His [H.G. Baynes] interest in psychology leads him to study psychiatry at the Maudsley Hospital. While working there he meets the Swiss psychologist, C. G. Jung and this meeting is to change the course of his life.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 111

 

Godwin’s work with those. suffering from shell-shock led to his accepting a post at the Maudsley Hospital to study psychiatry. It was there that he first met C.G. Jung on one of Jung’s early visits to England.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 115

 

Godwin visits Dr Jung in Zurich, and the impact of this first visit decides the future course of his life. He leaves England and his studies at the Maudsley Hospital to work with Jung in the hope of becoming an analyst. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 119

 

Godwin’s meeting with Jung, while he was working with patients suffering from shell-shock at the Maudsley, was one of those life-changing events which occurred at the very moment when he was in such great need of a new direction.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 120

 

Godwin described his first visit to Dr Jung at his home in Kusnacht. He travelled by train to Zurich Bahnhof, and from there he took the tram out to Kusnacht. It was a momentous meeting. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 120

 

He [Baynes] remembered how this first meeting had given him some inkling of that vision of the human soul which arrested me in my talk with Dr Jung on a summers evening by the lake of Zurich. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 121

 

It was a profound experience and this he maintains is the only way to know Jung; he rnust be not just known, but experienced. He writes: ‘An academic curiosity alone will never give you the key to the understanding of Jung’s ideas.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 121

 

The early weeks with Jung in Zurich led to some profound soul searching. Perhaps the discovery of his own inner world and the deeper truths that he discovered within himself, as a result of this totally new experience of introversion, was, for Godwin, like a religious experience.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 122

 

Jung’s study is filled with beautiful things and one thing in particular is especially fine: a Roman vase with young rnen and women, painted in black, chasing each other round the outside. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 123

 

It was at this time, during his early days of analysis with Jung, that Godwin was particularly concerned about his father’s health. It seems he was now attending to his father’s illness instead of running in all directions at once to escape it.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 123

 

(It had been Godwin’s fond hope that Rosalind could be influenced by Jung, just as he had been, and that this would save their marriage. However, this did not prove to be possible.)  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 123

 

After Godwin’s initial meeting with Jung, he wrote a letter to his parents saying that he had ‘learned more in one hour with Jung than in all my life before.’   ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 123-124

 

At Jung’s suggestion, Godwin became known to the world in Zurich as ‘Peter’. The reason for this is one for conjecture. Some people have suggested that it was an allusion to Peter the Rock, and that Jung saw Peter as the one who would, as his assistant, help him to convey his ideas to a wider public and also, to deal with the more extraverted aspects of his work.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 124

 

In the summer of 1920, Jung held his first seminar in England. This took place at Sennen Cove in Cornwall and it had as its subject a book with the title Peter Blobb’s Dreams.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 124

 

It was during her second visit to Zurich in 1922, that Eleanor met Doctor Esther Harding. This was the English woman with whom she later founded the first Jungian group in New York, together with an old friend of Eleanor’s, Kristine Mann. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 126

 

No one can free himself from his childhood without first generously occupying himself with it. ~Carl Jung, Integration of the Personality, Page 111

 

With Jung’s encouragement, he [H.G. Baynes] began to keep a daily record of his dreams followed by long and detailed analyses. The dreams together with his own analyses, which were full of self-revelation and also self-castigation, he would show to Jung.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 128

 

It was during these early days of his analysis with Jung that Peter began to see both his father and his mother in a more compassionate light. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 128

 

Very early in their work together Jung appears in Peter’s dream and it is clear that a powerful transference has already begun.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 128

 

This must have been an important dream in the early part of Peter’s analysis, at a time when Jung had become for him like ‘the eye of God’ and there is a sense also of his feeling of loss and abandonment while Jung was away for his three week holiday. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 130

 

The divorce proceedings were now at their height and Peter was still experiencing his loss and hurt in relation to Rosalind but was also full of self-recrimination and regrets. This is expressed in a dream he had on March 16th 1920.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 130

 

Maitland Radford. He writes: ‘I was so immensely taken or drunk with this new and eager intellectual milieu that I actually refused to go to my brother’s wife’s funeral [ this was the first wife of Peter’s brother, Jack], because I wanted to stay.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 130

 

My sympathy with my father comes from the fact that we both suffer from the same curse. The dream tells me that the inner necessity of my dependence on Jung comes from the fact that I associate my powerful wealmess with my father and therefore I worship Jung’s strength. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 135

 

He [Jung] is the father who can support the son and heal the father weakness with his strength. I can lose sight of the stigma of my own inheritance by identifying myself with Jung’s strength.  ~H.G. Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 135

 

Now I take him [Jung] on my knee and can realise the fight he put up from within. This is the real reconciliation. I have never understood him until now.  ~H.G. Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 135

Jung’s influence on Peter was all-embracing and as he came to understand more about his own psychology, and what had led to his tendency towards what he saw as ‘erotic incontinence’, so he also came to regard Jung as the guide, and the model for complete inner integrity that he wanted to emulate. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 141

 

In earlier times [George Bernard] Shaw would have been a crusader or an uncompromising Prince of the Church. Perhaps even an inquisitor. While Jung would have been a mystical recluse either canonized as a Saint or crucified as a martyr to truth.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 142

 

In this first period of analysis with Jung and also his [H.G. Baynes] own self-analysis, there was a sense of his profound regret at what had gone wrong in his life.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 142

 

He [H.G. Baynes]  writes: ‘Jung stands for the parting of the ways at this rebirth of my soul.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 142

 

As his analysis progresses with Jung, his sense of his own worthlessness becomes increasingly pronounced along with regret in relation to the situation his own impulsiveness has landed him in.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 144

 

Can I show Jung all the intimate, revealing and terrible contents of my soul? Must he read this very book that I am writing in now? Must the soul stand utterly naked, stripped off every vestige of honour and decency and fair-seeming?  ~H.G. Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 144

 

Godwin’s days were full. Seeing patients in the mornings and working on his translation of Jung’s Psychological Types in the afternoons. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 145

 

It is a long time ago, but I think I remember Godwin telling me that Psychological Types was written in a difficult and learned German, and that Jung said it was necessary to use this language for a scientific book, in Germany anyhow. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 145

 

Some evenings we would go and swim in the lake from the Jung’s boathouse. Godwin would make them nervous when he dived off the boathouse roof into rather shallow water, but he was an expert diver.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 145

 

It was at this period that Peter was to become Jung’s chief assistant and by now a warm relationship had developed between them. It was as though Jung recognized in Peter a man of stature who was, in terms of his personality type, his exact opposite. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 146

 

As a complement to one another, they each had qualities that were needed and admired by the other. Jung in his extreme introversion needed Peter’s extraversion to create a Jungian community.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 146

 

Jung’s typology, as an introverted, intuitive, thinking type, was almost diametrically opposite to Peter’s, which was an extravert, feeling, intuitive. Jung introduced Peter to the possibility of a rich inner life.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 146

 

Jung, with his profound introversion, relied on Peter to deal with the extraverted aspect of his work; that of bringing people together, of providing a base and a welcome for the English-speaking people who came to Zurich to study with Jung, and executing the practical arrangements for the Jungian congresses and seminars.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 147

 

One of the first English doctors to come to Jung in Zurich was Godwin Baynes (always called Peter), who soon realised the value of Jungian psychology and, in spite of a rather chequered career, devoted his whole life to it, until his death during World War 2.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 147

 

He [H.G. Baynes] came to Jung originally because his first marriage had run on the rocks while he was in service abroad.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 147

 

Emma Jung and Toni Wolff were particularly fond of him [H.G. Baynes], and before long he began his first term as Jung’s assistant.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 147

 

In many ways he [H.G. Baynes] was the best assistant Jung  ever had, for he was singularly free of a certain jealousy and a sense of inferiority that working with an outstanding man like Jung unfortunately seems to breed in other men, even those considerably younger. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 147

