Carl Jung:  CW 18 “The Symbolic Life”

 

The individual is obliged by the collective demands to purchase his individuation at the cost of an equivalent work for the benefit of society. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 452.

 

Individuation and collectivity are a pair of opposites, two divergent destinies. They are related to one another by guilt. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 452.

 

Ideas are not just counters used by the calculating mind; they are also golden vessels full of living feeling. “Freedom” is not a mere abstraction, it is also an emotion. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Pages 310-311.

 

It is normal to think about immortality, and abnormal not to do so or not to bother about it. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 310.

 

No rules can cope with the paradoxes of life. Moral law, like natural law, represents only one aspect of reality. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 625.

 

In reply to your kind enquiry about “rules of life,” I would like to remark that I have had so much to do with people that I have always endeavored to live by no rules as far as possible. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 625.

 

The “Invisibles” further assert that our world of consciousness and the “Beyond” together form a single cosmos, with the result that the dead are not in a different place from the living. ~CW 18, Page 315.

 

The communications of “spirits” are statements about the unconscious psyche, provided that they are really spontaneous and are not cooked up by the conscious mind. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 313.

 

The Christian-my Christian-knows no curse formulas; indeed he does not even sanction the cursing of the innocent fig-tree by the rabbi Jesus” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, §1468.

 

Our psychology is a science . . . Plenty of unqualified persons are sure to push their way in and commit the greatest follies . . . Our aim is simply and solely scientific knowledge . . . If religion and morality are blown to pieces in the process, so much the worse for them . . . Knowledge is a force of nature that goes its way irresistibly from inner necessity. ~Carl Jung; CW 18; Page 314.

 

Nobody is immune to a nationwide evil unless he is unshakably convinced of the danger of his own character being tainted by the same evil. Carl Jung, CW 18, para 1400.

 

One has to remind oneself again and again that in therapy it is more important for the patient to understand than for the analyst’s theoretical expectations to be satisfied. The patient’s resistance to the analyst is not necessarily wrong; it is rather a sign that something does not “click.” Either the patient is not yet at a point where he would be able to understand, or the interpretation does not fit. ~Carl Jung.  CW 18, Page 61

 

Lack of conscious understanding does not mean that the dream has no effect at all. Even civilized man can occasionally observe that a dream which he cannot remember can slightly alter his mood for better or worse. Dreams can be “understood” to a certain extent in a subliminal way, and that is mostly how they work. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 52.

 

Dreams are as simple or as complicated as the dreamer is himself, only they are always a little bit ahead of the dreamer’s consciousness. I do not understand my own dreams any better than any of you, for they are always somewhat beyond my grasp and I have the same trouble with them as anyone who knows nothing about dream interpretation. Knowledge is no advantage when it is a matter of one’s own dreams. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 122

 

Never apply any theory, but always ask the patient how he feels about his dream images. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 123.

 

Because the European does not know his own unconscious, he does not understand the East and projects into it everything he fears and despises in himself. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1253.

 

[There is a] . . . continued and progressive divine incarnation. Thus man is received and integrated into the divine drama. He seems destined to play a decisive part in it; that is why he must receive the Holy Spirit.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para, 1551.

 

We cannot receive the Holy Spirit unless we have accepted our own individual life as Christ accepted his.  Thus we become the “sons of god” fated to experience the conflict of the divine opposites, represented by the crucifixion. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para, 1551.

 

Man’s suffering does not derive from his sins but from the maker of his imperfections, the paradoxical God. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1681

 

I consider my contribution to psychology to be my subjective confession. It is my personal psychology, my prejudice that I see psychological facts as I do. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 275.

 

Never forget that in psychology the means by which you judge and observe the psyche is the psyche itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 277.

 

The individual must now consolidate himself by cutting himself off from God and becoming wholly himself Thereby and at the same time he also separates himself from society: Outwardly he plunges into solitude, but inwardly into Hell, distance from God” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1103.

 

The serpent in the cave is an image which often occurs in antiquity. It is important to realize that in classical antiquity, as in other civilizations, the serpent not only was an animal that aroused fear and represented danger, but also signified healing. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 116.

 

Reason becomes unreason when separated from the heart, and a psychic life void of universal ideas sickens from undernourishment. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 311.

 

The righteous man is the instrument into which God enters in order to attain self-reflection and thus consciousness and rebirth as a divine child trusted to the care of adult man. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 739.

 

The serpent owes his existence to God and by no means to man. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 690.

 

Then our era will be a near replica of the first centuries a.d., when Caesar was the State and a god, and divine sacrifices were made to Caesar while the temples of the gods crumbled away. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 581.

 

Since history repeats itself and the spiral of evolution seemingly returns to the point where it took off, there is a possibility that mankind is approaching an epoch when enough will be said about things which are never what we wish them to be, and when the question will be raised why we were ever interested in a bad comedy. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 581.

 

Our concept of consciousness supposes thought to be in our most dignified head. But the Pueblo Indians derive consciousness from the intensity of feeling. Abstract thought does not exist for them. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 16.

 

These “centres” are the so-called chakras? and you not only find them in the teachings of yoga but can discover the same idea in old German alchemical books, which surely do not derive from a knowledge of yoga. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 16.

 

For modern psychology, ideas are entities, like animals and plants. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 742.

 

Sooner or later it will be found that nothing really new happens in history. There could be talk of something really novel only if the unimaginable happened : if reason, humanity and love won a lasting victory. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1356.

 

The essence of culture is continuity and conservation of the past; craving for novelty produces only anti-culture and ends in barbarism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1344.

 

Human reality is made up of a thousand vulgarities. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1354.

 

A life of ease and security has convinced everyone of all the material joys, and has even compelled the spirit to devise new and better ways to material welfare, but it has never produced spirit. Probably only suffering, disillusion, and self-denial do that. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346.

 

Most people need someone to confess to otherwise the basis of experience is not sufficiently real. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1811.

 

“Facts first and theories later is the keynote of Jung’s work. He is an empiricist first and last.” This view meets with my approval. ~Carl Jung, citing British Medical Journal (9 February 1952), CW 18, Page 664

 

When a man is in the wilderness, it is the darkness that brings the dreams ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 674

 

And you can be sure that the dream is your nearest friend; the dream is the friend of those who are not guided any more by the traditional truth and in consequence are isolated.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 674

 

We must never forget that Christ was an innovator and revolutionary, executed with criminals. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1539

 

The reformers and great religious geniuses were heretics. It is there that you find the footprints of the Holy Spirit, and no one asks for him or receives him without having to pay a high price. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1539

 

Why was that cruel immolation of the Son necessary if the anger of the “deus ultionum” is not hard to appease? One doesn’t notice much of the Father’s goodness and love during the tragic end of his Son. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1539

 

Suffering that is not understood is hard to bear, while on the other hand it is often astounding to see how much a person can endure when he understands the why and the wherefore. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1578

 

It is quite understandable that we should seek to hold the truth at arm’s length, because it seems impossible to give oneself up to a God who doesn’t even respect his own laws when he falls victim to one of his fits of rage or forgets his solemn oath. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1539

 

We take flight into the Christian collectivity where we can forget even the will of God, for in society we lose the feeling of personal responsibility and can swim with the current. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1539

 

His gods and demons have not disappeared at all; they have merely got new names. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 82

 

We find numberless images of God, but we cannot produce the original. There is no doubt in my mind that there is an original behind our images, but it is inaccessible. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1589

 

The important fact about consciousness is that nothing can be conscious without an ego to which it refers. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 18.

