The loss of Fraulein Wolff has hit me very hard indeed. She has left behind in our circle a gap that can never be filled. My health rests on a shaky foundation.  But when one is in one’s 79th year one no longer be surprised at anything at all.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 121.

It might be said of her that she [Toni Wolff] was “Virgin” as defined for us by Esther Harding, meaning simply an unmarried woman who, since she belonged to no man, belonged to herself and to God in a special way. Toni Wolff to Sallie Nichols; C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances, Pages 47-51

Then after a pause, Miss Wolff added this: “You know, sometimes if a man’s wife is big enough to leap over the hurdle of self-pity, she may find that her supposed rival has even helped her marriage! This ‘other woman’ can sometimes help a man live out certain aspects of himself that his wife either can’t fulfill, or else doesn’t especially want to. As a result, some of the wife’s energies are now freed for her own creative interests and development, often with the result that the marriage not only survives but emerges even stronger than before!” ~Toni Wolff, C. G. Jung, Emma Jung and Toni Wolff – A Collection of Remembrances, Pages 47-51

She [Toni Wolff] had very changeable looks, as so many intuitives do, and could sometimes look beautiful and sometimes quire plain. Her extraordinary brilliant eyes-mystic’s eyes-were always expressive. ~Helena Henderson on Toni Wolff, Carl, Emma, Toni Remembrances, P. 31.

This time the feminine element will have conspicuous representatives from Zurich: Sister Meltzer, Hinkle Eastwick (an American charmer), Frl. Dr. Spielrein (!), then a new discovery of mine, Frl. Antonia Wolff, a remarkable intellect with an excellent feeling for religion and philosophy, and last but not least my wife. ~Carl Jung, Freud/Jung Letters, pp. 438-41.

He [Jung] was only about forty at the time, but, as we know, his schoolfellows at the gymnasium had already called him “Father Abraham,” and I think anyone who knew them both well, and often saw them together, would agree that, while he seemed the prototype of the wise old man, she [Toni] had a quality of eternal youth. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

It was anything but easy at first for him to find a modus vivendi by which she [Toni] could give him her extraordinary gift—it would not be an exaggeration to call it her genius—for companionship in the “confrontation with the unconscious.” ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

As we saw in the preceding chapter, Toni Wolff was brought by her mother to Jung because of her depression, accentuated after the sudden death of her father. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

I do not know exactly how long the analysis lasted but I think about three years. It was followed by a period during which they [Carl & Toni] did not see each other at all. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

Jung had already realized her amazing gift, and now he found that his feeling for Toni added to rather than diminished his affection and devotion for his wife and family. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

The reality of his family and home were an absolute necessity to him [Jung], especially during this time of facing the unconscious, and we must remember that his problem of how to include Toni Wolff in his life fell within the same period It was most essential for me. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

To have a normal life in the real world as a counterpoise to that strange inner world. My family and my profession remained the base to which I could always return, assuring me that I was an actually existing, ordinary person. The unconscious contents could have driven me out of my wits . . . [but family and profession] were actualities which made demands on me and proved to me again and again that I really existed, that I was not a blank page whirling about in the winds of the spirit, like Nietzsche. Nietzsche had lost the ground under his feet because he possessed nothing more than the inner world of his thoughts—which incidentally possessed him more than he it. He was uprooted and hovered above the earth, and therefore he succumbed to exaggeration and irreality. For me, such irreality was the quintessence of horror, for I aimed, after all, at this world and this life. No matter how deeply absorbed and how blown about I was, I always knew that everything I was experiencing was ultimately directed at this real life of mine. I meant to meet its obligations and fulfill its meanings. My watchword was Hic Rhodos, hic salta! Thus my family and my profession always remained a joyful reality, and a guarantee that I also had a normal existence. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

It seems hard that, just at the time he [Jung] was tried to the uttermost by his “confrontation with the unconscious,” Jung had also to deal with perhaps the most difficult problem a married man ever has to face: the fact that he can love his wife and another woman simultaneously. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

Jung also did not yet know that the anima frequently projects herself into a real woman and that this projection endows that woman with the whole numinous quality of the unconscious—yes, she even has the fascination of a goddess. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

We have already seen a first appearance of the anima, when Jung was still a boy, in the girl he met near Sachseln on his way back from visiting the hermitage of Niklaus von der Flüe. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 86

Toni Wolff was perhaps—of all the “anima types” I have ever known—the most fitted to carry the projection of this figure. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

She [Toni] was not beautiful in the strictly classical sense, but she could look far more than beautiful, more like a goddess than a mortal woman. She had an extraordinary genius for accompanying men—and some women too, in a different way—whose destiny it was to enter the unconscious. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

