encountering black night, you must devote yourself to me and seek no joy. Joy can never ever be prepared, but exists of its own accord or exists not at all. All you must do is fulfil your task, nothing else. Joy comes from fulfillment, not from searching for it. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 253

There are also internal ceremonies. The ceremony must be dissolved and become spirit. The bridge should lead out beyond humanity. Inviolable, far, of the air. Your bridge is too low. People will knock their heads on it. There is a community of spirits. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 254-255

Let us build the bond of community so that living and dead images will become one and the past will live on in the present. ~The Dead One, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 256

Help me to understand your language, so that I will not stray from you nor you from me. I need community with you so that I fall prey neither to the community of the living nor to my desire and yours, whose envy is insatiable unending and therefore begets evil. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 256

You are my community. I live what I can live for the living. But I cannot live the excess of my longing with the living. It belongs to you, you shades. We need your living with us. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 256

But I am damned to haul you [Jung’s Ego] through a medieval hell, so that you too will become somewhat acceptable. But before that the devil shall live with you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 218

The touchstone is being alone with oneself. This is the way to the valuation of oneself. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 218

A movement back into the Middle Ages is a sort of regression, but it is not personal. It is an historical regression, a regression into the past of the collective unconscious. This always takes place when the way ahead is not free, when there is an obstacle from which you recoil; or when you need to get something out of the past in order to climb over the wall ahead. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 218, fn 216

And now we come to the vile swindle that you [Jung’s Ego] pursue with your intellect.

You [Jung’s Ego] speak more ·skillfully than others; and thus you abuse your capability and discolor and tone down and strengthen and touch up, and loudly proclaim your honorableness and credulity. You gloatingly leave others in the lurch, if they only get caught in your snares. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 220

But you [Jung’s Ego] are responsible to humanity in everything that you do and that you think. Do not pretend there is a difference between thinking and doing. You rely only on your undeserved advantage, not to be compelled to say or do what you think and feel. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 221

You [Jung’s Ego] ought to be life’s womb and vessel. Smash all the dead idols within. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 223

You [Jung’s Ego] should struggle to leave what others must do in spite of their effort. Freedom does not belong to you, but form; not power, but the conceiving and suffering. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 223

Your [Jung’s Ego[ soul, my brother ass, has risen to the light. You are not your soul, you only belong to your soul, and it belongs to the great light that never goes out. The life of man does not extend to your soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 224 [error]

You [Ego] want to be understood? That’s all we needed. Understand yourself, and you will be sufficiently understood. The powers of nature understand you better than you do yourself.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 224

If you were not my soul who rose to the eternal realm, I would call you the most terrible scourge of men. But who moves you? I know that divinity is not humanity. The divine consumes the human. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 227

As you already know, I [Soul] have long predicted solitude for you. You need not be afraid of madness. You won’t be so lonely that you must fear madness. You see that your work prospers and bears marvelous fruits. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 229

I am a nameless one, one of the many who lived and died in solitude. The spirit of the times and the acknowledged truth required this from us. look at me- you must learn this. Things have been too good for you. Only solitude can grant depth. ~Anchorite, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 231

Practice solitude assiduously without grumbling so that everything will in time become ready. You [Ego] should not die unfulfilled. Your years are numbered and many years are still needed for your fulfillment. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 232

You [Ego] should become serious and your word sink heavy as iron into the ground of mankind. Let go of too much science. There lies the way that is not your way. Your way goes toward the depths, toward the rarest and deepest. Science is surface, instrument, language. You have yet to perceive this childishness in science. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 232

Jung: Am I a scholastic?

Anchorite: Not that, but scientific; science is a new version of scholasticism. It needs to be surmounted. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 232

Soul: But you can change inwardly. You need to become stronger and more affirmative. That way you will make it turn out well.”

Jung: I’ll remember that. You mean the “man” inside me.

Soul: You need to stand in for the Divine. Don’t forget. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 234

What tribulations do men not take upon themselves for the sake of gold? Gold waits and does not shorten their tribulations. The greater the tribulations, the greater the trouble, the more esteemed it is. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 237

Self-forgetting virtue is an unnatural alienation from one’s own essence, which is thus deprived of redemption. But It is a sin to deliberately alienate the other from his self by means of one’s own virtuousness. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 239

The work of redemption is always first to be done on ourselves. This work cannot be done without love for ourselves. Selfless love is a sin, because it is not true. We can never abandon our self, or else we will abandon our work of redemption. But we also should not use the other for our own alleged redemption. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 239

The God acts from within himself. This should be left to him. What we do to the self, we do to the God. If we twist the self, we also twist the God. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 239

Even closer? What? Even deeper into the grave of the God? Is the place of our work in the vault itself? The God should not live in us, but we should live in the God. Apparently in the self and thus in God. Dreams and long days of tranquillity. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 240

Jung: What remains when my flashing godly light fades away?

A Dead Woman: Your body remains with you, my beloved, body, living body. You will think from your body, not from the cell nuclei of your brain. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 242

The phallus is not the foundation but the summit of a building, of a church that still lies sunken, like a tower erected over a dome. We need this church since we can live in it with you and take part in your life. You have excluded us to your own detriment. Hence for you the phallus is the first sign of the church in which you hope for community with the living? Speak, why do you hesitate? ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 244

“Brimo, the old one-which is how it begins. The one who bore the son, the towering phallus, who grew out of her shame and strove after the shame of the heavenly wife, who arches over earth. Because she lies above the son, enveloping him above and below. The head of the phallus reaches down to her lower parts, but her bliss radiates beyond her head into the spaces, higher than the head of phallus can reach, the blind one, the worm. She bears and raises him. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 245-246

A number of times I read in Nietzsche the expression “ultimate solitude.” This is the phrase that stands before me. My soul, do you hear this expression? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 203

See Nietzsche, “The Fire-Signal,” in Dithyrambs of Dionysus (1888): “Seamen blown off course! Rubble of old stars! / You seas of the future! Unexplored sky! / to all that knows solitude do I now throw this line: / give answers to the flame’s impatience, / catch me, the fisherman on high mountains, / my seventh. final solitude!”  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 203, fn 3 [error]

The individual must now consolidate himself by cutting himself off from the divine and becoming wholly himself. Thereby and at the same time he also separates himself from society. Outwardly he plunges into solitude, but inwardly into hell, distance from God. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 203-204, fn 3

Whoever does not value his own life will lose it. Now you must live. Others ought to look after themselves and not stand where your knife stabs. You shouldn’t become a monkey and fool to others- for the sake of tomfoolery. Everything has a limit. They will be insolent to you because you have laid down your weapons. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 205-206

Jung: Should one refrain from teaching truth to others?

Jung’s Soul: Yes, one should. Restrict yourself to teaching the way to subjective truth. Objective truth in these matters comes down to a delusional system. Ultimate things ought to be subjective truths.” ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

You don’t know the significance of the subjective. It is of cosmic significance. It reaches to the kernel of things. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

It [the subjective] is related to the chaos, the deep essence of the world. The law is surface, order is the outer side. Chaos is your mother. You rest in uncertainty as in the mother’s womb, eternally becoming and in a seminal state. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 208

A kangaroo with her joey in her pouch. – This is painfully grotesque-and fraught with meaning. The ink almost flows too fast in order to write such things easily… The kangaroo is an image of Christ, as is the Pelican. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 209

The maternal is cruel- for he who is not stuck inside. But for he who is inside it is pure bliss and delight, and he can prosper. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 210

Don’t ask in such a direct way, it’s disturbing. Don’t disturb the development of nonsense. It’s salutary. This is what you need to learn today. let the nonsensical grow. How else could you discern meaning?” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 210

Yes, uncertain, by God. We have to speak of “uncertain”.  I think this is an important point. “Uncertain” is the word of words for everyone who must consort with his beloved and revered soul. I tend toward contempt of the soul. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 210

I rise again-I had become flesh-now I return to eternal glitter and shimmer, to the eternal embers of the sun, and leave you to your life and earthliness. You will remain with men. You have been in immortal company long enough. Your work belongs to the earth. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 211

In the light, in the egg, in the sun, in what is innermost and compressed, in the eternal longing embers-so rises the sun in your heart and streams out into the cold world. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 212

My soul, do you still exist? You, whom I ridiculed and abused, who appeared to me in a foolish form? Woe betide those who have seen their soul and felt it with hands! I am powerless in your hand, my God! ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 213

Such is my language and to you I leave the understanding. No one besides you has your soul. It is always with you, yet you see it in others, and thus it is never with you. You strive to draw to yourself those who seem to possess your soul. You will come to see that they do not possess it, and that you alone have it. Thus you are alone among men-in the crowd and yet alone. Solitude in multitude-ponder this. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 213

I believe and accept that my soul is something different from me. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 215

Do you sense it, the duty of the world?

Yes, from spheres to spheres

it needs to bear seed from seed,

it brings us the light of the world:

sprinkling as if from a dark sieve

it sows love, love, love

from night to night, from pole to pole. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 103

These lines were copied here by Toni Wolff. They are from an epic poem by Richard Dehmel (1863–1920), 1905 this work inspired a series of seven woodcut prints by the Expressionist painter Ludwig Kirchner. Dehmel’s frank treatment of sexual themes led to charges of obscenity and blasphemy. In 1905 this work inspired a series of seven woodcut prints by the Expressionist painter Ludwig Kirchner. Dehmel’s frank treatment of sexual themes led to charges of obscenity and blasphemy. Page 557, fn 1

My God, my wonderful light! Page 555

An inscription in Toni Wolff’s handwritting.

“LA SOMMA SAPIENZE E’L PRIMO AMORE” (the highest wisdom and the primal love) is the sixth line of the third Canto of Dante’s Inferno, the inscription above the gate of hell.

The whole inscription reads: “THROUGH ME THE WAY INTO THE GRIEVING CITY, / THROUGH ME THE WAY INTO ETERNAL SORROW, / THROUGH / ME THE WAY AMONG THE LOST PEOPLE. / JUSTICE MOVED MY HIGH MAKER; DIVINE POWER MADE ME, / HIGHEST WISDOM, AND PRIMAL LOVE. / BEFORE ME WERE NO THINGS CREATED / EXCEPT ETERNAL ONES, AND I ENDURE ETERNAL. / ABANDON EVERY HOPE, YOU WHO ENTER” ~The Black Books, Page 405, fn 1.

Sunday. This entry was not reproduced in LN. On January 27, 1916, there was a presentation to the Association for Analytical Psychology by Adolf Keller concerning Théodore Flournoy’s “Une mystique moderne.”

Jung had two copies of this work, both of which were annotated. In the discussion, Toni Wolff noted, “In analysis one can also reach God through love and will, not by overpowering, as K. thinks.”

Jung replied, “In analysis we rather get prepared for it. If not, overpowering happens.”

Schneiter commented, “The unio mystica of the mystics is love,” and Jung commented, “The experience of the devil is missing.”

Emma Jung commented, “The concept of God does precisely not match a known image or an imago,” to which Jung replied, “That is already the case with the primitives (the God is not the father, but the Grandfather, etc.).  This shows that it is not a revaluation of the father and that it is only concept by proxy that could be replaced by any other. God is everything that is xx and creates emotion.”

Further on in the discussion, Jung commented:

“First God is felt traditionally, conventionally, then dynamically, then felt into humanity (as magical effect of the person).

But this results in a God beyond good and evil. It leads to the devil (as war). It is a primitive thought: everything alien is magical. Also medieval. Mlle V shows us that she experiences God as a subjective dynamis, and between men it is the personal.  A God beyond good and evil questions the human relationship . . . a God beyond good and evil is not Christian either. The Christian is only an etiquette.—If she was to continue consequently, she would come between the poles.  At the end she takes the view, according to which she turns into a Christ herself. This is already analytical. The Christians become christiani, not christoi” (MAP, pp. 99ff.). Jung’s comments concerning a God beyond good and evil converge with the conception of Abraxas that he was elaborating in these entries. ~The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 280, fn 417

He who is pregnant with chaos is fortunate. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 206

Why should you not be horrified? Horror belongs to loneliness, and loneliness is your way. You have enough people in your outer life. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 206

How should you be powerful? We are children of chaos, inextricably intertwined with it. Our deepest nature is disorder. That is the beginning of all things. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

“Straightforward direct love.” love inside-out is better described as indirect love. To my way of thinking loving someone indirectly is to love their obverse. Love the generosity of the miser, the ugly of the beautiful, the rationality of the crazy and the badness of good. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

Don’t go too far. But value your emotions. They are instructive and a vital principle to others.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 207

Just as the others. Do you want to be better than others? That would be a Christian ideal that leads to self-righteousness and desolation. What I want to say is, humbly be as bad as others. It will do both you and others good. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 208

It’s easy for you to talk. The subjective seems to me like an undefinable primordial soup, hopeless and arbitrary. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 208

Jung’s Soul: Restlessness is my essence and the foundation of my life.  ~ The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 211

Jung: What is harder? Truly the struggle with the dead!”

Soul: One dies of life.

Jung: Yes, then one dies of life. Why, then?

Soul: If one does not live with life.

Jung: Do I not live with life?

My God, what else do you want?

Soul: I demand your life.”

