I really do think that you [Katy Cabot] understand Dr. Jung’s teaching far better and deeper than almost anyone else. ~Toni Wolff, Jung, My Mother and I, Page 14

My mother saw Jung for the first time while I was at the Kinderspital. She also began her analysis with Toni Wolff that same autumn. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 44

After her first interview with Jung in the autumn of 1929, she was now analyzing regularly with Toni Wolff, as it was Jung’s habit to send a new patient to his assistant for weekly analysis, occasionally seeing the patient himself. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 45

He [Jung] is one of the most deeply religious men, in the true sense of the word, whom it has been my privilege to meet. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 49

All of intellectual Europe is beginning to recognize that he [Jung] is one of the most, if not the most powerful intellectual force which has appeared since Schopenhauer.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 49

Keyserling told a friend of mine the other day that he considered Jung the most superior mind that he’d ever encountered. It is a liberal education to sit at his feet and it is a most inspiring experience to attend in the new great lecture hall of the University his special lectures in German before the Philosophical Society, and to hear the tremendous applause with which they receive the man whom previously the University had forced out because of their inability to understand his high and advanced thinking. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 50

. .. Analysis is Work, hard, tedious and at times discouraging but I am sure the results justify all the work and energy one puts into it. It is of course just as lonely for me as it is for Jim but the extraordinary reestablishment of Janey’s health has justified the long stay in Switzerland.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 50

It is true that I shall have my seminar already on October 12th. I enjoyed your picture postcards very much. It is exceedingly nice of you that you gave me a sign of your existence from time to time. Hoping to see you soon, I am, Yours sincerely, C.G. Jung  ~Carl Jung, “Jung, My Mother and I, “Page 53

As I said earlier, two things that Jung taught my mother early in analysis were to appreciate good clothes and to enjoy alcohol.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 53

Jung went on to say later that it was only a metaphysical truth that every man was equal to every other man. Everyone must realize that the ‘mob’ consists of inferior beings, inferior types of the human species.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 55

Jung says,he thinks that animals are as dignified as a lowly developed man. We must deal with such men in their own way. It is idiotic and cruel to treat inferior man as we would superior man. There is a fundamental mistake in our democratic ideas. We owe it to Christianity that all men are considered equal and that God looks at everyone the same way ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 55

Then Jung went on to say that people often say, “No one loves me.” But we have to create that thing which loves us, and which we love. We are inclined to take love like a tree or a gold mine. We simply can’t go on taking for granted that love is something that we get from ‘somewhere.’ It has to be created because it does not exist, it must be made first.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 55

Katy began her analysis in 1929 with Toni Wolff, after that single hour with Jung to which Mrs. Jung’s letter from that autumn alludes.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 53

When from time to time my mother overcame her fear of not measuring up to the other members of the “intellectual” group, she would join in, but on one occasion, Barbara Hannah criticized her red varnished fingernails in front of the group, hinting that my mother was frivolous! Katy was crushed.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 54

…Jung spoke about people who love to be compassionate to others; they are the great helpers and eternal saviors! It is such a nice feeling for them and quenches for them their unquestionable thirst to be on top! He said it would be very much better if such people were compassionate with themselves – with the ugliest man in themselves! ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 54

…one has to accept the inferior sides in oneself first, if one hopes to build up the superior sides. It is like building a house, one doesn’t begin with the roof. One must dig the foundations first and go into the dirt.   ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 55.

One must swallow one’s inferiority before one can create something new and better.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 56.

Inferior man doesn’t believe in the individual, he believes in great gatherings and in huge and fine buildings to house them. If someone says, “So and so many millions believe in this or that,” then he, too, will believe.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 56

Jung hazarded that Buddhism was also a good religion, and had millions of followers. Whereupon the curate said, “I am not concerned with that!” That is just it, Jung said, and went on that clergymen are not concerned with the spiritual strivings of man.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 56

Life is truth and a doubt of truth – a question. If something is finished, a definite truth, then it is dead, as it cannot develop further. Best is a half-truth, for a living truth emerges. If truth is static, it is dead.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 56

The Church is made for the inferior man. And for that reason we need it, because we are all inferior. A wise man would never want to disturb the Church. It is a spiritual stable for spiritual lambs – and for wolves!  Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 56

With a good shepherd who will show the sheep the way to good pastures (inferior man demands good pastures) the Church is a most desirable thing and the more Catholic the better. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 56

What is good for inferior man, is bad for superior and creative man: Church is a prison for him, belief is hell to him, because he must create. And if he is fettered by eternal truths, then he suffocates and says, “The Church is wrong,” forgetting the Church is right in about ninety percent of himself!  Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, age 56

The priests are in the same enclosure as the sheep. They are two different aspects of the same thing. A priest who isn’t fettered and doesn’t believe in the dogma of his church, has no value … we suspect him of hypocrisy. He is a cheat.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 57

In the Catholic Church, the priests have to have a wider viewpoint – otherwise they could not deal with the more educated members of the Church. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 57

Jung went on to say that a herd of sheep left alone has no life and is eaten up by wolves. So it is with certain people, they must be prisoners. They are happier that way.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 57

One can’t talk about psychology in France, Italy and Spain: they think it is mysticism. Those people cannot understand what psychology is talking about, because the whole world of problems and symbols is all within the walls of the Church. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 57

No human relationship can provide the miracle of transubstantiation. If you realize that then you can have your spiritual food every day. That is the side that people don’t reckon with whenthey leave the Church and expect to live off others.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 57

Even an Atheist, if he is a member of an atheist club, still has the Church within his reach. He can confess and repent, and with one leap he is back again in the fold.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 57

We are convinced that people who live in other countries are not all devils, but primitive man believes that they are. They have in that way security in their tribe. Nothing welds people together more than collective misdeeds.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 57

Communities will often commit crimes so as to bond themselves together. When the Church was falling asunder, they burnt the heretics, started the Inquisition. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 58

If we say, “This church is false … ” then we have expelled ourselves from our own home – we have uprooted ourselves. If you deny the Church, it is as if you had appendicitis, yet you are convinced you have no appendix. You can’t cut out an appendix you don’t have, so you are lost. The devils we have within us make us believe they don’t exist so they are able to work on in the dark.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 58

When someone is devoting himself to a cause, people think he is doing it for ambition. They think an abbot lives his miserable life in his own interest. These priests are to be taken seriously, for they live their miserable lives for a cause. They accept their miserable lot for the cause. If you have ever looked into such a life you will be deeply impressed by the misery of it. It is tolerated and borne for a cause, and it works.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 58

He [Angelus Sileslus] became frightened [of what he had written] and went back into the Church as a monk, and who developed a neurosis. The inferior man in him began to howl, and he ran home. He died in a monastery – a terrible fate.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 58

I tried my best to fit you [Katy Cabot] in somehow. But there has been such a flood of consultations that together with an abominable cold, I was quite unable to live up to all my obligations. I am extremely sorry that I could not squeeze you in any more. If there should be any particular trouble I wish you would whisper into my ear at the occasion of the April Fool’s dinner. Thousand regrets.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 59

No letters from my mother to Jung were kept by him before 1937.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 59

l health, and though she studied with Jung and Toni Wolff, it never seemed to occur to her that mental health was also necessary.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 66-67

She [Katy Cabot] fluctuated between the serious and playful poles of her nature in part because she felt inferior to the Zurich intellectuals, even though Mrs. Jung, Barbara Hannah, and several other bright women in the circle had not been to any university.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 70

In 1931, shortly after my father’s death, she [Katy Cabot] toyed with the idea of studying at Oxford, which Toni Wolff, educated at Bern University, also advocated.  ~Carl Jun, Jung My Mother and I, Page 70

She also mentions “financial complications” at that period, which kept her from analysis with Jung. But his fees were modest – about SFr 20 per hour – and she could afford a staff of three.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 83

  Inasmuch as the Ten Commandments are near to a natural morality, they represent the will of God. If a person is not obedient to his parents, and does not honor them, he does not honor himself either. So if you violate and trespass against those Commandments, you do a thing against life. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 85

 The symbols of the Catholic Church have a peculiar validity and can function as if they were a truth despite the fact that they are so absurd. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 85

 If the Catholic Church did not administer magic, so to speak, it would lose its hold over the people. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 85

 The only place you can get this ‘magic’ is in a Catholic Church, administered by priests with apostolic succession. It is wonderful for people to have a place where actual magic is happening, for then the unconscious is caught.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page  87

 If I imagined that a priest could perform a rite of real magic value which could not be repeated or bought anywhere else, I would gladly tum Catholic. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 87

 They are the Protestants, who have forgotten that the Virgin Birth is a fact – of course the Virgin Birth and the Trinity are psychological facts and not historical facts. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 88

 Jung said that people often confused reality with psychological reality. When Nietzsche did not grasp the psychological reality of Zarathustra, then he is Zarathustra and is mad. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 88

 Dr. Jung said [Barbara] Hannah admired me [Katy Cabot] very much and would like to do as I do, but doesn’t know how. [Mary] Foote is afraid I am a very bad person and suspects I might have a beau. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 89

 As for Barbara Hannah and Mary Foote, they had arrived in Zurich at about the same time, a few years before Katy. Both were artists, and in analysis with Jung, and both lived at the Pension Sonne in Kusnacht before eventually taking apartments. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 89

 Dr. Jung went on to say that in analysis first lovely feelings are exchanged, but after that one can go lower to affectionate gestures and a kiss, then on the ground floor is bed. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 91

 “You take the panics seriously, don’t you?” I said, “Yes.” “Well,” he said, “if you take the panics seriously then there is seriousness within you.” If a person stands in front of a picture and raves over it, and feels inferior because he cannot create such a lovely thing, then it shows there is beauty in him for otherwise he could not feel that way. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 91-92

 Oh, those, If you put Hannah in trousers she’d be a typical Scottish minister. She envies you and would like to be like you. She’d like to have your nails, but they wouldn’t suit her, she’d be ridiculous! ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 92

 He replied that you are not only the child of your parents but the child of mankind. One does not necessarily take after one’s parents; one can have some very decent ancestors to take after. He added that if one could go back far enough in the history of one’s parents one could find out why they became that way. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 93

 One of her [Katy Cabot] targets were the Jung’s, to whom she was always sending flowers. (Mrs. Jung reciprocated with books at Christmas.) She also liked to give unsolicited advice, especially in matters of health, not only to her Boston father-in-law in his nineties but also to Jung. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 94

 The highest accomplishment of man is to be conscious of himself. The whole thing is to know what one is doing. All the moral and ethical valuations of things are a mere interlude, a step in the development of consciousness. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 80

Jung said that he could well understand that I could get the beauty and feelings in paintings, as that comes through the eyes and not through the ears.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 96

 If you hear the right way you will hear the unconscious and what it is trying to tell you. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 96

 Katy had turned forty in 1935, and the little-girl side was retreating while the masculine side was in the ascendant – a normal process for women, according to Jung.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 97

 I then told him of my transference to Wolff and how I hated her saying she was not seeing me again, and how I finally asked her to dinner; that at first she was cold then said she would come. Jung said that Wolff had certainly released my feeling.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 99