Indeed, she [Toni] learned of this gift through her relation to Jung, but she afterward showed the same gift when she became an analyst; in fact, it was her most valuable quality as an analyst. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

Many years afterward—during Jung’s long illness in 1944—she [Toni] asked me if I could teach her how to do active imagination, because she had never really done it at all! (I was amazed, for I knew she had helped many people with the method and as a rule it is quite impossible to do this unless one has already gone through the experience oneself.) ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

But I soon found out that not only had she [Toni] no ability to do active imagination, she had not the slightest wish (except for a dim feeling that she really ought to) to experience the unconscious at first hand. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

She [Toni] had no doubt whatever of its [Active Imagination] objective existence, but no inclination to go into it herself. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

She [Toni] could unhesitatingly accept whatever genuine experiences other people had there and give them the firmest support by her calm attitude toward the most irrational, even incredibly strange, phenomenon.  I have never seen anyone else in the least like her in this respect, but then, people with a touch of genius are usually unique. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

During the time of separation [From Jung], Toni fell back into her original depression, not so badly, but unmistakably. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

Jung still hesitated to see more of her [Toni] outside analysis, however, for he knew how drawn he was to her and he was most reluctant to inflict any suffering on his wife and family. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

He [Jung] once told Marie-Louise von Franz and me that, curiously enough, it was his family that had given him the final impetus to seek a modus vivendi, whatever it might cost. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

He [Jung] told us that this fear had kept him awake a whole night, a night during which he slowly realized that if he refused to live the outside attraction [with Toni] that had come to him entirely from the unconscious against his will, he would inevitably ruin his daughters’ Eros. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

What saved the situation was that there was no “lack of love” in any of the three. Jung was able to give both his wife and Toni a most satisfactory amount, and both women really loved him. Therefore, although for a long while they were at times most painfully jealous of each other, love always won out in the end and prevented any destructive action on either side. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

Emma Jung even said years later: “You see, he never took anything from me to give to Toni, but the more he gave her, the more he seemed able to give me.” ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

The desire somehow to destroy the marriage and marry the man herself.  Toni told me once it had cost her more than anything in her life to learn that she must not give way to this almost universal feminine instinct. It was a characteristic of Toni to learn facts slowly—she was an intuitive type—but once she had learned them, she knew them forever and never wavered again. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 87

She [Toni] also realized later that Jung’s unswerving loyalty to his marriage gave her more than she could possibly have had without it. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 88

It was of the greatest possible help to Jung to have the companionship of Toni, with her unfailing sympathy and understanding, during the greater part of his “confrontation with the unconscious.” ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 88

He [Jung] said: “Either she did not love me and was indifferent concerning my fate, or she loved me—as she certainly did—and then it was nothing short of heroism. Such things stand forever, and I shall be grateful to her in all eternity.”  ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 88

Later, Jung often experienced such phenomena (loud reports in the furniture, for example) as a pre-stage to a creative effort (usually they occurred before he realized what he was going to write). It was at bottom the same incentive as that which had led him finally to face all the difficulties of his friendship with Toni Wolff: not to accept the promptings of the unconscious had a negative effect on his surroundings. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 89

I have to admit that, without believing some of the specific accusations, my image of you was somewhat darkened, especially after Fraulein Wolff told me that, if you had been a German, you would have voted for the Nazis. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 48

Please give my warmest greetings to your dear wife and to Fraulein Wolff and do pass on my new address to them. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

This time I owe a special debt for my work with Fraulein [Toni] Wolff.  ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 130

At last I’m able to thank you personally for the kind letter you wrote me on the occasion of Toni Wolff’s death. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

On the day of her [Toni Wolff] death, even before I had received the news, I had a bad relapse of my tachycardia. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

  1. W. [Toni Wolff] died so suddenly and so entirely unexpectedly that one could scarcely realize her disappearance. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

I had seen her [Toni Wolff] two days earlier – both totally unsuspecting. As early as mid-February I had Hades dreams, which I related entirely to myself, because nothing pointed to Toni. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

None of the people who were close to her [Toni Wolff] had any warning dreams, while people in England and Germany did, and in Zurich only some who knew her merely superficially. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

“I feel the need to recommend the collected papers of Toni Wolff to your attention.

They are distinguished not only by their intellectual content but by the fact that the author had personally experienced the development of analytical psychology from the fateful year of 1912 right up to the recent past and was thus in a position to record her reactions and sympathetic interest from the first. Her papers also have a documentary value. Even those who did not know the author personally will glean from them an impression of the versatility and depth of her spiritual personality. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 424-425

Note: Daniel Brody was theproprietor of Rhein Verlag, Zurich, publisher of the Eranos Jahrbilcher.

