The Life and Ideas of James HIllman

In late February 1953, when James and Kate [Hillman’s] arrived in Zürich, Jung and his wife Emma had just celebrated their golden wedding anniversary.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 208

Kate [Hillman] began weekly analyses with Emma Jung, whose book Anima and Animus was a classic within Jungian literature— and also, despite what might have been considered a “conflict-of-interest,” with [C.A.] Meier.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 213

Attending the Institute didn’t cost all that much, and the fee for a session of analysis was 40 Swiss francs, the equivalent of nine dollars.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 213

Sometime during the winter of 1953-54, while Hillman was taking [C.A.]Meier’s class in “Psychology of Dreams,” Emma Jung’s “Psychologie de Anima,” and Linda Fierz’s “Symbolism of Individuation,” he also went to a meeting of the Psychological Club, which the Institute students were occasionally allowed to attend.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 216

A few weeks after Julia’s [Hillman] birth, Emma Jung and Meier wrote Hillman that he had “satisfied the examiners in all subjects of the Propadeutical Examination for the Diploma of the C. G. Jung Institute. Your average grade was: 1.57 (very good). But the Curatorium emphasizes that this in no ways qualify you to practice analysis.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 222

A year later, in November 1955, he [Hillman] was examined by Emma Jung on “The Theory of Dreams and Interpretations.” At that time, though only a few intimates knew it, Jung’s wife of more than fifty years was diagnosed with stomach cancer.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 229

She [Emma] was never able to finish her magnum opus on The Grail Legend and died a few weeks later. The funeral was held in the Küsnacht Swiss Reformed Church, and both James and Kate [Hillman] attended (she had been in analysis with Mrs. Jung). ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 229

On the 27th of November Mrs. Jung died suddenly… People came from all over to take part in the funeral and the mourning was severe because she was so widely and deeply loved. ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 229

It [Emma’s Funeral] was a very moving thing for us. We were sitting in the back of the church, when Jung came in a side door with about nineteen members of his family, children, grandchildren—an enormous procession, the patriarch with his following, his great fertility, the old man and his tribe. There was this sense of such strength. It really was an archetypal vision.  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 229

In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted.  ~Carl Jung, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 9

“Fredy,” as his [Meier[ friends had called him all his life, had been appointed the first president of the C. G. Jung Institute five years earlier. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 210

Born in April 1905, Meier had met Jung as a boy, been through analysis with him in the 1920s, obtained a medical degree from the University of Zürich, and started his own private psychiatric practice around 1930.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 210

During World War II, he’d served as Jung’s private secretary. “Fredy Meier was an extremely welcoming host, who liked his Scotch, Campari, and good French wines,” wrote Thomas B. Kirsch in The Jungians. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 210

In 1948, Meier had taken over Jung’s professorship at the Federal Polytechnic Institute, and become president of the Analytical Psychology Club as well as the newly-formed Jung Institute. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 210

I felt I was an extravert. And he [Meier] said, ‘I’m not so sure about that.’ Which was a good answer, because he left it uncertain. I think you go through phases in your life when you are more extraverted or more introverted, so I could not classify myself one way or the other that easily. ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 214

Meier contributed very little verbally to my analysis. He was, I think, very passive. But he was a model of physical presence, and that’s what I seemed to need the most. He carried the projections of an earth spirit—rather than a head or heart spirit—a tough man spirit. It was, for me, about being in my own body, and being present. ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 215

He [Meier] was a slightly older psychic brother for me,” “and the first one to say about analysis, when I was finding it so difficult at the beginning: ‘You just have to submit, go through it, the whole way is through submission.’  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 215

For Hillman, Meier represented something of the same male vitality, as did Mircea Eliade, as had the poet Patrick Kavanagh in Dublin. “They gave the impression of being physical men, while I was Jimmy. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 217

“My feeling problems with Meier and Scharf I work out right there with them,” “Especially with Meier because I dream of his lack of feeling and then we talk about it. You see, his not having feeling doesn’t mean that I can’t work towards it, or that he and I together can’t work towards it.”  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 219

His analyst, C. A. Meier, was chosen as pro-tem president. “I was twenty-nine years old, already a father, but I felt like a boy among presences!” Hillman would recall  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 226

To his analyst, Meier, Hillman would also write about his “inherited weakness” which “makes the road to my salvation very tough. But of course this ‘toughness’ is just the salvation.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 227