Jung: Are you shooting off to God again, my soul? ~ The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 211

I want to vanish from your sight, you ought to live in darkest solitude. Human lights should illumine your darkness. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 212

Pregnant women belong to fate.” Release me, I rise to the eternal realm. Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 213

This comrade is fussy and critical. I did not want him as my companion. But his companionship was forced upon me. To live under one roof with him, that is quite something-I’d prefer a bad woman or a wayward hound-but one’s own I-this horrifies me, because it is terribly boring and deadly monotonous. And besides it possesses many bad qualities. In particular it lacks self-admiration and correct valuation of itself It seems that an educational undertaking is called for if anything at all is to transpire.  The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 215

The following paragraph was not reproduced in LN. Instead, Liber Secundus ends with: “Now shut, you bronze doors I opened to the flood of devastation and murder brooding over the peoples, opened so as to midwife the God. / Shut, may mountains bury you and seas flow over you. / I came to my self, a giddy and pitiful figure. My I! I didn’t want this fellow as my companion. I found myself with him. I’d prefer a bad woman or a wayward hound, but one’s own I – this horrifies me. / An opus is needed, that one can squander decades on, and do it out of necessity. I must catch up with a piece of the Middle Ages within myself. We have only finished the Middle Ages of- others. I must begin early, in that period when the hermits died out. Asceticism, inquisition, torture are close at hand and impose themselves. The barbarian requires barbaric means of education. My I, you are a barbarian. I want to live with you, therefore I will carry you through an utterly medieval Hell , until you are capable of making living with you bearable. You should be the vessel and womb of life, therefore I shall purify you. / The touchstone is being alone with oneself. / This is the way” (pp. 457- 58). The Black Books, Vol. V, Page 215, fn 28

Book VI:

I come as a spokesman. It is too sad to be abandoned by the living. Salome weeps, her eyes have become blind from tears. We want sympathy.  ~Elijah, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 266

My eyes are closed. They were once open and I saw the light, the great flame that the living need. But it died out. Too great a grief rolled over it and snuffed it out. One should excavate it. ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 266

Sal. lead me to the place where our house once stood, before the cursed God was born. I can’t see, but I feel the warmth that remains at the spot where the flame once burnt. I will dig up that place with my hands. Father, are we at the spot?  ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 266

On December 22, Salome had identified herself as his sis ter, and their mother as Mary (Book 2, p. 189). ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 267, fn 282

What the world recognizes turns to water. The genuine is rare and unrecognized. But it works from the few to the many, who do not recognize it.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 268

I have rested. I have done what I could, what I saw. I have practiced. Was that magic, a wish to force things? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 284

Since you do not deserve to be suffocated by women, as you were not suffocated by me. You see in me what woman is for man-a snare and a ladder to heaven.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 255

Unify yourselves, and thus become whole! And then you live. Joy belongs to the life of the earth. What do you know about joy? A hymn to joy, but you keep a procession of sorrow.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 279

Cf. Jean Paul, “Good women must always bear and hold the ladder to heaven, on which men ascend into the heavenly blue and sunset.” The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 255, fn 256

In 1921, Jung noted, “For a man, a woman is best fitted to be the real bearer of his soul-image, because of the feminine quality of his soul” ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 256, fn 259

[Pray]To your God, that he bring you the light, otherwise it can’t come along. It needs the bridge of prayer. You ought to leave no means untried. Where nothing helps, prayer helps. Prayer helps your God. He has the light, I don’t have it. 273 I can see only from the distance, through you. But you don’t see it.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 264

love can also not be. love is sometimes, but life is lasting. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 235

Elijah, you need not contemplate it at all. It is not to be thought. It is to be viewed. It is an imaginary painting.

Salome, it is not true that only the simple is pleasurable; over time it is even boring and in truth the multiple captivates you.  ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 238

Dear lord Jesus Christ, we are not pure. The mud of hell sticks to us. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 239

Oh Simon Magus, who hides in Philemon, are you in my garden or am I in yours? ~The Dark One, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 245

He is sufficiently unfree through outer but even more through inner circumstances. Once he has freed himself from the external side, he falls into the internal. I also want to free him from that. I even have to for the sake of my own life. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 216

You didn’t want to obey, you resisted. But you should not resist any humiliation. You should accept the injustice, since Abraxas wants to knead you into people like yeast into flour.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 217

4 is the number of the principal Gods, as 4 is the number of the world’s measurements.

1 is the beginning, the God.

2 is Eros, for he spreads himself out in brightness.

3 is the Tree of life, for it fills space with bodies.

4 is the devil, for he opens all that is closed, he dissolves everything formed and physical; he is the destroyer in whom everything becomes nothing.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 220

But woe unto you, who replace this incompatible multiplicity with a single God! In so doing you produce the torment of doubt for the sake of the one God and the mutilation of the creation whose nature and aim is differentiation.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 220

The multiplicity of the Gods corresponds to the multiplicity of Gods men. Numberless Gods await the human state. Numberless Gods have been men. Man shares in the nature of the Gods. He comes from the Gods and goes unto the Gods the God. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 221

Jung: Abstinence! From what?

The Dark One: “From man.”

The Dark One: Jung: What? Enhanced solitude?

“No, abstinence from man, abstinence from human joy and suffering.”

Jung: That is Eastern wisdom! ~ The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 221-222

You will go to men as one veiled. Your light shines at night. Your solar nature departs from you and your star begins.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 223

The daimon of spirituality descends into our soul as the white bird. He is half human soul and is called desire-thought. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

To this one God man shall pray. Prayer increases the light of the star, it throws a bridge across death, it prepares the life of the smaller world, and assuages the hopeless desires of the greater. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 227

I need a new shadow, since I have recognized the terrible Abraxas and have drawn myself back from him. The cold grew and my star blazed brighter. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 228

Commingling. Abstain from human suffering and joy. Remain secluded until abstinence is complete, and you are freed from the touch of man. Then I will accept you as my child.  ~Great Mother, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 229

Both man and woman, in their respective ways, are governed by the law of Eros and the spirit. ~The Turk, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 230

Many things can become real, which seem impossible today. The doors must remain open. Necessity has the final say. ~The Turk, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 231

You have not yet experienced the fragmentation. You will be blown apart, scattered to the winds. Everyone carries away a piece of you. Men are preparing for the last Supper with you. ~The Turk, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 231

The following was added here in LN: “First: these qualities are differentiated and separate in us; therefore they do not cancel each other out but are effective. Thus we are the victims of the pairs of opposites. The Pleroma is rent within us. / Second: these qualities belong to the Pleroma, and we must possess and live them only in the name and under the sign of differentiation. We must differentiate ourselves from these qualities. They cancel each other out in the Pleroma, but not in us. Distinction from them saves us” Vol. VI, Page 209, fn 20

There is one more condition: let the black one go [Toni Wolff]. excessively deep relation. She is also empty and lives through you. She can’t give to you what you need. You chose the 7 lights. The more you bind yourself, the weaker you become. No more letters, no time which you ought to give to me. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 258

“But he is distinct from creation in that he is much more indefinite and indeterminable. He is less differentiated than creation, since the ground of his essence is effective fullness. Only insofar as he is definite and differentiated is he  creation, and as such he is the manifestation of the effective fullness of the Pleroma. Everything that we do not differentiate falls into the Pleroma and is cancelled out by its opposite. If, therefore, we do not differentiate God, effective fullness is canceled out for us” 211, fn 33

The white serpent is the lower truth, understanding and wisdom, from which all science and philosophy have developed or, been made. The black bird is the upper error-superstition concerning the things of reality, within and without. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 294

What is past is always an obstacle for what is to come. It must first be completely cleared away. What time could not destroy must be artificially destroyed. For this you need the means that mankind has always needed to arrive at the future from the past: namely severing, separating from the old, destruction of the bones. It is truly an injury of the old, but the new live only through completely wearing out the old. Only with unnatural means can man get out of what was natural of old and hence arrive at a new naturalness. Exercises, that one calls [askesis] belong to this. Otherwise man is completely defenseless against the old, since the old is natural, while the new is unnatural and weak, that is it seems so to you, but the new yet prevails, and then you must suffer it instead of happily creating it yourself. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 294

This man [Jung] would like to know who I am. Did I not tell him who I was and who I am? I did not say who I will be. I will be Phanes. I will dissolve myself in his splendor when this man dies. I do not die, I am already Phanes, not a man but a flame of God. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 297

I was more earthy than earth. I was subterranean, I grew upward, I grew through this man. I overcame him. I am his work, what he has lived. He is not I. He belongs to earth. Phanes is the eternal fire, the encompassing blaze, that has will become invisible and visible, the eternal dawning. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 297

What are you thinking of? He is the Abraxas of the earth. No one bestows joy on the earthly ones as he does. He is the hermaphrodite, who for joy unites what is separated. He makes you strong and happy on earth. He preserves the life and happiness of men. How could you grow without him? You poor fools! If you don’t know how to serve the Gods, at least serve yourselves.  ~Jung Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 279

! come, my light is with you. Your path leads straight. Your feet do not err. Disaster is warded off The way is secure. Disunity is removed from you. The Lord of light is born. He lifted himself up and white steeds go before him. Flowers spring up from beneath his feet. The sagacity of the earth and the goodness of the blessing light have prepared the path to joy for you. Lay worry aside. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 280

The Lord has come. Mortals may be happy. The soul gave herself to the evil one. The evil one is lamed by love. One of his eyes is blinded. Henceforth he doesn’t drink the radiance of the light. He embraced and was embraced. You are secure. Enjoy the leveled way. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 280

He was my companion for many thousands of years. First he was an old man, then he died and became a bear. That too died and became a fish otter. This also died, and became a black newt. This also died, then Atmaviktu became entered into me and immediately raised me to the threshold of splendor. I myself am the Atmaviktu, the ancient. Formerly he erred and became a man, while he is actually an earth serpent. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 290

That was the spirit of and the error of Atmaviktu. He is still erring and hasn’t flown into my throat yet. When he comes near me, I swallow him, so that I become full and my stony heaviness and immobility dwindle. I lack Atmaviktu’s soul. If I possess it, I will enter into the gate of splendor. I will lay myself over the gorge. I am the bridge, the living arch that leads over to the land of men and from the land of men into the golden castle. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 290

Serpent: Atmaviktu is a kobold, a conjuror of serpents, and is himself a serpent. Do I know who I am?

Soul:  You should know, you blind worm.

Serpent:  My name is my essence. I have been called Atmaviktu since my birth, if it has ever taken place. Perhaps I always was and always will be. How should I know who I am? ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 290

Serpent: Atmaviktu? I am the kernel of the self The self is no man. That was Atmaviktu’s error. That was my banishment and my darkness for many thousands of years.

Soul:  So that is Atmaviktu!

Jung: But what is the green robe?

Serpent: That’s Atmaviktu’s cloak, which he took off as a man when he died and became an animal.

Soul:  Yet what is the robe?

Serpent: His humanity. ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 291

Soul: Tell me, why did Atmaviktu become a man?

Serpent:  It was unavoidable. He became sick from longing for man. His head hurt, because he could not think what he did. Therefore he became a man for the sake of healing. He remained in this state, and that was his error, since no one can become their own mantle. He realized this and died, in that he went into the forest and became a bear. Through this men became more human and began to build castles and left the forests to the bears. As they spread and increased their power, they cleared out the woods. Then Atmaviktu died for the third time and drew himself back as an otter into the water. Once more men spread themselves and built ships and headed to new shores. Then Atmaviktu died for the fourth time and became a black newt and drew himself back into the waters under the earth. But men conquered the whole earth and flooded everything with their might. However in the darkness Atmaviktu found his own self again, namely, myself, the white, self-illuminating serpent, which feeds on fire and has also swallowed the last error of Atmaviktu. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 291-292

My light streams from necessity. My star shines from your misery. My springs flow from the fullness of your life. Everything unlived is shadow and poverty for me. What has been lived nourishes my strength. Heed the emissary.  ~Phanes, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 281

Light must be created. You must create it out of raw matter that you’ve received. It must still be uttered. Words! The light has shown itself only as matter. It will only become luminous when it has been lifted on high. What the Cabiri carried up must still be pulled up. It must pass through your highest light, through the highest lights: science and art. All powers must combine for this work.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 282

So listen-a golden serpent is the way, a shimmering serpent bridge over a black grave-a dark gate behind splendor-a red light in the darkness of the background-that is evil. I make it out. You did well in not taking this way. Should I take it? So may the eye of evil take me-to a red cave-serpents of blood on the walls -a white gate- a long passage upward in wide halls, countless gates- up onto the roof on narrow steps-above is a worldwide prospect-I blossom like a fire on a mountain top-I glow through eternities-can you still see me- a distant light-itself a star lost in infinities-but, behold a thread-many threads spun from star to star-on a dizzying bridge infinitely long-it is reached, the first star-also a world. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 286

You [Soul] didn’t believe in me, therefore you went astray. Why did you go astray? Because I believed more in you than in myself. Therefore the radiant one rose in my self. The source of the eternal fire is with me. Come to me and live in me and love the fire and the eternal splendor. My self has the highest wisdom, the hottest fire. My self lives in the gate of splendor. My self draws the fire of the star to it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 286

Thrice five towers surround the castle. Thrice six gates are in the walls. Thrice seven great halls are in the castle. The green stream flows below. The dark cloud is above, over it the fire, the eternal one that you drew. There are caves in the mountain, there lies the stacked gold, the solidified fire. Where are the men? The castle is empty. Perhaps they left. I see Philemon in the golden house of splendor-alone. Where is Baucis? Did she die, no, she lives, I am Baucis. She stands behind the wise one, her hand touches his throne. They are alone. Where are the men? Who lives in the palaces? No one. Everything is ready. Does no one come? Call now, Philemon! Your voice is weak. And I have no voice that human ears could hear. Do men not see the castle? Is the cloud covering it? Yes, it is, it hides the fire. What grief, this black cloud! Where did it come from- smoke below the fire! How strange! Are you a mourner, a hermit, Philemon? Do you grieve that your fire is hidden? Green water flows around your castle. Where is a bridge? There is no bridge there, Oh Philemon. How can people get across? You, pontiff, should build a bridge, a wide bridge from rare and precious stones. Why do you grieve? Why do you hide the fire with the cloud? Do you grieve because of your solitude? You are not alone, I am with you. Build the bridge, I accompany you.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 287-288

I come from below, from the great cave, in which I lived for many thousands of years. I became white and blind from sheer darkness. My young have got feet, and I gnawed my tail, not from hunger but in self-contemplation. I lived from fire and drank liquid earth. Therefore I have become as solid as white marble and as cold as ice. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 289

Soul: “You want to deify man?”