In the first volume of [Eranos] proceedings, therefore, Jung’s contribution turned out to be comparatively short, as it was drawn from the sketchy notes taken by Toni Wolff. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 265.

The hetaira or companion is instinctively related to the personal psychology of the man. The man’s individual interests, tendencies, and, if need be, problems lie within the purview of her consciousness, and through her they are stimulated and advanced. She gives him a sense of personal value apart from collective values, for her own development requires that an individual relationship be drawn out and realized in all its nuance and depth. The function of the hetaira would be to awaken in the man the individual psychic life which goes beyond his masculine responsibility, to make him a whole personality. This development generally becomes a task only for the second half of life, after his social existence has been established. ~Toni Wolff, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 187-188

He [Jung] was “the prototype of the wise old man,” whereas Toni Wolff enjoyed “the quality of eternal youth. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 187-188

At much the same time of the fantasy he made the extraordinary discovery that of all his friends and acquaintances only one young girl [Toni Wolff] was able to follow his extraordinary experiences and to accompany him intrepidly on his Nekyia to the underworld. It was anything but easy at first for him to find a modus vivendi by which she could give him her extraordinary gift-it would not be an exaggeration to call it her genius-for companionship in the ‘confrontation with the unconscious. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 188

The Jungian analyst Barbara Hannah said flatly that Emma and Toni [Wolff], the mother figure and the hetaira figure, were the two fundamentally inseparable sides of a single problem. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189

Toni Wolff was perhaps-of all the ‘anima types’ I have ever known-the most suited to carry the projection of this figure. She was not beautiful in the strictly classical sense, but she could look far more than beautiful, more like a goddess than a mortal woman. She had an extraordinary genius for accompanying men-and sometimes women too, in a different way-whose destiny it was to enter the unconscious. Indeed, she learned of this gift through her relation to Jung, but she afterward showed the same gift when she became an analyst; in fact it was her most valuable quality as an analyst. Curiously enough, she did not ever enter the unconscious on her own account. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189

What saved the situation was that there was no ‘lack of love’ in any of the three. Jung was able to give both his wife[Emma] and Toni [Wolff] a most satisfactory amount, and both women really loved him. Therefore, although for a long while they were at times most painfully jealous of each other, love always won out in the end and prevented any destructive action on either side. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189-190

You see, he [Carl Jung] never took anything from me to give to Toni [Wolff], but the more he gave her the more he seemed able to give me. ~Emma Jung, Jung: His Life and Work by Barbara Hannah, Page 119.

Toni Wolff was Jung’s close collaborator. She was certainly part of that process of search and discovery, when everything seemed still fluid and formulations were tentatively being sought. Wherever the Jung’s were, Toni Wolff was there also. She participated with her whole being during her whole life in Jung’s world.  Tina Keller, The Memoir of Tina Keller-Jenny, Page 28.

The Self is at the same time a unique thing, a totality and also a group. As such it can be said to have two aspects, the inner and the outer. As the inner, it is the many-told factors, archetypes, figures, situations, symbols, etc. which constitute it; and as the outer, it is a group of people which are an inherent part of the life of an individual. Both aspects are interrelated. ~Toni Wolff, A Memoir of Toni Wolff, Page 46.

The Eastern mind is far ahead of us in the knowledge of the basic psychological facts. I will only remind you of the fundamental law of the opposites, which ancient Chinese philosophy has formulated under the symbols of the Yang and the Yin. Yang and Yin are cosmic principles as well as psychical ones. ~Toni Wolff, Some Principles of Dream Interpretation, Page 5.

The archetypes are “categories of imagination,” typical forms of apperception and behaviour, inherent psychical patterns earlier than any consciousness. They are the self-representation of human. The archetypes are the real underlying factors of autonomous complexes. ~Toni Wolff, “Analytical or Complex Psychology,” Page 23.

Jung presented Toni [Wolff] with a revised copy of Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido in 1951. Seiner lieben (“To my dearest Toni”) “The author presents to you this child of painful effort born close to the birthday of the invincible sun. ~ Naeff family archives

Mary [Mellon] also planned to include several of Toni Wolff’s essays in the first Bollingen Series, but again, that plan never transpired.11 William Schoenl, CG. Jung: His Friendships, Page 43.

