C.G. Jung (Studies in Jungian Psychology by Jungian Analysts)

Life has been so cruel to some people that one cannot pass judgment on them for being warped. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 24

Strangely enough, Jung’s discoveries were less accepted or were accepted more slowly in his own profession, academic psychiatry, than in many others. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 6

As I saw it, a scientific truth was a hypothesis which might be adequate for the moment but was not to be preserved as an article of faith for all time.  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 9

I have set up neither a system nor a general theory but have merely formulated auxiliary concepts to serve me as tools…. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 9

I have never been inclined to think that our senses were capable of perceiving all forms of being…. All comprehension and all that is comprehended is in itself psychic, and to that extent we are hopelessly cooped up in an exclusively psychic world. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 9

… at the source of the great confessional religions as well as of many smaller mystical movements we find individual historical personalities whose lives were distinguished by numinous experiences. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 11

The significant difference … between merely pathological cases and ‘inspired’ personalities is that sooner or later the latter find an extensive following and can therefore transmit their effect down the centuries…. they are talking of something that is ‘in the air’ and is ‘spoken from the heart.’  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 11

The wise man who is not heeded is counted a fool, and the fool who proclaims the general folly first and loudest passes for a prophet and Führer, and sometimes it is luckily the other way round. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 11

it seems to me very much more cautious and reasonable to take cognizance of the fact that there is not only a psychic but also a psychoid unconscious, before presuming to pronounce metaphysical judgments…. There is no need to fear that the inner experience will thereby be deprived of its reality and vitality. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 12

There was a daimon in me…. It overpowered me, and if I was at times ruthless it was because I was in the grip of the daimon. I could never stop at anything once attained. I had to hasten on, to catch up with my vision. Since my contemporaries, understandably, could not perceive my vision, they saw only a fool rushing ahead. … I had no patience with people aside from my patients. I had to obey an inner law…. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 22

“Shamefully A power wrests away the heart from us, For the Heavenly Ones each demand sacrifice; But if it should be withheld Never has that led to good,” ~Holderlin, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 23

The daimon of creativity has ruthlessly had its way with me.  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 23

Part of being a good cook, of course, is being a gourmet. He loved to let his guests guess what ingredients had gone into a soup or a sauce; I remember a boeuf braisé à la marseillaise with a sauce of sixteen ingredients!  ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 25

Rather like Goethe’s “God-nature,” Jung referred to nature as “God’s world” an overwhelming mystery all around us, full of the most wonderful and awesome events and forms. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 27

To ‘God’s world’ belonged everything superhuman dazzling light, the darkness of the abyss, the cold impassivity of infinite space and time, and the uncanny grotesqueness of the irrational world of chance. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 27

For the rest of his life, and despite certain moral criticisms of the character of Faust, Jung kept his great admiration for Goethe and, indeed, loved him as one loves a kindred spirit. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 35

This transformation is a process in the collective psyche which is a preparation for the new aeon, the Age of Aquarius. This new image of God appears in Jung’s first dream of the underground phallic god-king, awaiting in this hidden form its eventual resurrection. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 37

The play and counter play between personalities No. 1 and No. 2, which has run through my whole life, has nothing to do with a it’ or dissociation in the ordinary medical sense. On the contrary, it is played out in every individual. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 39

Now I knew that No. 1 was the bearer of the light, and that No. 2 followed him like a shadow. My task was to shield the light and not look back at the vita peracta; this was evidently a forbidden realm of light of a different sort…. I recognized clearly that my path led irrevocably outward, into the limitations and darkness of three-dimensionality. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 41-42

in the light of consciousness the inner realm of light appears as a gigantic shadow… Now all at once I understood … that cold shadow of embarrassment which passed over people’s faces whenever I alluded to anything reminiscent of the inner realm  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 42

I deliberately chose this form because I wanted to avoid the impression that I had any idea of announcing an ‘eternal truth.’ The book [Answer to Job] does not pretend to be anything but the voice or question of a single individual who hopes or expects to meet with thoughtfulness in the public.  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 42

