Tina Keller Memoirs

Belonging to a materialistic age, I overvalue quantity. If my time is full, and I have an impression of achievement and even pressure, I get satisfaction. But inwardly I know that if I have plenty of leisure to satisfy my introverted side, my work is of better quality. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 155

I have never heard Jung present his views in a better way than on this occasion, and I believe the very sincere concern of the Quakers created this excellent atmosphere to which Dr. Jung responded. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 98.

Dr. Jung said, “Follow that which is alive in you and it will lead you to God, even if it seems to go in another direction.”  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 152

This kind of group [Oxford Group] life is not good for me and I must avoid it. For a few days, when I felt so estranged from myself, insanity seemed threatening. Remembering Dr. Jung’s teaching brought me back to normality. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 147

While in Geneva I also had the privilege of doing psychological work with Professor Charles Baudouin. He is well known for his book on Suggestion and Autosuggestion (1920) that is translated into many languages. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para  131

When I first heard C. G. Jung speak, there was an echo in me. He seemed to have discovered things I needed to hear although I could not have said why I was so fascinated. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 134

It becomes clear that just following nature does not lead to what humans are meant to become. There is in humans an urge to think, to put in order, an urge to create. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 136

But the so-called “inferior function” seems not to be available unless the person goes through a crisis. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 170

I had put Mary on a pedestal, and she had now proved to me that she was human with human weaknesses. Dr. Jung had said that it was the worst one could do to a person to place her on a pedestal! ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 176

In the course of the years I realize that only such crucial pain can bring fundamental transformation. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 176

I went to Zurich to see Toni Wolff who as always was willing to help. But the sessions with her were empty; her words did not reach me and my grief was beyond words. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 178

As I left Toni Wolff after the last of those fruitless interviews, she intuitively mentioned “the great Mother.” “You seem to have come to the problem of the ‘great Mother,”‘ she said… Yet once again her intuition had led her in the right direction. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 179

When anger came it was like a cleansing wind. There was nothing to regret or restore. I had to realize that I had done my best. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 185

It was also through Dr. Jung’s attitude that I was now able to accept my feelings of anger without self criticism. Out of the anger grew a healthy resolution to prove myself by doing good work. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para186

I had to experience that even the best intentions of Toni Wolff could not reach me. Only so was I open to the Earthmother’s healing. You may say the Earthmother is an imagination, and yet it was a very real experience. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para187

Results of psychotherapy are often quite unpredictable. Each person is different and so is the effect of the interaction of an individual with a therapist. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 124 

Dr. Jung had shown me that it was quite useless to reason or puzzle about “God” with the intellect.  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para186

Toni Wolff was Jung’s close collaborator. She was certainly part of that process of search and discovery, when everything seemed still fluid and formulations were tentatively being sought. Wherever the Jungs were, Toni Wolff was there also. She participated with her whole being during her whole life in Jung’s world.  Tina Keller, The Memoir of Tina Keller-Jenny, Page 28.

Like Dr. Bircher I had been disappointed with official medicine. Much time was spent in establishing a diagnosis, but then treatment consisted mostly in alleviating symptoms. When a destructive process had once set in, official medicine has no means to reverse the process. Sometimes fundamentally changing a person’s nutrition and habits, Dr. Bircher was able to help a chronic invalid regain real health. When an incurable illness had set in, the way the patient was accompanied on his way towards death was also impressive, for then psychotherapy was given priority, and again special nutrition was sometimes able to reduce pain and discomfort. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 117

In former centuries many marriage partners lived in such associations where each person was part of a functioning whole. Personal relationship was much less important than the functioning whole which was kept stable, as each adapted to a common goal. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 171

I tried to help my patients find themselves and open to the growth process. More and more I tried to eliminate the patterns of the doctor-patient relationship. The work must be a collaboration, and in the measure that I came closer to wholeness myself, I was also better able to put responsibility onto the patient. I want to consider my work more like the work of a gardener, and I am concerned with finding the best conditions for growth. The human being is a living growing whole, wherein all parts and functions are related. A diagnosis cannot be clearly established. If we can provide good conditions for growth, malfunctioning will gradually correct itself. A child at birth has many possibilities, and of these only a selected part is allowed to develop according to the parents’ mentality and culture. In our changing world many undeveloped urges cause trouble because they need to be developed also and used. I would in my therapy room provide an atmosphere as if it were a playroom where “the child” in an adult may again be a child for a while and experience and thus develop unused faculties. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 126