“I hope Mrs. Jung is well and all your family. Please give her my kindest regards and my love to Toni [Wolff].” Mary Mellon, William Schoenl, CG. Jung: His Friendships, Page 43

She [Toni Wolff] is Dr. Jung’s greatest pupil and has for many years helped him in his work by taking many of the patients which he felt himself unsuited to help. I analyzed with her for a good three months. She is very austere, very dignified and severe, but when you get to know her you find she is a most warm and human creature. She is the most important person for you to know, outside of Jung himself. ~ William McGuire, Bollingen, Page 112

From Claridge’s in Brook Street, Paul asked Jung’s secretary whether he [Paul Mellon] could work with Toni Wolff, Jung’s closest associate, during their stay. ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 5

She [Mary Mellon] began on a personal note: Mrs. Cabot had just sent her some new pictures of Jung and Toni Wolff that had made Mary so homesick she could scarcely bear it.  ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 22

The tentative [Bollingen] list of publications, as it was headed, included twelve works. Four were by Jung, one by Emma Jung, and one by Toni Wolff: Jung’s Transformation Symbolism of the Mass, Two Essays (reprint), and, under the pseudonym Basilides, VII Sermones ad Mortuos, Emma Jung’s Grail, and-Mary also hoped-a book of essays from Toni Wolff.  ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 23

Of the persons associated with Jung, Toni Wolff stood out in Mary’s mind as the one who understood his work best. Jolande Jacobi had also been mentioned for the position.  ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 48

She [Mary] remembered meeting Jacobi in Ascona and, frankly, she did not like her very much, but that might have been a first impression only. In Jung’s view she might be better suited to be his representative, or he might have another suggestion. Still, Mary said, she was hoping he would suggest Toni Wolff. ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 48-49

I really do think that you [Katy Cabot] understand Dr. Jung’s teaching far better and deeper than almost anyone else. ~Toni Wolff, Jung, My Mother and I, Page 14

My mother saw Jung for the first time while I was at the Kinderspital. She also began her analysis with Toni Wolff that same autumn. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 44

After her first interview with Jung in the autumn of 1929, she was now analyzing regularly with Toni Wolff, as it was Jung’s habit to send a new patient to his assistant for weekly analysis, occasionally seeing the patient himself. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 45

Katy began her analysis in 1929 with Toni Wolff, after that single hour with Jung to which Mrs. Jung’s letter from that autumn alludes.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 53

l health, and though she studied with Jung and Toni Wolff, it never seemed to occur to her that mental health was also necessary.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 66-67

In 1931, shortly after my father’s death, she [Katy Cabot] toyed with the idea of studying at Oxford, which Toni Wolff, educated at Bern University, also advocated.  ~Carl Jun, Jung My Mother and I, Page 70

I then told him of my transference to Wolff and how I hated her saying she was not seeing me again, and how I finally asked her to dinner; that at first she was cold then said she would come. Jung said that Wolff had certainly released my feeling.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 99

But Baynes has to handle Miss Wolff as an adult being. Such men as Baynes and Crowley can only deal with or relate to women whom they treat as if being on an inferior level, or who are on an inferior level. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 124

I told Onkel [Jung] how Crowley hated Miss Wolff, and I said I wondered why I had, and others did. He said that people misunderstand Miss Wolff because she had to talk as if through a thick wall with people because they won’t hear! ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 124

I told him one heard people saying, “Dr. Jung and Miss Wolff are wonderful psychologists, just marvelous, the best you know, a magnificent team!” “Yes,” he [Crowley] retorted full of humor, “a good pair of horses to drag people uphill.” We both simply roared with laughter.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 125

He [Jung] said that she [Toni Wolff] analysed dreams for him and was wonderful, that she was rather reserved and one did not see her coming forward much, but there was much behind the veil – pure gold – but she emphasized things too much at times and got people’s backs up.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 125

You see, your personality has changed a great deal: formerly it was yourself instigated by your mother partly – who fabricated such plans and ideas more or less. You wanted to be on top of society, as every woman would. And now you don’t want this anymore; you have seen better values …. The socially ambitious person has drifted into the background and is now your alter ego, that is, your shadow ….  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 137

In January, Katy received a long “analytical letter” from Toni Wolff (4.01.37) which mentions Katy’s need to become a “woman of granite” and less fluid. Toni also analyses Katy’s dream that “second-rate” women have let the dukes of Windsor and Kent make them pregnant.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 137

Women particularly seem to have been frequently ill in the ‘thirties, as Toni Wolff, Linda Pierz, and Mary Foote often complained of being unwell. Since antibiotics were not yet available, infections took a long time to cure.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 140

I think it was very fine and courageous of you [Katy Cabot] to have made this decision to [to give up Eranos]. I realise how difficult it must have been for you.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 155

To despise one’s self simply shows that one has not yet made friends with one’s self.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 155