Spiegelman and Hillman would take classes together, socialize on a regular basis, and share an analyst in Meier.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 237

Because Stein, like his Jewish compatriots Hillman and Spiegelman, also entered analysis with Meier, they were considered a triumvirate. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 238

Meier, who in a résumé submitted that year when applying for a visiting lectureship in America had self-described his status as “generally acclaimed as the most brilliant disciple of Dr. Jung, resigned as president of the Institute earlier in 1957 after a rift with Jung. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 241

I modeled myself on his way of doing analysis—which was dream analysis and active imagination as dialogue, which I did a great deal of. Turning to books and scholarship or symbol history for understanding your own dreams is very much a Zürich style— and was Meier’s style.  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 241

Meier had written a monograph called Ancient Incubation and Modern Psychotherapy, whose focus was a location of legendary healing in Greece, the Sanctuary of Asclepius. When James and Kate had first arrived in Zürich, they had studied German by trying (unsuccessfully) to assimilate Meier’s text. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 242

Arriving in Greece late that summer of 1957, the young Hillmans and the older Meiers rented a boat. Their destination was the eastern end of the Peloponnese island chain, and a place called Epidaurus. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 242

Hillman would write in a Preface to the American Edition of Meier’s book, published in 1967. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 242

Unlocking the significance of such a dream back then was not something Hillman received any assistance with from Meier. “His interest in Greece probably awoke my interest, but it didn’t come straight from him. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 242

I started too high up in my attempt to connect. I thought I had to know more Greek, or get there through knowledge. And Meier was absolutely silent. ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 242

The following August of 1958, James and Kate made a second journey to Greece, with his wife once again paying for the Meiers to accompany them. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 243

Now Meier and Hillman began meeting occasionally in Zürich with a small group that included the well-known medium Eileen Garrett, president of the Parapsychology Foundation of New York. Garrett believed that “without feeling or emotion, ESP doesn’t work.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 254

ld in Saint Paul-de-Vence, France, in mid-July 1961, Hillman and Meier were among the participants, along with anthropologist Francis Huxley and his novelist uncle, Aldous Huxley.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 254

Hillman reflected in 2011, between science and soul, “which manifested particularly where I was on the one hand working at the Institute and trying to stay with soul, and on the other hand working in Meier’s view of parapsychology with the [Eileen] Garrett scientific experiments.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 259

In “Friends and Enemies,” which Hillman delivered at the Society for Analytical Psychology in London that fall, he was also considering the curious relationships with his first analysts, C. A. Meier and Rivkah Scharf-Kluger.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 264

As Stein wrote Hillman after re-reading “Friends and Enemies” in 1964: “I had not realized how much your relationship to Meier probably entered into your need to write it.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 265

“Even though Meier was Jung’s right-hand man for almost three decades, they had a personal rift late in Jung’s life,” “In turn Meier had very difficult relationships with his own male students. After his resignation from the Institute in activities. ~Thomas Kirsch, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 265

In 1957 Meier withdrew from most Jungian … He was concerned about the direction the Institute was taking, because the approach to the unconscious was becoming too disconnected from modern science. As a medical doctor and psychiatrist he wanted to return to the scientific basis for the study of dreams and the unconscious.”  ~Thomas Kirsch, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 265

Hillman had stopped seeing Meier for therapy in 1959, not long after the second trip that Meier took at the Hillmans’ invitation to Greece. Meier was angry with Hillman because, now that he’d been named Director of Studies, Hillman was working closely with Franz Riklin, who had replaced Meier as Curatorium president. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 266

Between the two older men, there was deep enmity. After Meier made “some cynical remark” about Riklin, Hillman realized that he couldn’t have both the Institute job and continue his analysis. However, Hillman continued trying to bridge the gap.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 266

Meier finally wrote back that, while he was “deeply touched” by Hillman’s strong belief in him, he held an increasingly dim view of the Institute the more distance he got from it. He did not want to “become contaminated” again. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 266

The thing with Meier is of course a nuisance, but nothing can be done about it, since he counts himself so important in the world scheme of things.~Kenny Donoghue, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 266

Hillman’s friend Spiegelman had once asked Meier, who was his analyst as well, whether Jung was anti-Semitic. “No more than the average Swiss,” Spiegelman recalled the answer, and later realized that Meier was really talking about himself.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 271