Jung: Not man, but man’s primordial kernel. That deserves worship. I gave you enough. I want to give you some more, as much as you deserve. But I deserve human freedom. You should give it to me. Man deserves it. You Gods want slaves. But man wants to be a law himself.  This must be. This will be accomplished. ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 273

A new sun broke away from the flaming body of the primordial mother. A dragon crept up and spat out the new sun. It could no longer endure the light in it. Thus everything was as it should be.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 271

You [Jung’s Soul] must not lose the connection with me. But I believe that you should try to speak with the one on the side of the light. Perhaps he can tell you things that I don’t get. It will not be Phanes, but the one who lives in the flame.[“] ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 271

Man of the West! I speak to you. Your air is nebulous. let light in. There is a clear day to the East, while the west glows in ruddy twilight. A new sun rises in the east. look eastward. listen eastward. A voice comes from there. A fluttering fire smoldered there, now it’s with you. What did we do? We grasped it. We made serpent-like plantlike forms. You built vaults and high arches. Is there something under them? Do you keep something safe there? Empty air, that’s what. We have no roof while you have only roofs. That’s why I seek your roof. I want to live with you: I, the patient taciturn one. I make strange things with a slow hand, I fill the vaults with rare decoration. Do you give me shelter?” ~ A Man of the East, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 274 

I believe that it is you who carries the new light. I believe that your hand made what we need. I give you my allegiance. I was burnt in the fire like red clay, I am as solid as stone. My nature is of the earth, of the solid red rocks. The centuries do not alter me. I am still the same as of old. My wisdom needs no renewal, no alteration. My eye speaks unwavering mystery, my mouth remains silent before the stranger. I do not teach myself, I am. I add to myself in slow growth.” ~A Man of the East, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 274-275

Protect yourself from alteration. No development, rather roots in the earth. That’s why Prometheus was chained to the rocks, because he couldn’t stop stealing. He himself became a predatory flame, that’s why he was bound to the earth. Do it voluntarily first. Bind yourself to the earth, become stone. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 275

If you yourself are frugal, you teach others frugality-and thankfulness for the meagre. Above all, one is thankful only for the meagre, never for the abundant. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 250

The Buddha appeared in a circle of flames in a fantasy of December 22, 1913, in Book 2, p. 186. In a dialogue on February 5, 1916, the soul informed the “I” that he needed abstention from suffering and joy in men; the “I” described this as Eastern wisdom. The reference appears to be to the Buddhist doctrine of nonattachment (see above, Book 6, p. 221). ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 249, fn 235

So listen then: much is loaded on you and much is still expected from you, for the living and the dead. Strange things are yet to be fulfilled. Do not resist. Good grows out of evil. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 250

Become good, Christianity has fully made you into a monster. The witch trials could already have taught us that. Damned foolishness of these people: they should have roasted their souls, instead they grilled their own flesh and with this they fed the paunch of their souls. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 251

Jung is referring to the witch trials that took place in Europe from the end of the fifteenth century. The classic account of how to detect and punish witches is to be found in the Malleus Maleficarum, Published by the Dominican inquisitors Jacob Sprenger and Heinrich Kramer in 1489. ~The Black Books, 251, fn 240

Jung: What a question! And what a decision! I must be honest: my mind goes for the seven lights.

Soul: “So you want the seven? That’s what I thought. That has broad scope-cold lights.”

Jung: That’s what I need: cooling, fresh air. Enough suffocating sultriness. Too much anxiety and too little breathing room. Give me the 7 lights.

Soul: “The first light designates the Pleroma.

The second light designates Abraxas.

The third light, the sun.

The fourth light, the moon.

The fifth light, the earth.

The sixth light, the phallus.

The seventh light, the star.

Why are the bird, the heavenly mother, and heaven missing?

They are all enclosed in the star. When you look toward the star, you will look through them. They are the bridges to the star. They make up the single 7th light, the highest, the floating, which rises with roaring flapping of wings, released from the embrace of the tree of light with 6 branches and I blossom, in which the star God lay slumbering. The 6 lights are singular and form the multiplicity. The one light is one and forms the unity, it is the blossoming crown of the tree, the holy egg, the seed of the world endowed with wings so it can reach its place. The one gives rise to the many again and again, and the many entails the one.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 254-255

I carry with me all the highest greatest suffering and all the highest joy. The measurable and the measured alone belong to men, not the reverse, as the devils always want to teach you. Give me your fidelity and I will help you. You know that I can bring about much. I give you power and keep disturbances far from you. That way you will rise up to what is further.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 256

After all, I sit right at the source of life. You must come to me, otherwise you won’t live. You live through me, through the disgust that I exude. Don’t you know that life feeds on corpses? Take heed. Whoever fails to overcome revulsion toward the grub of corpses does not live. The world will become a corpse for him. Rather let everything else lie and come to me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

I am your woman, who can give you life. In the long run no earthly woman is capable of the same. You selected the 7 lights, receive therefore your life from me and not from an earthly woman. This is painful, but true. You’ll always give life only to them, they can’t give it to you. Only I can do that. Therefore, every time the emptiness and disgust seize you, come to me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

So no more letters to women, no moaning. They can’t give it you. You should have known this for a long time. You are the source of life to them, until they have found their own source. Moaning letters are misfires. You must give, but must receive only from me. Human women are always jealous of me, in that they confuse themselves with your soul. That is their devilry, from which they suffer and make you suffer. You have caught me and forced me to be faithful. I am your woman, no one else is. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

At this time, Jung was corresponding with Maria Moltzer and Toni Wolff.  ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257, fn 261

I will give you strength, if you go only with me. I will keep others away from you, but come to me. You must be lonely with me. Much silence, and do not bind yourself. Take the human aspects that you need. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 257

Yes, it is jealousy, womanly jealousy. Do you think that it has no significance? It is self-preservation. Consequently I must malign the black one. I am against her not because she is somewhat not good, but because she takes too much away from me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 258

I always want a great deal from you. Women are my most dangerous opponents, since they have my qualities. That’s why you can confuse me so easily with the black one. I also have golden goat eyes and a black coat. I place myself between her and you. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 258

The white one is less dangerous to you, since she is completely unlike me and of such an adverse nature that you can’t at all lose yourself there. You just suffer too much from her. She was dangerous before, but no longer. She is just embittered against you because I am stronger than her. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

But the black one is dishonestly clever. I understand that you love her, but I would like to get rid of her. It’s unclear whether I will succeed. There are human matters which I cannot master. But I will always be against her. So pay attention. Not too far away from me!”    ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 258-259

Precisely that is dark to me. I don’t know how I work. It can become only clear through men, since nature recognizes herself only through men. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

The golden bird is no soul; it is your entire nature. Men are also golden birds as well; not all; some are worms and rot in the earth. But many are also golden birds. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

Unification with the physical Abraxas occurs through the human woman, but that with the spiritual Abr. Occurs through me; that is why you must be with me.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 261

I wonder about that too. I stand in deep obscurities. Where does the golden bird ascend? For a long time now I have dreamt of fire and of the day overhead, but it’s as if we are standing in a deep ravine, and far above ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 264

One must note that. Science belongs to the small lights. They are necessary, but should be restrained so that seventh light can shine. Science corresponds to the clear light of the sun, art corresponds to the light of the moon. Both stand beside the seventh light, but are not the same. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 265

Jung: Everything is still unclear. Help me find the light. Is Phanes the ultimate and the highest?

Jung’s Soul: “Yes, he is the ultimate and highest. What comes after him is development, preservation, and decline.” ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 268

What are you whining about? Men are mortal. Nothing saved your friend Gilgamesh from losing his brother. That is the law of the earth. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 270

0ur Lord Jesus Christ! Blessed be your name. Your work lasts long, you endured hardship for the sake of mankind. You did the greatest thing for us, out of animals you made quasi-human beings. You gave your life for beastly mankind, your spirit was with us through an endlessly long time. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 232

You [Christ] have done your great work patiently, and men still look to you and still ask you for help and want to receive the mercy of God through you. You do not tire of giving to men. I praise your divine patience. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 232-233

Behold, Lord Jesus Christ, they [Mankind] do not love you, but they long for you with greed, for they also crave their neighbor’s possessions. They do not love their neighbor, but they want what is his good. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 233

Don’t you have any love for our lord Jesus Christ? Can’t you give him the price of peace after his completed work? And continue his work as your work in yourselves? Do you really still need his help and care? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 234

I believe that our lord Jesus Christ has completed his work, since the one who has given his life, his entire truth, and his entire soul, has completed his work. Therefore I believe that our lord Jesus Christ has indeed improved mankind. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 234-235

He [Christ] has redeemed it up to point where men let themselves be redeemed from Gods and Godmen. Now the time will come when each man has to continue his work of redemption. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 235

A dream told me that you were suffering, you Elijah, you Salome, you elders, and you, my maternal soul that cannot forget me. You, maternal soul, tell me why should I, who had been your lover, appear to you now as your unbeloved man? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 235

I am astonished, Elijah. Do you not know what happened? Do you not know that the world has put on a new garb? That the one God and the one soul have gone away and in turn a multitude of Gods and soul daimons have moved back into the world? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 237

What is, gives no pleasure. Pleasure comes only from the new. Your maternal soul would also like a new husband-ha ha! She loves change. Her bourgeois man is not pleasurable enough for her. In that respect she is unteachable and therefore you believe she is mad. We love only what is coming, that gives pleasure. ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 237

Old Gods have become new. The sole God is dead-yes, truly, he [Christ] died, he kept too many different things inside of him, thus he disintegrated into a multitude. Thus the world became rich overnight. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 238

The sole God became two, again a single one and a multiple one, whose body consists of many Gods. But the single one’s body is only a man and is bigger than the sun. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 238

But the soul became the steps of its ladder, closest, nearest, near, far, further, furthest. First she is my own being, then she is a serpent and a bird, then she is mother and father, then even further away Salome and Elijah. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 238

Elijah: I do not like this multiplicity. It is not easy to think it.

Salome: The simple alone is pleasurable. One need not think about it. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 238

Salome: Father Elijah, do you realize that men are ahead of us? He is right, the many is more beautiful, richer, and more pleasurable. Jehovah is twofold unity, and always the same. ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 239

You said: [“] My God my God, why have you forsaken me,” when you hung on the cross in the final torment. Likewise we lose heart because we are not pure. You said: [“] My God my God, why have you forsaken me,” when you hung on the cross in the final torment. Likewise we lose heart because we are not pure. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 240

Each of us is on the cross between two criminals, one ascending to Heaven, the other descending into hell. Each of us is on the cross between two criminals, one ascending to Heaven, the other descending into hell. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 240

Can I help? Or is it superfluous that a man elevates himself to being a mediator of the Gods? Is it presumption or should a man become a redeemer of the Gods, after men are saved through the divine savior? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 241

I believe that has already gone on more than enough. I rather think that the Gods are insatiable, because they have received too many sacrifices. Dearth makes for satisfaction, not abundance. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 243

The Gods give in. You have broken the compulsion, therefore you look like the devil as he got around the edicts of the Gods. He is the rebel against the eternal law, to which, thanks to the devil, there are also exceptions. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 244

The devil is helpful in this respect. He helps you to come to yourself. You think that this is a detour. The detour via the Gods is necessary, since they are and need to be taken into consideration, otherwise you will fall prey to their law. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 244

Spirituality conceives and embraces. It is womanlike and therefore we call it mater coelestis, the heavenly mother. Sexuality engenders and creates. It is manlike, and therefore we call it phallus, the earthly father. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 223-224

Man and woman become devils become to each other if they do not separate their spiritual ways, for the essence of creation is differentiation. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224

For the mother and the Phallus are superhuman daimons that reveal the world of the Gods. They affect us more than the Gods since they are very closely akin to our essence. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224

The mother is the grail.