I then asked him [Jung] why Mr. Crowley had an ANIMUS, and I went on to say that despite the fact that he might think me queer I was determined to hold to it that Mr. Crowley had an animus!! He said indeed it was true and that he had saddled himself with Mrs. Crowley’s animus, so it was really Mrs. Crowley’s animus speaking through Mr. Crowley.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung, Mother and I, Page 99

 I grew a rhinoceros hide over my heart so none of my parents’ avalanches could reach me. It was a defense which grew thicker and thicker as the years went on.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 100

 As a child I had covered my heart with rhino hide so that my parents could not hurt me. Jung said I must answer people back, like Hannah, when they are rude. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 100

 From my work with women patients, I learned how important an emotional marriage with the father, or with his substitute (the first man in a woman’s life), is vital for feminine development. Page 103-104

 The way to the self, if you have the power to take it, is a difficult way – if you have the power to do it. Most people indulge themselves but they don’t work on themselves.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 108

 the difficult entanglements, in which one finds oneself, are one’s roots. If you don’t touch the soil, and instead lead an artificial, cut-off existence, then the self has no real feet- it is a ghost and should never have been born. It is a futile indulgence to neglect a job to indulge in self.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 108

 if you can stand the sight of yourself as a murderer, or an offender, then you might be strong enough to continue on the right path. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 109

 He said, “You must apply the same criticism to yourself that you apply to others, and thus see where you are lacking. Christ said, ‘Do not judge so as not to be judged. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 111

 It must have to do with Jung being in me: his spirit seems to be around me in the dream, even though I am in America. Like a ghost, it accompanies me, and a chair should be ready for it. I must find out what the connection is in all that.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 112

 I told Dr. Jung of Rennet’s rage – his fist banging down on the table, and his saying, “I hate Dr. Jung.” “Rennet is afraid of unknown things,” Jung said. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 116

 He said, “Look at her hands, so thin and nervous – not like mine or yours,” and he spread out his solid hand for inspection. She looks nervous and can easily be stirred by men, and must have been pretty unconscious not to have known she was pretty when she was thirty-eight.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 118

He [Jung] was going to see a few people while in Cambridge, but on the island off of Maine, he would see nobody and just enjoy Nature. He said that if it were not for Mrs. Jung, he would take a tramp steamer across the Atlantic, which he would really enjoy.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 122

 I said that he [Jung] bored me with the stuff he wrote – just like Dr. Baynes! Onkel then said Baynes comes out with adolescent psychology stuff- college boy mentality, like Crowley – that is their degree of maturity. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 124

 But Baynes has to handle Miss Wolff as an adult being. Such men as Baynes and Crowley can only deal with or relate to women whom they treat as if being on an inferior level, or who are on an inferior level. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 124

 I told Onkel [Jung] how Crowley hated Miss Wolff, and I said I wondered why I had, and others did. He said that people misunderstand Miss Wolff because she had to talk as if through a thick wall with people because they won’t hear! ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 124

 I told him one heard people saying, “Dr. Jung and Miss Wolff are wonderful psychologists, just marvelous, the best you know, a magnificent team!” “Yes,” he [Crowley] retorted full of humor, “a good pair of horses to drag people uphill.” We both simply roared with laughter.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 125

 Onkel [Jung] said I was not at one with myself to so hate my fellow beings. If I know certain things in myself then I can stand them in mankind.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 125

 He [Jung]  said that she [Toni Wolff] analysed dreams for him and was wonderful, that she was rather reserved and one did not see her coming forward much, but there was much behind the veil – pure gold – but she emphasized things too much at times and got people’s backs up.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 125

 Not only was Mrs. Jung’s interest in Greek and Latin suspect to Katy; she also was jealous of Mrs. Jung’s intellectual abilities. That jealousy

was the real motive then; later she admired Mrs. Jung’s studies and recommended I follow her example.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 129

 Dr. Jung asked me what gods the Parthenon housed, and I said ‘Athene.’ He said that Athene was the anima of Zeus – she represented the wisdom of Zeus. She was his thought that took form. ~Katy Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 130

 I asked Oncle [Jung], “How can I attain to spiritual development?” He replied that I must die and be born again and go back a thousand years until I reach the state of the child in the mother’s womb where I have no persona at all, where I am a living thing moved by the unconscious; then the spirit would seize me and I’d be lifted up and that would cause me unbearable pain and then I’d be lifted up onto the earth again. ~Katy Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 130

 Then Oncle [Jung] tried to show me things as they are: natural and simple. I have all the hardness outside. I am like a child lost in a huge ice box! That must be turned around and the child in me must come out and must be replaced by granite. Inside I am still too liquid.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 133

 You see, your personality has changed a great deal: formerly it was yourself instigated by your mother partly – who fabricated such plans and ideas more or less. You wanted to be on top of society, as every woman would. And now you don’t want this anymore; you have seen better values …. The socially ambitious person has drifted into the background and is now your alter ego, that is, your shadow ….  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 137

 In January, Katy received a long “analytical letter” from Toni Wolff (4.01.37) which mentions Katy’s need to become a “woman of granite” and less fluid. Toni also analyses Katy’s dream that “second-rate” women have let the dukes of Windsor and Kent make them pregnant.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 137

 Women particularly seem to have been frequently ill in the ‘thirties, as Toni Wolff, Linda Pierz, and Mary Foote often complained of being unwell. Since antibiotics were not yet available, infections took a long time to cure.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 140

 He [Jung] said, “Ah!” then went on to say that the fact that I see the shadow in people is questionable. I am too little concentrated on the black side in myself, so that I see the others as monsters, but I do no see my own monster!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 149

 I told Uncle [Jung] that I had made a list of my bad sides, but it did not seem to help me. He said that the fact that I recognize, and make a list of bad sides, won’t get them out of me. I shall just have to learn to accept and live with them.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 149

 One has inside a mixture of good and evil. The thing is to get the good and bad sides to work. We must learn to stand on our own. We are all monsters – a mixture of good and bad qualities.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 149-150

 You cannot wipe out fundamental traits in character. Instincts are those basic tendencies in character which enable us to live our particular individuality.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 150

 If one does not realize one’s erotic fantasies  then one dreams them.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 151

 He [Jung] went on to say that his lower layers were always ready  for any kind of woman. “If we don’t realize how we look to each other and take into account any fantasy we might have, then we are dead pillars of salt,”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 151

Sometimes, he [Jung] said, he had such terribly boring people that he had to make a tremendous effort with himself to bring out his unconscious fantasies, so as to help them.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 151

 One feels as if one would like to sit there and make no effort, they are so boring, but in such cases one has to make the effort with my unconscious. I must get into contact with my patients, and I can’t if I hold myself aloof. I must think and realize my fantasies about them as about anyone I meet in daily life. I have to make an effort of the heart.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 151-152

 Then he said that, in my dreams, I live an unconscious love affair with Onkel [Jung], and now we come to the tragic conclusion where I want to shoot him and myself so as to make a sensational affair out of it.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 152

 I have the great American failing of being too far away from my instincts: there is a great distance between me and my instinct. My shadow is the monkey- playful and treacherous. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 152

 Then, as I left, I said to Onkel [Jung] that I did not know how to proceed. He was very nice and sympathetic, and said I must follow my dreams. I said that I hoped to see him soon, and, as he bent down to catch my words, I kissed him on the back of the neck. He was a bit taken aback, I thought. Bless him.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 153

 I think it was very fine and courageous of you [Katy Cabot] to have made this decision to [to give up Eranos]. I realise how difficult it must have  been for you.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 155

 To despise one’s self simply shows that one has not yet made friends with one’s self.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 155

 That Toni imagined Katy depending on anybody indicates how little she understood her analysand.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 156

Onkel [Jung] said he had to teach people to be lazy. It is an art to be lazy. When you live a certain kind of life and you are all the time ill, one says, “Is that style of life the one you should live? Is that satisfactory?” ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 160

 Jung often said that, for extraverts, illness was the only way to make them turn inwards; through forced introversion they learned to know themselves better.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 160

 Onkel [Jung] went on to say that people give him the name that best expresses his role to them, in the most dramatic form. Some men have called him Mother or Ma, others Father Confessor!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 164

 I then told Onkel that de T. had seen the doctor who said that he was suffering from nicotine poisoning. Whereupon Onkel laughed, and said that de T. smoked too much, so as to narcotize himself – a diluted suicide.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 165

 When you are dealing with a person whose unconscious wants to make an end of his life, you have a tendency to want to kill him. Smokers and drinkers to excess are committing a mitigated suicide.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 166

 He [Jung] said that he had a chest of tropical medicines and would [in India] take quinine and put chlorine in the washing water and drink only bottled waters and eat no uncooked foods etc.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 167

 He [Jung] then showed me a picture in a book of old German Hermetisch philosophy, where a pole rose up in the air topped by a crown and clouds above it, with the lamb of God lying across the cloud. The bottom of the pole was in water and mud- Muladhara! ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 171

 He [Jung] said that the whole Kundalini Yoga was a psychological system. It tries to formulate how things that are in the unconscious, reach consciousness with all the symbols.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 171

 I asked him [Jung] about the hermetic philosophy. He said it all hung together, in a way, with the Cabbalistic philosophy and the Gnostics, but the Hermetic philosophy was older than the Cabbalistic philosophy.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 171

 Cabbala was the mystic philosophy of the Jews, a contemporary of hermetic philosophy. Cabbala is a Greek philosophy and is the ‘Gnosis’ of the Jews, and still going in Galicia, and in Poland in the Jewish sector.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 172-173

 Onkel [Jung] said that he, like myself, used to enjoy big gatherings, but now he only wants to get away and work and enjoy his solitude. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 179

 Mrs. Baynes thinks without feeling and is apt to make mistakes. She has an animus that disregards feeling altogether, so she gets out of tune and sings the wrong note. It is intellectual talk, absolutely without feeling. She has no sense of consideration, and feelings do not disturb her.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 179

 Onkel [Jung] went on to say that he and Toni would not become intimate friends of their pupils because if people are with them continually they do not feel the need to develop; for when you are with someone who understands things better than you, you don’t lift a finger.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 183

 He [Jung] said that people like himself, or Toni, suffocate developments. I asked how they both developed so far. He said they were forced, by their patients, and by circumstances, to get on. “The water of the great flood forced me up to a Jungfrau or an Everest. I had to get up there.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 184

 My patients forced me by their neuroses, otherwise I would never have lifted a finger. Some doctors hang behind and are below their patients. A doctor who doesn’t allow himself to be forced along will be a damn fool after a while.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 184

 I then suggested Anne M., who came here a lot and then finally left in a huff and rage against him and Toni. Onkel [Jung] said that she was a half crazy person, who did not listen, and who really was convinced that she was Siegfried and that he was a woman Brunhilde.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 184

He [Jung] went back to Anne M. again, and said that he tried to save her from the meanness of her psychosis, but because she could not have her way, he (Onkel) must be the devil.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 184

 To come to Kusnacht is a tremendous lure for crazy people. All the time you have such cases. They are on the border line and so destructive, for the devil is strong and crazy. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 184-185

