He [Jung] told me his wife had started to learn Latin, and also some natural science, after her fifth child went to school. Now she can read all the mediaeval Latin texts. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 62

Jealousy always means that we see someone else doing what we should have done but for our incapacity or laziness; it is easier to criticize other people. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 99

The average is a statistical truth, and this is a concept; but it implies that there must be exceptions, and there are exceptions to the general rule of space, time and causality. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 101

He [Jung] added that he never has had good reviews; but, like Schopenhauer, ‘People read me, and people will read me. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 101

This man also asked C.G. if he believed in astrology because he had mentioned it; but, said C.G., it is not necessary to ‘believe’ in such concepts – he simply observes that they are sometimes relevant. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 102

Later we talked again, and C.G. said how interesting it would be if someone were to study the dreams people had under anesthetics; he mentioned one or two examples. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 157

Also he [Jung] spoke of his great interest on reading that a neuro-surgeon, concerned with epilepsy, had stimulated the corpora quadrigemina and the patient had had a vision of a mandala, a square containing a circle. This vision could be reproduced – and was reproduced – by the stimulation. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 157

He [Jung] said he had for a long time thought that the brain stem was important in our thinking life and how interested he was that the corpora quadrigemina, the four bodies, was the area, for it confirmed his idea of the importance of the square and the circle as symbols. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 157

In the evening after dinner, we somehow got onto the subject of numbers which, C.G. said, had a life of their own. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 158

C.G. spoke also of participation mystique – that everything is known. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 162

He [Jung] said that even at school he had always been suspected of being a fraud – as when the teacher refused to believe he had written his essay; there was so much in it the teacher had never heard of that he concluded C.G. had got someone else to write it for him. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 146

He [Jung] struggled with himself about telling her [Emma] but he did so; she was quite undisturbed, and in a way relieved for ever since heroperation she had been preparing for death. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 147

He [Jung] mentioned the witch doctor at Bollingen, whose house on the hill we had seen from the boat yesterday. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 134

The witch doctor has a very ancient book which was given to him by a monk of Einsiedeln who liked him when he was a boy. It is a reprint of an older volume, and contains the so-called sixth and seventh books of Moses. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page134

With it, in the same chamois leather bag, he [Jung] had a little jade Chinese wishing wheel (it looked eighteenth century and was celadon jade with a movable centre). ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 136

Then some left, and C.G. went out and returned with a selection of gramophone records; they were all of Negro spirituals. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 139

The painting of this ceiling was C.G.’s idea; his coat of arms, or the separate parts of it, fill a long panel at one end and at the other end is that of Mrs. Jung. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 182

I asked of his first impressions of the anima and he [Jung] said it came in his dream of the white dove when the little girl stood beside him; she was like his eldest daughter. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 189

The extraverted person cannot value anything from the inside, hence the superficiality of much academic psychology – psychological tests for example, or the physical explanations of mental experiences. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 194

Then when C.G. was in India, he was invited to Mysore State where this man was the guru to the ruler; he was treated very well, stayed in the ruler’s guest-house, and was taken for drives in an ancient but comfortable motor car. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 199

He [Jung] mentioned also the archetypes as the representation of the instincts, that is, the instincts can be expressed in many ways – there are hundreds of possibilities. But one form is selected because it corresponds to the instinct – it is an image of it. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 200.

But the delusion itself is something; one cannot deny its reality because it is unusual. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 201

This is the puer aeternus and you need it, especially in old age for it keeps people healthy. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 217

You can’t change people to fit a theory. ~Carl Jung, Meetings with Jung, Page 217

After dinner we sat on the verandah, C.G. behind the little table wearing, as usual, a blue apron, and on the table lay the stone he was carving of the family lineage on the male side. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 219

He [Jung] was particularly interested to see how they [Harvard] had translated the word ‘unconscious’ into Latin, and it was mens vacua, the unknown or unexplored mind. ~E.A. Bennet, Meetings with Jung, Page 220

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