The phallus is the spear. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224

If you do not differentiate yourselves from sexuality or from spirituality, and do not regard them as things-in-themselves, you are delivered over to them as qualities of the Pleroma. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224

Spirituality and sexuality are not your qualities, not things you possess and encompass. Rather, they possess and encompass you, since they are powerful daimons, manifestations of the Gods, and hence reach beyond you, existing in themselves. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224

No man has a spirituality or a sexuality unto himself. Instead, he stands under the law of spirituality and of sexuality. Therefore no one escapes these daimons. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 224-225

If your community is not under the sign of the mother, it is under the sign of the Phallus. Absence of community is suffering and sickness. Community in everything is dismemberment and dissolution. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 225

In community we go to the source, which is the mother. In singleness we go to the future, which is the engendering phallus. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

The daimon of sexuality approaches our soul as a serpent. She is half human soul and is called thought-desire. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

The serpent descends and cunningly lames the phallic daimon, or else goads him on. She bears up the too-crafty thoughts of the earthly, those thoughts that creep through every hole and cleave to all things with craving and blind desire. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

Although the serpent does not want to, she must be of use to us. She flees our grasp, thus showing us the way, which our human wits could not find. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 226

This star is the God, the goal of man. This is his one guiding God. In him man goes to his rest. Toward him goes the long journey of the soul after death. In him everything that man withdraws from thew greater world shines resplendently. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 227

Before Hercules incinerated himself and was placed among the Gods, he became the child of Omphale. That is what happened to him. m So, my mother, you who stand in the higher circle and shroud me and protect me from the Gods: I want to become your child. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 228

Many women amount to many books. Each woman is a book, each book a woman. The houri is a thought and the thought is a houri. The world of ideas is paradise and paradise is the world of ideas. Mohammed teaches that the houris admit the believer into paradise. The Teutons said as much. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 230

Jung: What then will remain of me?

Great Mother: “Nothing but your shadow.”

Jung: But where is my I?

Great Mother: “Nowhere. No longer are you an I, but a river that pours forth over the lands. It seeks every valley and streams toward the depths, toward the sea.” You’re bristling at nothing.”

Jung: Can I live without an I?

Great Mother: “You are the fool and the door between two eternities, an open passage, a street walked upon; one walks on it with shoes and spits on it.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 231

Your nature is not only spiritual but also chthonic. Even more than mine is. You are more spiritual and chthonic than I, and so you are always at odds with yourself. I even think that you are not one, but two, and that you haven’t realized it yet. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 216

Serpent, you chthonic origin, most despicable beast, we need your wisdom. let mother go, and twist high into your suffering. You are must become the savior. The cross awaits you. You must be lifted up on the mountain of torment and exposure. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 217

I swear to you, you hideous madness of Abraxas, turn your paws against the eternal Pleroma, let go of man. He is too puny and an unworthy sacrifice to your power. We are whining dogs before you, the lion. This hunting hound is of no use to you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 219

The number of Gods and devils is as innumerable as the host of stars. Each star is a God, and each space that a star fills is a devil. But the empty fullness of the whole is the Pleroma. Abraxas is the effect of the whole. Only the ineffective opposes him. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 220

Equality prevails not for the sake of God, but only for the sake of man. For the Gods are many, while men are few. The Gods are mighty and endure their manifoldness. like the stars they abide in eternal solitude, separated by vast distances. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 220

Men are weak and do not bear their manifoldness, therefore they dwell together closely and need communion, so that they can bear their singularity. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 220

Thus, just as it is no use to reflect upon the Pleroma, it is not worthwhile to worship the multiplicity of the Gods. Least of all does it serve to worship the first God, the effective fullness, and the summum bonum. By our prayer we can add nothing to it, and take nothing from it; because effective emptiness gulps down everything. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 221

“I am the death that rose with the sun. I come with quiet pain and long peace. I lay the cover of protection on you. In the midst of life begins death. I lay cover upon cover on you so that your warmth will never cease.” ~A Dark Form with Golden Eyes, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 222

The bright Gods form the heavenly world. It is manifold and extends and increases infinitely. The spiritual sun is the supreme lord of the world. The dark Gods form the earthly world. They are simple and they lessen and diminish themselves infinitely.  ~A Dark Form with Golden Eyes, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 222

Their nethermost lord, namely the devil, is the moon spirit, satellite of the earth, smaller and colder than the earth. ~A Dark Form with Golden Eyes, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 222

There is no difference between the might of the heavenly and earthly Gods. The heavenly Gods magnify, the earthly Gods diminish. Both directions are immeasurable. ~A Dark Form with Golden Eyes, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 222

The world of the Gods is made manifest in spirituality and in sexuality. The heavenly ones appear in spirituality, the earthly in sexuality. ~A Dark Form with Golden  Eyes, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 223

Fullness and emptiness, generation and destruction, are what distinguish God and the devil. Effectiveness is common to both. Effectiveness joins them. Effectiveness, therefore, stands above both, and is a God above God, since it unites fullness and emptiness through its effectuality. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 212

This is a God you knew nothing about. We call him Abraxas. He is even more indefinite than God and the devil. Nothing stands opposed to him but the ineffective; hence his effective nature unfolds itself freely. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 212

Abraxas stands above God and devil. He is improbable probability, that which takes unreal effect. If the Pleroma had an essence, Abraxas would be its manifestation. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 212

The human has fallen from you. You have come closer to the stars. The kingdom of what is to come will open. Let silence enter, the silence of eternity, since all paths, even the most winding, lead to the valley of silence. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 213

What the God speaks is life, what the devil speaks is death, but Abraxas speaks that hallowed and accursed word that is at once life and death. Abraxas produces truth and lying, in the same good and evil, light and darkness, in the same word and in the same act. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 214

You [Soul] are like the chicken that has hatched ducklings. You don’t listen to what I say. You are unreasonable. You don’t come to humane terms with me, though you always claim that you do. You work against me and you are in love with me. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 216

Yet because we are parts of the Pleroma, the Pleroma is also in us. Even in the smallest point the Pleroma is endless and eternal, since small and great are qualities that are contained in it. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 207

We are also the Pleroma itself; hence I say that we are not in the Pleroma, but we are it. Figuratively, the Pleroma is the smallest point in us and the boundless firmament about us. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 207

Every so-called fixed and certain thing is only relative. That alone is fixed and certain that is subject to change. Creation, however, is subject to change; therefore it alone is fixed and determined because it has qualities: indeed, it is quality itself. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 207

Creatures came into being, but not the creation since it is the very quality of the Pleroma, as much as noncreation, eternal death. The creation is ever-present, and so is death. The Pleroma has everything, differentiation and nondifferentiation. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 208

If we do not differentiate, we move beyond our essence, beyond creation, and we fall into nondifferentiation, which is the other quality of the Pleroma. We fall into the Pleroma itself and cease to be created beings. We lapse into dissolution in eternity and endlesssness. This is the death of the creature. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 208

The most important pairs of opposites are the effective and the ineffective, the fullness and the emptiness, the living and the dead, the different and the same, hot and cold, change and force and spare matter or time and space, the sin virtue and the virtue sin, good and evil, the beautiful and the ugly, the one and the many. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 209

You must not forget that the Pleroma has no qualities. We create these through thinking. If, therefore, you strive for distinctiveness or sameness, you pursue your thoughts which are not in the Pleroma about the qualities of the Pleroma, which do not exist. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 210

Not your thinking, but your essence, is differentiation. Therefore you must not strive for what you conceive as distinctiveness, but for your own essence. You should and can strive only for this without damage and for everything else in the name and the sign of your essence. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 210

Since, however, thought alienates us from our essence, I must teach you that knowledge with which you can bridle your thoughts. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 210

Whereas the essence of the creation is differentiation, the essence of God is effective fullness. Effective emptiness is the essence of the devil. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 211

We need no proof of their [God/Devil] existence, since it is enough that we have to keep speaking about God and the devil. They are both manifestations of the non-existent qualities of the Pleroma. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 211

“I always want a great deal from you. Women are my most dangerous opponents, since they have my qualities. That’s why you can confuse me so easily with the black one [Toni Wolff]. I also have golden goat eyes and a black coat. I place myself between her and you. The white one [Maria Moltzer] is less dangerous to you, since she is completely unlike me and of such an adverse nature that you can’t at all lose yourself there. You just suffer too much from her. She was dangerous before, but no longer. She is just embittered against you because I am stronger than her. But the black one is dishonestly clever. I understand that you love her, but I would like to get rid of her. It’s unclear whether I will succeed. There are human matters which I cannot master. But I will always be against her. So pay attention. Not too far away from me!” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 259

Maria Moltzer, in all likelihood. Years later, Toni Wolff, referring to a dream in which Moltzer appeared, noted, “Am I like M. M.—or is she C.’s [Carl’s]anima—inhuman?” (August 20, 1950, Diary O, p. 78). ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 277, Fn 264

Jung also painted two portraits of Phanes, giving one to Emma Jung and one to Toni Wolff (The Art of C. G. Jung, cats. 50, 51, pp. 122–23). Phanes also figures in two further paintings (Ibid., cats. 52, 53, pp. 124–25). In cat. 53, the background figures on the left and right respectively are Ka and Philemon. ~Carl Jung, Vol. VI, Page 277, fn 267

You unite yourself with Abraxas through me. First you give me your heart, and then you live through me. I am the bridge to Abraxas. Thus the tree of light arises in you and you become the tree of light  and Phanes arises from you. You have anticipated, but not understood this. At the time you had to separate from Abraxas to become individual, opposed to the drive. Now you become one with Abraxas. This happens through me. You cannot do this. Therefore you must remain with me. unification with the physical Abraxas occurs through the human woman, but that with the spiritual Abr. occurs through me; that is why you must be with me. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 261

On February 29, 1916. Toni Wolff noted, “Sexuality = Collective general feelings = in the unconscious. Abraxas head, lion, as danger: cosmic thoughts. More conventional: general collective and cosmic intellectual thoughts. —unconscious Abraxas tail and serpent, sexuality as danger (dream 26 II 1916)” (Diary L, p. 178). ~The Black Books, Vol. VI, Page 261, fn 268

Volume VII

To be one with yourself is being one with others. Being one with others is immortality. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 167

I recalled that until 1900 I had kept a diary, and I thought that this would be a possibility for me to try to observe myself. This would be an attempt to meditate on myself, and I began to describe my inner states. These represented themselves to me in a literary metaphor: for example, I was in a desert, and the sun shone unbearably (sun= consciousness). ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 20

For the sake then of trying to achieve the maximum honesty with myself, I wrote everything down very carefully, following the old Greek mandate, ‘give away all thou possessest, then thou shalt receive.'” This was from the Mithraic liturgy. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 21

Then came the vision on the way to Schaffhausen, which provoked him [Jung] to return to his soul. He considered himself an anchorite in his own desert, trying to find visual metaphors to contain and express his experience. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 22

His [Jung’s] soul told him that she was not his mother. He should be patient; the way to truth was to those without intentions, and he needed to realize that intentions limit life. He addressed his feeling of self-scorn, and his soul told him that this was out of the question; scorn was only an issue if he was completely vain. She asked if he knew who she was; had he made her into a dead formula? ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 23

Jung had probably actually started by physically digging holes in his garden, down by the water, to release his fantasies. He then began to imagine doing the same, while seated in his library. He descended into the depths and a fantasy sequence unfolded. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 23

He [Jung] had further encounters with Elijah and Salome on December 22 and 25. These critical fantasies signaled a breakthrough from passive witnessing to active engagement. He had broken through a barrier; a method had been found and consolidated. Trusting to his soul’s vision, he entered into an exchange with the figures, listened to them, and allowed himself to be instructed. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 24

My “scientific” question went: what would happen if I switched off consciousness? I noticed from dreams that something stood in the background, and I wanted to give this a fair chance to come forward. One submits to the necessary conditions-as in a mescaline experiment-so that it emerges. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 25

He [Jung] recalled, “Sometimes it was as if I heard with ears. Sometimes I felt it in the mouth, as if my tongue, formulated words, and then it came, that I heard myself whisper a word’ to myself. Under the threshold of consciousness everything was living.” ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 26

St. Ignatius of Loyola’s fifth spiritual exercise instructs individuals to “see with the eyes of the imagination the length, breadth and depth of hell” and to experience this with full sensory immediacy. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 26

From 1909 onward in Vienna, the psychoanalyst Herbert Silberer conducted experiments on himself in hypnagogic states. Silberer attempted to allow images to appear. These images, he maintained, presented symbolic depictions of his immediately preceding thought. Silberer corresponded with Jung and sent him offprints of his articles. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 26

Toni Wolff was “suffering from depression and disorientation much accentuated by the death of her father.” Her father had died the previous year. Much later, in an active imagination with her father, on September 7, 1937, Toni Wolff said to him, “I became ill after your death-melancholic-completely unreal and sunk in the inner world.” ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 28

According to Hannah, “Jung immediately realized that she [Toni Wolff] needed a new goal to reawaken her interest in life,” and so he put her to work doing some research for what eventually became Transformations and Symbols ef the Libido. She was stimulated by the material, which had a salutary effect on her depression and disorientation. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 28

That autumn, he [Jung] took her [Toni], with Moltzer and his wife, to the International Psychoanalytic Conference in Weimar. A diary entry from January 18, 1912, indicates that she attended a discussion session at Jung’s house in Kusnacht. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 28

She [Toni Wolff[ noted that Jung read from Transformations and Symbols of the Libido and that the interpretation of the tree and the cross as mother symbols and the discussion of sacrifice and renunciation fully described her own conflict with her mother. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 28

Eventually, Dr. [Jung]deals with the sacrifice. Perhaps I must experience this for him-with mother and maybe also with him. I must experience it-that way I was always able to deliver him the problems that he had not thought through to the end-I lived them first-with him-for him-then knowledge. Now it is conscious. ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 29

I must come again much closer to Dr. [Jung], inwardly he is now far from me.”… “I think that he has got a lot of Symbols [CW 5]] from me-I inspired it-the revision-I brought him a lot of it. He probably doesn’t know that. ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 29

In an entry on the following day, she [Toni Wolff] noted that the work bound her to Jung-that a spiritual marriage had developed-but that she had to go further. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 29

Jung: Yes, I feel him. He fills me with unspeakable feelings. What is it? Dread? Or is it melancholy, looking back, recollection of pain, fear? Who are you? Give me a word. He [Wotan]: I am the man you overcame. -The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 224

Truly a God of ore, a servant of the Great Mother. What man would be able to compete with the love and the severity of the Mother? That is the gruesomeness of the eternal Mother. You overcome the Mother only through submission. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 220

(I] Do you then see no hope?