That Toni [Wolff] imagined Katy depending on anybody indicates how little she understood her analysand.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 156

He [Jung] said that he had a chest of tropical medicines and would [in India] take quinine and put chlorine in the washing water and drink only bottled waters and eat no uncooked foods etc.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 167

The Schifflibach was a huge success with young and old; the Jung’s loved it, as did Toni Wolff.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 205

As there had just been a thunderstorm, a lot of water fell down onto his “lady companion’s” hat. “She took it in good part,” my mother wrote. The “gentleman” and the “lady” were apparently Dr. Jung and Miss Wolff.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 205

Apparently Dr. Jung has been accepted by your whole background; your mother is charmed by him, and he sits in your father’s cabin, more or less in your father’s place – but only the nice side of your father is important. Naturally, because your father has these fits of temper, you felt him to be emotionally unreliable, and part of your lack of security comes from that reason, also your mistrust of people. Therefore, if you feel towards Dr. Jung as towards a fatherly figure whom you can trust absolutely, and if you express this to him in one way or another, you would have gained a lot of ground. So don’t hesitate to do it.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 138

They both [Toni Wolff] & Barbara Hannah] had a tremendous lack of personal development – they became too conscious of their mutual shadows and projected them onto each other.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

Toni [Wolff] can blindfold people as to her shortcomings, and when she is in a bad humor, or queer mood, it is in disagreement with her obvious character, so people don’t get on to [correctly perceive] her.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 332

I told him that I thought Toni [Wolff] was stingy. He said it was not quite that, as she could be ridiculously generous and had given large sums to charity, but that she could not be generous in a human relationship.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 332

Late on 9 August, I received a telephone call from my mother telling me that Tommy had died at 8:30 p.m. I returned to Zurich the next day, traveling 3rd-class with Dr. Jung, Barbara Hannah, Toni Wolff and others coming back from the Eranos Tagung.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 414

Thanks to her intuition, Linda [Fierz] sees Katy more clearly than Toni Wolff ever did. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 429

The next day Carl and I were up for the ten-thirty train home about two. We found T.W. [Toni Wolff] in the [hotel] dining room – but she wanted to wait for the Jung’s who were not yet up. They had to stop in Thun for their luggage & only arrived in Zurich after seven! A long day.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 446

Less than a week after Mrs. Jung wrote the above letter, Toni Wolff died unexpectedly of a stroke on 21 March at the age of sixty-four. Though she had suffered from severe arthritis for many years, she still had been very active. Toni’s death was a shock to the psychological group in Zurich, as no one had anticipated it.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

Emma Jung and Toni Wolff were particularly fond of him [H.G. Baynes], and before long he began his first term as Jung’s assistant.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 147

Peter’s relationship to woman was clearly a troubled one. Toni Wolff commented to him that he seemed more able, at this time, to trust himself in a relationship with a man than with a woman.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 164

Joe [Henderson] speaks of those who were worlding alongside Jung in Zurich at the time. They were; ‘Toni [Wolff], Cary (who never worked as an analyst) Peter, Emma Jung and “C.G.”.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

Students and patients alike were all in Zurich to analyse with either Jung or with one of his assistants: Emma Jung, Toni Wolff and Peter were the three people who were working most closely with Jung. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 227

She [Anne] later described this momentous visit. Peter suggested straight away that they should go to Bollingen to talk with Jung. This was on a Sunday and Jung was staying there together with Toni Wolff.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

Toni [Wolff] was Jung’s first assistant and was also a woman of unusual intuitive flare and rare intelligence. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

Emma is reputed to have said, later in life, that she was forever indebted to Toni [Wolff] for assisting Jung during his powerful and difficult experience of the unconscious, when he felt at times in danger of losing his way and his very identity. Emma felt she would have been unable to give him the support and understanding he needed. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

In a talk Peter had with Toni Wolff, she too had made it abundantly clear that she felt this marriage would end in disaster. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

I have known men and women who were hosts to Jung and Toni Wolff when they travelled on psychological missions outside Switzerland and these people have spoken of their dismay when in the intimacy of their homes they observed Toni Wolff repeatedly in the grip of great distress.  ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 175

Throughout these long years Toni Wolff stood fast and in the process not only sustained the full weight of Jung’s undiscovered feminine self, enabling him thereby to live it out through her into maturity, but inevitably became also the vulnerable intermediary between himself and his embattled shadow.  ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 176

You see, he [Carl Jung] never took anything from me to give to Toni [Wolff] , but the more he gave her the more he seemed able to give me. ~Emma Jung, Jung: His Life and Work by Barbara Hannah, Page 119.