 

There is no reason whatsoever why you should or should not call the beyond-self Christ or Buddha or Purusha or Tao or Khidr or Tifereth. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1672

 

That gives peace, when people feel that they are living the symbolic life, that they are actors in the divine drama. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 630

 

A career, producing of children, are all maya compared with that one thing, that your life is meaningful. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 630

 

My intuition consisted in a sudden and most unexpected insight into the fact that my dream meant myself, my life and my world, my whole reality as against a theoretical structure erected by another, alien mind for reasons and purposes of its own. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 490

 

An analyst who cannot risk his authority will be sure to lose it. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1172

 

You can’t wrest people away from their fate, just as in medicine you cannot cure a patient if nature means him to die. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 291

 

Therefore our Lord himself is a healer; he is a doctor; he heals the sick and he deals with the troubles of the soul; and that is exactly what we call psychotherapy.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 370

 

The doctor has to cope with actual suffering for better or worse, and ultimately has nothing to rely on except the mystery of divine Providence. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1578

 

It seems to me to be the Holy Spirit’s task and charge to reconcile and unite the opposites in the human individual through a special development of the human soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1553

 

He who can risk himself wholly to it finds himself directly in the hands of God, and is there confronted with a situation which makes “simple faith” a vital necessity; in other words, the situation becomes so full of risk or overtly dangerous that the deepest instincts are aroused. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1539

 

The alchemists thought of their opus as a continuation and perfection of creation. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1631

 

The utterances of the heart— unlike those of the discriminating intellect—always relate to the whole. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1719

 

The heartstrings sing like an Aeolian harp only under the gentle breath of a mood, an intuition, which does not drown the song but listens. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1719

 

What the heart hears are the great, all-embracing things of life, the experiences which we do not arrange ourselves but which happen to us. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1719

 

What sets one man free is another man’s prison. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 163

 

But when we penetrate the depths of the soul and when we try to understand its mysterious life, we shall discern that death is not a meaningless end, the mere vanishing into nothingness—it is an accomplishment, a ripe fruit on the tree of life. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

 

Nor is death an abrupt extinction, but a goal that has been unconsciously lived and worked for during half a lifetime. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

 

But if we listen to the quieter voices of our deeper nature we become aware of the fact that soon after the middle of our life the soul begins its secret work, getting ready for the departure. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

 

Out of the turmoil and error of our life the one precious flower of the spirit begins to unfold, the four-petaled flower of the immortal light, and even if our mortal consciousness should not be aware of its secret operation, it nevertheless does its secret work of purification. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1705-7

 

It is my practical experience that psychological understanding immediately revivifies the essential Christian ideas and fills them with the breath of life. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1666

 

Suffering is not an illness; it is the normal counterpole to happlness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 179

 

It is always possible that what lies in the darkness beyond our consciousness is totally different from anything the most daring speculation could imagine. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 617

 

The very numbers you use in counting are more than you take them for. They are at the same time mythological entities (for the Pythagoreans they were even divine), but you are certainly unaware of this when you use numbers for a practical purpose. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 461

 

It is the face of our own shadow that glowers at us across the iron curtain. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 85

 

This general point of view lifts the individual out of himself and connects him with humanity. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 116

 

If a man is capable of leading a responsible life himself, then he is also conscious of his duties to the community. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 56

 

Childlike faith, when it comes naturally, is certainly a charisma. But when “joyful faith” and “childlike trust” are instilled by religious education, they are no charisma but a gift of the ambiguous gods, because they can be manipulated only too easily and with greater effect by other “saviours” as well. ~Carl Jung, CW 18

 

What is the use of technological improvements when mankind must still tremble before those infantile tyrants, ridiculous yet terrible, in the style of Hitler? Figures like these owe their power only to the frightening immaturity of the man of today, and to his barbarous unconsciousness. Truly we can no longer afford to underestimate the importance of the psychic factor in world affairs. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 11

 

Suffering that is not understood is hard to bear, while on the other hand it is often astounding to see how much a person can endure when he understands the why and the wherefore. A philosophical or religious view of the world enables him to do this, and such views prove to be, at the very least, psychic methods of healing if not of salvation. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 692

 

The archetypes are the great decisive forces, they bring about the real events, and not our personal reasoning and practical intellect . . . The archetypal images decide the fate of man.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 183

 

It is a great mistake in practice to treat an archetype as if it were a mere name, word, or concept. It is far more than that it is a piece of life, an image connected with the living individual by the bridge of emotion. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 96

 

Just as conscious contents can vanish into the unconscious, other contents can also arise from it.  Besides a majority of mere recollections, really new thoughts and creative ideas can appear which have never been conscious before. They grow up from the dark depths like a lotus. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 37.

 

Rationalism and superstition are complementary. It is a psychological rule that the brighter the light, the blacker the shadow; in other words, the more rationalistic we are in our conscious minds, the more alive becomes the spectral world of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, CW 18 Para 10

 

Nature commits no errors. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 95

 

The interpretation of dreams enriches consciousness to such an extent that it relearns the forgotten language of the instincts. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 52

 

Most people need someone to confess to, otherwise the basis of experience is not sufficiently real. They do not “hear” themselves, cannot contrast themselves with something different, and so they have no outside “control.” Everything flows inwards and is answered only by oneself, not by another. It makes an enormous difference whether I confess my guilt only to myself or to another person. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 17

 

There is no admonition to repentance unless the patient does it himself, no penance unless—as is almost the rule he has got himself in a thorough mess, and no absolution unless God has mercy on him. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 17

 

We cannot demand of our patients a faith which they reject because they do not understand it, or which does not suit them even though we may hold it ourselves. We have to rely on the curative powers inherent in the patient’s own nature, regardless of whether the ideas that emerge agree with any known creed or philosophy. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para  664

 

In psychology it is very important that the doctor should not strive to heal at all costs. One has to be exceedingly careful not to impose one’s own will and conviction on the patient. You have to give him a certain amount of freedom. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 147

 

You can’t wrest people away from their fate, just as in medicine you cannot cure a patient if nature means him to die. Sometimes it is really a question whether you are allowed to rescue a man from the fate he must undergo for the sake of his further development. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 147

 

What are religions? Religions are psychotherapeutic systems. What are we doing, we psychotherapists? We are trying to heal the suffering of the human mind, of the human psyche or the human soul, and religions deal with the same problem. Therefore our Lord himself is a healer; he is a doctor; he heals the sick and he deals with the troubles of the soul; and that is exactly what we call psychotherapy. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 181

 

We have stripped all things of their mystery and numinosity: nothing is holy any longer. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 94

 

Only through our feebleness and incapacity are we linked up with the unconscious, with the lower world of the instincts and with our fellow beings. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 109

 

Brooding is a sterile activity which runs round in a circle, never reaching a sensible goal. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 16

 

Contradictory views are necessary for the evolution of any science, only they must not be set up in rigid opposition to each other but should strive for the earliest possible synthesis. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 639

 

Ultimate truth, if there be such a thing, demands the concert of many voices. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page xiv

 

The idea of an unconscious psyche has not yet gained undisputed currency, despite the existence of an overwhelming mass of empirical material which proves beyond all doubt that there can be no psychology of consciousness without a recognition of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para ix

 

Fantasy is not a sickness but a natural and vital activity which helps the seeds of psychic development to grow. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para viii

 

It makes an enormous difference whether I confess my guilt only to myself or to another person. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 17

 

He is the man who plants a field and before the crop is ripe is off again to a new field. He has ploughed fields behind him and new hopes ahead all the time, and nothing comes off. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 33.

 

The people would never have been Deutsch taken in and carried away so completely if this figure had not been a reflected image of the collective hysteria Deutsch. Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1400 .