 Then I asked him [Jung] how he felt with no one to carry on [his work]. He said it was not necessary; he was leaving behind a wealth of literature, and the ones to come would glean from it. “After all,” he said, “Nature does not produce a series of me, and after Goethe or Schopenhauer, there was no one – after all, notes etc. are kept, and I put my thoughts into them, and leave behind a great deal of literature.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 187

 Onkel [Jung] said that he first read Nietzsche in the Canton du Valais, and was first impressed with its beauty; then he saw it was an amazing tragedy: that it was a slow approach to the world of the shadow.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 187

 Nietzsche thought he was writing a gospel to the world in order to make the way for the Lord. The German soldiers read Zarathustra in the trenches: it spoke to their unconscious.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 187-188

 Onkel [Jung] said that he was ahead of his time, but some day everyone will learn what he now teaches.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 189

 Katy could not stand old maids, of which there were many in Europe in the thirties because the First World War had killed so many men. Strangely, despite her loathing of spinsters, Katy liked to dress up as one at fancy-dress parties. Her British spinster outfit was most unbecoming!  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 190

 It widens my horizon and I become more human and less auto-erotic. It shows that I am at one with myself if I can see things that are happening around me. Being auto-erotic shows that one is looking for effects: the effect one makes when coming into a room – not seeing or even thinking of the other people, only thinking of oneself and the effect one makes. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 190

 Auto-erotic people only see themselves, and that is why they have panics.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 191

 There was no personal relation because the mirror only mirrored him. It is like Roosevelt, with his stereotype smile which he puts on for everyone. He does not mean it for the people he smiles at, it is his smile.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 191

 Onkel [Jung] went on to say that President R. had no human connections with anyone. He would not take the trouble to say, “I don’t agree with you!” Onkel said that other people with such mothers had an ‘infantile paralysis’ too.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 192

 An old animus means opinions, and a young animus means an enterprise.  ~Carl Jung, Jung, My Mother and I, Page 196

 Onkel [Jung] said a man’s egoism is so great that he can smear his boots with the fat of his murdered brother.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 196

  Onkel [Jung] said that most of the people in Germany were influenced by Hitler, but if they would think straight, they would say, “We are the real devils of Europe.” But instead they say, “England is the evil spirit: we Germans are good people, and devils are attacking our dear Vaterland.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 230

 He [Jung] added that when you trap someone, you trap yourself and worse. If your scheme succeeds, you suffer a defeat. You should not set traps.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 200

 Onkel [Jung] said, “I never say, ‘You must have a resentment,’ but instead, I say, ‘But it resents, and if you are not conscious of it, it’s your handicap for you are too little conscious of your own resentments.”‘  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 201

 He [Jung] said that Miss Foote had an abysmal feeling of inferiority. Such people, he said, have a terrific power complex, and Miss Foote can spoil everything with her feelings of inferiority. People like her are sadists, and they act in a melancholy way.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 202

 He [Jung] went on to say how he felt utterly suffocated and panic-stricken when he went up to the Jung fraujoch the first time. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 203

 The Schifflibach was a huge success with young and old; the Jung’s loved it, as did Toni Wolff.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 205

 As there had just been a thunderstorm, a lot of water fell down onto his “lady companion’s” hat. “She took it in good part,” my mother wrote. The “gentleman” and the “lady” were apparently Dr. Jung and Miss Wolff.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 205

 I swam out to this flotsam and jetsam and fished out a wooden hanger bearing the name Rosemary Kennedy. At the hotel we learned that indeed the Kennedys had been on holiday at a nearby villa but had departed in haste for London, where Joseph Kennedy was American Ambassador.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 206

 We also learned that the inhabitants of the Cap were disgusted by the Kennedys’ dumping all their rubbish into the Mediterranean.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 206

 A teenage boy with cropped fair hair, wearing short trousers, earnestly addressed a mirror and made extravagant gestures – the first Hitler Youth I had ever seen, and whose fanatical behavior sent a chill down my fifteen-year-old spine. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 210

 During the War, both German and American Jews took up residence at the hotel, including an American Jewish woman and her adult son from an internment camp in Germany.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 210

 I went to see Onkel because I wanted to explain to him why I had not gone to Bollingen, at Toni’s invitation, right after getting back from Geneva and seeing off the “English train.” I found him not feeling too well sinus trouble – and he was going to Dr. M. I begged him to ask Dr. M. if he should have calcium.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 214

 “There is nothing more bothersome than when people don’t tell what troubles them; it makes a strained situation. It produces a strained atmosphere, if you don’t say what is on your mind.” ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 215

 When I told him [Jung] of the remark I made to Mrs. Baumann about no one listening to his (Onkel’s) seminars, he roared with laughter, and said again, “Enf ant terrible!”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 216

 Katy certainly had the “stuff” in her to deal with her loneliness. Though she was unaware of her strong inner man, he would stand by her in the far more serious crises of the future. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 216

 I then told Onkel [Jung] that I was so impressed by his lecture in Ascona, where he had spoken of El Kadir. He said he thought he had given an especially bad lecture that day. He went on to say that he had lived El Kadir, had seen him, and those things jump into the eyes of people, and their own experiences become alive, and that gets them.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 220

 He [Jung] went on to say that he was aware he talked of important things, and through his own feelings, he also had been particularly moved by that story of the Koran. He said, “I talk of something which I have experienced! Massignon hasn’t seen him – he doesn’t know what he is.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 220

 I then told Onkel [Jung] that I had seen El Kadir in Florence at the age of seventeen, and later here, but it was fleeting and only twice. I could not tell what he thought.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 220

 In America, it is expected of one to appear as if one had no education. One must not talk differently, or voice ideas that are different from the ‘herd,’ for that is what people don’t like. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 222

 Onkel [Jung] answered that books such as his, to be understood, need psychological knowledge. People never look in – they always look out. They never realize they have a ‘mind.’ They use their mind, when they do use it, to kill their own mental life. Psychology is the science of the living mind.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 222

 He [Jung] went on to say [presumably after Katy broached the subject] that Mrs. Pierz was after prestige, and wanted to play a role, and in consequence, she has a hole and a void which she does not see, and she overcompensates it with the role of the perfect mother.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 222

 Onkel [Jung] said that Germany has extraordinary fighting power, but had no sustenance. For one coup, they would be stronger than in 1914, but they could stand only one tremendous push, and that the first onslaught would be terrific, because they would be willing to sacrifice up to two million men.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 229

 The Nazis have no regard for human life and would just pour men in. The Allies are more human and don’t wish such a loss of life as in 1914.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 229

 War is sweet to those who have not experienced it.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 229

 Onkel [Jung] said that Stalin was frank in his dealings with people, did not put on hypocritical airs, just said what he wanted to say, stating his aims quite plainly. When Lady Astor asked him how long he was going to keep on killing people, he answered her, “As long as it is necessary!”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 230

 Stalin feels that certain elements are unhealthy so he wipes them out. Stalin does not presume and invent such stories and such lies [as Hitler]. He is a straightforward brute, a cunning brute, while, on the other hand, Hitler is just a rotten devil, and an hysterical, neurotic individual, always excited and believing what he says. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 230

 He [Jung] said it was not hypocrisy but adaptation! When one lives among wolves, one must howl with the wolves. I told him that my animus had always hindered me from having the right kind of persona. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 231

 When I saw Onkel [Jung], we spoke of the Mellons. We said how nice they were. He affirmed that they were sincere and honest people, and said that Mrs. Mellon1 has size, and is a ‘character’ in a way, but is unfinished and a rough diamond.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 232

 He, Paul Mellon, is a nice fellow, and has already picked up considerably. They are unusually nice people. I said I supposed they didn’t really need analysis so much, and Onkel said that indeed they did need it. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 232

 Onkel [Jung] said that he and Toni had put her together, and she then thought she knew enough to ‘swing it’ – become an analyst. The van W.s prejudiced the Mellon’s against Toni, but Mrs. Mellon was charmed with Toni the other  night at the Rufenacht lecture and asked her to tea. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

 I asked Onkel [Carl] why Toni was so hard and rough and gruff at times, and not at all understanding, sometimes. Uncle said that she had a remarkable mind, was a genius and a person of quality. Her animus is her hard and gruff side which comes through whenever the unexpected happens.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

 I said that to me she [Toni] seemed like a grouchy old man with the gout, and was at moments difficult. He [Jung] said that side of her was absurd and grotesque and you often get such a side with people with a special gift.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

 After all, everyone has a flaw and Toni has a remarkable natural mind. What Toni cannot stand is something unexpected! When something changes or something unforeseen happens, she resists it like hell!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 233

 She [Toni] is an introvert, and like all introverts, she fears the unexpected; it is hostile! Extraverts, on the contrary, like to have things different from what they expected. They just love it when something unforeseen happens.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 234

 Toni is a very advanced person, but she comes from a most conservative family, who has lived in Zurich for centuries, and are like hard, old wood. Her mind is the only thing movable in her. If she had not that mind she would be stone-hard.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 234

 I asked Onkel if he couldn’t analyse Toni and cure her of that absurdity, the rough side of her nature, as it was unworthy of her to keep it when she had the opportunity to get rid of it, through some work with him. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 235

 He [Jung] said one cannot touch that subject with her [Toni] – one cannot ‘get at it’ – as when you approach her about it, the same revulsion takes place as when something unexpected happens. It is sort of wheels-within-wheels, and one cannot do anything about it. She refuses to let one broach the subject.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 235

 Toni is adapted to a life where nothing happens – they lived that way through the centuries in Switzerland.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 236

 Toni is a typical Zurich lady of the 18th century. Then, life here was quiet, and you met the same people: they had names you knew and were old families you knew – but let one  tranger appear, and they were all a-flutter.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 236

 Onkel [Jung] went on to say that if one restores old conditions, as ·he did when he built Bollingen, a medieval house (he always felt himself a medieval man and had the desire to return to his natural surroundings), you live the ancestral life, and you feel fundamentally well.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 236

 He [Carl] said he saw Toni in an old-fashioned gown, in the 13th century, and he had a three-cornered hat and was bowing low in front of her. The more she is advanced on one side, the more she feels that rough side of herself – the untouchable flaw!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 237

 Toni indeed had a stiff side, which I noticed myself. But she compensated for it with a very friendly personality. Being an introvert  myself, I felt sympathy for Toni’s not liking the unexpected; though one can be conscious of this weakness, it is very difficult entirely to overcome it.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 237

 In it [Bollingen], I felt my ancestral souls, and it was just like paradise. It was cold, uncomfortable and dark at night, yet something in me felt well beyond measure. I had finally seen what I was lacking, because when I was a boy, everything was cold – snow was drifting in the window, the water froze in the pitcher, ants were in the room, and the stove smoked. It was an 13th century house and never rebuilt.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 238

 He [Jung] said, he was so impressed by friends with warm houses. When you go to sleep, you return to your ancestors; you go back into the unconscious. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 238

 I told him [Jung] of my desire to become a Catholic. He said that Catholicism would be quite nice if there were no Catholics. I must  let him to explain later the funny kind of psychology which he said they have.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 239