You wrote me a detail about Toni’s [Wolff] death which nobody else had reported to me, and which completes the medical picture. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 166

What kind of physician one has is definitely part of one’s fate. I’m thinking of Toni [Wolff] a lot. It hurts me deeply to think of her lonesome death, as I experienced Toni as a very solitary person in the last years. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 166

I shall always be grateful to Toni [Wolff] for doing for my husband what I or anyone else could not have done at a most critical time.” ~Emma Jung; Laurens Van Der Post Jung: The Story of our Time; Page 177.

Barbara Hannah, who was equally close to both of them, recounted the great shock that Jung’s health suffered during those weeks:His [Jung’s] tachycardia returned, he kept an unusually high pulse for several weeks, and was not well enough to go to the funeral. Outwardly he kept extremely calm, so that both his wife and his secretary told me they thought he had overcome the shock after a few days, but from my notes for April 1953, I see that he said himself that his pulse was still between 80 and 120; moreover, this trouble continued for some time.  Although it took Jung a long time to overcome the shock physically, he was able much sooner to find a psychological attitude to Toni’s [Wolff] death and to accept the pain it gave him. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 407

“I hope Mrs. Jung is well and all your family. Please give her my kindest regards and my love to Toni. [Wolff]” …” I can feel all through me how I will feel when I lay eyes on you again.”  ~Mary Mellon – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 43

Onkel [Jung] went on to say that he and Toni [Wolff] would not become intimate friends of their pupils because if people are with them continually they do not feel the need to develop; for when you are with someone who understands things better than you, you don’t lift a finger.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 183

He [Jung] said that people like himself, or Toni [Wolff], suffocate developments. I asked how they both developed so far. He said they were forced, by their patients, and by circumstances, to get on. “The water of the great flood forced me up to a Jungfrau or an Everest. I had to get up there.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 184

I went to see Onkel because I wanted to explain to him why I had not gone to Bollingen, at Toni’s [Wolff] invitation, right after getting back from Geneva and seeing off the “English train.” I found him not feeling too well sinus trouble – and he was going to Dr. M. I begged him to ask Dr. M. if he should have calcium.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 214

Onkel [Jung] said that he and Toni [Wolff] had put her together, and she then thought she knew enough to ‘swing it’ – become an analyst. The van W.s prejudiced the Mellon’s against Toni, but Mrs. Mellon was charmed with Toni the other night at the Rufenacht lecture and asked her to tea. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

I asked Onkel [Carl] why Toni [Wolff] was so hard and rough and gruff at times, and not at all understanding, sometimes. Uncle said that she had a remarkable mind, was a genius and a person of quality. Her animus is her hard and gruff side which comes through whenever the unexpected happens.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

I said that to me she [Toni Wolff] seemed like a grouchy old man with the gout and was at moments difficult. He [Jung] said that side of her was absurd and grotesque and you often get such a side with people with a special gift.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

After all, everyone has a flaw and Toni[Wolff] has a remarkable natural mind. What Toni cannot stand is something unexpected! When something changes or something unforeseen happens, she resists it like hell!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

She [Toni Wolff] is an introvert, and like all introverts, she fears the unexpected; it is hostile! Extraverts, on the contrary, like to have things different from what they expected. They just love it when something unforeseen happens.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 234

Toni [Wolff]is a very advanced person, but she comes from a most conservative family, who has lived in Zurich for centuries, and are like hard, old wood. Her mind is the only thing movable in her. If she had not that mind she would be stone-hard.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 234

I asked Onkel if he couldn’t analyse Toni [Wolff and cure her of that absurdity, the rough side of her nature, as it was unworthy of her to keep it when she had the opportunity to get rid of it, through some work with him. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 235

He [Jung] said one cannot touch that subject with her [Toni Wolff] – one cannot ‘get at it’ – as when you approach her about it, the same revulsion takes place as when something unexpected happens. It is sort of wheels-within-wheels, and one cannot do anything about it. She refuses to let one broach the subject.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 235

Toni [Wolff] is adapted to a life where nothing happens – they lived that way through the centuries in Switzerland.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 236

Toni [Wolff] is a typical Zurich lady of the 18th century. Then, life here was quiet, and you met the same people: they had names you knew and were old families you knew – but let one stranger appear, and they were all a-flutter.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 236

He [Carl] said he saw Toni [Wolff] in an old-fashioned gown, in the 13th century, and he had a three-cornered hat and was bowing low in front of her. The more she is advanced on one side, the more she feels that rough side of herself – the untouchable flaw!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 237