 

Peter Baynes once told me that beyond doubt his true vocation was to be Jung’s assistant, but his extraverted, open nature constantly involved him in other plans. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 148

 

When I was eight years old I used to call him Papa Jung. He liked children and was always with his own 5 taldng part in family outings and presiding at mealtimes.  ~Briget Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 148

 

Sometimes there would be a period when Papa Jung would retire into a still more solitary retreat among still thicker and taller reeds on an island in the upper stretches of the Zurichsee [Bollingen]. ~Briget Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page149

 

Mrs. Jung was the perfection of a motherly, loving, quiet, beautiful woman who was also the  perfect Swiss housewife. I see also a round table of children, there was jolting in Swiss and some cream cheese which Papa Jung sprinkled generously with sugar and gave me a spoon to eat it with. ~Briget Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page149

 

He was a fatherly figure, powerfully built and very tall- as tall as my father who was 6ft 4ins and he carried me on his back to my bedroom high up in the tower, so I should know.  ~Briget Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 149

 

She [H.G. Baynes daughter] felt at home in the Jung household, under the all-embracing motherly wing of Emma Jung, and they accepted her as an integral part of their large and lively family. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 149

 

She [H.G. Baynes daughter] remembers how, at breakfast time, all the children would recount their dreams to Jung and Emma and a general discussion of these dreams would ensue.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 149

 

It was in 1921, during Peter’s early months of working with Jung as his assistant, that he met the girl who was to become his second wife; a young woman who had come from Edinburgh to see Jung because she was suffering from severe bouts of depression. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 149

 

When sorrows come, they come not single spies, But in battalions. Shakespeare, Hamlet, iv.. Jung’s Apprentice, Page 150

Hilda Davidson came to Zurich to work with Jung in the summer of 1921. Ruth described her as ‘a lovely woman with long golden hair, literally long enough to sit on. She was naturally a gay, happy person, even brilliant, but she was one of Jung’s patients because she had bouts of deep depression which no one could account for.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 151

 

At that time patients, Jung’ s students and the analysts working in Zurich met freely together, attended seminars and also dined and socialised together, so there was nothing unusual in a friendship between Peter, who was by now Jung’ s assistant, and Hilda, who was there as one of Jung’s patients’ and was at the same time receiving help from Peter.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 151

 

It was not until much later, in the early 1930’s, that Peter was able to discover his own true identity and the ability to value his own very different personality type and his own natural way of working which was, as a feeling extravert, so very different to that of Jung’s. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 158

 

The consequence of his love for Jung is encapsulated in the opening statement to this book, that ‘a man who has  learnt to despise himself’, can learn ‘to love himself’.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 158

 

Christopher Carl Randall (he was christened Carl after Jung and Randall after his great uncle) was an outstandingly beautiful baby. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 160

 

Peter’s relationship to woman was clearly a troubled one. Toni Wolff commented to him that he seemed more able, at this time, to trust himself in a relationship with a man than with a woman.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 164

 

In the l 920’s, this tribe [Elgonyi] had had no contact at all with the outside world and Jung wanted to make a psychological study of the inhabitants before they became affected by Western influence. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 165

 

On 1st July he [H.G. Baynes] records: ‘On this day I wrote my last despairing letter to C. G. about the terrible hardness of life with Hilda. There was a profound protest against my fate in this.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 166

 

There is no escape.’ Jung’s reply to Peter’s cry for help was to admonish him and to say that on no account must he give in to her emotional blackmail (i.e., her threats of what she might do if he insisted on going to Africa with Jung).  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 166

 

In August of that year Peter was also involved in the preparations for the Swanage conference, which marked Jung’ s second important teaching conference in England, in which he spoke of dream analysis and the great god Eros, god of relatedness and also of Logos, the god of form. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 166

 

‘Godwin promised Dr Jung months ago to sail with him to E. Africa on the 15th, but of course he did not; and when Hilda died today we wondered what he would do. Hilda was a sweet girl, a true lady, admired by everybody. Ruth has known her well and loved her: she felt at home with us and we with her. Poor Godwin!’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 166-167

 

In her will Hilda left everything to Peter. He had no time to consider the practical implications nor to come to terms with her death.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 167

 

We carry within us the wonders we seek without us: There is all Africa and her prodigies in us. ~Sir Thomas Browne, Religio Medici, pt. i, par. 3 Jung’s Apprentice, Page 168

 

While Jung was in London in the summer of 1925 for the Swanage seminar, he had visited the Wembley Exhibition in London and wrote that he ‘was deeply impressed by the excellent survey of the tribes under British rule and resolved to take a trip to tropical Africa in the near future.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 168

 

So we have a visual record of the party of four, Jung, Peter, a young American, George Beckwith, and a young English woman, Ruth Bailey, who joined them later.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 169

 

It was actually while he was packing to go that Hilda had taken her life. She had threatened to do this if he left her and now the threat had been carried out. Peter had decided that he could not let Jung down.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 169

 

‘His wife’s death made the African journey difficult for him, although it also meant a great deal to him, especially in retrospect. Peter once told me – with the endearing self-criticism of which he was capable – that he had been a terrible wet blanket on the trip.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 170

 

Dr X explained. ‘Dr Jung’, he said, ‘is interested in dreams and their interpretation, and as a change from studying them among the highly civilized people of Europe, he wants to get further back and see if he can learn anything from a fairly primitive people. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 171

 

The DC welcomed them with a blazing fire and a glass of whisky in his impeccably English drawing-room. For a day after this, Jung was incapacitated with a fever and laryngitis.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 172

 

Jung describes an unpleasant encounter with a pack of hungry hyenas who were attracted by the savoury smells of their roasting lamb. One hyena had gone into the hut belonging to their cook and had nearly killed him.   ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 172

 

Here, each day, Jung and Peter would conduct their daily palavers with the Elgonyis in a combination of Swahili and sign language. It was now that the real business of this expedition began as Jung and Peter began to converse and interact and to join in the lives of these wonderfully natural, dignified and beautiful people.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 174

 

Jung goes on to comment that women in the West have lost this sense of their own natural wholeness and he wonders ‘whether the growing masculinisation of the white woman is not connected with the loss of her natural wholeness (shamba, children, livestock, house of her own, hearth, fire) and whether the feminising of the white man is not a further consequence.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 175

 

‘My companions and I had the good fortune to taste the world of Africa, with its incredible beauty and its equally incredible suffering, before the end came. Our camp life proved to be one of the loveliest interludes in my life. I enjoyed the “divine peace” of a still primaeval country.  ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 175

 

During the palavers Jung, sitting on a small stool, would converse, with the help of a dictionary, in Swahili, and contrary to Hislop’s prediction, most of the natives spoke enough pidgin Swahili for simple conversations to take place. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 175

 

They were approaching Egypt from Africa, as Jung had always wished to do, coming from the darkness of the primaeval experience into the light of an ancient civilization, and flowing with the ancient life-force symbolized by the great River Nile.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 193

 

Jung made his notes and considered the powerful effect Africa had had on him; an adventure, epitomised by the wild African dancers, that had taken him completely by storm.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 193

The African adventure was a powerful experience for Peter, but he was like a man haunted by the ghostly presence of his dead wife.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 194

 

For the joy of love is too short, and the sorrow thereof, and what cometh thereof, dureth over long. Sir Thomas Malory, Le Marte D’Arthur, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 195

 

Jung’s two colleagues, Peter and Cary de Angulo, both involved in the translation of Jung’s books into English, and both left with the care of a young child, make a ‘sensible’ marriage.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 195

 

Peter’s return from Africa brought him face to face with the terrible tragedy of his wife’s death. He speaks of being haunted by her spirit.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 195

