Carl Jung: “C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances”

The least differentiated function is always the one from which our renewal starts; it is just the one that yields the renewal of life; when a person has used up his conscious point of view, he capsizes; the thing which never has lived is as green and as fresh as spring-it means a complete reversal of the whole personality. ~ C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

We are immortalized in memory. Oh, yes, it is so. The soul has become immortal if we leave something behind for others. Psychology can affirm no other immortality. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff-A collections of Remembrances, Page 7.

Numbers are autonomous. They had their life, their significance before men used them as instruments. The mathematicians continue to use them as instruments, so in that instant they become dry. Before they had their proper significance. C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

Austerity is also in the realm of nature-the forests, the mountains-but without insistence, nature never insists on its qualities; and to do this means, in fact, to lose the quality of one’s quality. It no longer is nature, no longer natural. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

The fourth, that’s the devil. He is the only metaphysical person outside of the gods. Without the fourth there is no meaning. ~C.G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff-A Collection of Remembrances, Pages 51-70.

The shadow is something very evasive. I don’t know mine. I study it by the reaction of those around me. We depend on the reflection of the mirror of our entourage. When it is not good, self-criticism is in order. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

The archetype is outside of me as well as in me. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

Our psyche can function as though space did not exist. The psyche can thus be independent of space, of time, and of causality. This explains the possibility of magic. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

Children are in the collective unconscious until they acquire a small consciousness of their personality, until they say “I,” or “me,” or their name. They are rooted in the collective unconscious and are uprooted from it by the flood of impressions from the outside. They know everything, but they lose the memory of it. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

The psyche, which we have a tendency to take for a subjective face, is really a face that extends outside of us, outside of time, outside of space. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

One must not avoid unhappiness. One must accept suffering; it is a great teacher. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

Your individuality, your Self, appears in the objective facts of your life. An event can seem incredible, unacceptable, but if it happens to you, then it means that it is you. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

It is of no importance whether evil is here or there, but one can deal only with the evil in oneself, because it is within one’s reach, elsewhere one trespasses. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

It might be said of her that she [Toni Wolff] was “Virgin” as defined for us by Esther Harding, meaning simply an unmarried woman who, since she belonged to no man, belonged to herself and to God in a special way. Toni Wolff to Sallie Nichols; C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances, Pages 47-51

Intuitives don’t have substance; they have inventiveness, imagination. They don’t complete anything. It is necessary for them to acquire this faculty. ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

“Of course,” said Jung, “You know, when somebody comes to me and boasts about the great success of his latest book I look deeply into his eyes and say, ‘I hope , my friend, that this success will not harm you too much.’” ~ C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 84-85.

Then after a pause, Miss Wolff added this: “You know, sometimes if a man’s wife is big enough to leap over the hurdle of self-pity, she may find that her supposed rival has even helped her marriage! This ‘other woman’ can sometimes help a man live out certain aspects of himself that his wife either can’t fulfill, or else doesn’t especially want to. As a result, some of the wife’s energies are now freed for her own creative interests and development, often with the result that the marriage not only survives, but emerges even stronger than before!” ~Toni Wolff, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances, Pages 47-51

P.W. Martin, author of Experiments in Depth, used to say that the really individuated partner in the Jung couple was Mrs. Jung! ~Elined Prys Kotschnig; ~C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Page 40

The dream was of the general form of three elements being differentiated and a fourth less well developed; he elaborated at great length the problem of adding the fourth element to the existing trinity of faculties and the implications of this development. . ~Robert Johnson, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 36-39

He said that it was not the least important whether I accomplished anything outwardly in this life since my one task was to contribute to the evolution of the collective unconscious. ~Robert Johnson, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 36-39.

He indicated that though it was true that I was a young man, my dream was of the second half of life and was to be lived no matter what age I was. ~Robert Johnson, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 36-39.

Two days later I was again at Kusnacht to be met at the door by the famous two dogs at the entrance to Dr. Jung’s house. I had heard that he arranged to have his two dogs meet a new patient, the dogs being more sensitive to a potential psychotic than any human observation. ~Robert Johnson, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 36-39.

There, that’s the error, one must not seek happiness. The happiness that one seeks is a usurped one. Organic happiness, the bliss that comes from the center of the earth, that alone is fruitful and that simply comes. Sometimes it surges from the deepest suffering. ~ Carl Jung, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances; Pages 51-70.

Music is dealing with such deep archetypal material with boots as swift as and those who play don’t realize this. Yet, used therapeutically from this level music should be an essential part of every analysis ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Page 126.

Why do I have to talk about God? Because He is everywhere! I am only the spoon in His kitchen. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Page 109.

People – even theologians- are embarrassed to talk about God. It is more polite to talk about sex. Carl Jung, J.E.T., Page 7.

She had very changeable looks, as so many intuitives do, and could sometimes look beautiful and sometimes quire plain. Her extraordinary brilliant eyes-mystic’s eyes-were always expressive. ~Helena Henderson on Toni Wolff, Carl, Emma, Toni Remembrances, P. 31.