Hillman, making his own stand, was also running into opposition, and it cut close to home. His first female analyst, Rivkah Scharf-Kluger, reportedly found Suicide and the Soul “too extreme.” Hillman was told that Meier also “was really angry about it.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 275

As Hillman put it, “His [Meier’s] ambition was completely scientific and university professorship.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 276

While not a member of the governing Curatorium, as Director of Studies he attended all of its meetings. Curatorium President Franz Riklin was Hillman’s boss. Liliane Frey, the analyst Hillman continued to see on a regular basis, and Meier, whom Kate was still seeing weekly, both strongly disliked Riklin for what they considered a power grab.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 276

Arthur recalled sharing the insecurity he felt about his wife’s and Hillman’s relationship with both Frey and Meier. “Dr. Meier basically said nothing in response to that… She [Frey] interpreted it as a homoerotic fantasy on my part… There was a dinner dance held by the institute for faculty and students/trainees. Hillman danced with Bea, cheek to cheek. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 290

Arthur recalled sharing the insecurity he felt about his wife’s and Hillman’s relationship with both Frey and Meier. “Dr. Meier basically said nothing in response to that… She [Frey] interpreted it as a homoerotic fantasy on my part… There was a dinner dance held by the institute for faculty and students/trainees. Hillman danced with Bea, cheek to cheek. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 290

~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 293 Meier reportedly had intimate relations not only with Kate Hillman, but with a number of his female patients. As Marvin Spiegelman put it in one of our interviews: “Look what his [Meier’s] wife said when somebody talked about having sex with patients—‘Oh, Fredy does” that all the time.’ ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 293

According to Hillman, Marie-Louise von Franz said: “The trouble with Meier is, he has no creative anima,’ implying that’s why he runs after women, because he can’t connect [to] himself. I think that’s a pretty good observation. He was blocked; because Meier’s anima was all projected onto women, he couldn’t produce.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 293

[It was] “[a] foolish affair . . . ” “I’m sure I knew that I was tempting fate. When you consider reading life backwards, I think that unconsciously I had to fall, to have something terrible happen. I had to really sin, to be initiated. “It was a kind of violation or rupture with the professional code,  [one] that put me among the ‘big boys’: Meier, Jung, and other Zürich analysts who were my mentors and seniors.” ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 294

Dr. Meier said I should sue Hillman for the affair [with Arthur’s wife], and he would obtain a lawyer in Zürich for me to follow up, which he did. He also to my surprise actually wrote in the letter, that Hillman, for whom he had been the training analyst, was one of two people in his lifetime he had known personally that he considered evil.  ~Arthur V., The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 297

Yet Meier and two other Curatorium members, supported by Liliane Frey and Jolande Jacobi, intended to bring Hillman before a hearing. Riklin mobilized to try to stop them and, wrote Hillman, “in great silence Adolf [Guggenbühl] and I planned our moves.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 299

The day before a scheduled meeting of the Curatorium, Hillman wrote his friend Stein, “Meier called me to see him, which he has never done before, and during an hour urged me to resign in the name of ‘scapegoat’ to protect our name and group. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 299

Another who did not turn against Hillman was Franz Riklin. As with his enemy Meier, his ties to Jung went way back. Riklin’s mother was a cousin of Jung’s, and his father had worked closely with Jung during the early stages of analytical psychology.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 301

Like Meier, he[Riklin] had undergone analysis with Jung and begun teaching at the Institute right after it opened in 1948. He had been instrumental in the founding of both the Swiss Society and International Society for Analytical Psychology. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 301

Hillman wrote Stein of having a “psychotic Episode” in a dream, where he “cried like a six month old baby . . . with Meier lying near me on the bed as analyst.” Hillman did not learn until 2010 that Meier had gotten Reverend V. a Swiss lawyer and urged Arthur to pursue Hillman in court.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 301

Guggenbühl remembered Meier writing something concerning Hillman to the Institute like: “Why the hell don’t you get rid of that little Jew.” ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 301

Jim had admired Meier, for a long time. Meier was a big prophet or tutor for Jim. I always hated Meier. Not only hated him, but he was physically repulsive to me. When there was a dinner or something, and I had to sit beside him, I’d have to leave. For me his moral guidelines were absent. He was in some ways ruthless, but sentimental and ruthless. ~ Adolf Guggenbühl, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 301