She [Hilda] could not free her soul from the clutching fingers, which caught her out of the chaos of the past, by means of life. Therefore she was forced to free herself by death. Freedom she must have at all costs and I was merely part of the cost. Life had proved too much for her and she had to give it up. Her last word to me was her undying belief in Love … Yesterday I stood beside her grave and wondered if her spirit was in the breeze that rustled the autumn leaves. Throughout the year her spirit had been with me. By negation of the body and its functions she went over almost completely to the life of the spirit so that the shedding of the body became an inevitable need for her cramped and tormented soul. Thus she became a spirit of great power and constantly she affects me. Whether this relation exists in the world or solely in my soul I cannot say, but for me her spirit lingers. She is my guide, because her main preoccupation was religion. Religion seized her and ·broke her . . . only from the angle of religion does her life appear meaningful and intelligible. Her religious instinct was her only paramount guide by which she held her precarious course. Therefore like Pallas Athena, Hilda often assumes the guise of Mentor and stands beside me holding me to that same quest and striving in that same warfare. But her spirit has gone through a transformation. She has relinquished her personal and limited notions of truth … she has become an influence that is in a way personal in effect but celestial in intention. Very like the influence which Pallas Athena exercised upon Ulysses.  ~H.G. Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 195-196

 

It was during the Jungian conference in Swanage in the fateful year of 1925, that Peter had first come into close contact with Cary de Angulo. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 196

 

Cary was American, a woman of Peter’s age and in a similar situation: her first marriage had come to an end in 1924, although she remained on friendly terms with her ex-husband Xaime De Angulo. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 196

 

He [Cary’s first husband] was an anthropologist and a Spanish aristocrat but he had become an American citizen by the time he married Cary.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 196

 

Cary had come to live in Zurich in 1921 with her sister Henri Zinno, and they had a house together on the far side of the lake from Kusnacht.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 196

 

During this time he renewed his friendship with Cary, finding in her a ready and empathic ear: although she was not herself an analyst, she was able to listen with understanding as he spoke to her of his anguish over Hilda’s death.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 196

 

It was this friendship with Cary that enabled Peter to recover from the trauma and guilt which he suffered Chapter Fourteen – A new Marriage: Cary de Angulo 197 in relation to Hilda’s death and soon the friendship blossomed into love. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 196-197

 

However, Jung did in reality have grave misgivings about this union. They were far out on the Zurich See, swimming together, when Peter proposed to Cary, and Jung saw this as an indication that they were too much in the unconscious with regard to their relationship.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 197

 

But his main concern was that Cary, although she was a fine looking woman, was essentially not Peter’s anima-type. She was a big, strong-minded, independent woman of forty years old, and Peter was still dreaming of his inspiritrice, a young, slender girl of exquisite feminine beauty.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 197

 

There [Cary Baynes], standing up in her virgin dawn of bright beauty, was a maid slim in body, and her hair shone. She was looking down into the water. Then it seemed to me that she looked up and saw me with eager and innocent love. She flew to me and immediately embraced me with all her youthful heat and she had no shame and no shrinking and I wondered what fair being should be born of such a mating under the Sun.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 197

 

Finally, they came to a decision together and Cary and Peter were married on Saturday March 19th, 1927 at Marylebone Town Hall. The only witnesses to this marriage were his dear, loyal sister Ruth and her friend, Bertha. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 198

 

Therefore I must persistently bore through the conscious resistance and let myself go as Jung had to do. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 198

 

So, Marlowes House, complete with pony, became a child’s paradise, but a Daddy [Peter Baynes] who was creating a niche for Jungian Psychology in the somewhat antagonistic professional world of London had no time to join in the celebrations of his daughter’s thirteenth birthday.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 201

 

Both Cary and Peter were occupied with the translation of Jung’s books and papers into English. Cary also undertook a translation of the I Ching (The Book of Changes), into English, from the German translation of Wilhelm, and this is still the standard English version of that great Chinese book of wisdom.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 202

 

It was at this time that Peter and Cary first met Joseph Henderson. Joe was working as a journalist and was in analysis with a student of Jung’s called Elizabeth Whitney.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 204

 

I met Godwin (Peter) Baynes first when he and his third wife, Cary, were staying in her house in Carmel, a seaside resort on the Monterey Peninsular in California, in 1927-28.  ~Joseph Henderson, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 204

 

I was in analysis with Dr. Elizabeth Whitney in San Francisco, a recent student of Jung. I had gone to her after my graduation from Princeton University and I was looking for my vocation. ~Joseph Henderson, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 204

 

Peter opened the way for me to continue my analysis with Jung two years later and after that he opened the way for me to go to medical school at his old hospital, St. Bartholomew, in London, where I spent the nineteen-thirties and my real life in the world began.  ~Joseph Henderson, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 204

 

‘You [Joseph Henderson] should be in Europe, studying with Jung, why are you out here on the West Coast? If you want to do it you will find a way.’  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 205

 

During one of their first meetings, Peter showed Joe one of Jung’s paintings of a Gnostic mandala. Joe was fascinated by Gnostic philosophy, which held the belief that those who professed Gnosticism had a special lmowledge and understanding of the profound spiritual mysteries. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 205

 

When Elizabeth Whitney heard that Peter had introduced Joe to this book, she was shocked. She exclaimed: ‘He gave you the Seven Sermons of the Dead? But you’re only 25 ! This book belongs to the second half of life. The mandala is a visual impression of everything that is contained in the book. When Joe saw the mandala he said that he then knew that he had to work with Jung.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 205

 

Many years later, when his [Joseph Henderson] training as an analyst was complete, he was to become the pioneer for Jungian analysis on the American West Coast. At the age of 98, he is still in practice there. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 206

 

In Zurich Peter and Cary befriended me and I was frequently at their charming house and I saw them regularly at Jung’s Wednesday morning English seminar during the academic year 1929-30.  ~Joseph Henderson, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

In a recent interview, Joe [Henderson] has stated that there was no formal training at that time in Zurich and the Jung Institute was not founded until after the Second World War; so nothing was happening of a professional nature except the Wednesday morning seminars.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

 

Joe [Henderson] speaks of those who were worlding alongside Jung in Zurich at the time. They were; ‘Toni [Wolff], Cary (who never worked as an analyst) Peter, Emma Jung and “C.G.”.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

 

On being asked what these difficulties were, he replies: ‘Ximena was impossible. Very pretty and intelligent, but spoilt. I remember Peter saying,

‘she’s the best goat-catcher I know.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

 

‘Jung told me he [Peter] was quite difficult in Africa – he didn’t seem to understand that Peter did need to mourn, and to take time to recover.’ Of Peter and Cary’s relationship, Joe says that it seemed fine on the surface, ‘but not underneath.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

 

Jung said they felt they [Peter & Cary] should marry to please him, but that wasn’t true. This was the big mistake: although they outwardly played the happy family, inside there was no true love.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

 

“C.G.” was the nickname given to Jung by his Anglo Saxon friends; Barbara Hannah notes: ‘I think the custom originated with Peter Baynes.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 207

 

Joe [Henderson] describes Jung’s approach as ‘deeper’ and Peter’s as ‘broader’, the two together, ‘encompassing the whole dimension of the cross, with both the vertical and the horizontal characteristics.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 208

 

But he [Peter] was also in need of a woman who could inspire and delight him and who would to some extent reflect his anima, and with her sensible clothes, her fine intellect and her poor relationship to her womanly warmth and physical being, this was something Cary could never fulfil. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 210

 

Joe  Henderson comments that Peter ‘tended to think that the marriage was what Jung would want him and Cary to do and Jung said himself

to me once that he had no such idea at all.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 210

 

Joe [Henderson] thought that Peter had treated Cary badly and he felt sorry for her. He remarks: ‘I remember her saying, “I always said l would never be the rejected woman.”  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 210

 

She [Cary Baynes] has the honesty and integrity of a man in not indulging this dark side of her. She consumes her own smoke as well as she can. But she is very hard to live with. But so am I . . . My life is complicated by the fruits of much desiring. She, if anything, has desired too little. She seems to have

very few needs and wants, whereas I hang out of the window, always wanting something out of my grasp. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 211