 Snobs are flattered by being with people highly placed, but if you have right values, which you can safely represent, you are not exalted or lowered, even if you deal with people absolutely out of range. If you can discard the fact that a person is famous, or rich, then you can discard the fact that you are a swine!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 239

 Snobs are unhappy and miserable people. It does not matter whether a person is Her Grace, or not, or what her family is. You cannot be a slave to that sort of thing: if you are, then you are not right with yourself. When you have the right relationship to yourself, that means freedom. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 239

 When you have an ugly thought about people, you usually dismiss it, as you hate to have ugly thoughts. Don’t dismiss it! Say to yourself, here I have an ugly thought, and ask yourself whether you think something else about that person. Have you a grievance against that person? What next do I think about that person? What next?  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 240

 Mrs. Mellon would not have suffered from neurotic troubles if she wasn’t a dual personality. You, too, have that sort of personality. You must ask what is the truth about a person, and how does that person look from all sides?  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 240

 If only you and Mrs. Jung were here, it would be much more enjoyable. The archaic atmosphere, produced by my mother, has put me in the foulest humor imaginable! Christmas is going to be very peculiar here, due to the utter lack of Stimmung in Italy … it’s much more like Easter here, and even the windows have flowers and pigs and Santa Claus’s in the shape of Easter Eggs.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 243

 Apparently Dr. Jung has been accepted by your whole background; your mother is charmed by him, and he sits in your father’s cabin, more or less in your father’s place – but only the nice side of your father is important. Naturally, because your father has these fits of temper, you felt him to be emotionally unreliable, and part of your lack of security comes from that reason, also your mistrust of people. Therefore, if you feel towards Dr. Jung as towards a fatherly figure whom you can trust absolutely, and if you express this to him in one way or another, you would have gained a lot of ground. So don’t hesitate to do it.  ~Toni Wolff, Jung My Mother and I, Page 138                                                                                        

 Luttichau would poison everyone, a dirty devil, she is pestilential – she should confess to him. She will be utterly cursed and she is full of dirt. Princess Hohenzollern is frightfully decent and suffers herself to be poisoned by that woman. I asked if P. Hohenz. was really so decent, and he said no: she is torn to pieces by the pig in her. The fact that she likes to eat poison shows there is something vulgar in her, and that is why she cultivates that poisonous Luttichau. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 132

 It is stronger than herself She won’t own up to it, and it pushes her away and won’t allow anyone to approach it. It is like a mine: when you touch it, it goes off. You can’t touch a mine: it is untouchable, he said. “So I dismissed it and have not tried to cure her, as she can’t be tackled yet. Maybe in time she can approach it, her great problem. But those humors of hers, those grouches, are  flimsy nonsense and don’t make sense, so don’t pay any attention to them.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 235

One can’t stand one’s own perfection all the time, for then you will fall over your own top.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 246

 

It is typically American to make an etalage [display] of one’s good qualities, but the shadow looks on. It is just such a demonstration of qualities that accounts for her neurosis.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 246

 

I asked how that was possible, as I had for ten years been discovering my shadows, and was pretty well aware of them now! He said he knew that, but that I handle my shadow as my particular affliction, and refuse to see it as a general phenomenon.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 246

 

He [Jung] went on to that if we only knew that we are our own worst disappointments, if we are more intimate with our own shadow, we would understand other people’s.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 247

 

Onkel [Jung] said that Mrs. Jung knows there is nothing in it and is therefore not at all impressed [by high society].  But with me, it matters too much and I get caught. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 248

 

Onkel [Jung] went on to say that he could not be sure he would not be impressed if he were invited to Buckingham Palace, and as a matter of fact, when he was once driving along in a coach, belonging to one of the Indian Maharajahs, he suddenly started to laugh to himself and said, “Isn’t this grotesque and comical for me to be in this gilded thing!” ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 250

 

He [Jung] said she [Emma] had a remarkable personality and extraordinary qualities, and was a great student. He added that the most comforting thing on earth was a really nice old woman. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 252

 

Onkel [Jung]  told me about himself, when I asked him how he felt. He said he had an exhaustion of the heart muscle, caused by too much fat, and he must now diet and lose weight.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 253

 

He [Jung] said he overate and drank, and was ill afterwards, but loved it, and was going to Baden for a cure during his holidays!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 254

 

Onkel [Jung] said that if I go ahead with my work and impart what I know to him, that is enough, as it makes him think. It is as if a man couldn’t take [things] in through his mind. It gets into his unconscious and ‘works.’ ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 254

 

He [Jung] meant that Catholicism is a splendid religion in itself, but it is what people make of it which harms it. A splendid institution – except for the people who make the wrong use of it and derive the wrong conclusions from it; just as Christianity would be a splendid thing, were it not for the Christians!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 257

 

I asked why there were so few neurotic practicing Catholics. He [Jung] said the Catholics were nearer to the original instincts, and nearer to primitivity. They were ugly, just as primitives are, and have no relation with each other.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 258

 

I asked him if she [Katy’s Daughter] should see Toni occasionally. He [Jung] said, “NO,” not to make her complicated, but let her apply herself and get into life. She must learn to branch out into life, seize possibilities and mix with other people; then she may learn something about life.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 261

 

The best thing for her [Katy’s daughter] would be to take Latin lessons, as Latin was the base of all mental things, and would help her general education, and even make her accurate in her spelling. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 261

 

If you study Latin, you will find that it will teach you to concentrate: then you can apply yourself to learning something. There are literally thousands of middle-aged people like yourself, who do nothing with their minds, and just amble aimlessly and bored through the second half of their lives. I can’t understand how such people live and do nothing with their minds. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 262

 

I [Jung] can’t do what I did before as a young man. Now, my whole passion is in research. If I had to live, as I see a lot of middle-aged people doing, just going about, never reading or studying or thinking, I’d have committed suicide long ago! ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 263

 

I am never bored as my day is full of interesting things connected with my work, or my books. Only people bore me sometimes, but I with myself am never bored. I don’t know what boredom is. If I had no discipline, then I’d be the victim of my moods. Every minute I know what to do and do it with pleasure – I enjoy doing it.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 263

 

He [Jung[ went on to say that he never would have thought of studying the exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, for the idea bored him, but he said he saw that people should know about such things – so he studied them and found them most interesting.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 263

 

He [Jung] said, “These Exercitia were a means to explain to my public, so I studied them for my people. You can use your knowledge for such a purpose, and then it makes sense, because you apply it.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 263

 

I was fifty-two at her death, and felt frustrated and sad that despite the many years we had known each other, I had never felt close to my mother – and that now, it was too late. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 266

 

As for reading Jung’s books, I did so because they interested me, but I never saw myself as intellectual – in fact, quite the contrary. I was certain that I was stupid, because my intermittent schooling made it impossible for me ever to shine, and lazy, because my mother drummed that into me constantly. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 267

 

My mother was keen to learn Latin with me at first, but with Tommy back in Switzerland, she lost the single-mindedness that she had brought to the cooking lessons. In an early burst of enthusiasm, she engaged Marie-Louise von Franz to teach us (most likely suggested by Jung).  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 267

 

It is clear to me now that Katy’s “longing to get an education” was genuine only during her hour with Jung; our time in Ascona, which lasted until the third week in October, was fertile terrain for regression.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 267

 

Luckily, the men around me, being of a certain standing, were reluctant to seduce virgins de bonne famille. Even so, it was a strain, since chaperons no longer existed and I had to keep myself out of mischief.   ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 271

 

Feeling that the country was about to be invaded, the Zurich Swiss left for safer areas. Those who still ran cars packed their families and as many belongings as they could take and drove off, some with mattresses on the car roof-tops to protect themselves from. machine-gun fire or shrapnel.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 271

 

The Federal authorities discovered that Jung’s name was on the Nazis’ Blacklist, 1 so he was urged by senior officials in Bern to leave Zurich immediately. He drove the family car to Saanen with his wife, an eight-month pregnant daughter and some grandchildren.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 273

 

Onkel [Jung] said that one cannot always tell Linda [Fierz-David] the truth, that her annoyance with people who are ill is a revenge she takes because she had tuberculosis once, and had had to spend years in Davos.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 274

 

Onkel [Jung] said that Toni hates to think of people who have a certain value being sometimes wrong. She is too fair: if she is in sympathy with a

person, then nothing can be wrong and all is white; if she does not like a person, then all is black.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 274

 

They criticized the fact that I was not intellectual enough and thought that [ criticism] would cut ice with Onkel [Jung]. Onkel said that he told them that I was naturally a ‘child of the world,’ and that I did not understand a word of what psychology and analysis were all about, but took trouble to learn something, and apply it.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 275

 

He [Jung] then went back to Linda [Fierz David] and said that sometimes she does not tell the truth at all. And she is sly and clever and knows Toni inside-out- therefore, she knows how to play on that instrument!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 275

Onkel went on to say that all Italians were against the War because they were losing business. He said that Mussolini garbled all their prospects, and that Milan and the whole north of Italy is in upheaval. Italy will suffer the fate of R umania, for the Germans have rushed a lot of troops to Italy. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 321

 

Onkel [Jung] said that the Germans were in league with the devil, and had a lust for power which is satanic. Onkel then went on to say that the. Germans were Faust in his pact with Satan.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 322

 

He [Jung] went on to say that the first time Mussolini met Hitler, he exclaimed, “Ma che e un Signorino!” [Why, he is but a boy!] Mussolini is all

that he is on the surface, whereas Hitler, on the surface, is all that he is not. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I,  Page 322

 

Hitler is sinister – like the mild little schoolmaster who has lived and taught all his life in a quiet village, and whom everyone presumes to be harmless. Then, suddenly, this mild little man ups and murders his whole family.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 322

 

Mussolini’s life is a reality, and everything that he is is in the foreground: it is in his face and manner and in his every gesture. Hitler is just the contrary; he can only impress a German who is very intuitive, and who ‘smells’ what is behind Hitler.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 322

 

When Mussolini first met Hitler, he thought: “Poor beggar; there is nothing to him – just a Signorino.” But he never asked himself where was the Signorina (Anima) behind Hitler. Hitler’s Signorina – the ambitious anima devil-woman – is not a ‘human being.’  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 322

 

Everybody hoped that Hitler would do something stupid, but nobody in the winter of 1940-1941 imagined that he would be so foolish as to attack Russia. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 323

 

My mother and I had occasional Latin lessons with Frl. von Franz, but unfortunately they took place at 8 p.m. after a busy day, and we were not fresh; Frl. Von Franz always gave “lots of homework,” my diary notes. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 323

 

I asked Onkel how it was that he could write scientific books with such heart.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 326

 

Then – as to his works – he said that one must be a total man to write such things. Most people do not write that way because they are afraid of criticism and have too little feeling – no passion – only selfishness. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 327

 

People who read his [Jung’s] books only see something intellectual in them – along with their own feelings about them. They are not developed enough to appreciate the feeling quality which is in his books. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 327

 

He [Jung] said that his works were not only scientific, but that there was also wisdom in them and they were human. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 327