From earliest times attempts have been made to classify individuals according to types, and so to bring order into the chaos. The oldest attempts known to us were made by oriental astrologers…. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 47

Here [Psychology] alone the two currents of my interest could flow together…. Here was the empirical field common to biological and spiritual facts…. It was as though two rivers had united and in one grand torrent were bearing me inexorably toward distant goals.  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 52

It cannot be assumed, the analyst is a superman who is above such differences, just because he is a doctor who has acquired a psychological theory and a corresponding technique…. There is no therapeutic technique or doctrine that is of general application, since every case that one receives for treatment is an individual in a specific condition. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 53

The thinking type finds the feeling type stupid and sentimental; the latter takes the thinking type to be a “cold intellectual. To the sensation type, the intuitive is “unreal,” whereas the latter finds the sensation type a “flat spiritless pedestrian creature,” etc. Food for one is poison for the other. Judging from my practical experiences, the merit of Jungian typology, ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 48

There is no therapeutic technique or doctrine that is of general application, since every case that one receives for treatment is an individual in a specific condition. It is much more important to establish a relationship of trust than it is to demonstrate a clinical theory. The doctor “has something to say, but so has the patient. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 53

The treatment is also never merely logotherapy (Victor Frankl), because to therapeutic encounter, as understood by Jung, belong all those irrational imponderabilia, such as tone of voice, facial expression, gestures and by no means least that unconscious itself “which really is unconscious.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 54

You see, I have some rare and beautiful plants. I offer them the soil. If they like it they can stay here and bloom and grow. If they don’t, well then, nothing can be done. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 55

Matter and spirit both appear in the psychic realm, “as distinctive qualities of conscious contents. The ultimate nature of both is transcendental, that is, irrepresentable, since the psyche and its contents are the only reality which is given to us without a medium.’  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 58

In consequence of the inevitability of psychic phenomena, a single approach to the mystery of existence is impossible, there have to be at least two: namely, the material or physical event on the one hand and its psychic reflection on the other. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 58

[Psychology] is not concerned with things as they are ‘in themselves,’ but only with what people think about them. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 58

Since the human body is built up by heredity out of a multitude of Mendelian units, it does not seem altogether out of the question that the human psyche is similarly put together. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 59

From the start of my psychiatric career the studies of Breuer and Freud, along with the work of Pierre Janet, provided me with a wealth of suggestions and stimuli. Above all, I found that Freud’s technique of dream analysis and dream interpretation cast a valuable light upon schizophrenic forms of expression. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 59

it should be clear enough that Jung was not a pupil of Freud’s who defected, as has often been erroneously reported, but that he had already developed the basic features of his own life-work before his meeting with Freud. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 61

For Freud, sexuality in the last analysis is rooted in a biological drive; for Jung, sexuality, although indeed a biological occurrence, is also the expression of a “chthonic spirit,” which is “God’s other face,” the dark side of the God-image (phallus dream). ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 61

I knew Jung personally from 1933 until his death and I never perceived the slightest conscious or unconscious trace of any such attitude. On the contrary he frequently inveighed against Hitler and Nazism in quite unambiguous terms. He had numerous Jewish refugees among his analysands (some of whom he treated gratis) ~ Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 63

This [Nazism] evil is so abysmal that it can only end in total destruction. Even the innocent people who are left can no longer be spared the suffering that is coming now. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 64

As Mircea Eliade points out, the shaman himself does not heal; he mediates the healing confrontation of the patient with the divine powers.  ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 66

Among the so-called neurotics of our day there are a good many who in other ages would not have been neurotic that is, divided against themselves. If they had lived in a period and in a milieu in which man was still linked by myth with the world of the ancestors, and thus with nature truly experienced and not merely seen from outside, they would have been spared this division’ with themselves. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 67-68

In reality … individuation is an expression of that biological process simple or complicated as the case may beby which every living thing becomes what it was destined to become from the beginning.  ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 73