  1. Hope, yes- but beyond the chaos. It’s not me sitting on you, but stark actuality. I can’t bring salvation, but you can. You must make order patiently. Actuality against actuality. You must defend your life. Go to your work, step by step, and do not let yourself be disturbed. You will find the strength. Don’t let off. Take up the next book, do your duty. Close your eyes and ears. look at your image. There is unconcern in agony. Agony, that is your actuality. The primordial man lived and died. He has given you everything that the past could give you. Now you must create the present and build the future. The future will be created. The past lived. It outlived itself What evidence is still needed? Your complaint changes nothing. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 221

Don’t be surprised. You thought that you knew me, because you saw my beauty in dreams, as you slept blissfully under the silver moon of Africa. But you don’t know me. You saw one of my coverings, a mortal appearance that I borrowed from you. As you can’t see me, so you can’t make out my form. Your soul made a song about me, since she is a woman. What you may always grasp of me is appearance. My words are appearance, borrowed from the chambers of your speech. The golden heart of the world is an appearance, something radiant or shining like gold, like a sun of the world. I come from the heart of the world, I am the heart of the world, I am radiance, not light. I cover myself in solstices, my robe is time, and time is my appearance. I am unable to appear to you without appearance, Oh teacher of the black letters! ~He, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 222

[I]. So look around, gather all your visionary’s strength, reach through even the eternal darkness for the sake of human suffering.

I will for your sake, but the gigantic cloud of eternal night is awful. I see a yellow shining stroke from the top left of this cloud in the irregular shape of a streak of lightning, and behind it an indeterminate reddish light in the cloud. It does not move. Beneath the cloud I see a dead black serpent and the lightning stuck in its head like a spear. A hand, as large as that of a God, has thrown the spear and everything has frozen into a gloomy vivid image. What is it trying to say? Do you recall that image that you painted years ago, in which the black and red man with the black and white serpent is struck by the ray of God? This image is connected to it, since you also later painted the dead serpent, and did you not behold a gloomy image this morning, of that man in a white robe with a black face, like a mummy? ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 220

Oh, you speak of the book, that I forced you to read- a teacher, who should learn from his own children!-it was not I, noble master, who raised himself and was presumptuous. It was a dream vision gifted to me, a gift of heaven, that fell to me that night from the middle of the fourfold division of the world, when I saw the starry heaven of the eternal desert for the first time. Yes, what nights! I wasn’t presumptuous, a dream from unknown eternity was. I longed for you, my most beautiful friend, in all cold and foggy darknesses, in all the confusion and sickness of Europe. Yet you were far and only once did I hear a distant message from you. Yes, I have seen your true divine beauty; I didn’t do it from the hubris of my imagination, but the dream from the foreign heaven showed it to me. My eye was truly unworthy, my understanding, dull. I believed that I had seen you, but I saw only your appearance, and I didn’t know this. Net: I didn’t teach you from myself, from my hubris, but the dream sent from the heaven of the Gods showed it to me. I didn’t teach you my wisdom, but I taught you from a book that I found on the carpet, the red carpet of your he-use chamber. It lay in your house. The book didn’t belong to me. It was precious and more beautifully written than I could ever write. I never saw more delicate, whiter parchment than this, never was there a blacker ink than that which the book was written with. It was indeed an old book, and it spoke a language which wasn’t my language, but one more beautiful and perfect than there truly has been on earth. And how could I have taught you, if that dream hadn’t shown it, that thrice blessed dream, that truly flowed to me from the heart of the world. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 223

I didn’t deprive you. You deprived yourself through your injustice. Don’t you see that the parting is inevitable? For your sake and her sake [Toni Wolff]. The measure of suffering is full and the light of joy and life is burnt out. Another light is to be found elsewhere. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 220

Jung:  I see, you are thinking of that dream of the divine youth, that I dreamed two years ago in Africa. What about it?

Jung’s Soul: Didn’t you want to learn Arabic? That’s connected to it. Something in you longs to be back there. Do you know what it is? It is being alone with yourself. You that you must reconquer, otherwise nothing will happen. So you turn back to him, he will hear your voice again. And he must hear it again, otherwise he can’t live and neither can you.  ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 212-213

I don’t want to augment your knowledge, on the contrary, I want to bring your knowledge into life. It used to be the opposite. It goes like this now. That’s why I read you only those hieroglyphs that you need to establish the relationship with your neighbors, otherwise the religion will not become actual. And it should become actual. But it expresses itself visibly only in the transformation of human relations. Relations do not let themselves be replaced even by the deepest human knowledge. Moreover a religion doesn’t consist only in knowledge, but at its visible level in a new ordering of human affairs. Therefore expect no further knowledge from me. You know everything that is to be known from the revelation offered to you, but you are not yet living out everything that is to be lived at this time. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 216

Jung: Have you anything else to say to me? I’ll see what I can do with my time.

Jung’s Soul:  No, I have nothing else to say to you today. At most: you should begin the bibliography of the literature this evening for the new book. Also you should, beginning next week, you should begin to collect dreams and give patients corresponding directions for preparation. After the bibliography of the literature you should try tomorrow to record all the dreams which you still recall as more or less important, and also 4 further thoughts that concern the theme. You should use the hours of II-12 for this. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 218

From what follows in this entry, it appears that Jung was considering writing a book on the subject of dreams. No book was published, but some of the results of the projected work were presented in the form of his unpublished seminars in Swanage (Dorset, England), in the summer of 1925, on “Dreams and Symbolism.” ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 218, fn 187

Yes, I’m thinking about the assignment that Toni has received from the Great Mother. It’s underway now. Soon it will become clear. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 218

What you will learn from me you must apply to your wife [Emma]. You also speak to me and don’t know what you have to say, nor what I will say. You should also speak to her like this, and just as I answer your questions, so also will she answer. You trust me to speak from myself, why do you not also trust your wife? Much rather you should trust your wife. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 216

In the beginning there is the moon and the sun, feminine and masculine, yet the feminine contains the masculine. The second sign is a vessel that contains the four functions, apparently the body which contains the psychic. This is connected with what I told you yesterday about the masculine and the feminine and about the earth. The third sign is difficult: a fishing rod and a fish. The fishing rod is too big and the fish too small, so it can’t be caught. The fourth is a scale that is unevenly loaded. The fifth contains the small scale tray, the other side is firmly bound to the earth. The scale no longer moves. Both the lines below are the two fish, which aren’t too big, to be placed in the scale tray. The sixth is again the moon, the feminine, which gives birth to three masculine stars that belong together. The two fish are raised up, and somehow hang together with the three small suns. The ..J means the end of the sentence.

[I]. But what in the world does this message mean and where does it come from?

Jung’s Soul:  From the cosmic, i.e., from what is before birth and after death. The Great Mother Night, which carries the sun in her body sends the message. Reason enough to read it carefully. The first sign is apparently the nocturnal Isis herself, who has taken the masculine into herself. That was in the cards today, the ace of spades that fell to you. You stand in the sign of the feminine. The second sign refers to you, i.e., the message turns to you and says in the 3rd sign that this fishing rod is too big for the fish. The fish that you should catch is still somewhat beyond, also your balance is out of order. You don’t stand wholly in the middle. What can that relate to? First we’ll look further. The balance should be fashioned in a way that one side of the scale, the right, consciousness, should connect with the earth. That can relate only to your wife, who can give you strength. The other side is Toni. She apparently has the calling to receive the two fish. What does that mean? It seems she has the instruction of the Great Mother about this. In this sense she should be observed, also her dreams. But probably she must be kept hovering, perhaps in the sense that I spoke to you yesterday. The Great Mother then promises the birth of the 3 small suns or heavenly bodies and the two fish between. The 2 fish relate to the Christian and the Antichristian, which in the meaning of the future follow the three suns, which are related to the new religion. The sun is the masculine positive, the illuminator. A triumvirate, you, Emma, and Toni, the symbolic bearers, the Egyptian symbol, indicated in the word “FANDRAGYPTI,” pheasant of the Egyptians, Isis, Osiris, Nephthys. Nephthys-Toni therefore receives both the fish, i.e., the night or unconscious side. Both the fish fertilize the mother and cause the birth, the Christian-Antichristian follows behind as the afterbirth. This prediction is good. You can calm down. ~Jung Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 215

What lies in between is in the dream book, but still more in the images of the Red Book. What happens between the lover and the beloved is the total fullness of the Godhead. That is why both are an unfathomable mystery to each other. Since who would understand the Godhead? But the God will be born in solitude, from the mystery of the individual. The separation between life and love is the contradiction between solitude and togetherness. ~Jung Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 201

11, / 12. Aug. 1919

Dream: Emma, the 2 oldest daughters and I are sort of guests of a rich peasant in southern Siberia or South Africa. He practices ostrich breeding. low thatched building. I prepare a lemonade with ice to combat the heat. Emma reaches with her hand into it and spills the stuff. I am furious and throw all the glasses against the wall. They don’t break but fall like a rubber ball to the ground. I leave the room and go into a type of barn. There is a low wide table, on which remarkably old books lie. I take one in brown leather: “Acta Thomasina.” The pages are of brown pressed leather. In the middle of each page is an archaic figure of a prophet with his words in hieroglyphic signs alongside. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 202

Yes, the God will be born from solitude-this word strikes me. Thus solitude is coming on. Solitude hasn’t even questions. It doesn’t ask. It is empty and abysmal. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 204

You say that I am still on the surface? There, where it is still loud, still too much noise. I need sharp ears? I lament my hearing. I still speak too much about myself? How can I do otherwise? One could also say that I speak too little, since the words that could describe the great pain do not want to cross my lips. I understand that one should not speak about this-of the most holy, where the fullness of God shines. It is now cold and rigid in me, a blinking surface of metal, impervious, smooth. Do I speak too much, too much of the outside? Do I speak to the metal wall? Should I perhaps place my ear on it, to hear who speaks behind it, if anyone at all actually speaks behind this gruesome cold? Do I like being reflected in this metal surface? What shamelessness would not be entrusted to the human being? It would again be a carnival piece. Why actually do I want to speak? I certainly don’t want to hear. Yet above all I ought to listen. Will the vanity of speech not leave me? And am I delighted by the echo of my voice? Truly I am not deep enough, not even in pain, of which nothing is to be said. Damn, why must I mention it? Shallow surface, so it is, the rage of impotence. I am damned. My heart is cut off from myself. No more access to life. Where are you, source? How deeply buried, covered with pain! Yes-empty-empty as hell. My life has crossed over and I remain. Where do I find you? I am cut off from myself, a hanged man who fell from the bough. And should I begin to live thus? ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 205

My soul, should I call you? No, no more hope, no illusion. The terror must be naked, just as helpless as I. This time there are no crutches. We now plunge the rod into the bottomless, behind all possibilities, perhaps in a dullness without end, where the eternal quagmire no longer permits return. Yes, it grows hotter here-perhaps no more return-that is the right word-perhaps a bottomless abyss, a silence, a wordless solitude for the rest of one’s life. I know where my life has gone-and there in front stands the metal wall. My ears are dull, my heart is frozen stiff, therefore I speak hastily, to feign the life that I don’t possess. It seems to become heavy-metallically heavy-the wheel. I’d like to cry out, to keep from turning into metal. Oh-how did it come? that I became ore? A soundless ore, only heavy and tough, probably lead. In truth the ore has no ears and what speaks there is mere deception. For once I can’t feel fear, only rigidity and cold. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 204-205

What tension between the farthest heavens and the deepest hells! The sevenfold darkness-the jubilant heaven’s gold-what a speech! But I speak it. I talk, you don’t talk. You shouldn’t talk. I know that I must talk or rather stammer. I wanted to sing the praise of the marvelous God who appeared to me, I wanted to talk of the bliss of paradise, of the deep stillness of the peace of God, of all blessed and most blessed and the highest raptures which trickled over me profusely by the mercy of that indescribable God-a praise I wanted to sing of the salvation of my heart-I wanted to give thanks to the glory of the thrice holy stellar one-but it is mere words and truly not these those words that are to be said. There are many darker words, kindled in the darkest depths, utterly primordial words, pressed out of the unbelievably ancient and originary. Words without meaning and purpose, pregnant with all futures, sick from primordial longings and impossibilities, quelled in the mud of the centuries, a mystery divined only by someone who has the animal behind him. A folly of impossibility, consequently swollen by creative power. I suspect this. There is no more to be said. I have fear, an otherworldly fear, truly the fear of a meteorite that has fallen behind the Milky Way, no human fear, simply one occurring when nothing existed that might have known fear. A fear that is not actual, so it seems. Something that was never good and was always spoiled, as the source of a new health. That’s one way to put it. I could also say: something that was too weak, as the source of the greatest force. I curse this measly stammering, this plantlike blind boring. However something trembles in me and this something wants to speak. For it was something somewhere smelt and touched and something that threatens to come to life. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 205-206

Jung’s Soul:  I see much that you don’t see- trees that grow out above abysses, circling eagles that hover over immeasurable depths. A spirit that came from the East, spreading a whiff of death, he wanted to shroud you in darkness, I resisted him and chased him north to the fire pole, for transformation.

Jung: Who is the spirit of the East?