 

I told him [Jung] that his lectures at the university were so full of feeling, and of such marvelous simplicity, that they had a sort of church atmosphere. (My way of expressing his atmosphere.) ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 327

 

I then told Onkel [Jung} that it was just stupid for me to be sitting there, paying her  [Toni]twenty francs an hour, to come down to her level to please her. On the contrary, she ought to be paying me twenty francs an hour for doing it(!).  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 328

 

Onkel [Toni] went on to say that he had asked Toni what she had in common with me, whereupon he felt himself encountering something dull and black in her mood, and he couldn’t penetrate it. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 328

 

She[Toni]  is very intuitive and intellectual, and only facts can put people wise, especially with intuitives. One can never just tell people: they must

‘experience’ the thing themselves.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 328

 

As long as Toni is with people below her, she is marvelous, for she can only be a mother to the poor. She is like a mother who is only interested in the children while they are young, but has no use for them when they grow up. She is good for weak people, but no good when they have grown up.   ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Pages 328-329

 

As for Barbara [Hannah] being “in love with” Toni, that sounds too strong; but I can imagine Barbara might have had a school-girl crush on Toni.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 329

 

He  [Carl] went on to say that Toni is in a way a genius, and such people live half their lives or more on their genius. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 330

Toni is nice when you get on the right side of her, but when the devil is on her, then she is a black devil. It is all because she is utterly unconscious of the personal side.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

 

She [Toni] is like a respectable woman who has another side and doesn’t like to pay any attention to her creative animus to whom she is married. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

 

Barbara Hannah, who is also an artist, made the same mistake as Toni, and of course there could be no relationship between two such people with the same Weltanschauung [world view]. The shadow rose between them. They were just nagging each other with their shadows!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

 

They both [Toni & Barbara] had a tremendous lack of personal development – they became too conscious of their mutual shadows and projected them onto each other.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 331

 

Toni can blindfold people as to her shortcomings, and when she is in a bad humor, or queer mood, it is in disagreement with her obvious character, so people don’t get on to [correctly perceive] her.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 332

 

I told him that I thought Toni was stingy. He said it was not quite that, as she could be ridiculously generous and had given large sums to charity, but that she could not be generous in a human relationship.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 332

 

I told him that I was still very much of a swine, and people did bother me. He said that people must not bother me. One must look at other people as one looks at a peculiar type of monkey!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 333

 

Onkel [Jung] said that Frl. van Franz had had to study a great deal, and that he kept her up to it, and she worked like a dog. He also said that she had written a brilliant thesis.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 334

 

Onkel [Jung] said that Prometheus and Epimetheus is very psychological but is not as mad as is Zarathustra.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 335

 

He [Jung] said that psychological people simply would not study his works in a human way: they just played around with the ‘intellectual idea,’ and were generally very badly informed.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 337

 

He [Jung] said once he was complaining to a friend that no one read his books. The friend said, “Just wait until you are dead and then you will see something!” ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 338

 

Onkel [Jung] went on to say that his books were beyond the grasp of most people: they were too stupid – and besides, they had no training in psychological knowledge. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I,  Page 338

 

“Dwelling without desire, one perceiveth its essence; clinging to desire, one seeth only its outer form.” – “Tao is an irrational, hence a wholly inconceivable fact. Tao is essence, but unseizable, incomprehensible.” ~Carl Jung [citing Lao Tzu], Jung My Mother and I, Page 340

 

Now to go back to: “Where there is power, there is no love.” I asked Onkel [Jung] just what he meant; he said he meant love in the greater sense: love for one’s fellow beings.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 342

 

“In every heart, there dwelleth a Sejin [a Sage] – only man will not steadfastly believe it: therefore, hath the whole remained buried.”  ~Katy Cabot [citing Wang Ming], Jung My Mother and I, Page 347

 

He [Jung]  added, that if he tells me what the dream means he does not help me. There is a door open, and it is ridiculous to shut that   door, artificially as it would deprive me of an experience. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 350

 

If one is told a thing, it is dead knowledge. One must experience a thing. He [Jung] said that there were people who had read everything and yet had experienced nothing. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 350

 

One must never hope to see the real Toni because what you see is the real Toni. That is she. That is the real Toni! To be intimate with her, he said, would mean emptying her pot de chambre [chamber pot]!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 354

 

People will tear even God Himself to pieces! And why?-because He does not fulfill their expectations. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 355

 

Toni must be taken for what she is. Everyone has faults. We must be grateful for people with some qualities for some people are without a trace of mind, and at least she has that.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 355

 

You must digest yourself, Onkle [Jung] said, and accept yourself and say to yourself that you also have good and bad qualities, and this realization will help towards being more understanding of other people. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 355

 

If a person is, on the whole like Toni, a good person, then you want to know them, and some bad sides don’t matter.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 356

 

We spoke of Linda Pierz for a moment, and Onkel [Jung] said that Doctor Binswanger did not really love her, but that he needs the moral support which she gives him. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 356

 

Onkel [Jung] said that the dream denoted that I should not make it an exclusive goal to have hours with him, for I should see that there are other people in the world beside himself. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 300

 

He [Jung] went on to say that he who receives will be called upon also to give. You cannot get something from someone eternally and not give in return.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 300

Onkel [Jung] said that [Professor  Ernesto] Buonaiuti is still a baby, and sits at home with his mother, and is a good boy. But he has no experience of women, and the hell of life! A man like Buonaiuti has a lot of book knowledge, but no knowledge of life! ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 301

 

He [Jung] said the fact that I get the panics coming down means that I still have something to realize. When I come down to the basic facts then things happen. I can learn things.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 301

 

I asked Onkel [Jung]  how to get down to the hidden things. He said follow the heat like a lizard who creeps out of the shadow into the Warmth of the sun. (All this isn’t easy.) ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 301

 

I then told him [Jung] that Toni was a difficult problem for me in a way, as she was demanding and I often had to placate her. It made it difficult for me and like a burden I had to bear. Onkel said that Toni has too much imagination and is sensitive too. Take things quietly and not too seriously. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

 

He [Jung] said that if he took things too terribly gravely, he could send people into spasms. Toni is apt to make too much fuss. “She is very fussy, so I don’t tell her things for I don’t want her to get into a fuss.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

 

I never know, when I go to see her [Toni] , what she is going to be like. She might well be in a hell of a mood, or absent. She changes like the moon. With the moon, you can tell – but with her, you can’t. She is sometimes in abysmal gloom. She is sometimes quite impossible.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

 

He [Jung] said that Toni works with her mother instinct, for it is sweet to be a mother to helpless adult beings. “Never mind what mood she is in. Disregard it- for it’s all vapor.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

 

I then spoke of Mrs. Jung, and the smooth and agreeable atmosphere she gives out. He said that Mrs. Jung does not worry unnecessarily about detail. She has the right values and is interested in the right things, – which keeps her mind away from the wrong things. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 309

 

He [Jung] said that ‘Individuation,’ or the ‘Way to the Self,’ was a lonely way, and that one must ‘agree with oneself,’ and do what one knows to be right for oneself even if, in the process, one finds one is alone.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 359

 

He [Jung] said, “Those who want you to be a puppet will give you up, and it really does not matter at all if they do, as you will have lost nothing by losing such ‘friends.”‘ ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 359

 

He [Jung]said that Fraulein Bianchi was the same kind of swine as the others who constitute themselves a mother. She could not compete with Toni and Linda. It was a case of dog-eat-dog: The two strongest dogs kicked her out.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 359

 

I said I found Toni a rather small, frail and pathetic creature. He [Jung] said she was t hat and that I could not see her in that way – which was the true way of seeing her – if I had not written that letter. He said that I took a stand which made it possible for me to see her clearly.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 362

 

The fact that I felt the panic with Mrs. Jung shows that, when I am in his [Jung’s] house, I am confronted with having to face myself honestly.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 363

 

He [Jung] said that Mother Nature pushes us to be conscious of ourselves in every respect.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 363

 

He [Jung] said that when I first came to analysis, I was terrifyingly superficial – a painted surface. I was a hollow mask with death inside.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 363

 

As long as there is panic, it is a sign that the Unconscious is overwhelming me. Onkel [Jung] said that I am not safe and that one cannot trust me. One cannot take a guide on a difficult mountain who is liable to get into a panic. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 364

 

If you hate something in someone else, then you can be sure that you have the same bad thing in yourself. Otherwise you are just indifferent to a bad or good quality in the other person. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 364

 

After ten years, Jung was pointing out that the claustrophobic panics were the price she was paying for not coming down to a lower level and accepting her down-to-earth side.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 364

 

The naturalness in Mrs. Jung, a strong and balanced woman, may have induced “panics” in Katy before seeing her because she feared that Mrs. Jung would see into her “hollowness.”  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 365

 

Onkel [Jung] said that de T. was not enthusiastic about sex because he had been cut off from part of his nature throughout his life. First his mother, who was of course far from her instincts, then that wife completed the destruction of any sex feelings he could have had.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 366

 

Onkel [Jung] went on that the more I am aware of my fantasies of the lewd ldnd (the waiter, for instance), the more I am aware of myself in that less elegant aspect. Being aware of one’s own nature acts as a counter-poison against lumps and panics.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 367

He [Jung] said that ‘Individuation,’ or the ‘Way to the Self,’ was a lonely way, and that one must ‘agree with oneself,’ and do what one knows to be right for oneself even if, in the process, one finds one is alone.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 359

 

He [Jung] said, “Those who want you to be a puppet will give you up, and it really does not matter at all if they do, as you will have lost nothing by losing such ‘friends.”‘ ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 359

 

He [Jung]said that Fraulein Bianchi was the same kind of swine as the others who constitute themselves a mother. She could not compete with Toni and Linda. It was a case of dog-eat-dog: The two strongest dogs kicked her out.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 359

 

I said I found Toni a rather small, frail and pathetic creature. He [Jung] said she was t hat and that I could not see her in that way – which was the true way of seeing her – if I had not written that letter. He said that I took a stand which made it possible for me to see her clearly.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 362

 

The fact that I felt the panic with Mrs. Jung shows that, when I am in his [Jung’s] house, I am confronted with having to face myself honestly.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 363

 

He [Jung] said that Mother Nature pushes us to be conscious of ourselves in every respect.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 363

 

He [Jung] said that when I first came to analysis, I was terrifyingly superficial – a painted surface. I was a hollow mask with death inside.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 363

 

As long as there is panic, it is a sign that the Unconscious is overwhelming me. Onkel [Jung] said that I am not safe and that one cannot trust me. One cannot take a guide on a difficult mountain who is liable to get into a panic. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 364

 

If you hate something in someone else, then you can be sure that you have the same bad thing in yourself. Otherwise you are just indifferent to a bad or good quality in the other person. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 364

 

After ten years, Jung was pointing out that the claustrophobic panics were the price she was paying for not coming down to a lower level and accepting her down-to-earth side.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 364

 

The naturalness in Mrs. Jung, a strong and balanced woman, may have induced “panics” in Katy before seeing her because she feared that Mrs. Jung would see into her “hollowness.”  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 365

