The abstract God “beyond all human experience leaves me cold,” “We do not affect each other. But if I know that he is a powerful impulse of my soul, at once I must concern myself with him …” ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 23

I consider it my task and duty to educate my patients and pupils to the point where they can accept the direct demand that is made upon them from within. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 22

I have gained a deep and indelible impression of how dreadfully serious an experience of God is. It will be no different today. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 22

If that voice is listened to, one will have a chance of a more complete life, because one lives then almost as if one were two people, not one alone, and there will be a whole sphere of knowledge and experience in which all functions, all ideas, will enter besides our ordinary consciousness. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 23

Jung writes early on that the soul “is a function of relation between the subject and the inaccessible depths of the unconscious. The determining force

(God operating from these depths is reflected by the soul, that is, it creates symbols and images.” ~Ann Ulanov, Spirit in Jung, Page 26

when God is in the soul, i.e., when the soul becomes a vessel for the unconscious and makes itself an image or symbol for it, this is truly a happy state …[which] is a creative state … ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 27

“The happy state is the creative state.” Jung quotes Blake, saying that we feel bliss, ecstasy, “energy as eternal delight.” This gives rise to a “feeling of intense vitality, a new potential.”  For God, “life at its most intense, resides in the soul.” Here we feel alive, real, and living creatively.  ~Ann Ulanov, Spirit in Jung, Page 41

I go together with it, [God’s will] an immensely weighty milligram without which God had made his world in vain. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 42

“We need some new foundations,” “We must dig down to the primitive in us, … we need a new experience of God.” ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page ~Ann Ulanov, Spirit in Jung, Page 62

My personal view in this matter is that man’s vital energy or libido is the divine pneuma all right and it was this conviction which it was my secret purpose to bring into the vicinity of my colleagues’ understanding. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 64

A religious experience one way or another, for therein is revealed its immanental life force. It wants to step over … into visible life, to take concrete shape. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 66

Individuation then is not an ego-project of self-redemption we elect. It is risk and exposure “to all the powers of the nonego, of heaven and hell, of grace and destruction, in order to reach that point where … [we have] become simple enough to accept those influences, or whatever it is we call ‘God’s will,’ which come from the Unfathomable.…” ~Ann Ulanov citing Dr. Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 66

It is not a matter of indifference whether one calls something a ‘mania’ or a ‘god’.… When the god is not acknowledged, ego mania develops and out of this mania comes sickness. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 120

… the self is like a crowd … being oneself, one is also like many. One cannot individuate without being with other human beings.… Being an individual is always a link in a chain.… how little you can exist … without responsibilities and duties and the relation of other people to yourself.…The Self … plants us in otherness – of other people, and of the transcendent.” ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 122

Without the body, we can easily float off into the timeless quality of the archetypal, lured by no longer having to be ourselves: You cease to think and are acted upon as though carried by a great river with no end. You are suddenly eternal … liberated from sitting up and paying attention, doubting, and concentrating upon things … you don’t want to disturb it by asking foolish questions – it is too nice. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 125

This drifting as if “one with the universe” is not, however, the life of the spirit, for it is no longer life in the body. We need both body and spirit or we forfeit both. We possess both or neither. For there to be life in the spirit, we need life in the body. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 126

“One’s anxiety always points out our task,” Jung writes. “If you escape it you have lost a piece of yourself, and a most problematic piece at that, with which the Creator of things was going to experiment in His unforeseeable ways.” ~Ann Ulanov, Spirit in Jung, Page 145

Concepts are coined and negotiable values: images are life.  ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 176

Christ is still the valid symbol. Only God … can ‘invalidate’ him through the Paraclete. ~Carl Jung, Spirit in Jung, Page 216