Jung’s Soul:  He is a devil of a particular nature, a gloomy devil, a resigned devil, one who is saturated by all the over-ripeness of the East. How should I describe him? Do you know what I mean? No? He is full of the over-ripeness of the East, too old, too fat, too sad, quiet, like oil on water. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 207

Three deer fled from the forest and the most beautiful hunter could not catch them. He hunted with hounds and horses and bright spears and yet they escaped him. They jumped into the river and swam through it and the dogs lost their trail. The deer Goddess had rescued them-yes, Artemis. Isn’t she beautiful and chaste? Do you know her? And do you know him? Why do you want to hunt on Sundays? Why do you want to catch and kill the beautiful animals? That’s why her bear attacked you. That’s why you had to sacrifice to the beautiful moon Goddess, you fool. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 207

Soul:  Three serpents that lie on a rock, coiled in a knot. A sword has hacked them. A strong one-armed man wields the sword. His eyes flicker in chaotic passion. It was probably a follower and pupil of Dionysus, who had lost one arm. Where did he lose it? He chopped it off because it seemed foul and inadequate, yes, he himself hacked off his right arm in a frenzy. He no longer wanted to act, but simply to be driven. One also needs to be able to be driven. Why couldn’t he let the serpents sleep? Who told him to set his dog on the devil’s dangerous hound that wanted to leave him? His wild and untamed drive, which he called a sense of duty, had whispered the wrong thing to him. He wanted to be alone, to rule alone, intoxicated in solitude far from Gods and men, a castrato of his God. Why do you despise the loving darkness of the feminine, the cooling night? The whisper among the trees, my dark, healing speech? Why did you not speak to me? ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 207

This way shall lead out into the land of men, an assignment. The mystery of the summer morning, the happy day, the completion of the moment, the fullness of the possible, born from suffering and joy, the treasure of eternal beauty, the goal of the 4 paths, the spring and the ocean of the 4 streams, the fulfilment of the 4 sufferings and of the 4 joys, father and mother of the Gods of the 4 winds,  crucifixion, burial, resurrection, and man’s divine enhancement, highest effect and non-being, world and seed, eternity and rime instance, poverty and abundance, expansion, death and the rebirth of God, borne by eternally creative force, resplendent in eternal effect, loved by the two mothers and sisterly wives, ineffable pain-ridden bliss, unknowable, unrecognizable, a hair’s breadth between life and death, a river of worlds, canopying the heavens-I give you the love of men, the opal jug of water; he pours water and wine and milk and blood, food for men and Gods. I give you the joy of suffering and suffering of joy. I give you what has been found: the constancy in change and the change in constancy. The jug made of stone, the vessel of completion. Water flowed in, wine flowed in, milk flowed in, blood flowed in. The four winds precipitated into the precious vessel. The Gods of the four heavenly realms hold its curvature, both the mothers and both the two fathers guard it, the fire of the North burns above its mouth, the serpent of the South encircles its bottom, the spirit of the East holds one of its sides and the spirit of the West its other side. Forever denied, it exists forever. Recurring in all forms, forever the same, this one precious vessel, surrounded by the circle of animals, denying itself, and arising in new splendor through its self-denial. The heart of God and of man. It is the One and Many. A path leading across mountains and valleys, a guiding star on the ocean, in you and always ahead of you. Completed, indeed truly completed is he who knows this. Completion is poverty. But poverty is means gratitude. Gratitude is love. ~Phanes, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 192-193

Truly, I am the sacrifice. completion is the sacrifice.

Completion is joy and foreseeing of the shadow.

Completion is the end.

The end means the beginning, and hence completion is smallness and beginning in the smallest.

Everything is incomplete, and completion is hence solitude. But solitude seeks community.

Hence completion means community.

I am perfection itself, but only he who has attained his limits is complete.

I am the never-dying light, but complete is he who stands between day and night.

I am eternal imperishable love, but complete is he who has placed the sacrificial knife beside his love.

I am beauty itself, but complete is he who sits against the temple wall and mends shoes for money.

He who is complete is simple, solitary, and unanimous. Hence he seeks diversity,

community, ambiguity. Through diversity, community, and ambiguity he advances toward simplicity, solitude, and unanimity.

He who is complete knows suffering and joy, but I am the bliss beyond joy and suffering.

He who is complete knows light and dark, but I am the light beyond day and darkness.

He is who complete knows up and down, but I am the height beyond high and low.

He who is complete knows the creating and the created, but I am the eternal parturient image beyond creation and creature.

He who is complete knows loving and being loved, but I am the love beyond embrace and mourning.

He who is complete knows man and woman, but I am the man, and of the man his father and son beyond masculine and feminine, beyond child and the aged.

He who is complete knows rise and fall, but I am the center beyond dawn and dusk.

He who is complete knows me and hence he is different from me. ~Phanes, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 193-194

Yes, but you still need to take care of what is yours. You should have asked. I had to make you uneasy. Salome cooks poisonous potions. She is a Medea, adept in magic. ~Phanes, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 194

My God, born from suffering and joy, immortal one, luminously you preside over your way! You middle path full of salvation and damnation, full of fortune and misfortune. Your step beyond the mortal. lament is allocated for us and the smile of dawn. Stay with us, redeemer from suffering-laden infinities, boundary setter, my fate. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 195

She is always there where I don’t look. Do you believe that Philemon can see Ka and know what he is doing? Why would both have different kinds of truth, if they could reciprocally see themselves and ~know of one another? Consequently Salome is foreign to me as well. I only see my light, never my shadow, since I see out from within- Ka alone can say what Salome is doing. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 197

Do you want me to plunge myself into the heat of eternal procreation? Do you want again and again to be blended into the molten flow, in the dissolution of matter? To start all over again from the beginning? But you need the continuation, not the beginning. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 198

How should I form my gem, how should I give form to the Gods, if you yourself go on the way of procreation? Haven’t you drawn magical appearance from the black rod? If you are not solid, the light that everyone thirsts for will extinguish. Who should live from himself, if you don’t do it? Will you borrow life from others through mixing? All are drawn into procreation. Who possesses his soul? You must be solid for everyone, unmixed and cut off. ~Jung’s Ka, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 198

If the treasure of Ka comes up then you won’t be able to avoid it. Can you repudiate the treasures of Ka? No, you can’t. So you also can’t reject Philemon’s thoughts. The one begets the other. Question no further. You touch on the boundless. Remain with yourself. Do what is yours. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 199

First and foremost, you [Jung] should see that you are behind. Why did you give me the two kinds of properties? Why did you not separate the opposites? Why did you leave me mixed? This creates the trouble of the standstill. The opposites cancelled each other out. My other half, which is on the side of the earth, is another soul than I. She is between things and you. I am between the eternal images and you. I am mind, she is feeling. I am light, she is dark. The black one is her symbol.  You have still not released Salome from her. She is the spirit of the earth that dances poisonous dances, that bewitches and intoxicates, that drinks blood and causes magical sickness. If she were released from the symbol, she would give form, substance, and actual life to the eternal images. But she intoxicates herself in the blood of the holy one. Why? She has not been released from the human symbol. Why do you love the black one? Because she is the dancer- (there is a scratching on the door). ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 186

I will not be your slave-what is the fortune of the earth when it burns like hellish fire? When it makes sick, like poison? The struggle against you is accepted. I will not rest until you have handed over your power to men. Man must live. You should obey. I do not want to do without the beauty of the earth, the fragrance of the fields should not evade me, but the serpent poison should be slain, so that man can wander among the flowers. ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 187

You’re [Salome] not confusing me. Weakness is a strength. Weaknesses are the strongest powers of human life. I will wrestle from you the mystery of weakness, my weakness. Since I want man to become strong so that he can live on the earth without succumbing to the earth spirits. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 187-188

You [Jung’s Soul] don’t escape me. The black birds are your retinue, they live from your sacrifice. It does not lie with them. It lies with you. You don’t confuse me through feigning the spirit of the dead to me. They are prophets who have become dumb, eviscerated by you, by lovers choked by longing or hate. Circe alone possesses the mystery, not the miserable swines of her garden. Attempt your magic-he who lives his weakness, because he calls it holy, pries loose the rod from you. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 188

You have seen fear in me-do you have the evil eye? This is Philemon’s work! He gave you the evil eye. That is his late revenge for the fact that I broke his wing when he was Simon. Why did I have to help the Christians? ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 189

The question of my mystery. I have no mystery-pleasure and the sensation of pleasure-what’s that for a mystery? That is only a happening and nothing more. It is the devilish guile of Philemon to let me sense a mystery behind this. It is certainly Philemon who hatched this thought, and not this man. How could a man come to a such a thought? Pleasure is the sensation of pleasure and nothing further. Why should there be a mystery behind this? Why does this man ask me about a mystery behind this? Who gave him this crazy thought? Who goaded him to the impertinence to ask me such? To attribute such a crazy thought to me? Who other than Philemon? Only his evil art can produce such thoughts, that stick to one like a robe of Nessus. But I have no mystery, it is madness to ask me about mysteries, impertinence, cruelty. There is nothing behind sensation, no mystery, nothing beyond or within it. It is sensation alone-yes, laugh at my tears-sensation is sensation, pleasure is pleasure, displeasure is displeasure and nothing further. I do not want there to be a mystery within it-that is a disgusting, crazy thought, dirty and stupid.  ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 190-191

Don’t you notice that Salome goes against morality? She is in her manner pure, pure pleasure, pure sensation, with no thought, dirtied by no mystery-that is her ideal. You have offended her moral sense, you have even undermined it, since doubt no longer leaves her. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 191

Sensation is pure. Why do you want to mix in a mystery and muddy clear water with it? ~Salome, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 191

And yet you have already betrayed your mystery to us. You are the mystery that stands behind all pleasure, the soul, that touches the earth, you, my sister, who embraces matter, who makes the unsayable experiential. My love belongs to the eternal images, your love to eternal matter. Ka is your father, Philemon my father. So the veil, that deceptively hid the truth, dissipated the mist and created a thousand blind alleys, is rent. Recognize yourself as soul, renounce the purity of your pleasure, you yourself are its impurity, its blending, its mystery. Pleasure contains the eternal meaning, as the image contains the eternal pleasure. Are my images pure? I believed so and have forgotten it. My images breathe the pleasure of the world. And your pleasure gives birth time and time again to the eternal images. Is the deaf pure blue of the sky purity? No, it is blue, because you see matter. What would the crystalline clarity of water be, if you didn’t see the water? Only emptiness is pure. Pure pleasure is empty and would therefore be no pleasure. A pure image would be empty and would therefore be no image. Since an image always portrays something. Pleasure wants image in eternity and image wants pleasure in eternity. Sublime one, the 4 ways are accomplished, the 4 sufferings have been fulfilled borne, the 4 joys are fulfilled fulfilled, the offering to the Gods of the 4 winds have been prepared. The final work is accomplished: Salome became sighted. The 4 winds rise up to you, the 4 streams flow to you. The time has come where you alone speak, you God of all true and false Gods, you being of all non-being. We are silent and await your speech. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 191-192

I tell you, man is completely in God. He is the mediator between God as world and God as seed. Philemon sees God only as goal, Ka only as ground. You see him through me as seed and world. Since as a being God is the greatest and the smallest. ~Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 180

My soul, you should help me obtain and keep that middle point where I am in God and not in God, where I stand between the Gods. ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 181

You [Jung] are certainly in God inside and outside and yet you are you, with your truth neither inside nor outside, but in between, also neither above nor below, but in between. You are not the seed, but its covering. Oh, that this speech were richer! Or better perhaps, if it were poorer. The wealth of the possibilities of representing and describing is a misfortune. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 181

I am under a spell, a foreign power meddles. Science wants in, probably from you. You have to take care of this. My work is done. Farewell.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 181

Ka builds temples and tombs for all living Gods. If you are in your self, you are in God. And as God, you are in danger of being walled in and buried alive. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 182

A God reveals himself in divine and eternal effect and ossifies in it. It is his grave. And so it must be-the unavoidable fate of each God. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 182

Why should you always be with God and in God? Do you want to be God yourself? And be buried? God is eternally force and spirit. But you have a body. Your body Suffers if you always want to be with and in God. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 182

Not “outside of yourself,” but outside with men with yourself. You are then not only with you, if you are in you, but you can also be outside at yourself and with you, not just within. likewise you are in God, when you are in you, and God is in you, if you are outside with yourself. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 183

All the world speaks of Philemon, but who speaks of Ka? And yet Ka is the all-creator of beings and forms. ~Ka, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 184

What leads you to joy? The sacrifice of what does not belong to you. But joy is your own self. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 184

Spirits are always between two people. They live from the relation of two people. Spirits are also dead without relation, not only people. But spirits must be removed from a relation, so that they can die. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 186

Appearance is visible, what has an effect is dark. The effective one is dark. The one who appears is light. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 183

Now, it is graspable. We also approach the limits of what is currently understandable and knowable. But you now understand why God is both changing and unchanging? It all depends from where one speaks. When you speak of yourself out of yourself it is somewhat different from when you speak of yourself from the outside, from the world, with the eyes of the world. Even so the two statements contradict each other, so you still are, and the beholding world also is. The same way with God. Seen from your standpoint, he is changeable. Seen in himself, he is unchanging. He knows nothing of change since he does not know himself as a seed. But the seed turns. But what is a seed as a whole? Nothing. Therefore it: the totality does not feel it. But surely the seed feels it, since it feels abandoned and misunderstood by the totality. But the totality does not understand the individual. Therefore the individual must seek the way to God. He must thus draw God into himself. But how does this happen? This can only happen by his clearly showing God how he has turned, how he has changed. He must explain himself to him. He must find words and expressions by which he can reach God. Man, who must always work as the mediator for the part of God in him and the seed, can never do this through conscious devising or puzzling out, but only through the help of his soul, or through the help of someone who still has the soul of the other in them. The seed must always turn, since that is the godhead of life. Life is movement in its innermost. ~Serpent, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 179

