[Carl Jung on the relationship of “Mind” and “Body.]

We will put it aside for the time being and turn back to the original question of mind and body.

From what has been said, it should be clear that the psyche consists essentially of images.

It is a series of images in the truest sense, not an accidental juxtaposition or sequence, but a structure that is throughout full of meaning and purpose; it is a “picturing” of vital activities.

And just as the material of the body that is ready for life has need of the psyche in order to be capable of life, so the psyche presupposes the living body in order that its images may live.

Mind and body are presumably a pair of opposites and, as such, the expression of a single entity whose essential nature is not knowable either from its outward, material manifestation or from inner, direct perception.

According to an ancient belief, man arose from the coming together of a soul and a body.

It would probably be more correct to speak of an unknowable living being, concerning the ultimate nature of which nothing can be said except that it vaguely expresses the quintessence of “life.”

This living being appears outwardly as the material body, but inwardly as a series of images of the vital activities taking place within it.

They are two sides of the same coin, and we cannot rid ourselves of the doubt that perhaps this whole separation of mind and body may finally prove to be merely a device
of reason for the purpose of conscious discrimination—an intellectually necessary separation of one and the same fact into two aspects, to which we then illegitimately attribute an independent existence. ~Carl Jung, The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche, Page 325, Para 618-619.

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