Mama’s [Emma Jung] death has left a gap for me that cannot be filled. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 317.

He [Jung] struggled with himself about telling her [Emma Jung] but he did so; she was quite undisturbed, and in a way relieved for ever since heroperation she had been preparing for death. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 147

You see, he [Carl Jung] never took anything from me to give to Toni [Wolff] , but the more he gave her the more he seemed able to give me. ~Emma Jung, Jung: His Life and Work by Barbara Hannah, Page 119.

Since your visit I have been tormented by the idea that your relation with my husband is not altogether as it should be, and since it definitely ought not to be like this I want to try to do whatever is in my power. ~Emma Jung to S. Freud, Freud/Jung Letters Pages 452-3.

You were really annoyed by my letter, weren’t you? I was too, and now I am cured of my megalomania and am wondering why the devil the unconscious had to make you, of all people, the victim of this madness. ~Emma Jung to S. Freud, Freud/Jung Letters Pages 455-7.

Incidentally, America no longer has the same attraction for him [Carl] as before, and this has taken a stone from my heart. ~Emma Jung to S. Freud, Freud/Jung Letters, Page 303.

I would prefer to think that one should not dream at all, one should live. ~Emma Jung, Freud/Jung Letters, Page 456

In this way we could come to discuss many things which never came up in my analysis and I could understand your ideas from the foundation. Mona Lisa [Emma Jung] should be included too. Perhaps she knows all that is in it so well and understands it so completely that this would not appeal to her, but I thought it would he [Peter Baynes] asked me why it was such a problem with me about publishing the Red Book.  ~Cary Baynes, Introduction 1925 Seminar, Page xiv

I hope very much that your wife [Emma Jung] will decide to publish the lectures about the Anima in book form. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 189

The fatal illness of his wife Emma [Jung]-she died in November 1955 -marked the time when his life was nearing its end. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung’s Last Years, Page 100.

“I shall always be grateful to Toni [Wolff] for doing for my husband what I or anyone else could not have done at a most critical time.”  ~Emma Jung, Laurens Van Der Post Jung: The Story of our Time; Page 177.]

If I get another perfectly normal adult malingering as a sick patient I’ll have him certified! ~Carl Jung to Emma Jung. [Vincent Brome Biography]

“In all my eighty years, Barbara Hannah attested, I have never seen a marriage for which I felt such a spontaneous and profound respect. Emma Jung was a most remarkable woman, a sensation type who compensated and completed her husband in many respects.” – Barbara Hannah, Jung, Page 423

The close of her [Emma Jung]] life, the end, and what it made me realize, wrenched me violently out of myself. It cost me a great deal to regain my footing and contact with stone helped me. – Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 425

Emma Jung’s life was one of uncommon richness and was one of fulfillment, because her faithfulness to her own nature coincided with her faithfulness to her husband and her profound understanding of his life’s work. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 423

She [Emma Jung] was an immensely sensitive, shy, solicitous, circumspect, and introverted spirit. Yet she was as dauntless as she was enduring and delivered her meaning with great precision, erudition, and understanding. ~Laurens Van Der Post, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 423

The Jungian analyst Barbara Hannah said flatly that Emma and Toni [Wolff], the mother figure and the hetaira figure, were the two fundamentally inseparable sides of a single problem. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189

What saved the situation was that there was no ‘lack of love’ in any of the three. Jung was able to give both his wife[Emma] and Toni [Wolff] a most satisfactory amount, and both women really loved him. Therefore, although for a long while they were at times most painfully jealous of each other, love always won out in the end and prevented any destructive action on either side. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189-190

You see, he [Carl Jung] never took anything from me to give to Toni [Wolff], but the more he gave her the more he seemed able to give me. ~Emma Jung, Jung: His Life and Work by Barbara Hannah, Page 119.

Special mention may be made of a few letters scattered here and there in the collection from Emma Jung, who here also acted not only as the wife of her famous husband, but spoke for herself, standing on her own feet while at the same time taking sides with her spouse. With great maturity the young woman turned her attention to the problematic situation that. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 104

Think of Carl not with the feelings of a father but as one person does of another, who like you must follow his own law. ~Emma Jung to Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 139

From time to time I am plagued by conflict as to how I can be noticed next to Carl; I find that I have no friends, but that everyone who comes to visit us really only wants to see Carl, aside from a few boring people who are totally uninteresting to me.  Emma Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 140

Last night there was a tremendous amount of ceremony and fancy dress, with all sorts of red and black gowns and gold tasseled square caps. In a grand and festive assemblage I was appointed Doctor of Laws honoris causa and Freud likewise. Now I may place an L.L.D. after my name. Impressive, what? ~Carl Jung to Emma, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 123.