Toni [Wolff] indeed had a stiff side, which I noticed myself. But she compensated for it with a very friendly personality. Being an introvert myself, I felt sympathy for Toni’s not liking the unexpected; though one can be conscious of this weakness, it is very difficult entirely to overcome it.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 237

I asked him if she [Katy’s Daughter] should see Toni [Wolff]occasionally. He [Jung] said, “NO,” not to make her complicated, but let her apply herself and get into life. She must learn to branch out into life, seize possibilities and mix with other people; then she may learn something about life.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 261

Onkel [Jung] said that Toni [Wolff] hates to think of people who have a certain value being sometimes wrong. She is too fair: if she is in sympathy with a person, then nothing can be wrong and all is white; if she does not like a person, then all is black.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 274

He [Jung] then went back to Linda [Fierz David] and said that sometimes she does not tell the truth at all. And she is sly and clever and knows Toni [Wolff] inside-out- therefore, she knows how to play on that instrument!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 275

I then told Onkel [Jung} that it was just stupid for me to be sitting there, paying her [Toni Wolff] twenty francs an hour, to come down to her level to please her. On the contrary, she ought to be paying me twenty francs an hour for doing it(!).  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 328

Onkel [Toni] went on to say that he had asked Toni what she had in common with me, whereupon he felt himself encountering something dull and black in her mood, and he couldn’t penetrate it. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 328

She [Toni Wolff] is very intuitive and intellectual, and only facts can put people wise, especially with intuitives. One can never just tell people: they must ‘experience’ the thing themselves.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 328

She [Toni Wolff]] is very intuitive and intellectual, and only facts can put people wise, especially with intuitives. One can never just tell people: they must ‘experience’ the thing themselves.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 328

As long as Toni [Wolff] is with people below her, she is marvelous, for she can only be a mother to the poor. She is like a mother who is only interested in the children while they are young but has no use for them when they grow up. She is good for weak people, but no good when they have grown up.   ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 328-329

As for Barbara [Hannah] being “in love with” Toni [Wolff], that sounds too strong; but I can imagine Barbara might have had a school-girl crush on Toni.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 329

He [Carl] went on to say that Toni [Wolff] is in a way a genius, and such people live half their lives or more on their genius. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 330

Toni [Wolff] is nice when you get on the right side of her, but when the devil is on her, then she is a black devil. It is all because she is utterly unconscious of the personal side.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

She [Toni Wolff] is like a respectable woman who has another side and doesn’t like to pay any attention to her creative animus to whom she is married. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

Barbara Hannah, who is also an artist, made the same mistake as Toni [Wolff], and of course there could be no relationship between two such people with the same Weltanschauung [world view]. The shadow rose between them. They were just nagging each other with their shadows!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

One must never hope to see the real Toni [Wolff]  because what you see is the real Toni. That is she. That is the real Toni! To be intimate with her, he said, would mean emptying her pot de chambre [chamber pot]!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 354

Toni [Wolff] must be taken for what she is. Everyone has faults. We must be grateful for people with some qualities for some people are without a trace of mind, and at least she has that.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 355

I then told him [Jung] that Toni [Wolff] was a difficult problem for me in a way, as she was demanding and I often had to placate her. It made it difficult for me and like a burden I had to bear. Onkel said that Toni has too much imagination and is sensitive too. Take things quietly and not too seriously. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

He [Jung] said that if he took things too terribly gravely, he could send people into spasms. Toni [Wolff] is apt to make too much fuss. “She is very fussy, so I don’t tell her things for I don’t want her to get into a fuss.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

I never know, when I go to see her [Toni Wolff], what she is going to be like. She might well be in a hell of a mood, or absent. She changes like the moon. With the moon, you can tell – but with her, you can’t. She is sometimes in abysmal gloom. She is sometimes quite impossible.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

He [Jung] said that Toni [Wolff] works with her mother instinct, for it is sweet to be a mother to helpless adult beings. “Never mind what mood she is in. Disregard it- for it’s all vapor.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

He [Jung]said that Fraulein Bianchi was the same kind of swine as the others who constitute themselves a mother. She could not compete with Toni [Wolff] and Linda. It was a case of dog-eat-dog: The two strongest dogs kicked her out.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 359

I said I found Toni [Wolff] a rather small, frail and pathetic creature. He [Jung] said she was that and that I could not see her in that way – which was the true way of seeing her – if I had not written that letter. He said that I took a stand which made it possible for me to see her clearly.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 362

If a person is, on the whole like Toni [Wolff], a good person, then you want to know them, and some bad sides don’t matter.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 356

Toni’s [Wolff] remark, that Katy understood Jung’s teaching far better and more deeply than almost anyone else, was no empty compliment. Toni was not the type to flatter. Katy did understand Jung’s teaching remarkably well, but she found it difficult to impart it to people she was attached to.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 482

