C.G. Jung Letters, Vol. 1: 1906-1950

Dear Victor, 16 December 1948

The spirit prompts me to write to you.

It is quite a while ago since I have heard of you and very much longer since I have heard you really.

I may be all wrong, but I confess to have a feeling as if when you were in America a door had been shut, softly but tightly.

I don’t want to disturb you, but I feel as if I ought to tell you about my fantasy, so that you know my side of the picture at least.

I know there are things somewhere too damned difficult to be even mentioned, but they should not cut you off entirely.

It is not bad for you to get a breath from the great wind of the world occasionally and from all the dark things “that go bump in the night.”

That is why I take the liberty of knocking at your door.

I suppose you are very busy.

Don’t feel pressed for an answer, please!

I am looking for my own peace and that is the reason why I tell you about my qualms.

Having done so I recline in my grandfather’s chair going on dreaming about Virgil’s “Tityre, tu patulae recubans sub tegmine fagi … ”

Light that wants to shine needs darkness.

Cordially yours,

C.G. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 514.

Note: Virgil, Eclogue, I,1: “Tityrus, thou liest canopied beneath thy spreading beech.”

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