Although Hillman had sought to distance himself from Meier after the analyst’s seduction of Kate, he’d been forced back into a working relationship shortly before the “scandal” broke. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 301

One of these was Meier’s 1948 monograph on Greek healing rituals at Asklepius, Ancient Incubation and Modern Psychotherapy. Meier wrote Hillman that he was pleased to hear of this development “at long last . . . for which I have been asked so many times, and I wish to thank you very much for your effort.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 301-302

As for the older generation there as Kate says they are all Europeans and can join in one thing, the European power problem, even where they can’t join in anything else. ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 302

At another point, when Liliane Frey was telling people that Hillman had betrayed “his spiritual mother and father” (meaning herself and Meier), it was Kate who turned it around, saying to her husband: “And what did they do to you? But you see in Europe the young must obey the old, not the old support and follow the young.” ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 302

The powers-that-be in Zürich were enormously envious of my getting that spot at Eranos, I mean, Meier had wanted to be the Eranos psychologist. James Kirsch, an older analyst from L.A., had wanted desperately to replace [Erich] Neumann as the lecturer after his death. He [Kirsch] stirred up trouble like crazy against me [in the U.S.], because he wanted me out of there so he could be the Eranos psychologist.  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 311

Freud destroyed by Jung, and Meier destroyed by his fight with Jung, and now Meier and me fighting… all on account of love… or is it also historical, that is, an inevitable fight, because our culture knows no other way of moving from one spirit into another. ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 323

Meier, “on the verge of a lawsuit” with Hillman over the Northwestern book, had told him that Reverend V. was regularly forwarding him copies of all correspondence with the Reverend’s lawyer. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 323

This is hard for me, since my own academic shadow (and father complex, and inner Meier, and rabbi) tend to push me towards the learned side.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 324

He [Hillman] went on to write of “the ugly reactions” of the Jungian hierarchy as personified by Meier and Frey. “We are sort of grouped together in their minds, and in the long run it is important for us and for Jungian psychology that it not be led by the old duffers and their ‘pupils,’ but that those of us who are carrying something alive in us come out on top.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 326

Heinrich-Karl Fierz, a long-time Institute professor and medical director of the Zürichberg Clinic that Meier had founded in 1964, sent a registered letter about Hillman’s editing of the Northwestern Series and purportedly “stealing books from Meier and Jacobi” as being “uncollegial” and having violated statutes. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 335

In sending a copy of the letter to his friend Spiegelman, Hillman added a handwritten note at the bottom of the page: “Here it is! Can’t fight the police, so I am in a sense DISBARRED (no practice, no teaching, no work). I feel relieved, but it is a bad thing, especially for the Spirit, for Adolf too; he is alone now.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 342

“I interpret the ‘great sacrifice’ [I Ching 45] as either seeing Meier (whom I have vowed never to submit to again) or as resigning the Institute work.  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 297

Hillman could not remember exactly when—he learned that Kate, who was still seeing Meier for analysis, had been intimately involved with him. “I don’t know how I found out. I know only that at a sudden moment, I was in Meier’s office and said something that accused him. And he said, ‘You have to talk to Kate about that.’ Meaning, ‘I’m not going to say anything.’  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 283

Jung had told him that at his first meeting with Freud in Vienna fifty years earlier, Freud’s wife’s younger sister (Minna Bernays) had taken him aside and confessed to having an affair with Freud. “It was a shocking discovery to me, and even now I can recall the agony I felt at the time,” Jung reportedly told Billinsky.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 286

Then, six months after Jung’s death, Meier wrote Billinsky that, like the New York and London groups, Zürich’s Institute was betraying the great man by  selling him to the public “in order to be somebody themselves” and cash in on Jung. Page 286

Acquiring prestige, Meier added, was easier than being true to one’s own soul – implying that he was doing the latter Though Meier did not name names, the implication seemed to be that Hillman’s fundraising and other activities seeking to expand the Institute’s horizons went very much against his grain.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 286

Hillman had already found out about his wife’s relationship with Meier when, a few months prior to his “Betrayal” lecture in 1964, he wrote to J. P. Donleavy: “I get immersed with the women patients, seem to have nine women for every man, heart is all pulled out by them, the fantastic marriages people live.”  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 289

Along these lines, when Hillman went to see Meier after receiving this highest of accolades, “I remember saying to him that I felt somehow I had fooled them, that I didn’t really earn it.” Looking back, he would see this as a Hermes aspect of his character, this sense “that I’m favored by luck, that it’s not just me but something else is at work.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 246

