I’m therefore quite willing to help in your attempt in this direction, but I refuse in your own interest to plague myself with your material which is only helpful when you acquire its understanding by your own effort. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 459

 

You can’t change people to fit a theory. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 217

 

After dinner we sat on the verandah, C.G. behind the little table wearing, as usual, a blue apron, and on the table lay the stone he was carving of the family lineage on the male side. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 219

 

He [Jung] was particularly interested to see how they [Harvard] had translated the word ‘unconscious’ into Latin, and it was mens vacua, the unknown or unexplored mind. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 220

 

He [Jung] had been described as the explorer of the unconscious, and he thought this phrase particularly apt. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 220

 

At the same time he [Jung] showed me a small tumbler of slightly tinted (red or pink) glass, and the rim at the top was sharp all round. He said that at the moment his wife’s mother died the upper part of the glass had broken
off. ~E.A. Bennet, Meeting with Jung, Page 221

 

Janet never knew his patients; he was the opposite of Freud who could never see beyond his patients, but saw them only through his own theory. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 222

 

He [Jung] went on to speak of the natives in Africa – they had a natural psychology. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 236

 

Unless there is a personal religious experience – realizing from the inside what it means – nothing happens. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 238

 

He [Jung] likes to be quiet in the evenings and let his mind unbend, uncoil. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 274.

His [Jung] father was Lutheran, but of the Basel Reformed Church. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 275

 

C.G. took me to see his carving of Attis at the end of the path near the boat house. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 278.

 

He [Jung] spoke of the story of Attis as one of the most beautiful in antiquity and classed it with that of Apollo and Demeter. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 278.

On the wall of the Tower he [Jung] had made a new carving of a woman kneeling; he said she was the mother of Attis. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 278

He [Jung] never finds it irksome to be alone. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 279

 

C.G. told me to read Dr. Zhivago, a novel by the Russian, Pasternak; it was a wonderful picture of the anima. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 281

 

There was quite a crowd there and Barker, the professor of English from Cambridge, said, ‘Now Jung, you must know the famous passage in Faust about the setting sun!’ And Jung did know it, and recited it. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 284

‘But,’ C.G. went on to tell us, ‘here was a living myth, for the mountain lit by the sun is said to be the wife of Vishnu; and the myth gives the story and the experience meaning. That is what myths are.’ ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 284

 

Speaking of dreams he said we must always ask ‘Whose dream?’ ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 289

 

He [Jung] spoke of Aquarius and the significance of Khrushchev’s visit to America. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 295

 

 

The wedding cake is a mandala and the bride and bridegroom are the royal wedding couple, the King and Queen, for that evening, and they preside over the gathering. That is symbolism; it belongs to life. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 297

 

“Omnis festinatio a parte diaboli est”,’ he quoted in Latin – ‘all haste comes from the devil’. It is an old alchemical saying. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 297

 

Typology is a description of specific manifestations of energy. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 299

St. Paul’s teacher, Gamaliel, was a noted Cabbalist. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 301

This was the spread of knowledge laterally as well as vertically (that is spiritually), and he [Jung] said he had mentioned this in Aion, and that Pisces – he pronounced it with a hard ‘c’, Piskes – was like this: the sign was a perpendicular and a horizontal fish, they went in opposite directions. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 302

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