 

Onkel [Jung] said that de T. was not enthusiastic about sex because he had been cut off from part of his nature throughout his life. First his mother, who was of course far from her instincts, then that wife completed the destruction of any sex feelings he could have had.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 366

 

Onkel [Jung] went on that the more I am aware of my fantasies of the lewd kind (the waiter, for instance), the more I am aware of myself in that less elegant aspect. Being aware of one’s own nature acts as a counter-poison against lumps and panics.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 367

 

Onkel [Jung] said that Prometheus and Epimetheus is very psychological but is not as mad as is Zarathustra.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 335

 

Onkel [Jung] said that Frl. van Franz had had to study a great deal, and that he kept her up to it, and she worked like a dog. He also said that she had written a brilliant thesis.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 334

 

Now to go back to: “Where there is power, there is no love.” I asked Onkel [Jung] just what he meant; he said he meant love in the greater sense: love for one’s fellow beings.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 342

 

You must digest yourself, Onkle [Jung] said, and accept yourself and say to yourself that you also have good and bad qualities, and this realization will help towards being more understanding of other people. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 355

 

I live above my level, and must come down off my pedestal and be human, Onkel [Jung] said. That with him, one has to be natural, or one would not get anywhere in this work of ‘finding the self.’ He added that if my nature were acceptable to myself, I would not have a Lump or a split-off part.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 364

 

“If you hate something in someone else, then you can be sure that you have that same thing in yourself.” ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 365

 

Onkel [Jung] said that when you dream of a wild animal which pursues you, it is an instinct which assails you.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 365

 

I told Onkel [Jung] that as he was world-famous, he did not have to be in the limelight, for he was just automatically there. He said that there was a time when he was not world-famous, but that even then, he had had no desire to be in the limelight. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 368

 

He [Jung] said it was more important to be loved than to be in the limelight [famous]. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 368

 

I asked Onkel [Jung] if it was a nice feeling to be famous. He said that being famous was very nice and satisfying, and that was that, and enough. But what he really enjoys and what really gives him more satisfaction than fame – is that he leads the life he wants – (just as if he were not famous at all). ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 368-369

 

People are offended that I’m not in their Verein [group, association], that I don’t seek their companionship, but that is the price I have to pay

for my liberty!”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 369

 

Onkel [Jung] said that one must decide what the life is that one really likes, and then live it. Naturally, one has to pay a price for one’s  iberty. It all boils down to a question of being simple. Simplicity is the greatest art.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 369

 

If people wish to come with me, I will take them to the Promised Land, but they have to give up power. But if you come along, you will see it. I am going through a country which I like, and if you join in, you will see pretty much the same as I do, I guess.  ~Carl Jung, Jung,  My Mother and I, Page 370

 

Then Onkel [Jung] said that it was chiefly false values which prevent one from getting there. Priests can’t help one because they have a lot of second-hand knowledge only. ‘Immediate experience’ is the only thing that can give one the power to take people to the Promised Land. People must learn to be exceedingly simple.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 370

 

Without the [Psychological] Club there would be nothing, no patients, no students to exchange ideas. He had to hang onto it and keep it together. It would be a pity to let it go, he added. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 371

 

He [Jung] said that, when one fills every moment of one’s life as well as one can, then, when death comes, it comes at the right time and is not minded so much.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 372

 

2A He [Jung] went on to say that when one has lived everything within one’s reach, such a full life brings maturity and the time which is right for dying. A full life brings satiation, and the ripe time for death follows naturally.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 372

 

“As long as one is in any way held by the domination of cupiditas [avarice, greed; strong desire, lust] the veil is not lifted and the heights of a consciousness, empty of content and free from illusion, are not reached, nor can any trick or deceit bring it about. It is an ideal that can only be realized in death. Until then, there are real, and relatively real, figures of the unconscious.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 373

 

This ‘hour’ was pretty painful. I had just left Mrs. Jung’s study. She had just said that she did not like the spirit of the Psychological Club group, as they were so like the Pharisees, and full of Grossenwahn [inflated with their own importance] and Selbstgerechtigkeit [self-righteousness].  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 374

 

Then I told Onkel [Jung] a dream I had about Mrs. Fierz and Frau Jacobi.1 He said that intellectually, I could not, of course, compete with them. Fierz and Jacobi are not natural and this ‘intellectuality’ with them is a compensation for their lack of naturalness. Fierz plays intellectually with natural thoughts.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 378

 

Onkel [Jung] replied that Mrs. Jung does not talk much, and yet when she does say something, it is the right remark, and her remarks have substance.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 379

 

Onkel [Jung] said, “Just be who you are: it’s so simple, and easier than playing a role. If one is what one is and simple, one doesn’t arouse projections from people.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 379

 

I am very worried, because I may be facing deportation to America, early in November, due to the expiration of my passport and the unwillingness of the Zurich American Consul to renew it. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 381

Thank you [Katy Cabot] very much for sending me the book; it is indeed an interesting experience to read the New Testament in the language of our days: one gets a newer and more living impression, and many things strike you far more directly than in the traditional style. ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 386

 

Onkel [Jung] seemed to think that Roosevelt was a superhumanly sly man to have forced, by his uncompromising attitude, the Japs to declare War.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 386

 

In fact, Onkel went on to say that England had underrated everyone and did not even have the right anti-tank guns to pierce the German tanks.

Whereas even Switzerland had anti-tank guns which could master the German tanks.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 386

 

Onkel said that Roosevelt’s plans were made because of the vulnerability of Hawaii, and because a war with Japan is far more popular than one with Europe. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 386-387

 

Then we spoke of the War in Russia, and the arctic winter which the German High Command was not prepared for. Jung said that he had met some of the doctors who had come back from Smolensk. They said that they had spent their time amputating the frozen limbs of German soldiers.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 387

 

2M Onkel [Jung] went on to say that I am spoiled and imagine that I am safe, then the fear of death and the uncertainty of life grip me. Wherever we are we are never safe, only we don’t think of it. Death is a supreme necessity.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 388

 

Onkel [Jung] said that ‘hating to die’ with me is a secret, unrealized fear, and can be compared to a very young person who is inclined against sexual life. Such a young person is afraid of life, as sex is the skeleton in the cupboard, and life would call her to sex, so she just tries to escape anything that could make her live and bring her to sex.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 389

 

Onkel [Jung] said that Jews had offered him houses in America, and promised him fabulous sums if he would take over important clinics. But he said that he could not accept the offers because he is so bound to his native soil of Switzerland, and for him, no country but his own would do to live in.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 390

 

I doubt that Katy feared death more than other people, as Jung suggests, though she was fearful in some respects, of cows, horses, and enclosed places.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 391

 

Onkel [Jung] said that one can’t preach: one must do. That is far better!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 393

 

He [Jung] repeated that he becomes a ‘roaring devil’ when things become too much for him, and begin to pile up. He said that one can make anybody into a devil if you give him impossible conditions. Given certain conditions, he would degenerate into something awful and get terribly nervous.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 396

 

He [Jung] added, that if you live in a pig-sty, or in a stable or in a monkey cage, the atmosphere permeates you psychically and makes you wrong. Atmospheres can do that: simply change a person and get him all wrong and mixed-up within himself.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 396

 

The reason people get all these different atmospheres is due to the fact that the psyche is not wholly in the body. It is around one. We breathe the psyche. It is as if one were smelling it!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 397

 

Onkel said that often before a patient comes to him, he dreams a dream about the patient’s psychology. It is as if the patient were surrounded by an atmosphere which envelopes Onkel as well. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 398

 

The psyche is like a gas that fills the room. As soon as the person gets within the ‘orbit’ of that psychic bubble, he is permeated by it. The worst things can be caught from people unless one realizes what atmospheres can do. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 398

 

He [Jung] said that was why he always loathed those big steamers when he went to America with his passage paid for him. The last time he went, he told his sponsors, he preferred a small boat, which took ten days, on which he would meet only simple people.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 398

 

He [Jung] went on to say that when he was in India, he tried to get off by himself, because at times with the people he was with (American and Maharajahs) he got ‘permeated.’ He could not stand it any longer and had to seek a few days of solitude, which was always hard to find on such a trip.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 398

 

I told Onkel[Jung] that I had read such an interesting book on Tibet by Alexandra David-Neel, Mystiques et Magiciens du Tibet. He said that she was quite a person, that he knew her because she came once to the Club to lecture. He said her books were excellent and well worth reading.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 399

 

2Z We spoke of people putting on airs. Onkel said they had to in order to make up for their defects. Putting on airs and graces is a sort of compensation. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 401

 

4A One can be changed without knowing it: it just hits one and seems like a discovery, while really one has been that way for a while  Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 401

 

He [Jung] said that people just take on foolish airs without knowing it: it is a sort of ‘possession,’ just as if a peculiar kind of evil gets into them – but all the while, they do not know that they are possessed.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 401

 

Anyone who has illusions about himself has the panics. He can’t help realizing that he is walking on air!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 401

 

Then he [Jung] went on to say that I had been imitating it by making myself into a marquise and that naturally I was miserable having to play that awful role and associate with such people, when, as the daughter of old pioneer stock, I would feel much better with natural people. No one is natural is such a hotel.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 401

 

He [Jung] said that no American, however ‘mincing’, or with marquise airs, could ever put it over on him, for Americans have no history behind them. No American is ever a “lady”: a nice woman, yes – but not a lady. He said that the nicest Americans he ever met were simple people. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 404

 

“Never does man rise higher, than when he does not know where his fate will lead him.” [Nietzche]  Onkel [Jung] went on to say about himself, I know what I have done, but not what I am. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 405

 

Onkel [Jung] said that you can judge people by the people they like. He said that I could judge myself by the people I was really fond of. If one lives in a God-forsaken crowd, then one is one of them; or if one lives with respectable people, then one is one of them.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 405-406

 

I asked Onkel [Jung] why no one took me seriously when I said I had work to do. He said that no one assumes that I have mental interests as I was so much in the society of God-forsaken people that one takes me to be the same sort. Also I have taken on so many airs that people say it must be a ‘new air.’ ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 406

 

Onkel [Jung] said the British must talk down. The British consider Americans as colonials. In fact they consider even their own people colonials, even people of the aristocracy, if they have had the misfortune to be born in a colony.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 408

 

Late on 9 August, I received a telephone call from my mother telling me that Tommy had died at 8:30 p.m. I returned to Zurich the next day, traveling 3rd-class with Dr. Jung, Barbara Hannah, Toni Wolff and others coming back from the Eranos Tagung.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 414

 

It is very kind of you [Jung] to call my attention to Major de Trafford’s bicycle. It is very tempting, I admit – but after some consideration, I reached the conclusion that I am too old for a new bicycle. I can really do without one.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 416

 

Somehow it helps to accept fate and build like a bridge to the spiritual realm, in which our beloved-ones live on forever. I also hope that the demands of life will help you and that you will find new forces after this exceedingly strenuous time, which must have been rather exhausting!  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 416

Onkel [Jung] said the British must talk down. The British consider Americans as colonials. In fact they consider even their own people colonials, even people of the aristocracy, if they have had the misfortune to be born in a colony.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 408