The reproach most frequently levelled against Jung is that individuation is an asocial, egocentric exercise. This is by no means the case. The human being, in his instinctual nature, is a social being, and when this nature is rescued from unconsciousness and related to consciousness he becomes more socially fit and better related to his fellow men. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 75

Spirit threatens the naïve minded man with inflation, of which our own times have given us the most horribly instructive examples. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 84

We can perceive the slightest emotional fluctuations in others and have a very fine feeling for the quality and quantity of affects in our fellow-men. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 85

In exactly the same way Jung thought that psychic processes, and especially dreams, should be described both causally and in respect to their goal or purpose. The psychic healing process can only be understood from the final standpoint, whereas the causal standpoint is more apt to yield a diagnosis. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 87

The mind, as the active principle in the inheritance, consists of the sum of the ancestral minds, the ‘unseen fathers’ whose authority is born anew with the child. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 89

The creative function of the symbol-forming psychic dynamicor the spiritalways appears in the single individual. Only in the individual are new ideas, artistic inspirations and constructive hunches and fantasies created. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 90

One of Jung’s most important contributions to the art of dream analysis lay in adding an interpretation on the subjective level to Freud’s interpretation on the objective level. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 92

We must therefore take it that the dream is just what it pretends to be, neither more nor less ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 94

The dream never points exclusively to something known but always to complex data not yet grasped by our ego-consciousness. It points to a meaning we have not yet consciously realized. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 94

“The shaman,” says Eliade, “is the great specialist in the human soul; he alone ‘sees’ it, for he knows its ‘form’ and its destiny.” ~Mircea Eliade, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 99

Dreams, sickness, or initiation ceremony, the central element is always the same: death and symbolic resurrection of the neophyte. ~Mircea Eliade, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 100

Sometimes I know so little about what the unconscious demands that I simply leave it to my hands, so that afterwards I can think about what I have shaped. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 106

Active imagination is the most effective means through which the patient can become independent of the therapist and learn to stand on his own feet. However, he must then undertake the inner work on his own, for no one else can do it for him. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 112

In the reading of this Eastern guide to meditation it became clear to Jung that he had set out quite spontaneously along an inner way that had not only been known in the East for hundreds of years but had over many centuries been developed into a structured inner path. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 113

Most Zen masters expressly decline to take serious account of dreams, which they look upon as fragments of illusion which must be overcome. Jung, on the other hand, regards dreams as ”messages from the Self” which support the way of meditation. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 114

Although the wisdom of the East made a profound impression on Jung, nevertheless he constantly warned Westerners against imitating its yoga techniques and other practices. He looked upon such imitation as theft and as a disregard of our own psychic heritage, especially of our shadow. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 114

He [Jung] writes that he does not seek, as the East Indian does, to be freed from nature and the inner opposites. Instead he seeks that wisdom which comes from the fullness of a life lived with devotion “Nature, the psyche, and life appear to me like divinity unfolded. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 115

Here Jung confesses his Christian spiritual heritage: conflict (represented by the symbol of the cross) may not be circumvented, nor suffering avoided. He liked to quote Thomas à Kempis to the effect that suffering is the horse which carries us fastest to wholeness. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 115

Jung found the Buddha to be a more complete human being than the Christ, because the Buddha lived his life and took as his task the realization of the Self through understanding, whereas with the Christ this realization was more like a fate which happened to him. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 115

Jung foresaw that the East would exert a growing psychological influence on our culture, while we would intervene drastically in their world with materialism and political destruction. He saw that Buddhism, too, has been weakened by a partial hardening into an outer formula, as Christianity has with the Westerner. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 115-116

It is clear to me,” wrote a Japanese professor, “that Jung can contribute to our spiritual tradition and religion a reality basis that we have partly lost.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 116

The dynamic which produces such inner symbolic patterns in the psyche is what Jung understands by the word “spirit.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 93

Religion, says Jung, “on the primitive level means the psychic regulatory system that is coordinated with the dynamism of instinct. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 83

In Jung’s opinion, therefore, symbols were not invented or thought up by man, but were produced from the unconscious by way of so-called revelation or intuition. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 88