I am gradually learning, on my way of becoming, that there is a definite core of self and that I have outgrown my inner divisions. There is now a central goal, in which I feel my conscious and unconscious wills are united. I am noticing how often living is easy, as if everything was collaborating, for instance the opposites of acting and non-doing. Also quite often, outer circumstances seem to come surprisingly as needed. I am often astonished how things fall into place without my doing. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 139

Unless we feel ourselves to be part of an organic whole, our concern for individual development has a tendency to become self-centered. We need both a feeling of solidarity as well as the feeling of self-value. They must complement each other. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 140

Belonging to a materialistic age, I overvalue quantity. If my time is full, and I have an impression of achievement and even pressure, I get satisfaction. But inwardly I know that if I have plenty of leisure to satisfy my introverted side, my work is of better quality. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 155

 I have never heard Jung present his views in a better way than on this occasion, and I believe the very sincere concern of the Quakers created this excellent atmosphere to which Dr. Jung responded. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 98.

 Dr. Jung said, “Follow that which is alive in you and it will lead you to God, even if it seems to go in another direction.”  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 152

 This kind of group [Oxford Group] life is not good for me and I must avoid it. For a few days, when I felt so estranged from myself, insanity seemed threatening. Remembering Dr. Jung’s teaching brought me back to normality. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 147

 While in Geneva I also had the privilege of doing psychological work with Professor Charles Baudouin. He is well known for his book on Suggestion and Autosuggestion (1920) that is translated into many languages. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para  131

 When I first heard C. G. Jung speak, there was an echo in me. He seemed to have discovered things I needed to hear although I could not have said why I was so fascinated. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 134

 It becomes clear that just following nature does not lead to what humans are meant to become. There is in humans an urge to think, to put in order, an urge to create. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 136

 But the so-called “inferior function” seems not to be available unless the person goes through a crisis. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 170

 I had put Mary on a pedestal, and she had now proved to me that she was human with human weaknesses. Dr. Jung had said that it was the worst one could do to a person to place her on a pedestal! ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 176

 In the course of the years I realize that only such crucial pain can bring fundamental transformation. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 176

 I went to Zurich to see Toni Wolff who as always was willing to help. But the sessions with her were empty; her words did not reach me and my grief was beyond words. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 178

 As I left Toni Wolff after the last of those fruitless interviews, she intuitively mentioned “the great Mother.” “You seem to have come to the problem of the ‘great Mother,”‘ she said… Yet once again her intuition had led her in the right direction. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 179

 When anger came it was like a cleansing wind. There was nothing to regret or restore. I had to realize that I had done my best. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 185

 It was also through Dr. Jung’s attitude that I was now able to accept my feelings of anger without self criticism. Out of the anger grew a healthy resolution to prove myself by doing good work. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para186

 I had to experience that even the best intentions of Toni Wolff could not reach me. Only so was I open to the Earthmother’s healing. You may say the Earthmother is an imagination, and yet it was a very real experience. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 187

 Results of psychotherapy are often quite unpredictable. Each person is different and so is the effect of the interaction of an individual with a therapist. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 124 

 Dr. Jung had shown me that it was quite useless to reason or puzzle about “God” with the intellect.  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 186

 Many years ago Dr. Jung loaned me The Betty Book by Stewart Edward White. This book and the series of books following it have meant very much to me, and I keep rereading them. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 220

 It seems to me now that only as I learned to live in my body did the psychological development also become real and alive. All I had intellectually understood had to be assimilated as I learned to live in my body. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 224

 As I am trying to show, body awareness can bring great enrichment to life and could be an enormous help toward fuller life experience for many modern persons who are inclined toward a one-sided intellectualism. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 232

 I believe Dr. Jung was not really interested in that Institute. Some of the collaborators, however, were very anxious that there be a foundation carrying Dr. Jung’s name as a protection of their professional status.  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 189

 So one finds amongst people who believe that they are unselfish and altruistic, unconscious cruelty and tyranny. I have seen cases where well meaning persons seem to become a real danger for those at their mercy.  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 264

 I became more and more aware that I needed to develop the strong and hard qualities. Also I must become able to think clearly and realistically, to decide and be precise and not vague in what I say. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 265

 The work I did with Toni Wolff however stands apart, and the basic attitude of Dr. Jung made possible all that became helpful. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 265