Death is a drawing together of two worlds, not an end. We are the bridge. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Page 95.

The earth-rootedness that I felt in Jung was for me the guarantee for the credibility of his psychology. ~ Olga Freun von Konig-Fachsenfeld, J.E.T., Page 39.

This man [Jung] did in fact accept the shadow and. . . this acceptance brought problems and tensions but also aliveness, reality, integrity, and depth of being. ~Elizabeth Howes, J.E.T., Page 120.

If one can stay in the middle, know one is human, relate to both the god and the animal of the god, one is all right. One must remember, over the animal is the god, with the god is the god’s animal. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Page 112.

One morning in 1929 as I waited for Dr. Jung to come up to his study, I noticed with deep concern that his usual light step was ponderous and slow. I asked him if he were ill or very tired, and he said, “No …. Wilhelm has just died.” ~Mary S. Howells, J.E.T., Pages 119-121

I loved the old man who touched my life with outstretched hand and left his mark upon my soul. [Gilda Franz, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff: A Collection of Remembrances]

Jung, however, leaned forward and tapped the table with his middle finger and said “We are of the same substance as that table. Our discrimination, the  awareness is the difference.  M.I. Rex Weaver, J.E.T., Pages 90-95

What I fear greatly and suspect greatly is normality.  That is something people are trained to. It is like a tight lid.  That is why I am afraid of the psychologists of today who have the idea of universal validity. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Pages 90-95

Thoughts are real, they are the consciousness. People can’t see that. Einstein could not. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Pages 90-95

We have children and grandchildren and even if we don’t believe in immortality for ourselves, we can believe in the right to live of future people. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Pages 90-95

I am afraid of America which educates its children away from being individuals into being mass-educated people.  These are the Marxists without knowing it. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Pages 90-95

Each person works on his own pillar, until one day the temple will be built. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Pages 108-110

One morning in 1929 as I waited for Dr. Jung to come up to his study, I noticed with deep concern that his usual light step was ponderous and slow. I asked him if he were ill or very tired, and he said, “No …. Wilhelm has just died.” ~Mary S. Howells, J.E.T., Pages 119-121

We fear our serpent,” he said, ”as we also fear the numinosum – so we run from it. . . . All we have to give the world and God is ourselves as we are. But this is the hardest of all tasks. Most of us want others to do it for us, to carry us along.. . . ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Page 178.

He [Jung] indicated that though it was true that I was a young man, my dream was of the second half of life and was to be lived no matter what age I was. ~Robert A. Johnson,  J.E.T., Pages 36-39.

He [Jung] said that it was not the least important whether I accomplished anything outwardly in this life since my one task was to contribute to the evolution of the collective unconscious. ~Robert A. Johnson,  J.E.T., Pages 36-39.

“When her [Toni Wolff] mother was alive she was the eternal child, as her mother was such a charming person and did all the receiving and being nice to people. Now Toni really has to do something about things.” Jane Cabot Reid, Jung, My Mother and I, Page 332.

Jung reported in a letter to Mary Mellon in August 1940, “Miss Wolff has been a good citizen and undergone a training course as an ambulance chauffeur.”12 William McGuire, Bollingen, 34.

Jewish descent admitted to the Club to not more than ten percent, “if possible,” a limitation that replaced the earlier more stringent proposed wording of “under no circumstances.”16 The Committee also created a special category of “guest” membership, limiting Jewish participation in this section to twenty-five percent.17 Aryeh Maidenbaum, “Lingering Shadows,” 297.

Researcher Aryeh Maidenbaum, who unearthed the policy in 1988, reports that both Toni Wolff and Linda Pierz were deathly afraid that C. G. would be shipped off, in Maidenbaum’s words, “to a concentration camp if the Germans invaded and found too many Jewish Jungians in the club.”20 Aryeh Maidenbaum, “Lingering Shadows,” 297-8.

For I couldn’t talk with anyone about my inner experiences.

Often I had to hold on to the table in order not to fall apart.

I went through terrible times then and again and again had the feeling that I was being torn apart. Only with T.W.[Toni Wolff] could I discuss it, but then she was in the same mess and was without orientation.

Neither could my wife help me. It was absolutely awful.

But in that period my wife woke up, and she began to study physics, mathematics, Latin and Greek.