So now hear about another redeemer [Buddha]. He also taught that it is good to avert one’s eyes from the created, that it would be better to procreate no longer and that the best thing would be to bring the suffering of the world to an end. He rebelled against the creator of the world and his law of continuously engendering life. He sought remoteness from God and received it, since God always loves the seed, whether it be close to or distant from him. And so he also was again in God, but not crucified, since the seed was not damaged. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 180

You haven’t missed by much. Beyond the seed God comes to meet the shadow, his adversary. When he is fiery glow, his adversary is blue starlight, coldness within fire, snow on the embers. God is in conflict with himself. Both redeemers teach the good, the redemption from good and evil. Yes, both know the good way, even when they contradict one another. But they are one in the good. Yes, if we went toward the good, we would know where and when. For clear simple paths are mapped out for us by the masters, and travelled by countless people. Why don’t we take them? We shouldn’t strive toward the good, but toward life. life, so it is called in us, is higher than the good, since the good is just a fruit of life. But nowhere is the fruit more valuable than the tree on which it grew. Yes, if we went toward the good! But it is not our time, it does not want it, since it wants life, which is given to our time as more sacred, even certain evil actions appear better and more sacred than the merely good. We cannot defend ourselves. It takes the other road, the one toward life, since life for us is the good, since we know that life can be good. We cannot believe that life must die unlived. We believe that life is a flame that burns in itself and radiates itself. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 180-181

What are you wondering? One goes on the road to the inner and to arrive at the outer. The other goes toward the outer to reach the inner. Both roads are good and meet each other, and both need to be walked. How should you live differently than one moment in God and the next moment outside of God? If you are and remain inside God, you will be buried in his eternal effect. If you are and remain outside God, you never come to yourself and you remain a shell of yourself, a mirage in your own desert. So at any given time you should be with and in yourself and so with and in God. But if you remain in yourself, the deadly shadow of God overwhelms you and wants to bury you alive. Since God shines out of you and nourishes Philemon and Ka and goes to men and is the nourishment of their God, in so doing he divests himself of himself. So you should do just as God does. You will not live any other way. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 182-183

Jung: What then is the I? Is it not the same as the self?

Jung’s Soul: If you are in you yourself, then you cannot differentiate the I from the self But if you are outside with yourself, then the self is different from the I. Since the self is a great mystery, that I veil just as well as you. -If It is that smallest seed that fills all the heavens, a grain of dead matter and God in all eternity. Amen. I say “Amen,” since after such an implausible statement one must say “Amen” for confirmation. But all mysteries are implausible. I hate all mysteries, therefore I divulge them to you as much as possible. It would be better if there weren’t so many mysteries, but they are not to be denied- and finally-without mysteries, there would be no escape from the contradictions. So, if you are outside with yourself, then you feel your I differentiated from the self You feel your self either as a grain of dead matter full of revulsion, dread, and fear of death, or, if you accepted this inner death and held your last supper with this corpse and received the germ of God from this death, then you feel the self as the God in you. But look, there comes Philemon. What does he want? The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 183

It is good that you see my greatness and your limitation! You begin to find the right measure, you scorner of everything effective and living. I curse my darkness, my eternal abasement and yet I am what has an effect and you are just what appears, you deceitful appearance, charlatan, swindler, who steals the love of man from me. But today is a good day, the day where my curse reaches you-proclaim your limitation, shout out that you steal, that you rob the innocent you cheat and deceive. I am what has an effect and curse you, that the truly effective is always concealed! That’s why my brother had to be born the son of a king and all appearance and shimmer had to surround him till the grave, so that he became seen. Who among all the wise ones would have noticed him, if appearance had not emphasized him? Cursed be appearance, which deceives the world for all reality. Truly a good day, Philemon, your wing will be clipped. ~Jung’s Ka, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 184

Philemon is frightened. He senses the danger of the earth. He fears the beautiful serpent poison of the earth. His foot was once lamed by a poisonous bite, but wings grew. He knows the power of poison, so he develops the power to fly. He sees the serpent among the roses and therefore wants to be a butterfly. However, do not let yourself be too enchanted by him, since you are a man, a brother of the earth-dwelling animals. How beautiful and familiar is the fortune of the earth! The people you know and love, who know and love you, the trees that lovingly shade this spot of earth, the dewy flowers which greet the sun, the birds that fill the fluttering air of the dawn, shimmering leaves and flowers, the glittering surface of the water, the wind that clouds over the mountains, that is the fortune of the earth. This is also Philemon, the one who loves. The daimons reconcile themselves in man, who found himself, who is the source of the four streams and the spring-bearing earth. Water flows from his peak toward the four winds. He is the sea that gave birth to the sun, he is the mountain that carries the sun, he is the father of the four great streams, he is the cross that binds the four great daimons. He is the incorruptible seed of the nothing that accidentally fell through space. This seed is the beginning, younger than all beginnings, older than every end. I praise the greatness and smallness of man. His suffering fills the earth, his fate is in the smallest and most secret things. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 184

From June II to October 2, Jung was on military service in Chateau d’Oex. In an association to a dream on the night of July I, he noted apropos Toni Wolff and Maria Moltzer: “Pairs of opposites. Defended against the bad as against the good. T. W. appears to be a limit, since with M. and T. my soul is complete, fulfilled. T. is the second part of my soul-ugly beauty and beautiful ugliness. It must be concluded on the outside, because everything is fulfilled .” He also referred to his “impersonal love” of both of them (“Dreams,” p. 17). For Bowditch Katz’s account of her meeting with Moltzer on July 30, see introduction, pp. 63ff. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 148, fn 3

Truly, Phanes is the consoler. He leads the hands of those who err. He is the

counsellor of the widow.

He fills the empty beaker.

He lays bread on the table of the hungry.

He is the friend of the lonely.

He gives voice to the misunderstood.

He lays a weight on the scales of justice.

He is the wealth of the poor.

His light shines on the mountains.

He is born from sorrow and joy.

The devils too have served him.

He shines in the helpless eyes of the animal.

He is the understanding of what the devils speak.

He is the redemption of the dead.

He is the healing of the sick.

He is the compassion with all living things.

He is the beauty of the crystal.

He is the ascent from sin.

He is the law above all laws.

He is liberation through blood sacrifice.

Where he shines, there is no damnation.

He is the allegory of the highest, the sum of all riddles. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 165

Why do you love yourself? Because you are one. Why do hate yourself? Because you do not want to be one. But love is also the truth. To be one with yourself is being one with others. Being one with others is immortality. Don’t all times and all peoples live in you? Be one with yourself and you will cross over. Only the individual dies. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 168

Will you finally listen? Am I less than Philemon? Is white better than black? Philemon called me his shadow. I call him my shadow. I am solid, he is thinner than air. His truth is a shadow, a breath, fleeting and already blown away. I am a rock of ages. Do you think that I am less than him, since I am damned to chase after my shadow? Is he not condemned to always precede me? He’s only my herald, my forerunner. What then comes, is me. I endure, he comes and goes. When he ascends where I have yet to climb, I am still with you long after he has gone. I am your truth, which endures, he is a fleeting light, a ~ stray ray of sunlight. Hence listen to me? You spoke with Philemon about immortality? Did you see how he spread green and sky blue veils? No, since your eyes were already blindfolded. Do you think you now know something about immortality? A leaf that falls from the tree-an autumn day-yet the tree remains-how long?-A winter day-the axe chops its roots-and now-where is the tree?-It makes coffin boards-it cooks soup-it is a chair leg-it is tabloid paper-it is ash-decay-dust-the tiniest root of the smallest plant inhales one of its atomsyes, where is the tree? Who is the tree? Where does Philemon’s divine work of delusion remain? He taught you how small you are. But do you know how large you are? But how you ought to know it! You have eyes only for how immense and vast the world is, ears to hear how soon the sound of speech trails off in the distance, muscles to teach you how weak you are. The light of the day blinds you, and nevertheless you always look toward the light. But you don’t see me, since your eyes are made for light. Philemon truly planted these eyes in you. But you don’t know that you have eyes behind your eyes, ears behind your ears, dark eyes, shadow ears that I planted in you. These see and hear into what is infallible, unmistakable, into that which lies behind all light, into the eternal night of truth. You see with these eyes into what is smaller where you are large, you hear with these ears the faintest voices that reach you from the starry distance . .,. These eyes are vast like a starry heaven and these ears hear further than the limits of the zodiac. Do you know how immense you are? Philemon would like to make you believe that your life returns, like leaves on the tree. But didn’t the life of the tree go into the leaf? Didn’t the leaf fall?.,. Does it not lie rotting in the damp ground? But what is a leaf? It covers a heavenly vault with a million inhabited worlds. Does the vastness have a limit? Has the smallness a limit? Is there nothing in all eternity vaster than the vast and smaller than the small? The earth is a seed in the heavens. A speck of dust on the earth is as vast as the earth in the heavens. And the speck of dust is as vast as a heaven, as many heavens, numberless worlds, since where is infinity limited by a border? If Philemon goes to the great Gods and you sit small and solitary in the shadow of the earth-where does your I go, the living I, which you yourself are and without which you cannot be? Why do you feel the eternity of your I? Indeed, why do you want the eternity of your I? And why is it a sick relinquishment not to want eternity? The light of the day blinds you, it indicates the opposite to you. You see with eyes of the day, listen with ears of the day, wish with a heart of the day and therefore want to go up with Philemon to the great Gods and but you are not the sum of the great Gods you can see the deceptive appearance of this hope exposed daily. You lie to your own face, if you believe such. See with my eyes, listen with my ears! A laughable and serious mystery! Why am I damned to trail after Philemon? He is the worthy and beautiful radiance, only my shadow-he speaks great works, he is a mountebank of beauty and truth-but my truth makes one laugh-the Gods laugh at the mere mortals-you did not laugh when the great God Man was spoken of- you shuddered out of respect-your Christ even called himself his Son and you found it so beautiful and worthy-but that your immortal I-son will be a dwarf, who wouldn’t laugh? The great God Man laughed at his laughable immortality. But the dwarf thought that the great God takes satisfaction in him. The tree becomes a leaf. The leaf is the I, as well as the whole tree. The I of the tree becomes manifold in the leaves and each leaf is the whole tree-I. Yes, it is smaller than the whole tree and yet not less than the I. Is not every cell of the tree-! an I, and again every grain in the cell an I of the cell, the I of the leaf, the I of the tree? How many worlds does a tiny grain contain? What is the smallest unit of life? How great must something be, that it can still live? And how small should something be, that it can no longer live? As the Son of Man was shrouded in the great God Man before his appearance and was one with him, so in you is the Son-I enclosed in the smaller world, your I not less than you yourself. It is infinitely much smaller than you-but what is small? What is great? And because he is enclosed shrouded in you till the final hour, so he is called the shrouded one or he who is enclosed in the egg. Yes, he flies away like a bird at the hour of death. ~Ka, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 169-170

The truth? Should I choose? Since you ask me, is truth perhaps in me? Yes, the truth is in me: I am. That is the first principle of all truth.  ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 171

What God does not thirst after temples and altars? And what man doesn’t want to see his God honored? Show me the God who won’t let himself be caught by temples! ~KA, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 174

If God no longer understands me, I must recede into remoteness from God. I must protect myself from his loving vengeance. Remoteness from God is procession along the 4 false ways, it is crucifixion, it is Abraxas. The 4 false ways are: being one with the outer worldly being, & being one with the soul, being one with splendor, Philemon, being one with the shadow, Ka. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 177

If I look with the eyes of man, then God changes, since man does not understand how God changes himself. But if I speak from the essence of God- and I did exactly this-then God is unchangeably  the same, and he doesn’t understand himself as a seed, since above all he is incapable of understanding himself as a singularity, since his essence is totality, and generality, he does not know from omniscience, just as he also does not know himself as existing from universal essence. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 178-179

But the son taught men that it is good to turn one’s eyes away from the created, that it is better to procreate no longer, and that the best thing is to wait for the imminent end and the fulfilment. But the son was a man and the seed in him rebelled against the law of the world creator. But the love of God followed him and embraced him in bloody death. Thus the seed was damaged. Why? It didn’t seek the remoteness from God. It was not allowed to seek it, since that age was not allowed to know about remoteness from God. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 179

You [Jung’s Soul] went ahead of me, now you follow me. I am the leader. I am the fire that advances, you are a helpful arm that supports the wavering. I am what is to come, you are the fullness of the present. You are joy and enjoyment, discord and lies. You are the helper of men in good and evil. I am the fiery path of fate. You are errancy in good and evil. I am merciless truth. I am past and future. This man is my present. That is why he is my error, since I was and-I will be, but am not. My present is an error. This man errs and you exist. That is why you are always present, since man always errs. Why must he err? He is a star seed, he errs through the unlimited, he fell down from the unknown. He continues to err. His errancy is his truth; He would do well to know it. Through errancy he lives. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 147

I piled up the ore-red stones-gold-shining things from ancient shafts. If you knew what Atmaviktu the ancient brought, which ~ shimmering serpent skin he shed when he became Philemon. Dangerous poisons, daimonic luminous things-a shimmering ground for the feet of the lovers. ~Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 148