 

The immunity of the nation depends entirely upon the existence of a leading minority immune to the evil and capable of combating the powerful suggestive effect. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1400

 

When you are in the darkness you take the next thing, and that is a dream. And you can be sure that the dream is your nearest friend; the dream is the friend of those who are not guided any more by the traditional truth and in consequence are isolated. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 674.

 

The serpent in the cave is an image which often occurs in antiquity. It is important to realize that in classical antiquity, as in other civilizations, the serpent not only was an animal that aroused fear and represented danger, but also signified healing. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 116.

 

The serpent owes his existence to God and by no means to man. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 690.

 

Since we are psychic beings and not entirely dependent upon space and time, we can easily understand the central importance of the resurrection idea: we are not completely subjected to the powers of annihilation because our psychic totality reaches beyond the barrier of space and time. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1572.

 

We do not know what an archetype is (i.e., consists of), since the nature of the psyche is inaccessible to us, but we know that archetypes exist and work. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 694.

 

The better we understand the archetype, the more we participate in its life and the more we realize its eternity or timelessness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 695.

 

The utterances of the heart—unlike those of the discriminating intellect—always relate to the whole. The heartstrings sing like an Aeolian harp only to the gentle breath of a premonitory mood, which does not drown the song but listens. What the heart hears are the great things that span our whole lives, the experiences which we do nothing to arrange but which we ourselves suffer. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 9

 

We have stripped all things of their mystery and numinosity nothing is holy any longer. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 94

 

To find happiness in the spirit one must be possessed of a “spirit” to find happiness in. A life of ease and security has convinced everyone of all the material joys, and has even compelled the spirit to devise new and better ways to material welfare, but it has never produced spirit. Probably only suffering, disillusion, and self-denial do that. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 6

 

Because the European does not know his own unconscious, he does not understand the East and projects into it everything he fears and despises in himself. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 8

 

Without wishing it, we human beings are placed in situations in which the great “principles” entangle us in something, and God leaves it to us to find a way out. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 869

 

Besides a majority of mere recollections, really new thoughts and creative ideas can appear which have never been conscious before.  They grow up from the dark depths like a lotus. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 37.

 

Our personal psychology is just a thin skin, a ripple on the ocean of collective psychology. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 183

 

The archetypes are the great decisive forces, they bring about the real events, and not our personal reasoning and practical intellect . . . The archetypal images decide the fate of man.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 183

 

Much may be said for Freud’s view as a scientific explanation of dream psychology. But I must dispute its completeness, for the psyche cannot be conceived merely in causal terms but requires also a final view. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 473

 

I am a neutral Swiss and even in my own country I am uninterested in politics, because I am convinced that 99 per cent of politics are mere symptoms and anything but a cure for social evils. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 564.

 

About 50 per cent of politics is definitely obnoxious inasmuch as it poisons the utterly incompetent mind of the masses. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 564.

 

The healthy man does not torture others-generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1354.

 

When I hear such questions, it always makes me think of the Rabbi who was asked how it could be that God often showed himself to people in the olden days but that nowadays one no longer saw him. The Rabbi, replied: “Nor is there anyone nowadays who could stoop so low” ~Carl Jung, CW18, Para 600

 

We are so captivated by and entangled in our subjective consciousness that we have simply forgotten the age-old fact that God speaks chiefly through dreams and visions. The Buddhist discards the world of unconscious fantasies as “distractions” and useless illusions; the Christian puts his Church and his Bible between himself and his unconscious; and the rationalist intellectual does not yet know that his consciousness is not his total psyche, in spite of the fact that for more than seventy years the unconscious has been a basic scientific concept that is indispensable to any serious student of psychology ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 601

 

In any serious case the choice is limited by the kind of revealed image one has received. Yahweh and Allah are monads, the Christian God a triad (historically), the modern experience presumably a tetrad, the early Persian deity a dyad. In the East you have the dyadic monad Tao and the monadic Anthropos (purusha), Buddha, etc. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1611

 

I make a general distinction between “religion” and a “creed” for the sake of the layman, since it is chiefly he who reads my books and not the academic scholar. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1637

 

Dreams are very often anticipations of future alterations of consciousness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 51.

 

Every conscious act or event thus has an unconscious aspect, just as every sense-perception has a subliminal aspect: for instance, sound below or above audibility, or light below or above visibility. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 186.

 

The unconscious is, as the collective psyche, the psychological representative of society. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 453.

 

In my humble opinion all this has very much to do with psychology. We have nothing to go by but these images. Without images you could not even speak of divine experiences. You would be completely inarticulate. You only could stammer “mana” and even that would be an image. Since it is a matter of an ineffable experience the image is indispensable. I would completely agree if you should say: God approaches man in the form of symbols. But we are far from knowing whether the symbol is correct or not ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1612

 

Perhaps in a more enlightened era a candidate for governmental office will have to have it certified by a psychiatric commission that he is not a bearer of psychic bacilli. How much this would have spared the world had it been done before 1933!” ~C.G. Jung, CW 18, par. 1378

 

If the whole is to change, the individual must change himself. Goodness is an individual gift and an individual acquisition. In the form of mass suggestion it is mere intoxication, which has never yet been counted a virtue. ~C.G. Jung, CW 18, par. 1378

 

Goodness is acquired only by the individual as his own achievement. No masses can do it for him. But evil needs masses for its genesis and continued existence. ~C.G. Jung, CW 18, par. 1378

 

The scientist knows that no epidemic can be sealed off by a cordon sanitaire unless the individual is prevented from breaking it. Nor can one hope for the cleanliness of a people unless the individual is induced to wash himself daily. ~C.G. Jung, CW 18, par. 1378

 

“The mastermen of the S.S. are all, when segregated each by himself, indescribably small and ugly. But the good man shines like a jewel that was lost in the Sahara.” ~C.G. Jung, CW 18, par. 1378

 

Whatever we fight about in the outside world is also a battle in our inner selves. For we must finally admit that mankind is not just an accumulation of individuals utterly different from one another, but possesses such a high degree of psychological collectivity that in comparison the individual appears merely as a slight variant. How shall we judge of this matter fairly if we cannot admit that it is also our own problem? Anyone who can admit this will first seek the solution in himself, and this in fact is the way all the great solutions begin. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 313

 

Modern psychology can affirm that for many people this problem arises in the second half of life, when the unconscious often makes itself felt in a very insistent way. The unconscious is the land of dreams, and according to the primitive view the land of dreams is also the land of the dead and of the ancestors. From all we know about it, the unconscious does in fact seem to be relatively independent of space and time, nor is there anything objectionable in the idea that consciousness is surrounded by the sea of the unconscious, just as this world is contained in “Orthos.” The unconscious is of unknown extent and is possibly of greater importance than consciousness. At any rate, the role which consciousness plays in the life of primitives and primates is insignificant compared with that of the unconscious. The events in our modern world, as we see humanity blindly staggering from one catastrophe to the next, are not calculated to strengthen anyone’s belief in the value of consciousness and the freedom of the will. Consciousness should of course be of supreme importance, for it is the only guarantee of freedom and alone makes it possible for us to avoid disaster. But this, it seems, must remain for the present a pious hope. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para  754

 

At a time when all available energy is spent in the investigation of nature, very little attention is paid to the essence of man, which is his psyche, although many researches are made into its conscious functions. But the really unknown part, which produces symbols, is still virtually unexplored. We receive signals from it every night, yet deciphering these communications seems to be such an odious task that very few people in the whole civilized world can be bothered with it. Man’s greatest instrument, his psyche, is little thought of, if not actually mistrusted and despised. “It’s only psychological” too often means: it is nothing. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 102