Journey Down a Rainbow, by Priestley and Jacquetta Hawkes, was the last book Emma Jung read before her death in 1955.  William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page xii

The tentative [Bollingen] list of publications, as it was headed, included twelve works. Four were by Jung, one by Emma Jung, and one by Toni Wolff: Jung’s Transformation Symbolism of the Mass, Two Essays (reprint), and, under the pseudonym Basilides, VII Sermones ad Mortuos, Emma Jung’s Grail, and-Mary also hoped-a book of essays from Toni Wolff.  ~William Schoenl – C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 23

On November 27, 1955, Emma Jung died after she became seriously ill in early November. Journey Down a Rainbow was the last book that she read-and with great pleasure-before she could read no more.  ~William Schoenl, C.G. Jung-His Friendships with Mary Mellon & J.B. Priestley, Page 79

He [Jung] said she [Emma] had a remarkable personality and extraordinary qualities and was a great student. He added that the most comforting thing on earth was a really nice old woman. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 252

Thank you [Katy Cabot] very much for sending me the book; it is indeed an interesting experience to read the New Testament in the language of our days: one gets a newer and more living impression, and many things strike you far more directly than in the traditional style. ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 386

Somehow it helps to accept fate and build like a bridge to the spiritual realm, in which our beloved-ones live on forever. I also hope that the demands of life will help you and that you will find new forces after this exceedingly strenuous time, which must have been rather exhausting!  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 416

Somehow it helps to accept fate and build like a bridge to the spiritual realm, in which our beloved-ones live on forever. I also hope that the demands of life will help you and that you will find new forces after this exceedingly strenuous time, which must have been rather exhausting!  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 416

I have been sending you affectionate New Year’s wishes in my own wireless style, that is in thought, but nevertheless feel somewhat guilty for not having put them down on paper at the right time.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 430

It is a pity you cannot be here for the Club discussion; your contribution is very valuable to me and I hope to be able to get it into the discussion, for you have [come?] upon a very important point.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 431

The X affair was rather exciting, I must tell you about it when I see you. The reason why he was excluded [from the Club] is really that through his continued money borrowing and making debts etc., he was considered to discredit the Club, which is true.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 432

I have to add this post-scriptum to say: Did you hear of Prof. Zimmer’s death?1 And isn’t it awfully sad? He died of pneumonia in New York, as we heard through a cable from Mrs. Mellon.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 432

P.S. I shall bring biscuits and tea! [for Jane’s wedding] so please don’t sacrifice your valuable [war]coupons!  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 438

I hope the winter won’t bring too bad colds or other hardships. There is always much to do, of course; Onkel [Jung] is writing on another alchemistic text and is quite immersed in it. I am following with great interest Kerenyi’s seminar about Seele & Griechentum.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 450

Dr. Jung slipped yesterday, on the ice near his house, while I was there and broke his ankle. He is now in hospital waiting for the swelling to go down, before being put in plaster. It is a plain break – no complications.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 452

We also got a new grandchild last week; our youngest daughter has a little boy, it’s her third child. Fortunately it all went well and she went home yesterday, and en passant came in to show her son to his grand-father, which was a great joy to both of us.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 445

How very kind of you to send us such lovely carnations; they are of such beautiful colouring and arrived absolutely fresh. Thank you very much for them and also for your good wishes to our Golden wedding.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

We are spending our holyday in our beloved Bollingen, but unfortunately the weather is not very good; so far we had only a few sunny days. Nevertheless we enjoy the quietness & restfulness of the place. C. G. is well, fortunately & I just had a little grippe, but am better again now.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 580

Onkel has gone to Bollingen, I am not allowed because of my sciatica (which is better however).  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 589

Emma Jung and Toni Wolff were particularly fond of him [H.G. Baynes], and before long he began his first term as Jung’s assistant.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 147

She [H.G. Baynes daughter] felt at home in the Jung household, under the all-embracing motherly wing of Emma Jung, and they accepted her as an integral part of their large and lively family. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 149

She [H.G. Baynes daughter] remembers how, at breakfast time, all the children would recount their dreams to Jung and Emma and a general discussion of these dreams would ensue.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 149