He [Philemon] spoke about me-that I was related to you-mortal with you-the life of your body, your solar mantle. Philemon is immortal. The star seed in you is immortal. It is a piece of the world, a Pleroma, a light and a darkness. Light insofar as it is~ differentiated from the Pleroma; darkness, insofar as it is the Pleroma itself. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 148

The light shines out of difference. Differentiation strengthens the light of the star-Philemon raises himself higher. His head is in the blazing fire. He burns upward to the eternal fiery heavens. What is it? A weight lies on me-a burden? Is your body burdened? Is a poison in it? I see-you have not fulfilled the sacrificial service. It should be fulfilled. ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 148

You know, noble one [Ha], that you can’t touch us. We are not frightened, you darkest apparition. And because you know that, you come without claims, without will, without power, only with a request. It burns you somewhat. Shall I tell you what? The grain of gold, that fell into your eye. That’s why you want night, so that one doesn’t see it. Yes, old liar and deceiver, squirm as much as you like. Your threat is powerless. You ask if one could mercifully release you from the gold grain. Would you say that that is the truth? ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 149

Oh-how it burns- like hot lust, like hellish pain. Give water-quench the eternal fire-a knife, that cuts out the blaze bloodily. A chisel and hammer strike-that sprays out the glowing grain- still not enough. Touch me, touch me-you must participate in my torment-how can it be otherwise? let mystery surround you. A thousand dark coats, for your act of redemption- I weave an impenetrable mystery for you are protected- ~Ha, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 151

Ha. Why did my mother bear me- I crawled out of a stone-do you know the ridiculous entity that calls itself my mother- one could call it a stake, a sharp block or a cone. It’s beautiful, it’s pointed above and completely round underneath and evenly proportioned on all sides. But I crawled out of the top. She can’t laugh and can’t cry and is totally like hard stone. There is a mark, a sign on earth, that the unpopulated earth is embossed with a law, that everything has to be regular, everything has to be straight or circular. The old fire can melt and burn away everything, but the black mother stone never melted once it had been formed. I tremble, its shadow stands above, bright glowing peak on peak. My father, the fire, concocted this. I hate my father, whom I still must serve without cease. Who but I always changes and disturbs the quiet straight and circular work of my mother, I, who have inherited the fire of my father? I love everything regulated because I love my mother and always disturb it. Oh, how it captures and soothes me, when I see what is straight and regulated. I must be there and disturb it, or at least disturb something; it excites me to bring the straight out of its course. To cross something with a bent line, to suddenly distort something regular-I can’t let it pass. Then why should the cone that my father irrefutably crafted go tip to tip with my mother’s? Something crooked would do just as well. That’s why I lodged a grain of sand between them, which mother could not pulverize and that my father’s fire could not melt. likewise not finding it on earth, nonetheless I caught it when it plummeted from the stars. That was good stuff that never fails to plague- I shouldn’t say it out loud-it is man. He shouldn’t know that he lies between two cone tips that want to meet each other. He’s always wanting to make himself soft and tear himself up because of it, the fool, instead of making himself hard and fireproof. He always wants out of the press, one moment toward earth, one moment toward heaven. But he can’t do it; he is held captive and if he were clever, he would be strong and fireproof. He would be like a crystal, but I also disturb him, since I know how one makes him erratic. That is my secret. You’re not going to have it, you know enough. ~Ha, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 151-152

You lack dirt. Your understanding has no dung in it. The two diagonals, however, are you yourself. The circle is the sun. One has the sun, the other doesn’t. That’s why you are diagonal. However there must be one that stands straight and goes over the bridge, but that leaves the two suns behind it and becomes straight. That’s why it has to go under again and coil around itself, then it has the sun in the belly of the upper cone. It will stay longer with this, but the other longs for the second sun. But the other sun is dark in the belly of the lower cone. You see that he who is horrified at himself has the sun as a head, and as a wheel is entirely sun, and goes straight on the serpent’s way and it is no longer straight above, but a small tail upward-that is funny!  Have you learned something? ~HA, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 153

Soul: Did you hear what he said? Do you know that this is the truth seen from behind? But this is the truth. So listen now to the teaching and the song of the front side of the truth:

Philemon: Phanes is the God who rises agleam from the waters.

Phanes is the smile of dawn.

Phanes is the resplendent day.

He is the eternal undying present.

He is the gushing of the streams.

He is the soughing of the wind.

He is hunger and satiation.

He is love and lust.

He is mourning and consolation.

He is promise and fulfilment.

He is the light that illuminates every darkness.

He is the eternal day.

He is the silver light of the moon.

He is the flickering of the stars.

He is the shooting star that flashes and falls and lapses.

He is the stream of shooting stars that returns every year.

He is the returning sun and moon.

He is the trailing star that brings wars and noble wine.

He is the boon and fullness of the year.

He fulfils the hours with life-filled enchantment.

He is love’s embrace and whisper.

He is the warmth of friendship.

He is the hope that enlivens the void.

He is the magnificence of all renewed suns.

He is the joy at every birth.

He is the blooming flowers.

He is the velvety butterfly’s wing.

He is the scent of blooming gardens that fills the nights.

He is the song of joy.

He is the tree of light.

He is perfection, everything done better.

He is everything euphonious.

He is the well-measured.

He is the sacred number.

He is the promise of life.

He is the contract and the sacred pledge.

He is the diversity of sounds and colors.

He is the sanctification of morning, noon, and evening.

He is the benevolent and the gentle.

He is salvation.

But after this eulogy Philemon sat down in the gate of splendor and closed his eyes and looked at the light of the eternal present.

And after a while, he rose up and said:

“Truly, Phanes is the auspicious day.”

He sat down again and remained in contemplation. And after some time passed, he

rose for the third time and said:

“Truly, Phanes is the work, its accomplishment and reward.”

He is the troublesome deed and the evening calm.

He is the step on the middle way, its beginning, its middle, and its end.

Phanes He is foresight.

He is the end of fear.

He is the sprouting seed, the opening bud.

He is the gate of reception, acceptance and offering.

He is the spring and the desert.

He is the safe haven and the stormy night.

He is the certainty in desperation.

He is the solid in dissolution.

He is the liberation from imprisonment.

He is counsel and strength in progression.

He is the friend of man, the light emanating from man, the bright glow that man

beholds on his path.

He is the greatness of man, his worth, and his force. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 157-159

Man is never his best. Therefore I say unto man:

Be blessed in your poverty, be gentle, meek and merciful, bear vilification and persecution, since a light shines before you, that will not leave you secrecy in darkness. If you are angry, do not say, we are not angry, but be mindful of your poverty and reconcile yourself quickly. Be no enemy no one’s enemy, otherwise you will set yourself against yourself. But your poverty is too great that it could be at odds with yourself. Do not say: we love our enemy.20 This lie would be an extravagance in view of your poverty. leave your enemy alone, so that his hostility may devour itself. Do not wish to be perfect like the Gods, but attend to your poverty and nakedness, so that the imperfect and weak als-e in you does not completely perish. Your perfection would be obnoxious and an unfair burden for your neighbor. Consider bearing your poverty yourself rather than burdening your neighbor with the sham of your perfection. Do not forget to give alms to your poverty. But when you pray, do not beg the Gods, but wish that the glory of God perfects itself, that his law which is laid up in you fulfils itself, a-oo that you are able to bear your poverty in modesty, so that the light that ttgltts illumines the darkness of your path may stream brighter. Wish, when you pray, that what is necessary will be fulfilled, not what you take to be necessary, but what is inherently unavoidable. Your poverty does not bear wishing for more. No one can serve a master, but each serves himself, since he needs help for the sake of his poverty. The rich need no help. Therefore I say unto you: care for your life, what you eat and drink, and also for your body and what you put on. Isn’t the dish as important as life? And doesn’t your body also need clothing? Aoo Shouldn’t your body also be healthy and your life secured, so that you don’t become a burden to your brothers? Aren’t they also as poor as you? Look at the birds of the sky don’t they carry plumage for their protection? Don’t they build warm nests? Don’t they seek their nourishment with luck and hard work? Have you ever seen a raven feed others? Therefore serve your body, the patient servant, so that it remains healthy. SerVe Help your soul, the arrogant daimon, so that all false godliness and higher humanity fall from her, so that you may look at God. Nothing will come to you that you have not earned with honest effort. Do penance for every unearned gift that heaven has sent you, so that you don’t contaminate yourself with godliness. Take thought for the morrow, since tomorrow will have enough plagues. You hypocrites, first pull out the beam from your eye and wait till your brother asks you to free him from the splinter in his eye. If however your brother loves the splinter in his eye, why should you get mixed up with it? You should certainly not give that which is holy unto the dogs, nor cast pearls before swine, but are then your brothers and sisters dogs and swine? Ask, but do not lay on, knock, but don’t be pushy; it is not certain whether you will be received, since your brothers are poor and you should not provoke them to extravagance. But stinginess consumes itself, and the inheritance does not pass to you. Go the way of your inner law while observing the outer law of love. This middle way is sometimes narrow and sometimes wide. He who does not go on this way has damnation in his heart.

You may recognize the fertile by their fruits, but thank the infertile for having spared the world a monstrosity.

He who fulfils the law of inner necessity has the kingdom of the heavens in his heart,30 since he experienced the day of happiness. Do not act out of disunity with yourself, but from the fulfilment of your poverty.”

But after that Philemon stooped, and touched the earth with his hands and asked it for forgiveness since he had uttered a teaching. Then he walked back into the hall to a pool of water and purified himself from the presumption of teaching. He exchanged his white cloak for a brown coat and walked across the bridge to the land of men. He entered there into a way-side chapel. In the xx A crucifix hung above the altar.

Phil. bowed and said to him: My brother, forgive me my error, I have sinned against your word. I taught otherwise than you have. But if I err in this way, teach me to recognize the truth.”

But the crucified remained silent, since he had completed and sealed his truth with his death and in such a way left room for the truth of his brother. ~Philemon, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 159-161

“I come to my psychology only with the Egyptians. It fits like a glove.” ~Toni Wolff, The Black Books, Vol. 2, Page 215 ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 215, fn 181

Grant me a glimpse. Proceed to the completion of the work.

  1. [“]He spoke about me—that I was related to you—mortal with you—the life of your body, your solar mantle. Philemon is [1/2] immortal. The star seed in you is immortal. It is a piece of the world, a Pleroma, a light and a darkness. Light insofar as it is differentiated from the Pleroma; darkness, insofar as it is the Pleroma itself. The light shines out of difference. Differentiation strengthens the light of the star—Philemon raises himself higher. His head is in the blazing fire. He burns upward to the eternal fiery heavens. What is it? A weight lies on me—a burden? Is your body burdened? Is a poison in it? I see—you have not fulfilled the sacrificial service. It should be fulfilled.” ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 148

Jung: Your [Jung’s Soul] advice was good and gave me good sleep. Now I come to you to lay before you the thing that presently and always is the hardest for me. Perhaps you have some good advice. I know that T. [Toni Wolff] is quite valuable to me, but also quite worthless. I would like to come to some clarity, without doing her an injustice and also avoiding above all doing something too drastic and incorrect. Speak to me and help me, as you have already helped me. Speak to me! ~Carl Jung, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 208

[I]. But who are these people?

Those whom you live with.

[I] . Should I revere them?

  1. Not revere, but treat them as bearers of the principles of honor. You must let Toni go until she has found herself and is no longer a burden to you. Your friends should be no burden and you their donkey. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 213

Years later, Toni Wolff noted, “His [Jung] anima is naturally against me, like all women” (November 5, 1937, Diary K, p. 181). ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 213, fn 174

Jung’s Soul: I didn’t deprive you. You deprived yourself through your injustice. Don’t you see that the parting is inevitable? For your sake and her sake. The measure of suffering is full and the light of joy and life is burnt out. Another light is to be found elsewhere.  ~Jung’s Soul, The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 330

Jung: Do you then see no hope?

In August, Jung, his wife, Toni Wolff, Hans and Suzanne Trüb, and Emil Medtner went sailing and camping on an island in Upper Lake Zürich. In September they visited the village of S-Charl in the Lower Engadine and went hiking in the Alps (Ljunggren, The Russian Mephisto, p. 137). ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 221, fn 198

Sunday/Monday. In 1923, Jung gave a talk on “Psychological types” at the International Congress for Pedagogy in Montreux (CW 6). Sometime in 1923, Jung made a painting that featured Philemon and other figures (The Art of C.G. Jung, cat. 66, p. 145), with the following inscription on the verso: “We fear and we hope: will you sacrifice the laurel of eternity to the bridal expectant earth? our feet stand in the void and are granted no beauty and fulfillment. will the promise be broken? will the eternal marry the temporal?” (ibid., p. 147). Jung gave the painting to Toni Wolff. ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 223, fn 227

After 16 XII XI had a regressive incestuous dream with destructive symbols. The attempt to go to the anima was apparently misguided. Had bad results. Since the death of my mother, the A. [Anima] has fallen silent. Meaningful! ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 235, fn 236

See above, p. 232. In a diary entry of September 12, 1924, Toni Wolff wrote: “Does he still see me as anima? Because he is Philemon?” (Diary B, p. 6). On December 27, 1924, she wrote: “Anima Toni-substitute, because anima is primary, no unconditional attitude toward me. . . . C. told me that I had not been exactly like the anima. The anima said that I was indecently clever” (Diary B, pp. 76, 88). ~The Black Books, Vol. VII, Page 235-236, fn 237

 

 

 

 

 

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