 

He [Peter] experiences in the neediness of ‘woman’ a ‘vampirizing’ effect and at some level he feels that Hilda still holds his soul and that he is not yet free to truly love another woman. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 212

 

This was why Jung had insisted that Hilda’s dependence should not prevent Peter from joining the African expedition. The ‘vampirizing’ could end by destroying them both. However, something of this ‘possession’ from which Hilda suffered continued to haunt Peter long after her death, so, as he confesses to himself, he was not at that time available to the love of a woman. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 213

 

It was soon after his marriage to Cary that Peter was already having fantasies about a beautiful young woman called Agnes Leay (who had some years previously been a patient of his). ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 213

 

Belief consists in accepting the affirmations of the soul; unbelief in denying them. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson: Representative Men; Jung’s Apprentice, Page 219

 

‘and finally I lit upon the girl Agnes and imbued her with beauty and desire … For all these women called to you because of their distress. Their insanity, their loneliness, their fear of ghosts.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 214

 

In this fantasy Peter has had a direct encounter with his anima guide and also with the person who was to personify his anima and who later was to become his wife. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 215

 

Joe [Henderson] had become a confidante of both Peter and Cary and he was probably one of the first people to know that their marriage was on the rocks. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 215

 

Cary did not long suffer the pain of a rejected wife, but while she was still in it, I was temporarily disenchanted with Peter, not for divorcing Cary, but for not seeming to recognise her sense of loss. ~Joseph Henderson, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 216

 

Agnes Leay (she preferred to be called Anne), had been to see Peter for help when she was twenty-one. She was in love with a married American man who was already well established in life with four children. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 219

 

There had been problems in her [Agnes Leay] family that were affecting her: her sister had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and her father suffered from paranoia; she felt that psychic balance was a precarious thing but was also reluctant to admit that she might be suffering from any imbalance herself.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 219

 

Something of the vulnerability and sadness of this beautiful girl [Agnes Leay] had entered Peter’s soul and it was soon after his marriage to Cary that he began to dream of her as his anima or soul guide. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 220

 

Anne [Leay] was the moon goddess who had, unbidden, entered the scene of Peter’s unconscious world and she was there to stay, no matter how much he might make vows that he would ‘sacrifice the desires engendered’ by her. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 220

 

Yet something in Cary remained unfulfilled and desperately sad as a result of this betrayal of her own instinctual life. Peter comments on the ‘terribly sad look on her face. Whenever I surprise that sad, forlorn woman looking out of her eyes I just want to go off and weep.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 221

She [Cary Baynes] is the most decent woman in every respect and I think the most devoted and conscientious and the cruel thing is that it is her very decency which has betrayed her. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 221-222

 

Anne was altogether different from the other women who had been important in Peter’s life. Whereas Rosalind was an artist and feminist with very definite ideas of her own, Hilda a talented pianist and Cary a woman of very considerable intellectual gifts, Anne was just herself, and happy to give herself totally to the man she loved. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 221

 

Cary had a generous and noble spirit. She recognized that she was unable to give Peter what he needed and that he was profoundly unhappy. It was she who had originally suggested he should find himself a love partner. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 222

 

Jung had been hoping to hand over his practice to Peter during the following winter in order to concentrate on some writing. Peter’s threat to leave Cary and marry a much younger woman was a blow to him: he did not feel it would be possible for Peter to continue working in Zurich after his divorce. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 222

 

They started after the talk with Jung when Peter had ‘with the help of C.G.’ in November 1929, decided ‘that Anne is altogether too fragile to stand the squalls and whirlpools of my anima.’ As a result of this, he withdrew from her and for a time had a lightning romance with a patient of Jung’s whom he refers to as Maggie R. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 222- 223

 

He [Peter Baynes] told Maggie that he was in love with Anne and they had a brief affair with that understanding.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 223

 

He had [Peter Baynes] chosen two women for wives who had commanded his respect, love, admiration and even worship, but not his desire. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 223

 

But because his anima had up till now led him such a dance, he was unable to trust these feelings. It was the siren’s song leading him once again into deep water, leaving him without will or consciousness. He was dreading the necessity of confronting Jung with the question of his divorce from Cary. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 224

 

C.G. has been away in France with Emma ever since I got back. I had only a word with him over the telephone before he left so I have been wondering a lot what he will think about my divorce. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 224

 

It was as though Hilda had personified his spiritual nature: she appeared to him to be pure ‘geistlich’ (spiritual) with no relationship to her physical self, whereas Cary was pure intellect and for Peter represented the logos aspect and was only able to relate to a man through her thinking. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 224-225

 

He (Jung) said: ‘She [Agnes Leay] is the ideal anima-woman. It is her vocation.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 225

 

I have become accustomed to the idea that my own personal love life was my own affair, since Cary and I could not share it, and now I discover this is not so. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 226

 

Perhaps Cary and C.G. were right and it was a sort of infatuation which ought to be given up both for your sake and mine. I never believed that, but none the less such thoughts came like crows and settled in the branches and made their raucous clamour.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 227

 

Of course I knew only too well that the sexual tension was abnormal and was obscuring my mind so that I could not reason sensibly about you. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 227

 

Students and patients alike were all in Zurich to analyse with either Jung or with one of his assistants: Emma Jung, Toni Wolff and Peter were the three people who were working most closely with Jung. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 227

 

Jung felt that the contact with analysands outside the sessions, during conferences or at social gatherings, was often the most helpful of all. But with so many transferences floating around it created a somewhat incestuous situation, with everyone vying with one another for Jung’s attention.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 229

 

Anne my darling, I am tired out and my heart feels like lead. I cannot tell you yet all the arguments which C.G. used which have caused this war

within. He was so tremendously impressive because his humanity spoke to me. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 230

 

He [Jung] believes that I have allowed myself to be misled by my anima and have interpreted your feeling for me, and have even sought to awaken it, on a

mistaken basis. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 230

 

He [Jung] did not say I made you [Agnes] love me on false pretences, but he said that to marry me as he knows me and as Cary knows me would not be a natural choice for a young and gentle woman. ~Peteer Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 230

 

He [Jung] also said that I was mysticizing [sic] sexuality and that my attitude to sex was hysterical, because I had not sufficiently differentiated spiritual motives from sex motives. He said the mysticizing of sex had surely made a deep emotional appeal to you [Agnes]. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 230

 

He [Jung] was heavily involved, not only with the care of Margaret Radford (sister to his dear friend Maitland Radford), who had had a psychotic breakdown and had been admitted to the Burgholzli asylum, but more recently, with the breakdown of Cary’s sister, Henri Zinno, who had turned up suddenly at the Burgholzli in a state of acute confusion; she was having hallucinations and was hearing voices. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 231

 

Anne had already had a warm friendship with Cary from the visits she had made, together with her friend Laura Wolsey, to Peter and Cary’s home in Hemel Hempstead, before they went for their sabbatical in California. The two women were genuinely fond of one another. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 231-232

 

My dear Anne, Thanks very much for your letter. I never thought of you as wanting to take Peter away. The problems of his own nature do that.  ~Cary Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

 

She [Anne] later described this momentous visit. Peter suggested straight away that they should go to Bollingen to talk with Jung. This was on a Sunday and Jung was staying there together with Toni Wolff.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

 

Toni was Jung’s first assistant and was also a woman of unusual intuitive flare and rare intelligence. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

 

Emma is reputed to have said, later in life, that she was forever indebted to Toni for assisting Jung during his powerful and difficult experience of the unconscious, when he felt at times in danger of losing his way and his very identity. Emma felt she would have been unable to give him the support and understanding he needed. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 232

 