Joe [Henderson] speaks of those who were worlding alongside Jung in Zurich at the time. They were; ‘Toni [Wolff], Cary (who never worked as an analyst) Peter, Emma Jung and “C.G.”.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

C.G. has been away in France with Emma ever since I got back. I had only a word with him over the telephone before he left so I have been wondering a lot what he will think about my divorce. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 224

Students and patients alike were all in Zurich to analyse with either Jung or with one of his assistants: Emma Jung, Toni Wolff and Peter were the three people who were working most closely with Jung. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 227

Emma is reputed to have said, later in life, that she was forever indebted to Toni [Wolff] for assisting Jung during his powerful and difficult experience of the unconscious, when he felt at times in danger of losing his way and his very identity. Emma felt she would have been unable to give him the support and understanding he needed. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

C.G. is very distant and obviously with intention. He feels that I am going wrong and am cutting myself off. At least, that is what I have gathered from Cary and Maggie. But Cary has been unusually friendly and human to me, and Emma Jung has been very nice too. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 244

It was Emma Jung in her own deeply personal and feminine way, who was ultimately able to release Peter from. this state of conflict and indecision. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 251

On Monday I spent the whole evening with Emma Jung alone at her house (C.G. was at Aarau lecturing to Christians). Emma was just lovely. We just seemed to get to a calm. leisurely mood like a broad river where we found the most hum.an understanding. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 251

In September of that year the Bayneses were delighted to have a visit from Emma Jung, who came to stay at Reed House together with two of her four children, Franz and Lille. She was to be the guest of honour at the Analytical Psychology Club and the whole evening was devoted to the discussion of her paper on the animus. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

This was the first time Anne had met Emma. They liked each other at once and a strong friendship developed between them. Emma became an important person in Anne’s life and the following year, when her baby was just eighteen months old, she went to Zurich for a month to work with Emma.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

She [Anne] wrote that her time with Emma was making everything seem extraordinarily clear and that ‘we seem to have a fine understanding together.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

Emma, with her woman’s wisdom and warmth, could give Anne the affirmation she had never received from her own mother, and was also an important role model: ‘I do love Emma’, she wrote, ‘She does symbolise for me the kind of woman I want to be.’  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

Best of all, she [Anne] had been invited to dine with Emma together with two of her daughters, Agi and Marianne and about this invitation Anne was ‘tremendously excited’.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 259

This was a good time for them all [Baynes Family & Emma]. Jung was entirely at ease with small children and delighted in their company. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 284

This time with Emma and Jung was the first opportunity for Anne and Peter to meet with them as a foursome. It was especially important for Peter who was still unsure whether his marriage to Anne had created a barrier between himself and Jung. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 285

Although Emma had, ultimately, wholeheartedly supported their marriage, Jung still had reservations about it. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 285

C.G. has the same problem. His libido is still strong and possessive. He is never content. He built his tower as a tribute to the dream of life he would have liked to realize and never could. [This was Bollingen]. He had to compromise because his nature is essentially complex. He wants simplicity because he is not simple. He has always tried to foist upon Emma the tangible burdens of his complex strivings. He accumulates and then cannot maintain. Thus he is also surrounded by the decaying heaps of things and people from which his libido has receded and which are left to Emma to deal with. She expresses this remorseless continuity, this Abraxoid character to his desiring vitality. Always she reminds him of the debt intuitiveness piles up in the world of real things. He hates sensation because it is unexpressive, inarticulate and quite remorseless and indifferent to the flutters and strivings of intuition which is forever trying to escape from the real and the actual. New desires that add more and more to the heap of tangible liabilities must be renounced if this essential simplification is to be attained. Things cannot create happiness. They only make Egypt more lascivious and terrible in its effect. They only make you forget, like alcohol and infatuation. This is terrible Abraxas which makes life and death with the same breath and in the same act. The right way for me is toward an increasing simplification of life in the midst of a world which goes ever towards an increasing specialization and complexity. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 211-212

On Monday I spent the whole evening with Emma Jung alone at her house (C.G. was at Aarau lecturing to Christians). Emma was just lovely. We just seemed to get to a calm. leisurely mood like a broad river where we found the most human understanding. She told me lots of things about herself and her deep feeling conclusions seem to me ever so true. So you see I was able to tell her about you and me. She said she would like awfully to know you. She got your spirit as a worn.an, I felt, and she said: ‘You see Peter, I would never say that the way things are in our lives (meaning Toni [Wolff] and C.G.), is in any way a solution. She let me see how she had suffered and how she still suffers. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 251

