These [Eranos] “wall sessions” were the unforgettable highlights of the summer. They acquired a different character when Erich Neumann, of Tel-Aviv, was there, for then a dialogue developed between the two, and we listened. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 119.

Not so Jung: no question of letting the plan drop! Of course I must go on the trip, I had also to accept the risk of danger. The unconscious was nature, and like nature it could either help man or destroy him. What mattered was that he should try to confront nature consciously, to fathom it and transform it. That was the whole venture of life. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 121.

Before–going—to Africa in 1926 he learned Swahili, which stood him in good stead during palavers with the natives in Kenya and Uganda. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 122.

He [Jung] had no Hebrew, which he regretted very much, especially after he became acquainted with the texts of Jewish mysticism, which he would have liked to have read in the original. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 122.

After the death of his [Jung] wife, his four daughters and his daughter-in-law-each the center of a large family of her own-took turns staying with him for a while, to keep him company. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 122.

It was obvious that dictating letters tired him, but they took an important place in his life. As his libido stopped flowing into the production of scientific works, they became a receptacle for his creative ideas, and so their number continually increased in his later years. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 123.

But at bottom he understood and accepted his “outsiderness,” because he knew that his ideas expected too much of his contemporaries. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 124.

Jung was all the more pleased and grateful for the successful interviews, such as those with Mircea Eliade, Georges Duplain, Georg Gerster, Gordon Young, Richard Evans, and John Freeman. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 125.

A distinguishing mark of his [Jung’s] correspondence is that the great bulk of it was conducted with people unknown to him. Letters to the well-known or famous were in the minority. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 125.

It was one of Jung’s exaggerations to say that the “man of the people” understood him better than the intellectuals,… ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 125.

It was a particular joy to him that an abbess in Alsace read his “Answer to Job” with her nuns. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 126.

When Jung was writing, he enclosed himself in an invisible shell. Nothing could distract him or break through his concentration; it was a cardinal law that he was never under any circumstances to be spoken to while writing. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 128.

Jung was no cigarette smoker, but after luncheon he allowed himself a Brazilian cigar, which he would offer also to his friends. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 129.

When Jung was writing, he enclosed himself in an invisible shell. Nothing could distract him or break through his concentration; it was a cardinal law that he was never under any circumstances to be spoken to while writing. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 128.

Very early on Jung had taken to giving the typescripts to his pupils to read before sending them to the printer. All criticisms, all suggestions for changes, cuts or additions were carefully weighed and were generally accepted. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 128.

Advertisements