 As for sixteen years I had been the only Jungian psychotherapist in Geneva, and as Dr. Jung had often sent patients to me, I naturally asked him to recommend me to the Jung Institute in Zurich, as analyst. Mrs. Jung1 and Dr. Meier, 2 who were on the board, had assured me that of course I would collaborate. But Dr. Jung refused to recommend me. He wrote a letter saying that he was now old and did not wish to interfere in matters of the Institute. I believe Dr. Jung was not really interested in that Institute. Some of the collaborators, however, were very anxious that there be a foundation carrying Dr. Jung’s name as a protection of their professional status. I heard indirectly that there was much rivalry and discord among the members of the directing board, and probably Dr. Jung did me a service in thus hindering me from collaboration. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 189

 I have elsewhere spoken of my husband and of his good balance between body awareness and mental gifts. I had to gradually acquire what he had naturally and I would insist that it can be acquired, but it is a long and slow apprenticeship. When I stress that I followed my imagination, I want to say that there is no fixed recipe. Each person must find time to really concentrate on his body needs and let go to enjoy lying on his back and just watching the breath come and go; to have the courage to be alone and inactive, if possible in nature, or somewhere you are comfortable and undisturbed. Let your imagination find some pleasurable memory where you felt you were authentically you, perhaps as a child, perhaps on a special vacation when alone, and recapture the atmosphere of such a special time. Enjoy it, come back to it another time, until you begin to feel what is authentically you.

From there you may find what your real needs are and how often you do things you do not really want to do. It is most important that we come back to the atmosphere small children sometimes still have and that real artists are trying to recapture and transmit. We need another attitude to life where we are part of it, enjoy it, and let life carry us along instinctively, sensitive to inner promptings. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 234

It was my destiny to meet Dr. Jung. Nothing can change the fact that I needed this enormous challenge in order to become the person I was meant to become. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 269

 I think Dr. Jung gave me courage to accept risk and also to welcome the unknown. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 269

 Dr. Jung was against my studies; he was holding back my impulsive drive, but I had to follow the inner guidance, even against Dr. Jung. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 269

 Although Jung’s psychology freed me from many outworn, traditional conceptions, all that was most important in my life I recognize as being “beyond” psychology. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 275

 I am afraid many of the young persons who are now allowed to follow their inclinations too freely, lack the strength of will to overcome obstacles when a goal really attracts them. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 277

 I remembered how Jung had told me of his own beginnings, how he had listened very carefully to his patients and tried to make them find their own answers that arose from their own authentic depth. I am quite convinced that listening to the client is essential and it takes years of practice to improve such listening. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 283

 Then Dr. Jung told me an experience of his own as an example. He was swimming in the lake; he was a very good swimmer. That time he was seized by a cramp and as he could not move his arms; it seemed as if he must drown. Suddenly he knew that the cramp was showing him that he was doing violence to himself in an area where evidently life wanted his acceptance. The moment he promised himself to let go of the self-discipline he was imposing upon himself, the cramp subsided and he could swim again. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 153

 A very meditative movement my teacher taught me was what she called “inner swinging.” It could be in silence or with some rather slow music. I should do nothing but be receptive, feeling an inner rhythmic movement, as if I were a plant being moved by a gentle breeze. If it succeeds, it brings a real inner calm and is most satisfying. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 243

 Seeing the pairs of opposites as relative and not as moral absolutes was a revelation.  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 266

 I have described before how Dr. Jung taught me to write “from the unconscious” and how this training became through the years a guiding compass which I could no more miss. I therefore owe to his teaching very efficient techniques for dealing with my difficulties. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 266

 When some of his patients were in such an insoluble conflict, Dr. Jung  as their doctor did not pretend to have an answer, he merely waited with the patient to see what would happen spontaneously. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Para 268

In those early days, when one arrived for the analytic hour, the so-called “red book” often stood open on an easel.3 In it Dr. Jung had been painting or had just finished a picture.