Somewhere in Emma Jung’s remote ancestral background there was a family legend of a knight of her own kin who had failed the Quest and she felt called upon to set the failure right even in so late a day.  ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 153

The moment her special duties as mother [Emma] to five children were discharged she began a vast, imaginative research in the origin and meaning of the legend [Grail] and Jung felt he had to respect her sense of responsibility and not intrude upon a theme of unique meaning to her. ~Laurens van der Post; Jung and the Story of our Time, Page 153

 It was a very hard winter, with intense cold coming late; since the sap was already up in the trees, this led to the loss of many of them. Jung lost one of the two box bushes by his front door, much of his bamboo, and the clematis which grew so luxuriantly in the courtyard at Bollingen. The temperature was far below freezing. The vine over the front door at the Tower produced a curious red sap which ran down over Jung’s crest. He felt this was a strange synchronicity, so soon after Emma’s death, as if the vine were weeping tears of blood. But before these were finished and put into their places, he carved a stone in memory of his wife, which was placed in front of the covered loggia at his Tower. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 236

 After my wife’s death in 1955, I felt an inner obligation to become what I myself am. To put it in the language of the Bollingen house, I suddenly realized that the small central section which crouched so low, so hidden, was myself! I could no longer hide myself behind the “maternal” and the “spiritual” towers. So, in that same year, I added an upper story to this section, which represents myself, or my ego-personality. Earlier, I would not have been able to do this, I would have regarded it as presumptuous self-emphasis. Now it signified an extension of consciousness achieved in old age. With that the building was complete. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 237

 It was a very hard winter, with intense cold coming late; since the sap was already up in the trees, this led to the loss of many of them. Jung lost one of the two box bushes by his front door, much of his bamboo, and the clematis which grew so luxuriantly in the courtyard at Bollingen. The temperature was far below freezing. The vine over the front door at the Tower produced a curious red sap which ran down over Jung’s crest. He felt this was a strange synchronicity, so soon after Emma’s death, as if the vine were weeping tears of blood. But before these were finished and put into their places, he carved a stone in memory of his wife, which was placed in front of the covered loggia at his Tower. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 236

 After my wife’s death in 1955, I felt an inner obligation to become what I myself am. To put it in the language of the Bollingen house, I suddenly realized that the small central section which crouched so low, so hidden, was myself! I could no longer hide myself behind the “maternal” and the “spiritual” towers. So, in that same year, I added an upper story to this section, which represents myself, or my ego-personality. Earlier, I would not have been able to do this, I would have regarded it as presumptuous self-emphasis. Now it signified an extension of consciousness achieved in old age. With that the building was complete. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 237

He [Jung] was quite willing to face the fact that it was in a way a merciful fate that had forced him to survive both Toni and Emma, because, as he proved in the five and a half years that elapsed before his own death, he was able to go on creatively with his life and his individuation process after losing them. I think it is doubtful whether either of them could have done this. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 236

 I saw a good deal of Emma while Jung was in India and witnessed how terribly she missed him and how much she depended upon him. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 236

 Toni, moreover, had openly declared, from the beginning of my friendship with her, that on no account did she want to survive Jung, but they were both [Emma & Toni] very courageous women, and would certainly have faced life without him, each to the best of her ability. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 236

Ruth [Bailey] had arrived from England within a week of Emma Jung’s death and had taken the household, and all the arrangements for Jung’s external well-being, into her capable hands. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 235

Meanwhile Emma Jung, though she had enjoyed herself [Maine] enormously and found it all a different world, was getting increasingly breathless at the pace of American life and the amount of extraversion expected of her. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 171

Emma Jung had not had much (or any) desire to travel while her children were young, for she was an exceptionally devoted mother and always very anxious concerning her children’s welfare. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 170

 But as they got older, Jung increasingly encouraged her [Emma] to develop a life of her own, for he knew better than anyone else how valuable undivided interest is to small children, and yet how this very devotion becomes destructive as soon as the children are old enough to form their own lives. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 170

 Therefore, much encouraged by her husband, Emma Jung learned both Latin and Greek, when her children were all in school, and she was thus very valuable to him in the scientific side of his work. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 170

 Now he [Jung] encouraged her [Emma] to enlarge her horizon still more and to go with him to America. I remember that she was rather in two minds about it herself, but eventually decided to go. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 170

Jung himself, with Emma, Toni, and a few others, went by train, and we all met at the Harnackhaus in Dahlem. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung: His Life and His Work, Page 151

 

 

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