The feelings of decline and decay about the Institute that I encounter in many people and the growing dissatisfaction and even disloyalty point to a crisis that you have yourself been aware of and told me about many months ago. Rather than delay, it is a time for decisions.  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 252

In 1953, C. A. Meier had addressed an International Conference of Parapsychological Studies. Steeped in the scientific approach, Meier believed “that parapsychological phenomena are often a compensatory mechanism on the part of the unconscious and are not always at the disposal of the will of an experimenter in a formal public situation. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 254

Leaving the two little children behind with their nanny, now he [Hillman] would travel to Greece with Kate. But not only with Kate. In an unorthodox thing to do, they were accompanied by the analyst they shared, C. A. Meier, and his wife Joan. Even more unorthodox, Kate paid for the whole trip. Her sister, Tonie, came, too. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 241

According to Hillman’s recollection, Jung didn’t approve of Vasavada’s propounding “a completely Hindu religious point of view,” as a neophyte Jungian analyst. “As Jung saw it, ‘this guy didn’t learn anything.’ Meier [Vasavada’s analyst said, ‘Look, he’s from India and that’s the way he thinks.’ It was a tempest in a teacup, but Meier had resentments and I’m sure there were other things involved.” ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 241

It was extraordinary that he should do this in public for it made him look both foolish and aggressive and partisan. Then came a registered letter from Meier, with copies to the Curatorium, threatening legal action over the book he and Hillman had been working on together for Northwestern University Press (a translation of Meier’s Ancient Incubation and Modern Psychotherapy) claimed, correctly, that Hillman hadn’t informed him that a Preface written by Jung for his original edition was not being included, an “oversight” that according to Hillman, he apologized to Meier for Meier was now insisting that his book be published first in the series, that the Jung Preface supplant a new one by Hillman and finally that Hillman’s name not even appear, “neither as editor nor otherwise,” in connection with the volume. Meier later threatened to withdraw the book from publication, despite considerable money having been spent on its preparation. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, 320-321

The writing of this preface coincided with Meier charging him “with the most extraordinary things such as being evil,” while refusing to admit “guilt on any point in regard to me, nor even to any bad feeling.” This had occurred following a two-hour meeting between them “in a beer place, where we tried to straighten everything out. We came to an agreement there, but two days later he took it back in a letter and spoke of my betrayal complex, my repressions, cheating him [and of] being in the presence of evil. At the meeting, Meier had allegedly made the astounding assertion that he doubted the situation between Hillman and Reverend V. could ever be resolved because it was “two Jews fighting each other.” The Reverend, of course, was hardly Jewish, but that was the way Meier projected the whole mess. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, 322

What happened with the dream group, along with the matter of eros, seemed to lead Hillman back to Meier. As Hillman wrote to Spiegelman:

“It has to do with love between men, with homoeroticism in the deepest sense, coupled with the Germanic-Jewish problem also in its homoerotic aspects.” It was, perhaps, not that Meier didn’t love him, rather that “as Adolf sees it, he loves me very much . . . and he cannot handle his guilt towards me nor his love towards me, and ends with this peculiar projection of finding me ‘evil’! This last is so devastating, that it has the paranoid homosexual love thing in it.” ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 322

In fact, it was not yet over. That April came a nine-page compilation spearheaded by Meier that was called an “Aide-Memoire Concerning the Present Situation of Analytical Psychology in Switzerland.” It began by referencing “for several years a definite malaise which has developed more and more into a real crisis” with the Jung Institute and Hillman’s affair as its “true focal point.” Above all, “the appearance of uncontrollable rumors” had resulted in “an increasing poisoning of collegial relationships, particularly between those colleagues who were and still are in the immediate orbit of the crisis. Through this crisis an immeasurable harm has been done to the esteem of the work of Professor C. G. Jung in Switzerland and abroad.” The Hillman affair, Meier claimed, was “to a large extent the consequence of the conditions prevailing at the Institute,” statutes with “no clear separation of the powers in Legislative and Executive” that inevitably led “to an undemocratic, autocratic regime.” Here Meier was apparently looking to settle old scores dating back to his being ousted as Curatorium president twelve years before. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 342