I remember Dr. Jung telling me: “Follow that which is alive in you.” ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 22

Dr. Jung wrote in his “black and red books” during emotional upheavals and during the period of discovery described his “visions” and then wrote dialogues and commentaries. I developed daily “dialogues.” ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 24

For several months Mrs. Jung and I together took lessons in physics; she also had come to feel the need for more education. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 26

He [Jung] was in favor of “lay” analysts and there were at the time a number of therapists who had no academic training. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 26

I am deeply shocked that her [Toni Wolff] name and intimate participation is not mentioned in the autobiography of Jung. It is my conviction today that he, as well as Toni and Jung’s wife, Emma, would wish that Toni be included when Jung’s lifework is remembered. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 28

Very early in life I felt intuitively an “invisible world” around me and I imagined I belonged to it. I tried to take refuge in this imagination when I was uncomfortable in the so-called reality. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Page 114

As I was a fear-ridden child, I knew that I needed help from some suprahuman power, as I could not overcome fear by my own strength.  I had a governess who would pray with me when I was so afraid at night; I could feel how real religion was to her. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Page 114

I was about 18 when my father wanted my younger sister to go to an excellent college for girls in England. So I asked him to let me go also, to which he agreed. In spite of having sustained financial losses, he felt education was the best capital he could give to his children. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Page 114

I had no doubt that this was the “right” man God had sent to me and this conviction lasted through all the 51 years of marriage and beyond. Even when marriage presented many difficulties and even when I was unhappy, I still knew that this was the “right” man for me. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Page 116

I was incredibly happy when my husband led me out of the narrow restrictions of my home into a life with wide horizons. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Page 116

My husband came from a peasant family. They had known poverty, but they radiated contentment and happiness as I had not known in my home. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Para 116

How glad I was that my husband did not belong to the sophisticated society like the young men I had met at dances! My husband was dose to nature; everything was natural including the way he led me into sexuality. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Para 116

I who had grown up in a Victorian home whose mother felt sex to be a “duty” and who repressed all expressions of exuberance. I came to experience sex as an “ecstasy” and I just “knew” that this was a religious sacrament. Joy, including the body and its pleasure, became for me part of religion. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Para 116

I saw the artist in my husband. He was very musical and when he played the piano he spoke to my heart. This meant more than any words. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoirs, Para 117

On the other hand, I was also repelled, because Dr. Jung could be so sarcastic. He made fun of people in an unfeeling way. He was not the kind of man I was attracted to. But perhaps only a man who did not wish to be labeled “good” could explore the dark unknown? A “good” man, like my husband,

would keep to the light side of life. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 16

My husband was attracted to Jung’s ideas; he never doubted that he belonged with the Jungian movement. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 16

It was only later that people realized how the disappearance of symptoms is not identical with healing. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 16

It is the incredible mastery with which Toni helped me deal with this powerful figure of imagination that makes me say that she did for me what Dr. Jung could never have done. Dr. Jung agreed when I told him and said that it was the privilege of woman to go with her patients into their dark places, and that man had the tendency to stand aloof. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 28

I know that Dr. Jung tried to separate from Toni because he felt responsible. He did not want to involve her in a situation that would hinder her from living her own life. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 29

I have of course regretted that as Dr. Jung more and more concentrated on formulating the scientific books he wrote, he discontinued his “active imagination” and I also wish that some of that material contained in the “black book” could be accessible to certain readers. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 30

In the tower Dr. Jung tried to leave civilization behind. He wore clothes he had used in Africa; he worked with his hands and lived in a special atmosphere which is described in his autobiography. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 31

Message One morning as I awoke there was an incredible joy in me because the message “you are children of God” had taken on full reality. This truth transformed everything. It means that there is in me and in others a divine heredity. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 133

My reason is offended at the very idea of the combination of opposites. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 133

In many ways I was superficial, but that also helped me achieve, not hesitate before big tasks. I needed this superficiality for my studies where otherwise I would have gotten too discouraged. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 134

I had a most enriching contact with a Quaker group that asked me to speak to them about Jungian psychology. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 135

The radiant message about being “children of God” transcends psychology.  ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 135

He [Jung] had shown me the reality of the inner life and it is thanks to C. G. Jung’s teaching that my association with “Leonard” [Tina’s Animus] has been an enrichment, not a disturbance. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 135

I object to the way churches insist on our being miserable sinners. It discourages people and brings resignation. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 135

I know evil is a reality, but it is also a mystery and in the teaching about sin, there are many misunderstandings. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 135

For my part, I can only say that when I hear and feel the radiant message about being children of God, I am awed and have a great desire to be worthy. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 135

There were all the mistakes I had committed and I was regretful or angry about. Gradually I learnt, that there is nothing to regret, ignorance and errors made new learning possible. ~Tina Keller, Tina Keller Memoir, Page 138.

 

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