The advocates of hallucinogenic drugs are engulfed in a one-sidedly overvalued unconscious, and movements and parties which are politically and rationalistically oriented hope to change the world with only conscious sociological measures, completely ignoring the unconscious. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 97

The medically controlled use of hallucinogenic drugs which has come into practice in recent years is also crippled by the same misuse of power, which is characteristic of many of the methods which employ imagination: the power of the unconscious is conjured up through the use of the drug, but it is then the controlling therapist, instead of the experiencing subject, who is responsible for the confrontation. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 119

Drug users are often plagued by fearful anxiety dreams and visions which are meant to prevent them from going further into the unconscious (a bad trip!), and the dreams of politically and sociologically oriented world reformers generally criticize their intellectualism, their inflation and their lack of feeling. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 98

In civilized societies the priest is primarily the guardian of existing collective ritual and tradition; among primitive peoples, however, the figure of the shaman is characterized by individual experience of the world of spirits (which today we call the unconscious) and his main function is the healing of personal illnesses and disturbances in the life of the collective. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 99

Jung did not enter this world in a trance-state, but rather in full consciousness and without any diminution of the individual moral responsibility which is one of the attainments of Western culture. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 117

It is generally agreed today that Jung’s greatest and most characteristic discovery was the empirical proof that there is in fact such a ”collective soul” or collective psyche the collective unconscious, to use the name he gave it. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 123-124

In his later work Jung wrote that the archetypes might, in the last analysis, be partly non-psychic, but for the present at least can be described only in terms of their ordering function in the psychic field. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 125

At first Jung regarded the question of the origin of the archetypes as one of heredity, but in his later works he left the question completely open. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 126

Intensive contact with the unconscious is thus not only important for the mentally ill, because the healing tendencies of the psychic self-regulatory system can come into their consciousness in this way. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 97

The secret poet and director of the dream, however, is, as we have said, the “spirit,” the active, dynamic aspect of the psyche. Spirit is the real culture creating factor in human beings. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 88

From ancient Iran there are accounts of such celestial journeys in which the ecstatic experiences what, under normal conditions, would be in store for the soul after death. In the Book of Artay Viraf there is a description of the suffering of Viraf for seven days from tetanus. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 104

In the Roman Sominum Scipionis, described by Macrobius, Scipio is instructed in the secrets of the beyond by tile spirit. of his dead ancestor; and the so-called Oracula Chaldaica depict at great length an initiate’s visionary journey to the beyond. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 105

The future will show whether a psychic process of development will arise from the psychological “binding-back” (religion), whether the scientific path of subjective knowledge can lead without a break into the heartening universe of objective faith. In the fact … that it is no longer exclusively ‘psychology’ in the scientific sense intended by Freud but is already in a position to claim to be a theory of the soul in this fact lies the real meaning of complex psychology. ~Jean Gebser, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 129

Those who do not realize the special feeling-tone of the archetype, end with nothing more than a jumble of mythological concepts, which can be strung together to show that everything means anything or nothing at all. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 130

Although in the last analysis the myth, like the dream, is “its own meaning,” one cannot ignore the historical fact that myths do not have the same meaning for people living in the present that they had for past cultures. If they are to have meaning for us today, then they must be reinterpreted psychologically. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 130

Psychology is the only science that has to take the factor of value (i.e., feeling) into account, because it is the link between events and life. Psychology is often accused of not being scientific on this account; but its critics fail to understand the scientific and practical necessity of giving due consideration to feeling. ~Carl Jung C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 131-132

Our “modern” interpretations will probably be regarded as amplifying mythologems and a new interpretation will once again attain validity. This does no damage to the “eternal” myth. We are the ones who suffer when we can no longer connect it to our own psychic life. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 133

One wonders why the Christ-image, as an Anthropos figure uniting humanity, was inadequate to the task of liberating “the true man,” so that such projections of a differently modified Anthropos-image occurred and why was the symbolic image of the Buddha unable to protect the East from the invasion of communistic ideology? ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 135