 

Dogmas are spiritual structures of supreme beauty, and they possess a wonderful meaning which I have sought to fathom in my fashion. Compared with them our scientific endeavours to devise models of the objective psyche are unsightly in the extreme. They are bound to earth and reality, full of contradictions, logically and aesthetically unsatisfying. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 663

 

The activity of the collective unconscious manifests itself not only in compensatory effects in the lives of individuals, but also in the mutation of dominant ideas in the course of the centuries. This can be seen most clearly in religion, and, to a lesser extent, in the various philosophical, social, and political ideologies. It appears in most dangerous form in the sudden rise and spread of psychic epidemics, as for instance in the witch hunts in Germany at the end of the fourteenth century, or in the social and political utopias of the twentieth century. How far the collective unconscious may be considered the efficient cause of such movements, or merely their material cause, is a question for ethnologists and psychologists to decide; but certain experiences in the field of individual psychology indicate the possibility of a spontaneous activity of archetypes. These experiences usually concern individuals in the second half of life, when it not infrequently happens that drastic changes of outlook are thrust upon them by the unconscious as a result of some defect in their conscious attitude. While the activity of the personal unconscious is confined to compensatory changes in the personal sphere, the changes effected by the collective unconscious have a collective aspect: they alter our view of the world, and, like a contagion, infect our fellow men. (Hence the astonishing effects of certain psychopaths on society!) ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1161

 

The great events of world history are, at bottom, profoundly unimportant. In the last analysis, the essential thing is the life of the individual. This alone makes history, here alone do the great transformations first take place, and the whole future, the whole history of the world, ultimately spring as a gigantic summation from these hidden sources in individuals .In our most private and most subjective lives, we are not only the passive witnesses of our age, and its sufferers, but also its makers. We make our own epoch. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1400. 

 

One’s contemporaries are always dense and never understand that what appears to them unseemly ebullience comes less from personal temperament than from the still unknown wellsprings of a new age. How people looked askance at Nietzsche’s volcanic emotion, and how long he will be spoken of in times to come! Even Paracelsus has now been gratefully disinterred after four hundred years in an attempt to resuscitate him in modern dress. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 4

 

We must be able to let things happen in the psyche. For us, this is an art of which most people know nothing. Consciousness is forever interfering, helping, correcting, and negating, never leaving the psychic processes to grow in peace. It would be simple enough, if only simplicity were not the most difficult of all things. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 20

 

The fundamental error persists in the public that there are definite answers, “solutions,” or views which need only be uttered in order to spread the necessary light. But the most beautiful truth—as history has shown a thousand times over—is no use at all unless it has become the innermost experience and possession of the individual. Every unequivocal, so-called “clear” answer always remains stuck in the head, but only very rarely does it penetrate to the heart.  The needful thing is not to know the truth but to experience it. Not to have an intellectual conception of things, but to find our way to the inner, and perhaps wordless, irrational experience—that is the great problem. Nothing is more fruitless than talking of how things must or should be, and nothing is more important than finding the way to these far-off goals. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 7

 

If you take a typical intellectual who is terribly afraid of falling in love, you will think his fear very foolish. But he is most probably right, because he will very likely make foolish nonsense when he falls in love. He will be caught most certainly, because his feeling only reacts to an archaic or to a dangerous type of woman. This is why many intellectuals are inclined to marry beneath them. They are caught by the landlady perhaps, or by the cook, because they are unaware of their archaic feeling through which they get caught. But they are right to be afraid, because their undoing will be in their feeling. Nobody can attack them in their intellect. There they are strong and can stand alone, but in their feelings they can be influenced, they can be caught, they can be cheated, and they know it. Therefore never force a man into his feeling when he is an intellectual. He controls it with an iron hand because it is very dangerous. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 20

 

Although we are still far from having overcome our primitive mentality, which enjoys its most signal triumphs just in the sphere of sex where man is made most vividly aware of his mammalian nature, certain ethical refinements have nevertheless crept in which permit anyone with ten to fifteen centuries of Christian education behind him to progress towards a slightly higher level. On this level the spirit—from the biological an incomprehensible psychic phenomenon—plays a not unimportant role psychologically. It had a weighty word to say on the subject of Christian marriage and it still participates vigorously in the discussion whenever marriage is doubted and depreciated. It appears in a negative capacity as counsel for the instincts, and in a positive one as the defender of human dignity. Small wonder, then, that a wild and confusing conflict breaks out between man as an instinctual creature of nature and man as a spiritual and cultural being. The worst thing about it is that the one is forever trying violently to suppress the other in order to bring about a so-called harmonious solution of the conflict. Unfortunately, too many people still believe in this procedure, which is all-powerful in politics; there are only a few here and there who condemn it as barbaric and would like to set up in its place a just compromise whereby each side of man’s nature is given a hearing. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para xii

 

Why is it that we are especially interested in psychology just now? The answer is that everyone is in desperate need of it. Humanity seems to have reached a point where the concepts of the past are no longer adequate, and we begin to realize that our nearest and dearest are actually strangers to us, whose language we no longer understand. It is beginning to dawn on us that the people living on the other side of the mountain are not made up exclusively of red-headed devils who are responsible for all the evil on this side of the mountain. A little of this uneasy suspicion has filtered through into the relations between the sexes; not everyone is utterly convinced that everything good is in “me” and everything evil in “you.” Already we can find super-moderns who ask themselves in all seriousness whether there may not be something wrong with us, whether perhaps we are too unconscious, too antiquated, and whether this may not be the reason why when confronted with difficulties in sexual relationships we still continue to employ with disastrous results the methods of the Middle Ages if not those of the caveman. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para xi

 

Our personal psychology is just a thin skin, a ripple on the ocean of collective psychology. The powerful factor, the factor which changes our whole life, which changes the surface of our known world, which makes history, is collective psychology, and collective psychology moves according to laws entirely different from those of our consciousness. The archetypes are the great decisive forces, they bring about the real events, and not our personal reasoning and practical intellect . . . The archetypal images decide the fate of man.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 183

 

International relations turned into the most exaggerated nationalism, and the very God of the earth, the ultima ratio of all things worldly—money—developed a more and more fictitious character never dreamt of before. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1306

 

There is no psychology yet of such infinitely complex matters as economics or politics. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1307

 

I don’t consider myself competent to deal with the ultimate meaning of our world crisis. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1307

 

You call a certain phenomenon a symptom when it is obvious that it does not function as a logical means to an end but rather stands out as a mere result of chiefly causal conditions without any obvious purposiveness.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1309

 

Thus the yellow colour of the skin in a case of jaundice is a phenomenon with no purposiveness and we therefore call it a symptom, as contrasted with the war-paint of a Red Indian which is a purposive part of the war ceremonial. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1309

 

The whole of a nation never reacts like a normal modern individual, but always like a primitive group being. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

Man in the group is always unreasonable, irresponsible, emotional, erratic, and unreliable. Crimes the individual alone could never stand are freely committed by the group being. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

The State is the psychological mirror-image of the democracy monster. As the nation always rises as one man, the State is just as good as one man. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

It, the State, is not like a Roman Caesar, enslaving prisoners of war on the lower strata of the population; it squeezes its contributions out of the most vital and most gifted individuals of its domain, making slaves of them for its own wasteful devices. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

It [The State] does not know that energy only works when accumulated. Its energy is money. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

It seems that “democracy” was a suitable name only in the very youth of the State-ghost. In order to support its boundless ambitions two brand-new “isms” had to be invented: Socialism and Communism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