 

Late on 9 August, I received a telephone call from my mother telling me that Tommy had died at 8:30 p.m. I returned to Zurich the next day, traveling 3rd-class with Dr. Jung, Barbara Hannah, Toni Wolff and others coming back from the Eranos Tagung.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 414

 

It is very kind of you [Katy Cabot] to call my attention to Major de Trafford’s bicycle. It is very tempting, I admit – but after some consideration, I reached the conclusion that I am too old for a new bicycle. I can really do without one.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 416

 

Somehow it helps to accept fate and build like a bridge to the spiritual realm, in which our beloved-ones live on forever. I also hope that the demands of life will help you and that you will find new forces after this exceedingly strenuous time, which must have been rather exhausting!  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 416

 

There we met a young man, Pat Reid, who had been the “escape officer” at Colditz Castle. After organizing the escapes of many other officers, in October 1942 he had escaped himself with three others, and they traveled through Germany in two pairs, mostly by train. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 419

 

My ambitious mother hoped that when I had finished my secretarial course that I would be given a job as typist by Allen Dulles, who had come to Bern in November 1942 from Washington to direct O.S.S. operations in Switzerland. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 421

 

Mary Rufenacht nee Bancroft joined his [Allen Dulles] ranks as a spy, continuing to live in Zurich but traveling frequently to Bern. In turn she tried to recruit my mother, but Katy refused, saying she was not cut out for such work. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 421

 

Mary Rufenacht often traveled to Bern to report to Allen Dulles, but she did not move in Bern society. As a good spy should, she remained an eminence grise in the background; she and Dulles met frequently at his house on the Herrengasse, and soon they became lovers.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 423

 

Thanks to her intuition, Linda [Fierz] sees Katy more clearly than Toni Wolff ever did. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 429

 

I have been sending you affectionate New Year’s wishes in my own wireless style, that is in thought, but nevertheless feel somewhat guilty for not having put them down on paper at the right time.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 430

 

It is a pity you cannot be here for the Club discussion; your contribution is very valuable to me and I hope to be able to get it into the discussion, for you have [come?] upon a very important point.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 431

 

The X affair was rather exciting, I must tell you about it when I see you. The reason why he was excluded [from the Club] is really that through his continued money borrowing and making debts etc., he was considered to discredit the Club, which is true.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 432

 

I have to add this post-scriptum to say: Did you hear of Prof. Zimmer’s death?1 And isn’t it awfully sad? He died of pneumonia in New Yark, as we heard through a cable from Mrs. Mellon.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 432

 

He [Heinrich Zimmer] could have done such fine work and things that nobody else was able to. And for his family it means a terrible loss; I feel such pity for poor Mrs. Zimmer, who first lost her home and now her husband.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 432

 

This is to tell you and Mrs. Jung that Janey has just become engaged to a British Captain Reid, assistant Military Attache at the British Legation in Bern. … A certain amount of character and determination he must have, as he has been recently decorated by the British government for his organization in helping many British to escape from Germany. He himself escaped. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 437

 

Dear Janey, The surprising news of your engagement have reached my attentive ears and I hasten to deposit my feelings in the form of flowers at your feet. Mrs. Jung joins me in muttering our most sincere congratulations and magic wishes for the permanency of happiness, good luck and general welfare.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 438

 

P .S. I shall bring biscuits and tea! [for Jane’s wedding] so please don’t sacrifice your valuable [war]coupons!  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 438

 

The next day Carl and I were up for the ten-thirty train home about two. We found T.W. [Toni Wolff] in the [hotel] dining room – but she wanted to wait for the Jung’s who were not yet up. They had to stop in Thun for their luggage & only arrived in Zurich after seven! A long day.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 446

 

I hope the winter won’t bring too bad colds or other hardships. There is always much to do, of course; Onkel [Jung] is writing on another alchemistic text and is quite immersed in it. I am following with great interest Kerenyi’s seminar about Seele & Griechentum.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 450

 

On 11 February, Katy, who was due to see both Jung’s, was with Mrs. Jung while Jung was still out walking. On his way home he slipped on a patch of ice and broke his ankle.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 452

 

Dr. Jung slipped yesterday, on the ice near his house, while I was there and broke his ankle. He is now in hospital waiting for the swelling to go down, before being put in plaster. It is a plain break – no complications.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 452 

 

We also got a new grandchild last week; our youngest daughter has a little boy, it’s her third child. Fortunately it all went well and she went home yesterday, and en passant came in to show her son to his grand-father, which was a great joy to both of us.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 445

 

As I walked into Onkel’s [Jung’s] study today, he was sitting and writing at the table in front of his window, wearing his fur-lined dressing gown and skull cap. He looked rather like Erasmus, Faust, or some mediaeval alchemist. I had a decided mediaeval impression when I came in.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 456

 

Formerly, a Hitler, Goebbels or Goring would have had no show. In the Middle Ages such people, who were liars and cheats, would never have been followed. After the Reformation there was the great revolution of the peasants in Germany, and the Anabapatists (Wiedertaufer). ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 456

 

Our epoch started something: In Germany the Kings were put out of their palaces, removed from authority. Without anymore authority, and being a monarchic people, the Germans lost their tiller in the storm and fell prey to these gangsters.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 456

In Catholicism you have to swallow so many nuts, that you can’t digest them. If you ask a priest what is the Trinity, he does not know. You just have to believe it, but that is the nut with the shell.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 457

I showed Onkel [Jung] the picture of my old monk, or saint, or ‘ancestor’ as the Mantel’s said.1 Onkel said he must be a saint, or a sainted ancestor, because he has a halo and the staff of the hermit, and the rosary.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 458

 

Onkel [Jung] said, “Don’t try and overreach yourself and be too noble. Later on you get a resentment. One must spare one’s nobility, and not throw it away uselessly, because afterwards when one needs it then one gets a resistance.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 458

 

He [Jung] said that one  couldn’t take things as one wanted to take them. One should take things as they present themselves, and when a thing presents itself as important and gives one a serious reason, or serious impression, take it as important.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 459

 

Some people like certain things and other people different things. Nothing is important in itself! If you had a valley full of diamonds and no one knew about it, it would not be so important. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 459

 

Onkel [Jung] said the important point in Swiss psychology was the smallness of the country. Anyone coming from a big country like America doesn’t see what the world looks like to a fellow coming from a small country, wedged in between peoples of very definite national character.   ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 462

 

Onkel [Jung] said that de Nerval had real talent, but would not accept the ANIMA (his soul) and so he killed himself.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 470

 

Then Onkel [Jung] went on to talk about the important thing that is the Anima. It means the WHOLE man, but first people must know what the unconscious is and that takes weeks to understand.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 471

 

Onkel [Jung] went on to say, that to doctors he explained the Animus and Anima, but even they had great difficulty in understanding what it is. It is very difficult to understand the whole import of the Anima.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 471

 

The Anima is like living on a planet where no human ever appeared, then suddenly a figure appears (the Anima) and you are surprised!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 471

 

Toni’s remark, that Katy understood Jung’s teaching far better and more deeply than almost anyone else, was no empty compliment. Toni was not the type to flatter. Katy did understand Jung’s teaching remarkably well, but she found it difficult to impart it to people she was attached to.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 482

 

Onkel [Jung] said, for instance, that people like [John Foster] Dulles, who were not too split, the more they get powerful, the more the Anima begins to stir for she gets short of love. Then they get a peculiar uncertainty and develop an inferiority and a sensibility. ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 483

 

With [John Foster]Dulles there is a huge facade of nothing but power, and you can go a long way and walk through corridors and corridors and long buildings before you come to the Anima. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 484

 

I asked Onkel [Jung] how to go on, as I was terribly lonely. Onkel said to just drift along, and try to see people and accept things as they come along, and keep one’s eyes open to what comes along and do the best one can.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 492

 

The inferior function is one with the collective which is the law of nature and the law of our life. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 492

 

I am the sensation type and that type is irrational and the auxiliary function is feeling. My inferior functions are intuition and intellect. While I am apparently following my sensation and feeling and making them the main source of what I do, in reality I am driven to things by my inferior function, such as wrong opinions, nasty negative intuitions, which influence me very much.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 493

 

A typical intellectual rules his life by intellect, but stumbles over his feelings: wrong impressions, bad relations with people. He is influenced by his inferior feeling everywhere and that decides his fate. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 494

 

In my case intellect and intuition are the great powers of evil. The more I build up my mind, the more I decrease the fatal influence of these factors, as I get them under control!!!!!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 494

 

During Katy’s Italian journey in the summer of 1946 Winston Churchill was invited to Switzerland with his wife Clementine and youngest daughter Mary, for an official visit. But first they spent three weeks resting in a private house at Bursinell on Lake Geneva.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 507

 

Unfortunately, shortly before the official visit began Mrs. Churchill, when the boat made an abrupt turn to pick up Mary in the water, was hit hard by the rudder, and was so badly concussed that she could not attend the various state functions.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 507

 

Then the Churchills attended a number of receptions, with finally a late one at the British Legation to which Jung was also invited.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 508

 

Fortunately on the following day Jung was able to meet Churchill to talk with him in a privately-owned Schloss seven kilometers outside Bern. ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 508-509

 

Unfortunately I must inform you that Professor Jung has fallen ill, and since yesterday his condition is very serious. Therefore I must return your photos because in any case he would not be able to sign them in time. In haste, M-J S.]  ~Marie-Jean Schmid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 510

 

“I never saw anything so beautiful,” I said to Onkel [Jung], as I stretched myself lazily in the comfortable chair. “Do you know that it was only after I had worked with you for four years, that I saw color.” “When people get in touch with their feeling, they see color,” answered Onkel.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 529

 

When people get in touch with their feeling, they see color.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 529

 

To be related to someone is usual but to be related to your analyst, that is a particular thing which belongs to the question of becoming oneself and that becoming oneself can’t be accomplished if one is related to people who aren’t themselves!  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 529

 

I am constantly dealing with people who are not themselves, and I need friends who have a certain degree of ripeness.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 529

You [Katy Cabot] call me Onkel and its not a joke, for you really are a relative of mine. But just to belong to an ordinary family, doesn’t do the trick, you have to belong to an  unconscious family, and your unconscious family is me!” ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 529-530

 

The endogamous libido is not satisfied and is seeking application, that secret dissatisfaction is always trying to establish the original family relationship.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

…the convents attempted to establish the original family relation on a spiritual level. (Frater – brotherhood. Nun – sisterhood.) “It proved to be a

great satisfaction for a time,” he [Jung] said, “as long as people really loved each other. As long as they did that it LIVED.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

He [Jung] said that in the middle-ages people really did love each other, things weren’t as they are now! This original family which they established was a great satisfaction for a time, and these ‘families’ were the carriers of civilization. But, he said, it petered out just as the idea of Christian love did.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

However, there is a mystery in it which people don’t understand. You see, you reach the Self not just through your ego ( the person you know) but the Self includes the unconscious. You are the unconscious and how far does that unconscious go? (That ‘Self in the unconscious?) Perhaps you are in my unconscious?  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