The astrological image of the Aquarian period is an image of man which, according to Jung, represents the Anthropos as an image of the Self, or of the greater inner personality which lives in every human being and in the collective psyche. He pours water from a jug into the mouth of a fish, of the constellation of the so-called “Southern Fish,” which represents something still unconscious. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 136

This could mean that the task of man in the Aquarian Age will be to become conscious of his larger inner presence, the Anthropos, and to give the utmost care to the unconscious and to nature, instead of exploiting it (as is the case today, for the most part). ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 136

In the Kabbala, Adam Kadmon consists of the precepts of the Torah, and the Adam-image of the Mandaeans consisted of “the law.” Psychologically this means that at this cultural level the individual cannot make direct contact with the “inner man” but must do so through religious precepts. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 136

The Anthropos, seen as mankind’s “group soul” is, namely, an image of the bond uniting all men, or of inter-human Eros, the preconscious ground of all communication and community among men, as well as being that psychic element which, through its power to compensate and limit, stands opposed to the boundless or one-sided drive to live out any single instinct. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 138

Later on they drew together into one god, and then that god became man. But in our day even the Godman seems to have descended from his throne and to be dissolving himself in the common man.” ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 152

… Is it possible that God wishes to see whether I am capable of obeying His will even though my faith and my reason raise before me the specters of death and hell? That might really be the answer! But these are merely my own thoughts. I may be mistaken…. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 159

The appearance of the Antichrist at the end of the second Christian millennium is to be accompanied by an indescribable world-wide catastrophe, which is described in the darkest colors in the Johannine Revelation. Then, however, unmediated and in the midst of the most utter destruction, there will appear in heaven the sun-woman, “with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 164

If God himself should demand from me a murder, I would not commit it; instead, I would throw my tiny human freedom and consciousness onto the scale, and sooner offer myself as a sacrifice. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 167

If, however, latent meaning as a conscious plan for creation is ascribed to the Creator, then the question arises: Why should the Creator organize this whole phenomenon of the world, since he already knows wherein he can see his reflection? And why should he be reflected, since he is already conscious of himself? ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 169

After all these reflections I have come to the conclusion that man’s likeness to God is a matter which concerns not only man but also his Creator. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 169

Evil has become a determinant reality. It can no longer be dismissed from the world by a circumlocution. We must learn how to handle it, since it is here to stay. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 172

Nothing can spare us the torment of ethical decision. Nevertheless, harsh as it may sound, we must have the freedom in some circumstances to avoid the known moral good and do what is considered to be evil, if our ethical decision so requires. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 172

Naturally, human understanding and the human will can never pretend to have fathomed the depths of the divine spirit; any such statements are of course merely human and an “endless approximation” to the concealed. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 174

St. Augustine, the Church father, made a distinction between two kinds of awareness: a morning awareness (cognitio matutina) and an evening awareness (cognitio vespertina). ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 176

Augustine compares the gradual transformation of morning awareness into evening awareness with the succession of the symbolic days of the Genesis story of creation. On the first day there is knowledge of the Self in God, then follows knowledge of the firmament, of the earth, of the sea, of “things that grow out of the earth,” of “all animals that swim in the water and that fly in the air” until finally, on the sixth day, man discovers knowledge of man himself. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 176

He [Eckhart] too made a distinction between an “evening knowledge,” in which the creature is known in himself and a “morning knowledge” in which creature and the human self are known “in the One which is God Himself.” This morning knowledge, however, is discovered only by the man who is ”detached,” who has forgotten his ego and all creatures and who lives in a psychic condition “in which God is nearer the soul than the soul is to itself.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 177

Toynbee has seen what I mean, by historical function of archetypal developments. That is a mighty important determinant of human behavior and can span centuries or thousands of years. It expresses itself in symbols. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 181

The psyche is nothing different from the living being. It is the psychical aspect of the living being. It is even the psychical aspect of matter. ~ Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 184

We discover that this matter has another aspect, namely, a psychic aspect. And so it is simply the world … seen from within. It is just as though you were seeing into another aspect of matter.” At present, however, most materialists still believe in “dead” matter. ~ Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 184