Spiegelman quit his local Jungian society in Los Angeles after that, not to return for fourteen years. Later, though, he corresponded with Meier and, shortly before Meier died at the age of ninety in 1995, saw him in Switzerland. Spiegelman remembered deciding to ask the old man a question—about betrayal. While avoiding the subject of Hillman, Spiegelman brought up Tony Frey. Frey had undergone analysis with Meier and they had once been the closest of colleagues. In 1964 Frey had established with Meier the world’s first and only in-patient Jungian psychiatric clinic, the Zürichberg. Then he and Meier had a falling out, and Meier booted him, and Frey fought him into Federal court and lost. In 1996, Frey (who was married) had told an interviewer:

“What went wrong, I think, was that neither of us was aware of the transference and countertransference between us . . . Meier was always against the homosexuals. Given Meier’s and Riklin’s diametrically opposed reactions, the lines were being drawn. Hillman sat down and wrote a letter of resignation to Riklin, but found he “just couldn’t give it to him. I thrashed around in my room for hours… praying, thinking… ” At last he had consulted the ancient Chinese oracle, the I Ching (Book of Changes) seeking insight into what to do. He set down his thoughts in a private memorandum of several typewritten pages:  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 297

Then I did talk to Kate and she said yes [confirmed what had happened]. I remember going back to Meier and he brushed it aside in two ways, one being ‘oh, it was just short’ or something like that, which it wasn’t but meaning that it wasn’t important, but secondly implying that it was necessary to keep her in therapy or in transference or from going crazy. In other words, as if it hadn’t been for that, maybe things” would have been worse, some sort of justification like that.” “I was on the edge of physically hitting him. But I didn’t, I wish I had.”  ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 283

Even many years after the fact, it was still not easy to talk about. In the late summer of 1963 —whether before or after he found out about Kate and Meier is not known—Hillman had written his wife a letter while en route to Zürich after their being together in Sweden: “Our love seemed never to have gone so deep and intimate before as love, not only understanding and gentleness and all the good things our marriage has at times, but a deep personal desire for each other.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 284

The following year Meier confided in the pastoral counselor that his difficulties with Jung appeared “irreparable.”  Billinsky, recalling how Jung had spoken so admiringly of Meier during their meeting, responded that Jung may have realized he was too much a father figure and so fostered such a situation to make Meier “completely independent.” (Hillman saw such a situation differently: “My fantasy of it sees a curse from Freud to Jung, and from Jung to his generation of men pupils . . . All the eros between men was botched.”)  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 286

“I [Meier] had some of the most exciting experiences there by making a number of unheard of discoveries. What those discoveries consisted of, Meier never specified, but the two couples’ three-week sojourn had included a week on “a hired little boat, sailing & swimming” on the “island of Kos, where lived Hippocrates, the first healer, [whose] tree still stands,” Hillman wrote Donleavy. ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 243

After Hillman’s female analyst, Rivkah Scharf-Kluger, left to live in Israel, since May 1957 he had been seeing another of Jung’s female devotees, Dr. Liliane Frey, in addition to Meier. Now, having fulfilled “the minimum of 300 hours divided between a man and woman analyst” as well as 431 supervised hours seeing eight patients, Hillman applied to the Curatorium to present himself for the Diploma-Examinations.  ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 246

Jung had taken an active role until 1950, at which point he’d decided to resign from the Curatorium due to aging health so that he could devote his time to writing. The Institute’s teaching then fell to his “disciples” and, according to Hillman’s recall, “Meier had all kinds of gestures that were like Jung. He smoked like Jung. [Marie-Louise] Von Franz was also imitative of Jung, spoke with a certain affectation in her voice.” ~Dick Russell, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 210

“The main objective of this trip was ‘to get acquainted with the literature’ so that I might find out if this thesis-project suited me. I can say it does! I am deeply in it. I feel married to it; I love it, yes, even physically excited, interested. I had no idea that this would happen and it changes my view towards the doctorate from one of an ‘outer’ event done for the sake of ‘dignity,’ to something most vivifying. And mind you now, I am not writing in euphoria; the thing is a battle. I get ill, have had fever again, get exhausted, confused—but sometimes a pattern of insight emerges so intense that I can hardly scribble it

down. This is the way creative work should go; I know, I was an editor [at Envoy in Dublin] and told people all about it. But it never before has happened to me.” ~James Hillman, The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Page 227-228

James Hillman

C.A. Meier