Her [Anne] mother suffered from depression and had committed suicide the previous year. Anne had arrived home on April 15th 1929, after staying in Malta, to find her mother had taken an overdose of sleeping tablets. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 236

 

Laura Leay had been separated from her husband, Fred, for seven years. His paranoia and his bizarre accusations against his wife, in relation to infidelity and the embezzlement of his money, had become intolerable and he had finally been committed to an asylum. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 236

 

It is because of the ghosts that we absolutely need to hold on to a warm human hand and replenish the larder of faith by human consideration and understanding. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 238

 

The ghost of your mother seduces you through your pity. You cannot harden your heart against her just as I could not against Hilda and for that reason, Jung says she nearly pulled me over into unconscious suicide when I was in Africa. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 238

 

Inevitably, Anne had been left with a sense of guilt as a result of her mother’s suicide. While she was enjoying herself as the guest of Admiralty House in Malta, being feted by the British Navy, her mother had reached the ultimate moment of despair. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 237

 

Let man renew his love in thy pure rays He shall fill the womb of his Beloved With the joyful seed of his loins in praise and wonder For his joy springeth from the foundation of thy power. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 238

 

Every time I hit this kind of place I have to lash out because to me it is a clear denial of beauty. And I hate every system that kills beauty and freedom. And yet it is a superb country and the fair curves of the highlands are as good and rich as honey is sweet. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 239

 

Anne, I cannot think how life was tolerable at all before I loved you. I think very few men are able to realise how deeply unhappy they have been until they know what it is to love …There is no drawing back before the doubts and difficulties, but a deep calm, like the smile of heaven. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 239

 

What he had regarded as his main problem in his analysis with Jung, his ‘erotic complex’, was no longer driving him: his ‘erotic charger’ was at last broken in and was under his command. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 241

 

Could Peter have known, when he wrote his views on Lawrence, that Rosalind had had an affair with him and was, perhaps, Lawrence’s model for Lady Chatterley?  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 242

 

It is not sexuality that is wrong but always it is a man’s attitude to it which determines its character. My fight for the last two years [i.e. since falling in love with Anne] has been to build and shape an attitude which accords with love and agrees with Nature. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 242

 

If one thinks always of one’s own need one loses consideration and warm feeling for the loved woman. If you think of her too much you can lose touch with the necessities of your own nature and try and live through her as it were. It is a razor edge. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 242

 

He [Peter] saw Anne as the one person who could effect this reconciliation between artist and priest: ‘If they could agree together, life itself would be the moral art work fed by the passion of both.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 242

 

At the beginning of his analysis with Jung, he had spoken of this conflict in him [Peter], between the doctor-scientist and the singer-artist. Jung’s advice to him then was ‘to sing his analytic work’. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 242

 

Peter wrote, ‘it is always the bravest of men against whom Fate sends her thunderbolts.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 243

 

Peter commented: ‘I really feel Cary is the most devoted friend and I know if I were not married to her my friendship would never be shaken.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 243-244

 

C.G. is very distant and obviously with intention. He feels that I am going wrong and am cutting myself off. At least, that is what I have gathered from Cary and Maggie … But Cary has been unusually friendly and human to me, and Emma Jung has been very nice too. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 244

 

The pain is bad because I love C.G. and have given him all my loyalty, so that when he turns from me, as though all virtue had gone out of me, it is like an icy wind of December … I think the only way is for us to talk it out face to face. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 244

 

‘I can see we ought to submit the question of our marriage to the elders of the tribe, as it were, because that is also a question of social ethic and in such things we have to submit to extra personal authority.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 246

 

‘You [Anne] have a very distinctive mana or power which evokes the best character in my anima and through that intercourse she becomes pregnant and brings forth her value with the light. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 247

 

He [Peter] had worked for seven years in the shadow of Jung. He wrote of Jung’s ‘contemptuous dismissal of my attempt at creation (which) made me lose all heart and courage.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice 248

 

‘I shall not recover his [Jung] friendship, I think, because he could not agree with my ending my … marriage and my entrance into a new life with a new and young partner.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

In a talk Peter had with Toni Wolff, she too had made it abundantly clear that she felt this marriage would end in disaster. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

‘I wonder whether Anne’s woman’s biological instinct is really very good in choosing you as her mate, because of the fact that owing to the development of an inner life which comes to a man of your years, you would not have so much interest and libido for young children, or be so completely in that phase as a younger man would be.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

Jung … has also compromised with his evil side. But he did it with his eyes open and knew what he did. But you [he is addressing himself] created a rainbow illusion of fantasy in order not to see what you were doing.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

Resolved-this 9th February 1931 never to hold Peter to account for the pain which I may suffer through him. To give him all the gentle love in my power – and to stand firm, and to bless him for his great gifts to me. To remember that deep and singular desire in Ruth’s words: ‘to be a good wife to a good man!’

To follow the road leading to the star knowing the difficulties, yet with faith, courage and high heart. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 239-250

‘You [Anne] have a very distinctive mana or power which evokes the best character in my anima and through that intercourse she becomes pregnant and brings forth her value with the light. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 247

 

He [Peter] had worked for seven years in the shadow of Jung. He wrote of Jung’s ‘contemptuous dismissal of my attempt at creation (which) made me lose all heart and courage.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice 248

 

‘I shall not recover his [Jung] friendship, I think, because he could not agree with my ending my … marriage and my entrance into a new life with a new and young partner.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

In a talk Peter had with Toni Wolff, she too had made it abundantly clear that she felt this marriage would end in disaster. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

‘I wonder whether Anne’s woman’s biological instinct is really very good in choosing you as her mate, because of the fact that owing to the development of an inner life which comes to a man of your years, you would not have so much interest and libido for young children, or be so completely in that phase as a younger man would be.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

Jung … has also compromised with his evil side. But he did it with his eyes open and knew what he did. But you [he is addressing himself] created a rainbow illusion of fantasy in order not to see what you were doing.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

Also of course, Cary, and perhaps Ximena, who although she was only twelve, was a young girl who already possessed considerable charm and maturity, and she had become for Peter like a daughter. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 248

 

‘I hardly knew how broken and unhappy I had been until I crossed the threshold of your little temple. I was in the dark, excluded from the communion of love … and the warring parties within gave me no hope of peace or reconciliation. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 249

 

Life at bottom was just a torment and there was no purpose that had any relation with happiness. I could heal others but myself I could not heal.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 249

 

Yet, what he [Peter] had earlier told Barbara Hannah was also true, that ‘beyond doubt his true vocation was to be Jung’s assistant’.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 250-251

 

He [Peter] remembered the quote from. Katherine Mansfield’s prayer which had been so important for Anne: ‘Oh God, rnake me crystal clear that thy light may shine through’, and recognized this was his prayer also. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 251

 

It was Emma Jung in her own deeply personal and feminine way, who was ultimately able to release Peter from. this state of conflict and indecision. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 251

 

On Monday I spent the whole evening with Emma Jung alone at her house (C.G. was at Aarau lecturing to Christians). Emma was just lovely. We just seemed to get to a calm. leisurely mood like a broad river where we found the most hum.an understanding. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 251

 

The divorce from Cary was finally settled and while this was in progress Peter shared a flat with Joe Henderson, close to Bart’s hospital where Joe was doing his medical training.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 252

 

Here, beside a swift flowing stream, lulled by the gentle murmur of the autumn breeze, with the sweet autumnal scents and with the great blue arc of the heavens above them, they [Peter & Anne] made love.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 252

 

Peter and Anne were married shortly before Christmas in 1931, at the Registry Office in South Kensington. The only other person present at their marriage was Joe Henderson.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 253

 

Peter was now well known in London and his unique experience was increasingly in demand: there were several Americans in England looking for a Jungian analyst and when Hitler began to gain power in the thirties, a number of Jewish people came over to London from Germany to train as ‘lay’, in other words, as non-medical, analysts. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 253-254

 

‘You ask to be free my brother. I ask you not what are you seeking freedom from, but what are you seeking it for. To what end shall your freedom fly. ~Peter Baynes (Quoting Nietzsche), Jung’s Apprentice, Page 254

 

[Excerpt Peter’s “Hymn to the Sun.”]