The Self is a collective idea, which the Hindus call ‘conglomerate soul,’ consisting of many souls – built out of many souls as it were, both masculine and feminine ones.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

Onkel [Jung] emphasized that relationship between individuals is due to the Self, not only to the ego. There is a ‘something,’ an indefinable sympathy, a ‘peculiar’ kind of relationship between this ‘primitive family’ which is unique because of its illimitableness.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

But I kept saying to myself, ‘You are an intelligent man, but you seem to be getting nowhere.’ Everybody and everything was against me for thirty years. It was a dog’s life but it was lived sincerely! ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 532

 

It is a great thing to stand a situation in life that comes to you. Then and only then do you get to where you belong. I finally got to where I belonged. If you have to scrub your floor then do it well.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 533

 

Then Onkel [Jung] went on very forcibly to tell me never to forget that we human beings are animals and that we should pattern ourselves on them for they lead a far more natural life than we do. We should be humble, take things naturally – animals are like that they don’t draw conclusions.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My and I, Page 533-534

 

I just heard that your mother died – it is good when old people can die. Only for the surviving there is cause for pain and lamentations as it is they who experience a loss. For the dead it must be, if anything, a gain after the hardships and worries of earthly life. ~Carl Jung, Jung My and I, Page 542

 

[Professor Jung asks me to write to you – and I do so with regret – because he asks me to tell you that unfortunately he cannot see you Friday. He is not really ill, but he feels very tired and is leaving at the end of the week for the Rigi where he hopes to rest and recover completely.  ~Marie-Jeanne Schmid, Jung My and I, Page 547

 

At about that time Jung’s autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, was published. In it I came upon a passage which helped me overcome feelings of guilt and gave me the courage to end my twenty-three-year marriage.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My and I, Page 557

 

You call me Onkel and its not a joke, for you really are a relative of mine. But just to belong to an ordinary family, doesn’t do the trick, you have to belong to an  unconscious family, and your unconscious family is me!” ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 529-530

 

The endogamous libido is not satisfied and is seeking application, that secret dissatisfaction is always trying to establish the original family relationship.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

…the convents attempted to establish the original family relation on a spiritual level. (Frater – brotherhood. Nun – sisterhood.) “It proved to be a

great satisfaction for a time,” he [Jung] said, “as long as people really loved each other. As long as they did that it LIVED.”  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

He [Jung] said that in the middle-ages people really did love each other, things weren’t as they are now! This original family which they established was a great satisfaction for a time, and these ‘families’ were the carriers of civilization. But, he said, it petered out just as the idea of Christian love did.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

“However, there is a mystery in it which people don’t understand. You see, you reach the Self not just through your ego ( the person you know) but the Self includes the unconscious. You are the unconscious and how far does that unconscious go? (That ‘Self in the unconscious?) Perhaps you are in my unconscious?”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

The Self is a collective idea, which the Hindus call ‘conglomerate soul,’ consisting of many souls – built out of many souls as it were, both masculine and feminine ones.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

Onkel [Jung] emphasized that relationship between individuals is due to the Self, not only to the ego. There is a ‘something,’ an indefinable sympathy, a ‘peculiar’ kind of relationship between this ‘primitive family’ which is unique because of its illimitableness.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 531

 

But I kept saying to myself, ‘You are an intelligent man, but you seem to be getting nowhere.’ Everybody and everything was against me for thirty years. It was a dog’s life but it was lived sincerely! ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 532

 

It is a great thing to stand a situation in life that comes to you. Then and only then do you get to where you belong. I finally got to where I belonged. If you have to scrub your floor then do it well.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 533

 

Then Onkel [Jung] went on very forcibly to tell me never to forget that we human beings are animals and that we should pattern ourselves on them for they lead a far more natural life than we do. We should be humble, take things naturally – animals are like that they don’t draw conclusions.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 533-534

 

Katy was now out in the world “living,” as Jung urged his patients to do, but she never forgot the Jung’s. The more she “lived” the more frequent were her floral tributes to them.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

 

How very kind of you to send us such lovely carnations; they are of such beautiful colouring and arrived absolutely fresh. Thank you very much for them and also for your good wishes to our Golden wedding.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

 

I always thought of old age as a quiet & restful way of living, but with me, there seems to be more & more work & demands from all sides. The [Jung] Institute is partly responsible for this; on the whole I rather like it, though, for it keeps one alive. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

 

Less than a week after Mrs. Jung wrote the above letter, Toni Wolff died unexpectedly of a stroke on 21 March at the age of sixty-four. Though she had suffered from severe arthritis for many years, she still had been very active. Toni’s death was a shock to the psychological group in Zurich, as no one had anticipated it.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

 

It was a great shock to me to get the news of Toni’s death and I know that it must have been the same for you and also a great loss, for she was not only a wonderful person, but a magnificent collaborator in your work.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 565

 

The Jung’s were too old to make such trips, but the younger C.A. Meiers were visitors at the Villa.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 566

 

Thank you very much for your kind letter of sympathy, it was good of you to write. Toni’s death has been a terrible shock to me and to us all, especially as it was so sudden and entirely unexpected. There are many people who will feel as you do over her loss which is quite irreparable in many ways.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 566

 

It is very kind of you to ask me to come down to you for a rest after Easter, but I have not yet been away from the house since my long illness began last autumn, and now this fresh shock has set me back again.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 566

 

I am sorry, but July 7th I shall be in Schaffhausen, as it is my sister’s 70th birthday. If you let me know in time, I could arrange another day, but I have only little time left, as the examinations of the Institute take place during the first 2 weeks of July.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 567

 

What made the relationship between Jung and his “niece Catharine a unique one, outside of analysis, was that she appealed to his ban viveur side. Many of his contemporaries saw Jung only as a famous man – a great intellectual. They failed to recognize his human side: his love of fun and appreciation of good food and drink.  ~Jane Reidt, Jung My Mother and I, Page 571

 

I remember that Prof. Kerenyi once, when he spoke of the classical mystery cults, said that each generation fundamentally is a mystery for the following one, who can never understand that people had secrets at all before they were born.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 573

 

In a way the cultured women of the Roman empire were the actual predecessors of modern women. Medieval Christianity being so murderously patriarchal, European women from the Renaissance to our day, in waking up couldn’t fall back on any other model but the Roman one.  ~Linda Fierz, Jung My Mother and I, Page 578

 

We are spending our holyday in our beloved Bollingen, but unfortunately the weather is not very good; so far we had only a few sunny days. Nevertheless we enjoy the quietness & restfulness of the place. C. G. is well, fortunately & I just had a little grippe, but am better again now.  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 580

 

My mother not only liked to give flowers, and presents, but also to give dinner parties for her friends when in Zurich. Her relationship with the (C.A.) Meiers, for instance, developed from an analytical one with him to a social one with both him and his wife Joan.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 581

 

Of all her analysts, however, Katy was most fond of Jung.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 581

 

I feel dreadfully out of touch with essential things, though I am not allowing myself to be ‘side-tracked’ too much, yet I badly need you!  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 581

 

It is still wonderfully blooming and the flowers as well as the colours are so delicate and nearly spring like. I hope you have a nice time with your family.

Onkel has gone to Bollingen, I am not allowed because of my sciatica (which is better however).  ~Emma Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 589

 

Grandpa enjoyed his party and was pleased to receive birthday greetings from President Eisenhower and a visit from the Mayor of Boston – as well as congratulations from a female admirer who had chatted with him when he still strode through the Boston Common in his nineties en route to his office. Godfrey lived another thirty months and died on 2 November 1962 (Katy’s birthday) at the age of one hundred and one years and three quarters.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 596-597

 

Aunt Lilla ( Godfrey Cabot’s elder sister) and her husband spent many years in France and were close friends of Monet. She studied painting with Monet at Giverny and became famous; her pictures hang in several American museums, and four of her portraits hang at the Musee d’Art Americain at Giverny near Paris. The museum advertised its 1997 exhibition with a poster of The Green Hat, a portrait by Lilla Cabot Perry of her daughter.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 602

 

thank you for your nice Christmas-card. It is awfully good of you to invite me to your enviable San Remo-place with all its delights. Unfortunately I cannot avail myself of your kindness since I am afraid of the long trip and the inevitable effort involved. I have to live quietly and more or less withdrawn from the adventures of the world. Though my state of health gives me no cause for serious complaints. ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 602

 

Told Onkel how happy I was in old age. He said that I owed a lot to my naturalness. The standardized people, the monkey takes them from behind. Onkel prevented my getting standardized and keeps me liquid; that’s the trick my outlook is as it was (when young).  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 603

 

I’m flowing along with people I’m not stiff, I’m not figee [stiff] -that keeps one’s sense of humor. Schopenhauer said it’s the only divine quality of man. Those stiff standardized people are apt to get silly & senile. I stuck to main things love never ceases when it comes along in a natural way.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 603

 

People of extra intelligence have an inferior feeling. Successful men, a miserable family life. Churchill wonderful humor- a terrible bully in personal relations. Monty can’t stand someone beside him.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 605

 

Onkel said he’s not interested in Procaine, as he’d get too energetic & would undertake more work & he feels now he’d like to take things easy – that he’s done enough work.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 605

 

Katy continued to send flowers to Jung after Mrs. Jung’s death. Despite his great age, he was always punctilious in thanking Katy.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 606

 

Sorry to have missed you at the feast! These celebrations have been exhausting. I am just coming up for air. No visitors for me for now and for a long time! It has almost wrecked me.  ~Carl Jung, Jung My Mother and I, Page 607

 

Dr. Haemerli-Steiner was the brother of Dr. Haemerli-Schindler who was Jung’s doctor during his severe illness in 1944, and who died suddenly while Jung was still in hospital.  ~Katy Cabot, Jung My Mother and I, Page 607

 

Jung died the following year, on June 6, 1961. The funeral took place on 9 June at the Reformed Church at Kilsnacht. With Jung’s death an era ended. The small group which he had founded had expanded more and more rapidly as the years passed, especially after the creation of the Jung Institute in 1947.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 609

 

The whole style of Jungian analysis evolved, becoming more professional. Friendships between analyst and analysands were discouraged, and professional secrecy became all-important. Gossiping between patient and analyst became strictly taboo, though the older analysts found it difficult to stop the habit.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 609

 

The analyst was no longer supposed to adapt his treatment to suit a particular patient. The more regimented Freudian school began to influence Jungians, and rules for treating mental illnesses were devised. Therapists had fewer neurotic patients willing to pay for treatment and took on more borderline and psychotic cases. So seeing patients socially, as had been the practice in the 1930s and 1940s, went out of favor.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 609

 

The last of the first-generation analysts1 who worked with Jung in Zurich was Professor C.A. Meier, who died in November 1995 at the age of ninety. He was my mother’s analyst from 1945 until her death in 1976, and my own analyst from 1976 to 1986.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 609-610

 

My mother’s diaries are a personal record, yet a forceful voice among those witnesses to Jung’s life and works. She understood Jung better than many.  ~Jane Reid, Jung My Mother and I, Page 611