The psyche is an autonomous factor, and religious statements are psychic confessions which in the last resort are based on unconscious, i.e., on transcendental, processes. These … statements are filtered through the medium of human consciousness: that is to say, they are given visible forms which in their turn are subject to manifold influences from within and without. ~ Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 187

It is, in fact, impossible to demonstrate God’s reality to oneself except by using images which have arisen spontaneously or are sanctified by tradition, and whose psychic nature and effects the naïve-minded person has never separated from their unknowable metaphysical background…. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 188

Only heedless fools will wish to destroy [the Christian dogma]: the lover of the soul, never. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 188

Psychology as the science of the soul has to confine itself to its subject and guard against overstepping its proper boundaries by metaphysical assertions or other professions of faith. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 188

For it is not that ‘God’ is a myth, but that myth is the revelation of a divine life in man. It is not we who invent myth, rather it speaks to us as a Word of God. The Word of God comes to us, and we have no way of distinguishing whether and to what extent it is different from God. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 192

The essay by James Hillman, “Psychology: Monotheistic or Polytheistic,” on this subject seems to me to be unsuccessful. Hillman’s conclusions are based on the erroneous assumption that monotheism equals Self equals old king, and polytheism equals animus and anima equals son, which historically is not justified. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 196

The feminine factor had a determining influence on Jung’s personality and thought. The intellect, the purely masculine spirit of the world of professional scholarship, was alien to him, because this world knows nothing of the process of fertilization through the unconscious. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 145

But a larger mind bears the stamp of the feminine; it is endowed with a receptive and fruitful womb which can reshape what is strange and give it a familiar form. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 145

But the integration of the feminine into the world of masculine Logos to which our culture has been committed up to the present was not simply a personal matter with Jung. He was convinced that in general it is required of everyone these days. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 146

The mandala differs from a personal god-image not only in its feminine aspect but also in its unequivocally mathematical-geometrical character. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 150

If the process of robbing cosmic nature of its soul by the withdrawal of the gods or of God into the human being continues as at present, “then everything of a divine or daemonic character outside us must return to the psyche, to the inside of the unknown man, whence it apparently originated.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 153

One might also say that man himself, or his innermost soul, is the prisoner or the protected inhabitant of the mandala. Since modern mandalas are amazingly close parallels to the ancient magical circles, which usually have a deity in the center, it is clear that in the modern mandala man the deep ground, as it were, of the Self is not a substitute but a symbol for the deity. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 154

He [Christ] must have been a person of singular gifts to have been able so completely to express and to represent the general, though unconscious, expectations of his age…. In those times the omnipresent, crushing power of Rome … had created a world where countless individuals, indeed whole peoples, were robbed of their cultural independence and of their spiritual autonomy.” ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 182

Like Toynbee, Jung was convinced that we are in a period of cultural decline today and that the survival or disappearance of our culture depends on a renewal of our archetypal myth. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 183

Christianity slumbers and has neglected to develop its myth in the course of the centuries. Those who gave expression to the dark stirrings of growth in mythic ideas were refused a hearing. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 199

It is one of Jung’s greatest achievements, the significance of which has not yet been adequately recognized, that he rediscovered the projected religious myth of alchemy and showed unmistakably where it originated and where it is still at work today: not in matter but in the objective unconscious psyche of Western man. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 201

In their day the alchemists were the “empiricists in experience of God,” in contrast to the denominational representatives of the different creeds, whose aim was not experience but the consolidation and exegesis of a historically revealed truth. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 203

Greek alchemy, like the mathematics and the natural sciences of antiquity, was continued by the Arabs. In the Islamic world the alchemists were much closer in spirit to the Shi’ites, who were also “empiricists in experience of God,” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 203-204

Thus he [Mercurius] is always a paradox containing within himself the most incompatible possible opposites. The alchemists at least suspected the psychic origin of this symbol and therefore defined Mercurius as “spirit” and “Soul.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 208