The animus came alive in her then. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 211

And in all this tempest I had to be a normal father and husband, a doctor and all the rest. That I was able to endure at all was a case of brute force. Any other person would have gone to pieces. But there was a daemonic force in me. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 211

I also withdrew from the university at that point because I felt that I couldn’t make it any longer. 1 am in such an exposed situation, and I can’t possibly talk about the things that are going on inside me. Eight years I had lectured at the university of Zurich. Quite consciously. I sacrificed my academic career, because I felt, this is something tremendous this thing that is happening to me, and this will take up my life, but it isn’t a thing I could take to any university. Obviously, though, I was ready for more risk. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 210 – 211

T.W. [Toni Wolff] was experiencing a similar stream of images. I had evidently infected her, or was the déclencheur that stirred up her phantom imagination. My phantasies and hers were in a participation mystiques. It was like a common stream, and a common task. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 211

She [Toni] also found her center. But then she got stuck somewhere along the way, I remained too much the center that functioned for her. Therefore I was never permitted to be other than she wanted me to be, or than she needed to have me be. At that time she was entirely drawn into this terrible process in which I was involved, and she was just as helpless in it as I was. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 211

I know the moment when the problem of T.W was put to me. After the completion of her analysis I had discharged her, as was the correct thing to do, in spite of my feeling of being involved with her. Then after a year I dreamt I was in the Alps with her. We were in a valley of rocks, suddenly I heard the elves singing inside the mountain, and T.W. was on the point of disappearing into the mountain. I thought: this cannot be, this must not be. And I wrote to her again. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 202

On the anniversary of T.W.’s death, two years afterwards, I was in Bollingen, and Hans Kuhn had brought down a lot of dry brush to the house.

Then he came to me and mentioned in a slightly embarrassed sort of way that it was odd, but there was constantly a bird about which didn’t want to go away, and that he couldn’t understand it at all.

I went immediately to have a look, and there again was a red-breast,

It was sitting on a branch, and — very odd — it let me come really near and was not to be moved to leave our presence.

It sat there more than an hour.

When it began to grow dark, it came into the court-yard and sat on the pile of dry brush.

Hans knew that it was the anniversary of T.W.’s death and asked if that were not her soul.

I had already noted his reaction and had been thinking the same thing myself. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 214

Dream of T.W

(Dreamt that she had returned. It appeared as though she had died inadvertently by mistake as it were, and had returned in order to continue to live out a phase of her life.)

I can only understand this as the anima.

(Question: could it refer to a possible rebirth?)

In the case of my wife I feel a much greater degree of detachment or distance.

It has struck me that T.W. seems still to be nearby.

(Question; could this not be understood literally, i.e. that a thing which wasn’t dealt with in life, would have to be taken up once more in a further life?)

My wife achieved something that T.W. did not achieve. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 219

What is more or less clear to me is that I had the impression that T.W. is still nearer to earth and so could manifest herself to me more easily, whereas my wife is on a different level to which -L cannot attain at all.

T.W. is where one could possibly reach her.

I concluded that she was still in the vicinity and then naturally she is nearer the sphere of three dimensional existence and could, possibly, slip into existence again. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 220

010 In her [T.W.] case I have the strong impression, actually the certainty, of her not having yet attained the level of existence where a continuation of three dimensional existence would be pointless. If one takes it that certain levels of insight exist from which there is no need to return. Heightened insight inhibits the wish to reincarnate. This is nirvana, to disappear from the three-dimensional world. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 220

If there is a residue of karma, however, requiring to be dealt with we fall back again into desires, we re-enter the world to live it out, perhaps motivated even by insight that something still awaits completion. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 220

It keeps surprising me that 1 dont dream of my wife.

Why? I can’t dream of my wife.

And T.W. also has got misplaced since the dream with the hint of reincarnation.

There is not a trace of a dream of my wife, or there aren’t

dreams that give me the feeling of being anything more than memories, of an “as if.”

This has been so from the moment when my wife appeared to me in the dream as though posed for a picture. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 221

That was “real”, or rather, the message that this picture was posed for me was real, or — expressed differently — the intention was actual, was present.

But from that moment on I haven’t had a dream that gave me a feeling of her [Emma] presence, on the contrary, I have had the feeling of an inexorable separation, of parting. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 221

As a matter ci fact, I did not say anything about the phallus dream until I was sixty-five. I may have spoken about the other experiences to my wife, but only in later years. For decades a strict taboo hung over all these matters, inherited from ray childhood. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 41

My wife’s death, her attainment of her completion, and the things that then became clear to me, took me out of myself to a tremendous degree, and it took a great deal for me to be able to re-establish myself. The first thing that i felt at the time: I have yet to become that which I myself am. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 217.

I keep thinking of the dream that I had of my wife after her death, in which she appeared to me as in a picture which had something of her in it. I saw her in that beautiful dress that she wore as a young woman, which had been made for her by the medium with whom I had made experiments before my doctoral dissertation. I had a peculiar impression in the dream: my wife was neither friendly nor unfriendly, neither serious nor gay — she was like a picture, and I was given to understand the pose had been arranged for my benefit, that I was to remember her like that. The way in which she gazed at me could not be described by any other term than “objective”.

She looked at me the way a person does look at another human being, objectively. Neither “yes” nor “no”, but simply objective. Just as when I receive a letter from an unknown person I look at the letter quite objectively, without the slightest emotional reaction. And I think that precisely this belongs to perfect individuation, this objective quality. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 217.

My wife’s death, her attainment of her completion, and the things that then became clear to me, took me out of myself to a tremendous degree, and it took a great deal for me to be able to re-establish myself. The first thing that i felt at the time: I have yet to become that which I myself am. ~Carl Jung, Protocols (Draft), Page 217.