It was a great shock to me to get the news of Toni’s [Wolff] death and I know that it must have been the same for you and also a great loss, for she was not only a wonderful person, but a magnificent collaborator in your work.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

Thank you very much for your kind letter of sympathy, it was good of you to write. Toni’s [Wolff] death has been a terrible shock to me and to us all, especially as it was so sudden and entirely unexpected. There are many people who will feel as you do over her loss which is quite irreparable in many ways.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 566

Toni’s [Wolff] criticisms of Peter’s book were not helpful. She felt that the drawings and paintings of the patient Peter was describing were too disturbed and that it was not possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of depth psychology with such disturbing material.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 260-261

On Monday I spent the whole evening with Emma Jung alone at her house (C.G. was at Aarau lecturing to Christians). Emma was just lovely. We just seemed to get to a calm. leisurely mood like a broad river where we found the most human understanding. She told me lots of things about herself and her deep feeling conclusions seem to me ever so true. So you see I was able to tell her about you and me. She said she would like awfully to know you. She got your spirit as a worn.an, I felt, and she said: ‘You see Peter, I would never say that the way things are in our lives (meaning Toni [Wolff] and C.G.), is in any way a solution. She let me see how she had suffered and how she still suffers. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 251

As regards myself I felt for a week that you had completely taken the wind out of my sails, because I sensed that you had concluded from Toni’s account that my whole work on those drawings was practically valueless. Then I said to myself, ‘C. G has not read it and Toni [Wolff] is temperamentally averse from (sic) pathological material. I am a doctor, and it is precisely because the case was schizophrenic that I undertook the demonstration of the therapeutic evolution. The case is valuable and I stand for the value I put into it.’ From that point I got right again and can appreciate the cogency and soundness of your criticism of the presentation.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 261

Fate had a much worse blow in store for him [Jung] before he could finish the Mysterium Coniuctionis. In the early spring of 1953 he suffered a most unexpected and poignant sorrow: Toni Wolff died as suddenly as her father had done over forty years earlier, on March 21. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

Toni was thirteen years younger than I am and I never seriously considered the possibility that she could die before me. ~Carl Jung, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

He had, it is true, been seriously disturbed by one dream of hers and two of his own concerning her, which occurred seven years before her death, in the spring of 1946 but since the dreams could just as well have pointed to rebirth as to actual death, and since he had done everything he could in interpreting them to her, his alarm had subsided. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

Therefore her [Toni]sudden death was a most unexpected shock and blow to him. Jung had been seriously unwell for a few weeks but was up and about before the blow fell. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

Curiously enough, a short time before Toni died he [Jung] had told me a dream which had made him decide to give up smoking. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

Now, Jung had smoked a great deal all his life, although usually a pipe and never to the extent that Freud had smoked, but to give it up entirely so suddenly must have been exceedingly difficult. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

Toni, on the other hand, did undoubtedly smoke too much— about thirty to forty cigarettes a day—and she told me that half of the doctors she had seen had told her it was aggravating her condition and ordered her to give it up, whereas the others said there was no connection. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

Jung [Jung] had urged her [Toni] for years to reduce it at least, but this was one of the very few pieces of advice she refused to listen to, and she smoked incessantly until the day of her death. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 224

We must have a vice and I have chosen smoking as mine. ~Toni Wolff, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

I believe her to have been completely convinced that her smoking (which seemed excessive to us but not to her) was right for her, whatever it might be for other people. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

At all events, I have never seen anyone look more peaceful and fulfilled or so strangely alive than Toni did after death. I found myself asking her old maid, Lena, if she could really be dead, was the doctor sure she was not asleep? ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

The shock caused a relapse in Jung’s own health; his tachycardia returned, he kept an unusually high pulse for several weeks, and was not well enough to go to the funeral. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

Outwardly he [Jung] kept extremely calm, so that both his wife and his secretary told me they thought he had overcome the shock after a few days, but from my notes for April 1953, I see that he said himself that his pulse was still between 80 and 120; moreover, this trouble continued for some time. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

He [Jung] had been helped, it is true, by seeing Toni in a dream, which he dreamed on Easter Eve, looking much taller and younger than she had been when she died, and exceedingly beautiful. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

He [Jung] saw just her [Toni] image, there was no action in the dream, and he was especially impressed by having dreamed it on the night of the Resurrection. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

Although it took Jung a long time to overcome the shock physically, he was able much sooner to find a psychological attitude to Toni’s death and to accept the pain it gave him. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 225

 

 

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