Money value is fast becoming a fiction guaranteed by the State. Money becomes paper and everybody convinces everybody else that the little scraps are worth something because the State says so. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

As far back as 1918 I published a paper in which I called the attention of my contemporaries to an astounding development in the German edition of the collective unconscious. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

I had caught hold of certain collective dreams of Germans which convinced me that they portrayed the beginning of a national regression analogous to the regression of a frightened and helpless individual, becoming first infantile and then primitive or archaic. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

I saw Nietzsche’s “blond beast” looming up, with all that it implies. I felt sure that Christianity would be challenged and that the Jews would be taken to account. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

Germany was the first country to experience the miracles worked by democracy’s ghost, the State. She saw her money becoming elastic and expanding to astronomical proportions and then evaporating altogether. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

The whole educated middle class was utterly ruined, but the State was on top, putting on more and more of the “-istic” rouge as war-paint. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

Through Communism in Russia, through National Socialism in Germany, through Fascism in Italy, the State became all-powerful and claimed its slaves body and soul. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

Democracy became its own mirror-image, its own ghost, while the ghost became appallingly real, an all-embracing mystical presence and personality that usurped the throne a pious theocratic Christianity had hoped God would take. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

The old totalitarian claim of the Civitas Dei is now voiced by the State: one sheep as good as another and the whole herd crowded together, guarded by plain-clothed and uniformed wolf-dogs, utterly deprived of all the rights which the man on the island who called himself a democracy had dreamt of. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

And a new miracle happened. Out of nowhere certain men came, and each of them said like Louis XIV, “L’etat c’est moi.” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

But he comes from Braunau, a little town that has already produced two famous mediums—the Schneider brothers. (Harry Price has written a book about one of them.) Hitler is presumably the third and the most efficient medium from Braunau. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

When the State-spirit speaks through him, he sends forth a voice of thunder and his word is so powerful that it sweeps together crowds of millions like fallen autumn leaves. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

But if you carefully study what President Roosevelt is up to and what the famous N.R.A. meant to the world of American commerce and industry, then you get a certain idea of how near the great State in America is to becoming Roosevelt’s incarnation. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para

 

Just as Christianity had a cross to symbolize its essential teaching, so Hitler has a swastika, a symbol as old and widespread as the cross.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1328

 

And just as it was a star over Bethlehem that announced the incarnation of God, so Russia has a red star, and instead of the Dove and the Lamb a hammer and sickle, and instead of the sacred body a place of pilgrimage with the mummy of the first witness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1328

 

Hitler’s picture has been erected upon Christian altars. There are people who confess on their tombstones that they died in peace since their eyes had beheld not the Lord but the Fuhrer. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1329

 

You find in neo-paganism the most beautiful Wotanistic symbolism, Indo-germanic speculation, and so on. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1329

 

In North Germany there is a sect that worships Christ in the form of a rider on a white horse. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1329

 

It does not go as far as collective hallucinations, though the waves of enthusiasm and even ecstasy are running high. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1329

 

Nations in a condition of collective misery behave like neurotic or even psychotic individuals. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1330

 

It is usually the doctor treating a patient who unwittingly assumes the role of the projected figure. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1330

 

By transference the doctor appears in the guise of the father, for instance, as that personality who symbolizes superior power and intelligence, a guarantee of security and a protection against overwhelming dangers. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1330

 

In Hindu literature you also find the terms padma (lotus) and chakra, meaning the flowerlike centres of different localizations of consciousness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1331

 

In Tantrism and Lamaism it is used as an instrument of concentration and as a means of uniting the individual consciousness, the human ego-personality, with the superior divine personality of the non-ego, i.e., of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1332

 

Mandalas often have the character of rotating figures. One such figure is the swastika. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1332

 

When Nietzsche wrote his prophetic masterpiece, Thus Spake Zarathustra, he certainly had not the faintest notion that the superman he had created out of his personal misery and inefficiency would become a prophetic anticipation of a Fuhrer or Duce. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1333

 

Hitler and Mussolini are more or less ordinary human beings, but ones who, curiously enough, assume that they themselves know what to do in a situation which practically nobody understands. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1333

 

They [Hitler & Mussolini] seem to have the superhuman courage or the equally superhuman recklessness to shoulder a responsibility which apparently nobody else is willing or able to carry. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1333

 

Only a superman could be entrusted with faculties that are equal to the difficulties of the actual situation. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1333

 

But we know that mystical experience as well as identification with an archetypal figure lend almost superhuman force to the ordinary man. Not in vain do the Germans call their Fuhrer “our Joan of Arc.” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1333

 

I am told that Hitler locked himself in his room for three days and nights when his whole staff beseeched him not to leave the League of Nations. When he appeared again he said without any explanation, “Gentlemen, Germany must leave the League.” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1333

 

Hitler’s unconscious seems to be female. Mussolini’s Latin and very masculine temperament does not allow a comparison with Hitler. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

As an Italian he [Mussolini] is imbued with Roman history, and indeed in every gesture he betrays his identity with the Caesar.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

It is most characteristic what rumour has to say about him. I am told—I don’t know whether there is any truth in it or not—that not very long ago he [Mussolini] appeared at a reception in the Roman toga and the golden laurel wreath of the Caesar, creating a panic that could only be hushed up by the most drastic measures.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

Gossip is surely a bad thing, but I confess I always find it interesting because it is often the only means of getting information about a public figure. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

Gossip does not need to be true in order to be of value. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

Then if it [Gossip] gives an entirely twisted picture of a man, it clearly shows the way in which his persona, that is his public appearance, functions. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

Most of the biography of a public figure consists of the persona’s history and often of very little individual truth. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

The problems of modern life are too urgent to remain the playthings of shortsighted partisans. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1335

 

The religions might indeed be considered as psychotherapeutic systems which assist our understanding of instinctual disturbances, for these are not a recent phenomenon but have existed from time immemorial. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 519

 

The psyche consists not only of the contents of consciousness, which derive from sensory impressions, but also of ideas apparently based on perceptions which have been modified in a peculiar way by preexistent and unconscious formative factors, i.e., by the archetypes. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 519

 

The psyche can therefore be said to consist of consciousness plus the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 519

 

This leads us to conclude that   part of the psyche is explicable in terms of recent causes, but that another part reaches back into the deepest layers of our racial history. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 519

 

 

All religious and metaphysical concepts rest upon archetypal foundations, and, to the extent that we are able to explore them, we can cast at least a superficial glance behind the scenes of world history, and lift a little the veil of mystery which hides the meaning of metaphysical ideas. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 519

 

Metaphysics is, as it were, a physics or physiology of the archetypes, and its dogmas formulate the insights that have been gained into the nature of these dominants—the unconscious leitmotifs that characterize the psychic happenings of a given epoch. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 519

 

The archetype is “metaphysical” because it transcends consciousness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 519

 

Preoccupation with historical subjects may at first glance seem to be merely a physician’s personal hobby, but to the psychotherapist it is a necessary part of his mental equipment.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 518

 

In Italy it is the Fascio, and in Germany the S.S. is fast on the way to becoming something like a religious order of knights that is going to rule a colony of sixty million natives. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1336

 

In the history of the world there has never been a case where order was established with sweet reasonableness in a chaos. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1336

 

Chaos yields only to enforced order. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1336

 

In the dictator and his oligarchical hierarchy the State-ghost appears in the flesh. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1337

 

Disorder is destructive. Order is always a cage. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1338

 

Freedom is the prerogative of a minority and it is always based on the disadvantage of others. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1338

 