 

Let man renew his love in thy pure rays.

He shall fill the womb of his beloved,

With the joyful seed of his loins in praise and wonder.

For his joy springeth from the foundation of thy power.  ~Peter Baynes to Anne, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 256

 

Joe Wheelwright, who together with Joe Henderson, was to introduce Jungian psychology to the West of America, was also in London in the early 1930’ s. He and his new wife Jane, who was expecting their first baby, had returned from their studies in China.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

 

In September of that year the Bayneses were delighted to have a visit from Emma Jung, who came to stay at Reed House together with two of her four children, Franz and Lille. She was to be the guest of honour at the Analytical Psychology Club and the whole evening was devoted to the discussion of her paper on the animus. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

 

This was the first time Anne had met Emma. They liked each other at once and a strong friendship developed between them. Emma became an important person in Anne’s life and the following year, when her baby was just eighteen months old, she went to Zurich for a month to work with Emma.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

 

She [Anne] wrote that her time with Emma was making everything seem extraordinarily clear and that ‘we seem to have a fine understanding together.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

 

Emma, with her woman’s wisdom and warmth, could give Anne the affirmation she had never received from her own mother, and was also an important role model: ‘I do love Emma’, she wrote, ‘She does symbolise for me the kind of woman I want to be.’  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 258

 

Best of all, she [Anne] had been invited to dine with Emma together with two of her daughters, Agi and Marianne and about this invitation Anne was ‘tremendously excited’.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 259

 

He [Jung] spoke of never countering black magic with more magic or the laying of ghosts with incantations. He stressed the need to become conscious: not to combat a wrong situation with unconscious means, but ‘to purify yourself and perhaps the situation may improve.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 259

 

The pursuit of black magic is about using the power of the unconscious for ego purposes, which leads finally to the disintegration of society. But when one unites the conscious with the unconscious then life becomes full of meaning, ‘and one needs to hold the conscious condition against the tremendous weight and power of collectivity.  ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 260

 

It is when one steps beyond the limitations of whatever one is identified with, that a person can achieve consciousness, ‘and when consciousness is being extended, then one may expect visions or manifestations of the great, the powerful one, the old ape-man in us – who is best personified in Pan.’ ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 260

 

Toni’ s criticisms of Peter’s book were not helpful. She felt that the drawings and paintings of the patient Peter was describing were too disturbed and that it was not possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of depth psychology with such disturbing material.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 260-261

 

Peter was now experiencing increasing discomfort and misery from his duodenal ulcer, which he had become aware of when he first began working with Jung. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 265

 

Particularly intuitive individuals are inclined to disregard the reality of their body, of themselves and of the surrounding conditions. ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 265

 

One of Peter’s early patients, Mabel Weiss, remembers her sessions with ‘Daddy Baynes’ with astonishing vividness. She spoke of the warmth of his personality; his interest in her and of his sensitivity. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 266

 

He had the simplicity that must come from having lived a great deal. If you brushed against his life ever so lightly it was like tapping on a deep well. You felt all that you could not hear.’  ~Mabel Weiss, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 266

 

She [Anne] has the most gracious art of companionship. She is a loyal friend and eager lover. In her motherhood she is frugal and disciplined and wise. She has shown me the healing power of woman. Above all she is tender in her beauty and never arrogant. It is more than my heart dreamed of. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 267

 

My personal inner cup is full and I ask nothing more. But it could only grow at the expense of a certain detachment from Jung and his circle. My identification with him had to end. It was having a dreadful effect.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 267

 

As long as Peter identified his spiritual being with Jung, as though he were God, his own creative energy was unable to flow. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 268

 

Moreover, the compulsive sexuality which had seemed to control him [Peter] was, perhaps, because in his identification with Jung, he had placed too great a value on the spiritual and intellectual values, so that his physical nature, which he neglected, simply ran amok.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 268

 

He [Peter] wrote that since his marriage to Anne, this compulsive character in relation to his sexual libido had entirely disappeared. In this new marriage a true home-coming had taken place in both his inner and his outer life.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 268

 

He [AshtonSwatldn]  has recently been in Berlin negotiating with Hitler. Peter says he lent Ashton-Swatkin a copy of Jung’s paper on Wotan which he has translated into English and is now circulating round the foreign office. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 272

 

Peter was keen to make it known to Jung that his separation from him was not a split or a conflict in any way with what Jung stood for, but that it was a necessary and inevitable part of Peter’s own development. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 274

 

Baynes’ masterly demonstration of the emergence and development of a hero myth together with its therapeutic effect upon the patient as an inner personal experience of death and rebirth. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 274

 

The insect drawings you [Peter] mention don’t necessarily prove that there is a psychosis. They only show that there is a certain tendency towards a basic schizophrenic dissociation, the insects representing autonomous (Mendelian?) units that have a certain tendency to autonomy.  ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 275

 

While he was in Berchtesgaden, in June 1938, Peter wrote to Jung about Freud’s arrival in London to escape the Nazi persecution in Austria: ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 281

 

In the end, it turned out that the Freudian Society declined to have anything to do with the Congress, which was a disappointment to Peter, ‘although this merely means that [Ernest] Jones is a dictator and enjoys these tedious displays of power.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 282

 

This was a good time for them all [Baynes Family & Emma]. Jung was entirely at ease with small children and delighted in their company. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 284

 

As Ximena remembered, when she was so often at the Jung’s house as a young child, ‘Jung was a very friendly person of imposing stature. He inspired confidence and trust in me, as a child. Perhaps this was because he was very real, and in his own skin, not just giving off hot air.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 284

 

Christopher [Baynes] also remembered Jung as a warm, huge and friendly person who was entirely on the same wavelength as a child. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 284

 

This time with Emma and Jung was the first opportunity for Anne and Peter to meet with them as a foursome. It was especially important for Peter who was still unsure whether his marriage to Anne had created a barrier between himself and Jung. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 285

 

Although Emma had, ultimately, wholeheartedly supported their marriage, Jung still had reservations about it. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 285

 

It was during this two week holiday that Jung was to accept Anne unreservedly as Peter’s wife. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 286

 

‘There was … a little village square with a butcher, baker and a little shop with rather sophisticated hats in it with a name over the door, “Madame Soul”. This appealed to C.G. very much- the idea that he should find the anima in such a place.’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 286

 

‘since … the goal of science and the goal of individuation are not only different but incompatible, we do a kind of injustice to the introverting quest when we present our material as though it was mensurable by scientific criteria.’ ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 306

 

The ‘Eternal Art’ of individuation is, Peter maintains, ‘intrinsically alien to the rationalistic attitude of science. That is the difficulty in a nutshell.’  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 306

 

‘so with the new ideas that were being launched two thousand years ago. If they were to bring life to mankind, someone had to give his spirit to those ideas in order to make men know that their ideas had tremendous life. Therefore Jesus Christ was ldlled as the foundation stone of

the Christian Church.’  ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 307

 

‘This truth is a cruel teaching. But it had to be so as long as man was so unconscious of the reality of the spirit that he could only see it under the aspect of human sacrifice. The Spirit is cruel to man just so long as he cannot know its power in his life.’  ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 307

 

Peter’s deep admiration for Jung was in part founded in Jung’s courage at having encountered the Spirit, of having met his God, as it were, face to face; the direct experience of the absolute power of God.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 307

 

‘Finland’s resistance is a moral tonic for the whole decent part of the world. It has done a lot of good to the general mood of Switzerland

too. Switzerland is slowly transforming herself into a real fortress [During WWII]. We are grateful that nothing has happened yet. This has given us a precious time for thorough preparations.’ ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 310

 