There have always been great individuals who knew about this divine aspect of the soul: St. Augustine, Meister Eckhart, Ruysbroeck, Tauler and numerous others even Giordano Bruno called the soul “God’s light.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 218

The “terrible God” whom Nicholas of Flüe also encountered, whom Martin Luther and Jakob Böhme and many others knew, became for Jung a permanent reality as a result of this experience. All his childish and naïve ideas about a “loving God” as a Summum Bonum were outgrown once and for all. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 160

In Western alchemy, too, several masters suspected that it was a question of a meditative development of one’s own inner personality which, it was hoped, would then complete itself in the outer world. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 220

Petrus Bonus then further describes the stone as the resurrecting body which is spiritual as well as corporeal and of such subtlety that it can penetrate and pervade anything. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 221

…for without the conscious acknowledgment and acceptance of our kinship with those around us there can be no synthesis of personality…. The inner consolidation of the individual is not just the hardness of collective man on a higher plane, in the form of spiritual aloofness and inaccessibility; it emphatically includes our fellow man. ~Carl Jung, C. G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 226

The Gnostics, in their way, attained to a similar deep understanding of Christ as symbol of the Self, but they were caught in an inflation. They felt themselves to be superior to the “blind multitude,” in possession of a mystery which set them apart. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 233

As physics has to relate its measurements to objects, it is obliged to distinguish the observing medium from the thing observed, with the result that the categories of space, time, and causality become relative. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 236

From 1929 on Jung observed a class of events that appear to point to a direct relation between psyche and matter. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 236

Toward the end of his life Jung planned to concentrate his research on the nature of natural numbers, in which he saw archetypal structures and a primordial, very primitive expression of the spirit, that is, of psychic dynamics. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 246

While the mandala represents a psychological analogy to the unus mundus, synchronistic phenomena represent a parapsychological analogy which points empirically to an ultimate unity of the world. In the end everything that happens happens in one and the same world and is part of it. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 249

In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 250

Jung had his dream of the giant radiolarian, hidden in the center of the forest, while he was still a student in the Gymnasium, and this dream led to his decision to study natural science. Although at that time he could not have known anything about the universal meaning of the dream image, he rightly concluded that it was an indication that he should seek the light of all further knowledge in the secret orderedness of nature. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 139

My mandalas were cryptograms concerning the state of the self…. I had the distinct feeling that they were something central, and in time I acquired through them a living conception of the self. The self, I thought, was like the monad which I am, and which is my world. The mandala represents this monad and corresponds to the microcosmic nature of the psyche…. The mandala is the center. It is the exponent of all paths. It is the path to the center, to individuation. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 139-140

In 1927 Jung dreamed of such a mandala. He painted it and called it a “Window on Eternity.” A year later he painted a similar picture, with a golden castle in the center. Shortly after that there ensued an extraordinary coincidence: Richard Wilhelm sent him the manuscript of The Secret of the Golden Flower, in which Jung enthusiastically recognized a description of the same process at work. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 140

This dream brought with it a sense of finality. I saw that here the goal had been revealed…. Through this dream I understood that the self is the principle and archetype of orientation and meaning. Therein lies its healing function…. Out of [this insight] emerged a first inkling of my personal myth. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 141

The symbols of the cosmic Anthropos and the mandala are synonymous; they both point to an ultimate inner psychic unity, to the Self. The Buddha, the great Eastern symbol of this unity, was always represented in the early days as a twelve-spoked wheel; it was only after some contact with Greece that he began to be represented in India as a human figure. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 141

As womb or matrix of the “psychic ground,” the mandala contains more feminine features, which in the East are expressed by the image of Buddha’s lotus and the golden city, and in Western culture by the image of Eden divided into four parts, by the temenos, the fortress and the round vessel all feminine symbols. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 145

“The dream discloses a thought and a premonition that have long been present in humanity: the idea of the creature that surpasses its creator by a small but decisive factor. This “small but decisive factor” is consciousness. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 168

Through his investigations into the principle of synchronicity Jung prepared the way for an eventual alliance between depth psychology and microphysics, and therewith for the use of his ideas by contemporary natural science. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 254