Switzerland, the oldest democracy in the world, calls herself a free country because no foreigner ever enjoyed a liberty to her disadvantage until America and Great Britain went off the gold standard. Since then we have felt like victims. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1338

 

If we are stumbling into an era of dictators, Caesars, and incarnated States, we have accomplished a cycle of two thousand years and the serpent has again met with its own tail. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1342

 

Then our era will be a near replica of the first centuries a.d., when Caesar was the State and a god, and divine sacrifices were made to Caesar while the temples of the gods crumbled away. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1342

 

Since history repeats itself and the spiral of evolution seemingly returns to the point where it took off, there is a possibility that mankind is approaching an epoch when enough will be said about things which are never what we wish them to be, and when the question will be raised why we were ever interested in a bad comedy. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Pages 567-581

 

Even as Christianity challenged the Roman Imperium, enthroned ambitious Roman bishops as Pontifices Romani, and perpetuated the great Empire in the theocracy of the Church and the Holy Roman Empire, so the Duce has produced once more all the stage scenery of the Imperium which will soon reach from Ethiopia to the Pillars of Hercules as of old. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1328

 

Again it is Germany that gives us some notion of the underlying archetypal symbolism brought up by the eruption of the collective unconscious. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1329

 

The onslaught on Christianity is obvious; it would not even need corroboration through a neo-pagan movement incorporating three million people. This movement can only be compared with the archetypal material exhibited by a case of paranoid schizophrenia. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 576

 

This unconscious attempt plays a great role in the general personification of the State. It gives it its ghostlike quality and bestows upon it the faculty of incarnating itself in a human personality. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1331

 

The almost personal authority and apparent efficiency of the State are, in a sense, nothing else than the unconscious constellation of a superior instinctual personality which compensates the obvious inefficiency of the conscious ego-personality. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1330

 

The persona is never the true character; it is a composite of the individual’s behaviour and of the role attributed to him by the public. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

 

Since Socialism and Communism merely enhance the attributes of democracy, i.e., of a Constitution where there is a ruler without subjects and subjects without a ruler, they only serve to hollow out the meaning of Parliament, of government, of money, and of the so-called rights of the free citizen. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1334

Any human judgment, no matter how great its subjective” conviction, is liable to error, particularly judgments concerning transcendental subjects. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1584

 

It is our judgment that introduces the element of deception. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1584

 

The unconscious is neutral, rather like nature. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1586

 

It is the task of consciousness to select the right place where you are not too near and not too far from water; but the water is indispensable. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1586

 

A metaphysical being does not as a rule speak through the telephone to you; it usually communicates with man through the medium of the soul, in other words, our unconscious, or rather through its transcendental ‘psychoid” basis. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1586

 

Science is made by man, which does not mean that there are not occasionally acts of grace permitting transgression into realms beyond. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1591

 

I merely hold that metaphysics cannot be an object of science, which does not mean that numinous experiences do not happen frequently, particularly in the course of an analysis or in the life of a truly religious individual. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1591

 

Here Basil the Great would say, “Of course that is so, but all evil comes from man and not from God,” forgetting altogether that the serpent in Paradise was not made by man, and that Satan is one of the sons of God, prior to man. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1593

 

Even the God of the New Testament is still irascible and vengeful to such a degree that he needs the self-sacrifice of his son to quench his wrath.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1593

 

He is the Father or Creator of Satan as well as of Christ. Certainly if God the Father were nothing else than a loving Father, Christ’s cruel sacrificial death

would be thoroughly superfluous. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1593

 

What Victor White writes about the assimilation of the shadow is not to be taken seriously. Being a Catholic priest he is bound hand and foot to the doctrine of his Church and has to defend every syllogism. . ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1594

 

Being a doctor I am never too certain about my moral judgments.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1594

 

What God is in himself nobody knows; at least I don’t. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1595

 

Only a thing that changes and evolves, lives, but static things mean spiritual death.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1595

 

I would completely agree if you should say: God approaches man in the form of symbols. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1612

 

The privatio boni cannot be compared to the quaternity, because it is not a revelation. On the contrary, it has all the earmarks of a “doctrine,” a philosophical invention. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para  1613

 

Of course I am pleading the cause of the thinking man, and, inasmuch as most people do not think, of a small minority. . ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1616

 

As I have said, it makes a great and vital difference to man whether or not he considers himself as the source of evil, while maintaining that all good stems from God. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1617

 

The dogma of the Virgin Birth does not abolish the fact that “God” in the form of the Holy Ghost is Christ’s father.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1619

 

Christ is on the contrary the innocent and blameless victim without the macula peccati, therefore not really a human being who has to live without the benefit of the Virgin Birth and is crucified in a thousand forms. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1620

 

Penitence or remorse follows the deviation from the superior will. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1627

 

Thus the Gnostics thought that Christ had cut off his shadow, and I have never heard that he embodies evil as Yahweh explicitly does. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1633

 

To be alone with God is highly suspect, and, mind you, it is, because the will of God can be terrible and can isolate you from your family and your friends and, if you are courageous or foolish enough, you may end up in the lunatic asylum. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1637

 

Nothing shields you better against the solitude and forlornness of the divine experience than community. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1637

 

The self has always been, and will be, your innermost centre and periphery, your scintilla and punctum solis. It is even biologically the archetype of order and—dynamically—the source of life. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1638

 

Yet without dualism there is no cognition at all, because discrimination is impossible. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1639

 

We cannot even conceive of a thing that is not a form of energy, and energy is inevitably based upon opposites. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1640

 

Jung has been given the title “Gnostic” which he has rejected. ~Reverend David Cox, CW 18, Para 1641

 

The designation of my “system” as “Gnostic” is an invention of my theological critics. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1642

 

I loved the Gnostics in spite of everything, because they recognized the necessity of some further raisonnement, entirely absent in the Christian cosmos. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1643

 

I have Gnosis so far as I have immediate experience, and my models are greatly helped by the representations collectives of all religions. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1643

 

The sacrificium intellectus is a sweet drug for man’s all-embracing spiritual laziness and inertia. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1643

 

Gnosis is characterized by the hypostatizing of psychological apperceptions, i.e., by the integration of archetypal contents beyond the revealed “truth” of the Gospels. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1647

 

The people who call me a Gnostic cannot understand that I am a psychologist, describing modes of psychic behaviour precisely like a biologist studying the instinctual activities of insects. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1647

 

The Catholic Church has almost succeeded in adding femininity to the masculine Trinity. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1657

 

As God lives in everybody in the form of the scintilla of the self, man could see his “daemonic,” i.e., ambivalent, nature in himself and thus he could understand how he is penetrated by God or how God incarnates in man. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1660

 

The bill of the Christian era is presented to us: we are living in a world rent in two from top to bottom; we are confronted with the H-bomb and we have to face our own shadows. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1661

 

We are threatened with universal genocide if we cannot work out the way of salvation by a symbolic death. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1661

 

I don’t presume to know what the psyche is; I only know that there is a psychic realm in which and from which such manifestations start. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1586

 

We find numberless images of God, but we cannot produce the original. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1589

 

Psychology to me is an honest science that recognizes its own boundaries, and I am not a philosopher or a theologian who believes in his ability

to step beyond the epistemological barrier. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1591

 

I believe firmly in the intrinsic value of the human attempt to gain understanding, but I also recognize that the human mind cannot step beyond itself, although divine grace may and probably does allow at least glimpses into a transcendental order of things. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1589

 

In so far as the human mind and its necessities issue from the hands of the Creator, we must assume that moral judgment was provided by the same source. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1604

 