He [Jung] ends the letter: ‘Let us hope for the Fins and for everybody on the human side of the world and anathema(!) to the peoples of the Great Monster!’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 310

 

‘We are following the exploits of the R.A.F. with the greatest admiration and we marvel at the way the British people is carrying on. It is at least a light in the darkness which we feel very much being so close to it.’ ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 313

 

Peter now perceived Christopher as his puer aeternus which he must take with him on his own creative path; it is he who can show Peter the right path to take and who can help in Peter’s writing. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 314

 

‘So I am really at bottom hunting for my soul and the soul is also the right way that life needs to go.’  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 314

 

On the wall just above his [Peter] desk hung a signed photograph of Jung. When asked who this distinguished looking man might be he would reply: ‘That is a picture of my teacher.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 315

 

Peter adds a final paragraph to this letter asking Jung if he has another typed copy of the Red Book that he could spare him: ‘The thing I miss the most from the burning of my house was the loss of the typed copy of the Red Book which you gave me.’  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 318

 

I am glad you [Jung] were interested in my book. I must confess, I scarcely expected you would be, since you would have treated the stuff so differently. And yet a good deal of my life went into it and you must naturally feel a stir of spiritual paternity in your bones when you read it. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 305

 

I have been proposing to the Archbishops a kind of college or centre be established for the treatment and training of men in the analytical

way. Archbishop Temple responded to the idea very warmly and he is corresponding with me about it now. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 317-318

 

The shrieking of the demons is the stillness of the spirit. It means a withdrawal unheard of, until one hears the great silence. ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 320

 

As early as 1941 Peter was having a premonition of his death. He continued to suffer debilitating pain from his duodenal ulcer. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 320

 

As the end of his life approached, Peter seemed to become more preoccupied with his relationship to God, but this was not the God of his father – it was a god who seemed to have little to do with church worship.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 321

 

We have lost the reality of God as He appeared to the Jews and to our forefathers as a Power over against us. He now seems to come quietly out of the Earth-darkness into the circle of the single human flame and He calls this man or that man to His service.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 321

 

The man of the earth wants to extinguish the light of heaven because it binds the soul too closely to necessitous striving and cruel lust.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 321

 

Through serving the Mother we gain realism, strength and nourishment. Through serving God the father we gain the light which shows us the Way and the Task.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 321

 

I wonder if it is ever possible to realise the Star without first being broken by daemonic powers.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 323

 

In the spring of 1943 Anne became mortally ill with  septicaemia. The surgeon who looked after her said he would need to amputate the offending leg, where the infection had entered  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 324

He continued to communicate with her with his eyes, or by clasping her hand, but he never lost awareness of himself. Anne said how valuable this final month had been for him. He no longer felt he had to struggle to do things and the month of immobilization was like a wonderful preparation for death. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 324

 

Anne said: ‘I think that only in this way was he able to accept death, by having a month when he could slowly relinquish his hold on life.’  324

 

Peter died on September 6th 1943, with Anne by his side.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 325

 

Finances, without Peter’s salary, were stretched to the limit and at that time there was no government support for widows. But in spite of difficult circumstances, Anne’s spirit was indomitable. She let half of Reed House, and the family lived on the proceeds. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 325

 

However, perhaps as a result of having been used as a clinical case, Fordham’s feelings about Peter were ambivalent. He had left Peter to analyse with Hilda Kirsch because of these ambivalent feelings. The ambivalence veered between feelings of idealisation and intense antagonism.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 328

 

As early as January 1939 it was necessary to be careful in relation to the situation in Germany. Jung wrote to Peter expressing his concerns:

I am glad you have cut out the allusions to Germany. We have to be careful, of course, when it comes to any observations as to the present German conditions. The general mood in Germany is not just brilliant. The great progrome [sic] has caused a terrific revulsion in all decent Germans. I have heard very interesting details concerning the attitude of the army during the Tcheque crisis. Below the surface there is a division in the German mind which goes very deep. I think we have to reckon with the possibility of internal trouble, particularly in case of war. ~Carl Jung, Jung’s Apprentice, 287-288

 

Anne is my wife. This morning I felt the faint knock of the child against the wall of the womb. Our boat has a keel and there is a steady breeze. In two weeks time we shall be going into our new home, Reed House. The dream is being realised. And what of the book I am trying to bring forth? I have chosen the notion of attempting to describe the soul as a positive function of the autonomous psyche. Side by side with this conception there runs the reality of the anima as a negative destructive demon. To write a natural history of the soul must involve both aspects. The soul has a daemonic nature and every daemon is potential god and devil. In other words out of chaos life emerges. My own life nearly foundered in chaos and bitterness before I could trust myself to the slender promptings of the divine child. When I think, I lose my way, and the light goes out. But when I hear the voice of the child I believe again in simple truth and cleareyed beauty.  ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 255

 

Resolved-this 9th February 1931 never to hold Peter to account for the pain which I may suffer through him. To give him all the gentle love in my power – and to stand firm, and to bless him for his great gifts to me. To remember that deep and singular desire in Ruth’s words: ‘to be a good wife to a good man!’ To follow the road leading to the star knowing the difficulties, yet with faith, courage and high heart. ~Anne Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 239-250

 

 

C.G. has the same problem. His libido is still strong and possessive. He is never content. He built his tower as a tribute to the dream of life he would have liked to realize and never could. [This was Bollingen]. He had to compromise because his nature is essentially complex. He wants simplicity because he is not simple. He has always tried to foist upon Emma the tangible burdens of his complex strivings. He accumulates and then cannot maintain. Thus he is also surrounded by the decaying heaps of things and people from which his libido has receded and which are left to Emma to deal with. She expresses this remorseless continuity, this Abraxoid character to his desiring vitality. Always she reminds him of the debt intuitiveness piles up in the world of real things. He hates sensation because it is unexpressive, inarticulate and quite remorseless and indifferent to the flutters and strivings of intuition which is forever trying to escape from the real and the actual. New desires that add more and more to the heap of tangible liabilities must be renounced if this essential simplification is to be attained. Things cannot create happiness. They only make Egypt more lascivious and terrible in its effect. They only make you forget, like alcohol and infatuation. This is terrible Abraxas which makes life and death with the same breath and in the same act. The  right way for me is toward an increasing simplification of life in the midst of a world which goes ever towards an increasing specialization and complexity. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 211-212

 

She simply wants to separate … Beckwith [The third travelling companion in Africa] said she would not stand me six months. She says she brought me all the passion of her heart and I have never been more than lukewarm. All of this is from her angle perfectly true. I can see it too like that. The body is against it. All her adornment of her personality is in her intellectualism. There is no pride of the body in her. There she is abased and timorous. She is turned upside down. She tries to base herself on her distinctiveness or her differences from the common clay. But man’s instinct goes to the deep general womanhood, not to the monument to the ideal of individuality. ~Peter Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 212

 

Later on this image of the genial patriarch broke down when he divorced Cary, his life in Zurich ended, and he returned to England for good … Just as Peter returned to his roots in England, Cary ultimately returned to her country and settled in Connecticut where she became an important figure in the formation of the Bollingen Foundation which published Jung’s Collected Works and other things of cultural importance for Analytical Psychology. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, Page 215

 

On Monday I spent the whole evening with Emma Jung alone at her house (C.G. was at Aarau lecturing to Christians). Emma was just lovely. We just seemed to get to a calm. leisurely mood like a broad river where we found the most human understanding. She told me lots of things about herself and her deep feeling conclusions seem to me ever so true. So you see I was able to tell her about you and me … She said she would like awfully to know you. She got your spirit as a worn.an, I felt, and she said: ‘You see Peter, I would never say that the way things are in our lives (meaning Toni and C.G. ), is in any way a solution. She let me see how she had suffered and how she still suffers. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 251

 

As regards myself I felt for a week that you had completely taken the wind out of my sails, because I sensed that you had concluded from Toni’s account that my whole work on those drawings was practically valueless. Then I said to myself, ‘C.G has not read it and Toni is temperamentally averse from (sic) pathological material. I am a doctor, and it is precisely because the case was schizophrenic that I undertook the demonstration of the therapeutic evolution.