We ought not to underestimate the psychological effect of the statistical world-picture: it thrusts aside the individual in favour of anonymous units that pile up into mass formations. Instead of the concrete individual, you have the names of organizations ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 254

The goal and meaning of individual life (which is the only real life) no longer lie in individual development but in the policy of the State, which is thrust upon the individual from outside and consists in the execution of an abstract idea which ultimately tends to attract all life to itself. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 254

The fact that historically collective consciousness is probably older and more important than ego-consciousness is relevant here; the ego-consciousness of the individual appears to be a late acquisition and even today is a very labile factor in a great many people. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 256

Mass-degeneration does not come only from without: it also comes from within, from the collective unconscious. Against the outside, some protection was offered by the droits de l’homme which at present are lost to the greater part of Europe, and even where they are not actually lost we see political parties, as naïve as they are powerful, doing their best to abolish them in favour of the slave state, with the bait of social security.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 258

But most religions have compromised with the world and with the State to such an extent that they have become creeds, that is, collective institutions with general convictions instead of a subjective relation to the irrational inner powers. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 260

The State takes the place of God; that is why, seen from this angle, the socialist dictatorships are religions and State slavery is a form of worship….  ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 260

Western man, however, has fallen under the spell of the ideal of community, and for some time now the churches have been making every effort to encourage “group experience” and to attract the public to every sort of social “come-on,” from marriage and job bureaus to pop concerts, instead of doing their job, which is to speak to the “inner spiritual man.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 261

The contemporary division of society into a “right” wing and a “left” wing is nothing but a neurotic dissociation, reflecting on the world stage what is happening in the individual modern man: a division within himself, which causes the shadow that is, what is unacceptable to consciousness to be projected onto an opponent, while he identifies with a fictitious self-image and with the abstract picture of the world offered by scientific rationalism, which leads to a constantly greater loss of instinct and especially to the loss of caritas, the love of one’s neighbor so sorely needed in the contemporary world. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 265

therefore, that one could even define the ego as a “relatively constant personification of the unconscious itself, or as the Schopenhauerian mirror in which the unconscious becomes aware of its own face. All the worlds that have ever existed before man were physically there. But they were a nameless happening, not a definite actuality, for there did not yet exist that minimal concentration of the psychic factor, which was also present, to speak the word that outweighed the whole of Creation: That is the world and this is I! That was the first morning of the world … when that inchoately conscious complex, the ego, the son of the darkness, knowingly sundered subject and object, and thus precipitated the world and itself into definite existence….” ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 52

Freud’s greatest achievement probably consisted in taking neurotic patients seriously and entering into their peculiar individual psychology…. He saw with the patient’s eyes, so to speak, and so reached a deeper understanding of mental illness than had hitherto been possible. In this respect he was free of bias, courageous, and succeeded in overcoming a host of prejudices. ~Carl Jung, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 60

When I once remarked to Jung that his psychological insights and his attitude to the unconscious seemed to me to be in many respects the same as those of the most archaic religions for example shamanism, or the religion of the Naskapi Indians who have neither priest nor ritual but who merely follow their dreams which they believe are sent by the “immortal great man in the heart” Jung answered with a laugh: “Well, that’s nothing to be ashamed of. It is an honor!”  ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 13

Hegel’s weakness lay in what Jung calls “the attempt to dominate everything by the intellect” including the unconscious. In order to avoid the necessity of admitting that one is exposed to uncanny autonomous psychic influences from the unconscious, and thereby to circumvent the experience of these influences, one interprets them in an “artificial … two-dimensional conceptual world in which the reality of life is well covered up by so-called clear concepts.” ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, Page 44-45

They were perfect creatures of God, for He created only perfection, and yet they committed the first sin…. How was that possible? They could not have done it if God had not placed in them the possibility of doing it. That was clear, too, from the serpent, whom God had created before them, obviously so that it could induce Adam and Eve to sin…. Therefore it was God’s intention that they should sin. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time, 159