As I am not making a metaphysical judgment, I cannot help remarking that at least in our empirical world the opposites are inexorably at work and that, without them, this world would not exist. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1640

 

If man were positively the origin of all evil, he would possess a power equal or almost equal to that of the good, which is God. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1593

 

The self is not the ego, it symbolizes the totality of man and he is obviously not whole without God.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1624

 

Gnosis is characterized by the hypostatizing of psychological apperceptions, i.e., by the integration of archetypal contents beyond the revealed “truth” of the Gospels. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1647

 

“Many are called, but few are chosen” is an authentic logion and not characteristic of Gnosticism alone. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1641

 

For the patient’s mental health it is all-important that he gets some proper understanding of the numina the collective unconscious produces, and that he assigns the proper place to them. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1591

 

I must confess that I myself could find access to religion only through the psychological understanding of inner experiences, whereas traditional religious interpretations left me high and dry. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1643

 

It was only psychology that helped me to overcome the fatal impressions of my youth that everything untrue, even immoral, in our ordinary empirical world must be believed to be the eternal truth in religion. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1643

 

In spite of the fact that the Church long ago discouraged the idea of a quaternity, the fact remains that Church symbolism abounds in quaternity allusions. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1606

 

Protestantism is free to ignore the spiritual problems raised by our time, but it will remove itself from the battlefield and thereby lose its contact with life.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1608

 

Faith on the contrary—as it seems to me—maintains the conviction that the projection is a reality. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1635

 

Individuation is as much a fatality as a fulfillment. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 529

 

Being a natural and spontaneous symbol, the quaternity has everything to do with human psychology, while the trinitarian symbol (though equally spontaneous) has become cold, a remote abstraction. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1609

 

It makes an enormous practical difference whether your dominant idea of totality is three or four. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1610

 

Yahweh and Allah are monads, the Christian God a triad (historically), the modern experience presumably a tetrad, the early Persian deity a dyad. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1611

 

I don’t pretend to be able to explain the actual condition of the world, but it is plain to any unprejudiced mind that the forces of evil are dangerously

near to a victory over the powers of good. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1593

 

One should listen to the inner voice attentively, intelligently and critically (Probate spiritus!), because the voice one hears is the influxus divinus consisting, as the Acts of John aptly state, of “right” and “left” streams, i.e., of opposites. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1662

 

If one depreciates the unconscious one blocks the channels through which the aqua gratiae flows, but one certainly does not incapacitate the devil by this method. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1586

 

It is sheer malevolence to accuse me of an atheistic attitude simply because I try to be honest and disciplined. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1589

 

If I should express a belief beyond that or should assert the existence of God, it would not only be superfluous and inefficient, it would show that I am

not basing my opinion on facts. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1589

 

I am well satisfied with the fact that I know experiences which I cannot avoid calling numinous or divine. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1589

 

As the general manifestations of the unconscious are ambivalent or even ambiguous (“It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God,” Heb. 10:31), decision and discriminating judgment are all-important.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1588

 

As one habitually identifies the “psyche” with what one knows of it, it is assumed that one can call certain (supposed or believed) metaphysical entities non-psychic. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1649

 

It seems to me of paramount importance that Protestantism should integrate psychological experience, as for instance Jacob Boehme did. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1654

 

Inasmuch as out of evil good may come, and out of good evil, we do not know whether creation is ultimately good or a regrettable mistake and God’s suffering. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1654

 

If we seek genuine psychological understanding of the human being of our own time, we must know his spiritual history absolutely. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1833

 

The urgent therapeutic necessity of confronting the individual with his own dark side is a secular continuation of the Christian development of consciousness and leads to phenomena of assimilation similar to those found in Gnosticism, the Kabbala, and Hermetic philosophy. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1517

 

Behind the shadow, however, the deeper layers of the unconscious come forward, those which, so far as we are able to ascertain, consist of archetypal, sometimes instinctive, structures, so-called ‘patterns of behaviour.” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1830

 

True “redemption” comes about only when he is led back to that deepest and innermost source of life which is generally called God.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1745

 

Jesus was the channel for a new and direct experience of God, and how little this depends on external conditions is amply demonstrated by the history of Christianity. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1745

 

In this sense, too, Judas would be his [Christ’s] dark brother, since in the story of the Temptation the devil of worldly power stepped up to Jesus in much the same way as Mara tempted the Buddha. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1747

 

Although I owe not a little to philosophy, and have benefited by the rigorous discipline of its methods of thought, I nevertheless feel in its presence that holy dread which is inborn in every observer of facts. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1730

 

We know that children often have dreams dealing with the unconfessed problems of their parents. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1804

 

From the Indian standpoint our psychology looks like a “dialectical” yoga. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1817

 

For the greatest enigma in the world, and the one that is closest to us, is man himself.

 

It is exceedingly probable that the psyche is analogous to the body and is capable of having as many diseases. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1777

 

We all need nourishment for our psyche. It is impossible to find such nourishment in urban tenements without a patch of green or a blossoming tree. We need a relationship with nature. Carl Jung, The Earth Has a Soul: The Nature Writings of C.G. Jung, p. 154-155

We all need nourishment for our psyche. It is impossible to find such nourishment in urban tenements without a patch of green or a blossoming tree. We need a relationship with nature. Carl Jung, The Earth Has a Soul: The Nature Writings of C.G. Jung, p. 154-155

 

Understood as a psychological phenomenon, Ufos compensate our insecurity in this world. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 492

 

It is quite obvious that all human beings have father and mother complexes, and it therefore means nothing if we discern traces of a father or mother complex in a great work of art; just as little as would the discovery that Goethe had a liver and two kidneys like any other mortal. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1723

 

The supposed vacuum of a merely subjective psychic space becomes filled with objective figures, having wills of their own, and is seen to be a cosmos that conforms to law, and among these figures the ego takes its place in transfigured form. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1720

 

We also meet this phenomenon in alchemy, where a woman adept often plays the role of the soror mystica (Zosimos and Theosebeia, Nicolas Flamel and Peronelle, John Pordage and Jane Leade, and in the nineteenth century Mr. South and his daughter, Mrs. Atwood) ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1703

 

This is not a “scientific” book [Answer to Job] but a personal confrontation with the traditional Christian world view, occasioned by the impact of the new dogma of the Assumption. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 662

 

Although in human beings the archetype represents a collective and almost universal mode of action and reaction, its activity cannot as a rule be predicted; one never knows when an archetype will react, and which archetype it will be. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1492

 

And before raising the cry that modern psychology destroys religious ideas by “psychologizing” them, we should reflect that it is just this psychology which is trying to renew the connection with the realities of the psyche, lest consciousness should flutter about rootlessly and helplessly in the void, a prey to every imaginable intellectualism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1495

 

One must be deeply and directly moved by the strangeness, one might almost say by the incomprehensibility, of the Eastern psyche. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1483

 

Knowledge of Eastern psychology provides the indispensable basis for a critique of Western psychology, as indeed for any objective understanding of it. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1483

 

Gnosticism is still an obscure affair and in need of explanation, despite the fact that sundry personages have already approached it from the most diverse angles and tried their hands at explanations with doubtful success. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1478

 

But the philologist or theologian who concerns himself with Gnosticism generally possesses not a shred of psychiatric knowledge, which must always be called upon in explaining extraordinary mental phenomena. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1479

 

The explanation of Gnostic ideas “in terms of themselves,” i.e., in terms of their historical foundations, is futile, for in that way they are reduced only to their less developed forestages but not understood in their actual significance. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1479

 

The archetypal motifs of the unconscious are the psychic source of Gnostic ideas, of delusional ideas (especially of the paranoid schizophrenic forms), of symbol-formation in dreams, and of active imagination in the course of an analytical treatment of neurosis. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1480