The case is valuable and I stand for the value I put into it.’ Fromthat point I got right again and can appreciate the cogency and soundness of your criticism of the presentation.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 261

 

seen … similar ailments in psychological conditions where people were living beyond themselves, driven by certain unconscious contents. Particularly intuitive individuals are inclined to disregard the reality of their body, of themselves and of the surrounding conditions. An ulcer looks to me like the psychological blind spot that begins to ache in the body. For intuitive people it is hard to grip reality. They never can touch the thing in the right spot nor say what they really want to say, being intercepted on the way by all sorts of volatiles. An intestinal affection can be instead of a contemplation of inner life. We seem to be more apt to stand strain and hurry imposed upon us by external circumstances than when we apply that poisonous whip to ourselves. My very best wishes, Cordially yours, C.G. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice,

 

Concerning the question of traumatic schizophrenia you are free to use this term in as much as you have sufficient evidence to substantiate such a term. It is quite possible and indeed even probable that a specific disposition consisting in a congenitally fragile tissue can be fatally upset by an emotion. It is even a wide spread experience that a psychosis can be acutely produced by overwhelming emotions. The insect drawings you mention don’t necessarily prove that there is a psychosis. They only show that there is a certain tendency towards a basic schizophrenic dissociation, the insects representing autonomous (Mendelian?) units that have a certain tendency to autonomy. In the same way as the cave dweller has filled the remote corners of his caves with drawings of hunting animals, so your patient tries to catch his autonomous units by drawing them. He tries to keep them in association with his conscious mind, decreasing thus the danger that they all run away in different directions and disappear altogether. The fact that he can draw them shows that his conscious mind is synthetic enough to control these little beasts which, if the control should fail, would reappear as those well lmown schizophrenic personality-fragments or insulae. The insects that appear on the tree show that he succeeded in establishing the proper hierarchy in his unconscious. At least the picture points out that positive possibility. You lmow the schizophrenic disposition is rooted much deeper than the neurotic one. It really starts in the sympathetic system. I have seen the results of certain researches which are carried on by a chemist in the psychopathic hospital in Boston about schizophrenia. These results show that the physiological coordination of vegetative processes is just as much and in the same way disturbed as the mental coordination. The vegetative factors also go by themselves. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 275

 

in March, Jung wrote to Peter about the Jewish question: I’m glad you brought up the question of the German refugees. In the ‘Statuten’ of our International Society I took care to bring in the statement that German Jewish Doctors, whether living in Germany or abroad, could join our organization immediately without being members of the German “Landesgruppe”. This paragraph naturally only refers to Germany, because in all the other countries (with the exception of Austria) Jewish members are admitted in the “Landesgruppe”. It is therefore evident that any German refugee has a perfect right to attend our Congress and to read a paper, as any other member of the Congress. I should not advocate the exclusion of such names. If certain of the German delegates should feel uncomfortable, they have the individual right not to be present when the paper is read. It is of course understood that all political allusions should be avoided as it would be not only discourteous but also of exceedingly bad taste to make use of a scientific organization to fight over political follies. As Strauss himself is a Jew, I should like him to have a private chat with such refugees that want to read a paper. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 280

 

‘I expect you have heard that Freud is now living in London and the question occurred to me whether it would be a favourable opportunity to invite him to the International Congress [ which was the following year being held in England]. He is of course very old and frail and almost certainly could not come, but I think it would be sound from every point of view to ask him to be a vice-president. I am sounding you about it unofficially, but I think it will quite likely be raised at the next Council Meeting.’ Later in the letter he adds: ‘My feeling is that, particularly in view of the special circumstances which account for his presence in England, we ought to offer Freud this honourable welcome and do it with generous warmth … what do you think about it?’ ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 281-282

 

I have no objection against inviting Freud. It will be a well meant gesture of which I’m sure he will not avail himself. If he did, he would deny his own principle on which he has always lived … To the typed letter is added a p.s. in Jung’s own handwriting: Concerning Freud’s invitation I think it would be enough if the English Committee would send him a letter inviting him. You must realise that it was an awful trauma to him, to have lost my collaboration. If you call on him you confront him with this trauma. I should spare him. Peter thanks Jung for his letter. ‘I shall certainly take your advice about that. I am told he [Freud] is going to practice in London and Anna Freud too and I believe there are six or seven~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice,  other analysts who have come with him from Vienna, so there is more or less a flood-tide in London. They have had a terrible time, I believe, in Vienna. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 282

 

where Hitler is building a sort of guest house for visiting diplomats on the very summit of the Salzberg. It looks huge from below, and the people call it a tea house! But it looks to me like a cosmic fantasy. The light in it at night adds another star to the galaxies of heaven. He has 3000 workmen working up there on his mountain and a huge Kino and wooden barracks. Something terrific. The people are very nice about it. They laugh good naturedly at him, but he is undoubtedly secure in their loyalty. He must be a queer mixture. All the people here want to talk politics. It is like an obsession. However, you know all about that. ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 283

 

Forgive me that I did not react immediately. But what can you do when such an avalanche rolls over you unexpectedly? Your book is not only most unforeseen as regards volume but also as to contents. I already got drowned in it. Your foreword is almost overgenerous at least such a thing has never happened to me – most unexpected, most unforeseen! You will forgive me, if I say nothing about the contents yet. But I must give you my most hearty praise for the excellent way, in which your book is written. I wonder how your contemporaries will swallow this mighty pill. It may do something to them however. Well, the war will be a welcome excuse. I think the title of the book is aptly chosen, since the knowledge of the myth producing soul will be, or is already, a new and transfigured mythology. I beg you not to be impatient, as I have to read the book conscientiously. It will take a while until I can say more about it. I have been a bit ill lately, which is the reason why I am so slow. God, what a time! We all hope and pray for England’s victorySt George slaying once more the dragon. Many thanks! Yours cordially, C.G.  ~Diana Baynes, Jung’s Apprentice, 304-305

 

My dear Peter This is the fateful year for which I have waited since more than 25 years. I did not lmow that it was a such a disaster. although

since 1918 I knew that a terrible fire would spread over Europe, beginning in the North East. This year reminds me of the enormous

earthquake in 26 B.C. that shook down the great Temple of Karnak. It was the prelude to the destruction of all temples, because a new time had begun. 1940 is the year where we approach the meridian of the first star in Aquarius. It is the premonitory earthquake of the New Age.

Up to the present moment, Bollingen has escaped, together with Switzerland – the general destruction, but we are in prison. You don’t see the walls, but you feel them. The newspapers are hushed and one hardly cares to read them, except for doubtful information about the war. For a while, just when I started your book, I went with all my grandchildren to the West of Switzerland, because we expected an attack. Afterwards I was very busy, because all doctors were with the army. It is awkward to write as the censor reads the stuff. But I must tell you how often I think of you and all my friends in England. I often complain that Mr. Chamberlain has not read my interview with  Knickerbocker [an American reporter]. Your book is quite interesting and it seems as if your interpretations were hitting the nail on the head. Certain points would need some discussion. But one should talk, writing is too clumsy. It is difficult to be old in these days. One is helpless. On the other hand one feels happily estranged from this world. I like nature but not the world of man or the world to be. I hope this letter will reach you, and convey to you all the wishes the human heart can’t suppress, despite of censors. They are human too, after all. In autumn I resume my lectures at the E.T.H, about the individuation process in the Middle Ages! That’s the only thing with me one could call up to date. I loathe the new style, the new Art, the new Music, literature, politics and above all, the new man. It’s the old beast that has not changed since the troglodytes. My dear Peter, I am with you and with old England. 311-312