Jung, My Mother and I: The Analytical Diaries of Catharine Rush Cabot

Kusnacht-Zurich

Seestrasse 228

16.III.53

Dear Mrs. Cabot,

How very kind of you to send us such lovely carnations; they are of such beautiful colouring and arrived absolutely fresh.

Thank you very much for them and also for your good wishes to our Golden wedding.

How on earth did you know about it?

For we had told nobody, except of course the family and a few very close friends, so that we were greatly surprised when your telegram arrived.

As it seemed to come from Rome & I didn’t know your address, I am thanking you only now.

We were indeed quite touched by your affectionate thought.

Since the last weeks we have now finally some sunshine after a really awfully cold & sunless winter, and C.G. enjoys it quite particularly.

He is getting on very well now, fortunately.

I am well too, and just recovered from a light grippe, which I rather welcomed, as it gave me the opportunity to have a good rest, which I needed badly.

I always thought of old age as a quiet & restful way of living, but with me, there seems to be more & more work & demands from all sides.

The [Jung] Institute is partly responsible for this; on the whole I rather like it, though, for it keeps one alive.

But now we are all looking forward to the spring holiday, which begins next week.

I don’t know yet, whether we shall go away, it all depends on how “Uncle” feels – so far he didn’t think it would be a good idea, as he still felt so uncertain, as it [the weather] was still so very changeable.

We both are sending you our warmest greetings & hope you are being well too!

Very sincerely yours,

Emma Jung ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 564-565

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