 

In the light of these reflections, I regret Dr. Quispel’s quotations from the Gnostics, that the “Autopator contained in himself all things, in [a state of] unconsciousness (iv ayvtoaria)” and that “The Father was devoid of consciousness (avevvorjros)” as a fundamental discovery for the psychology of Gnosticism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1481

 

As a Christian I have to share the burden of my brother’s wrongness, and that is most heavy when I do not know whether in the end he is not more right than I. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1466

 

I hold it to be immoral, in any case entirely unchristian, to put my brother in the wrong (i.e., to call him fool, ass, spiteful, obdurate, etc.) simply because I suppose myself to be in possession of the absolute truth. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1466

 

I hold all confessionalism to be completely unchristian. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1466

 

If I possessed the absolute truth I could do nothing further than to press into my patient’s hand a book of devotion or confessional guidance, just what is no longer of any help to him. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1467

 

Whoever talks in today’s world of an absolute and single truth is speaking in an obsolete dialect and not in any way in the language of mankind. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1468

 

Christianity possesses good tidings from God, but no textbook of a dogma with claim to totality. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1468

 

Since technology consists of certain procedures invented by man, it is not something that somehow lies outside the human sphere. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1404

 

Indeed, it is becoming ever more obvious that it is not famine, not earthquakes, not microbes, not cancer but man himself who is man’s greatest danger to man, for the simple reason that there is no adequate protection against psychic epidemics, which are infinitely more devastating than the worst of natural catastrophes. Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1358

 

It is therefore in the highest degree desirable that a knowledge of psychology should spread so that men can understand the source of the supreme dangers that threaten them.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1358

 

Not by arming to the teeth, each for itself, can the nations defend themselves in the long run from the frightful catastrophes of modern war.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1358

 

But if you are faced with a good judge of men, he will extract your painful secrets from your trouser pocket with the greatest skill without your

knowing it, and do it much better than was ever done by a psychodiagnostic method. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1459

 

I am no prophet, and I cannot predict the future of our society. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1460

 

Thanks to the mass media and the cheap sensationalism offered by the cinema, radio, and newspapers, and thousands of amusements of all kinds, life in the recent past has rapidly been approaching a condition that was not far removed from the hectic American tempo. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1343

 

All time-saving devices, amongst which we must count easier means of communication and other conveniences, do not, paradoxically enough, save time but merely cram our time so full that we have no time for anything. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1343

 

The essence of culture is continuity and conservation of the past; craving for novelty produces only anti-culture and ends in barbarism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1343

 

Unfortunately our world, or perhaps the moral structure of man, is so constituted that no progress and no improvement are consistently good, since sooner or later the corresponding misuse will appear which turns the blessing into a curse. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1344

 

One has only to think of the spiritual devastation that has already been wrought by materialism, the invention of would-be intellectuals equipped with truly infantile arguments. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1345

 

To remove the ideal from the material to the spiritual world is a tricky business, because material happiness is something tangible (if ever it is attained), and the spirit an invisible thing which it is difficult to find or to demonstrate. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346

 

An attainable sausage is as a rule more illuminating than a devotional exercise; in other words, to find happiness in the spirit one must be possessed of a “spirit” to find happiness in. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346

 

A life of ease and security has convinced everyone of all the material joys, and has even compelled the spirit to devise new and better ways to material welfare, but it has never produced spirit. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346

 

But at all times there are only very few who are convinced from the bottom of their hearts that material happiness is a danger to the spirit, and

who are able to renounce the world for its sake. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346

 

One man, because of his inner weakness, needs encouragement ; another, because of his inner assurance, needs the restraint of austerity. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1349

 

Austerity enforces simplicity, which is true happiness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1349

 

But to live simply, without regret and bitterness, is a moral task which many people will find very hard. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1349

 

The community is not anything good in itself, as it gives countless weaklings a wonderful opportunity to hide behind each other and palm off their own incompetence on their fellows. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1352

 

Community at all costs, I fear, produces the flock of sheep that infallibly attracts the wolves. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1354

 

There could be talk of something really novel only if the unimaginable happened: if reason, humanity, and love won a lasting victory.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1356

 

About 50 per cent of politics is definitely obnoxious inasmuch as it poisons the utterly incompetent mind of the masses. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1301

 

We are on our guard against contagious diseases of the body, but we are exasperatingly careless when it comes to the even more dangerous collective diseases of the mind. .  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1301

 

It is quite obvious that all human beings have father and mother complexes, and it therefore means nothing if we discern traces of a father or mother complex in a great work of art; just as little as would the discovery that Goethe had a liver and two kidneys like any other mortal. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1723

 

And before raising the cry that modern psychology destroys religious ideas by “psychologizing” them, we should reflect that it is just this psychology which is trying to renew the connection with the realities of the psyche, lest consciousness should flutter about rootlessly and helplessly in the void, a prey to every imaginable intellectualism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1495

 

In the light of these reflections, I regret Dr. Quispel’s quotations from the Gnostics, that the “Autopator contained in himself all things, in [a state of] unconsciousness (iv ayvtoaria)” and that “The Father was devoid of consciousness (avevvorjros)” as a fundamental discovery for the psychology of Gnosticism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Page 1481

 

Since technology consists of certain procedures invented by man, it is not something that somehow lies outside the human sphere. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1404

 

It is therefore in the highest degree desirable that a knowledge of psychology should spread so that men can understand the source of the supreme dangers that threaten them.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1358

 

But if you are faced with a good judge of men, he will extract your painful secrets from your trouser pocket with the greatest skill without your

knowing it, and do it much better than was ever done by a psychodiagnostic method. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1459

 

I am no prophet, and I cannot predict the future of our society. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1460

 

To remove the ideal from the material to the spiritual world is a tricky business, because material happiness is something tangible (if ever it is attained), and the spirit an invisible thing which it is difficult to find or to demonstrate. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346

 

An attainable sausage is as a rule more illuminating than a devotional exercise; in other words, to find happiness in the spirit one must be possessed of a “spirit” to find happiness in. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346

 

But at all times there are only very few who are convinced from the bottom of their hearts that material happiness is a danger to the spirit, and

who are able to renounce the world for its sake. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1346

 

One man, because of his inner weakness, needs encouragement; another, because of his inner assurance, needs the restraint of austerity. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1349

 

Austerity enforces simplicity, which is true happiness. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1349

 

But to live simply, without regret and bitterness, is a moral task which many people will find very hard. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1349

 

The community is not anything good in itself, as it gives countless weaklings a wonderful opportunity to hide behind each other and palm off their own incompetence on their fellows. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1352

 

Community at all costs, I fear, produces the flock of sheep that infallibly attracts the wolves. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1354

 

There could be talk of something really novel only if the unimaginable happened: if reason, humanity, and love won a lasting victory.  ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1356

 

About 50 per cent of politics is definitely obnoxious inasmuch as it poisons the utterly incompetent mind of the masses. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1301

 

 

We are on our guard against contagious diseases of the body, but we are exasperatingly careless when it comes to the even more dangerous collective diseases of the mind. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1301

 

It is a truism that there are never facts enough, but, on the other hand, there is only one human brain, which only too easily gets swamped by the boundless flood of material. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1296

 

Yet the primitive is far from being illogical and is just as far from being “animistic.” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1297

 

The fundamental error persists in the public that there are definite answers, “solutions,” or views which need only be uttered in order to spread the

necessary light. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1292

 

But the most beautiful truth—as history has shown a thousand times over-—is of no use at all unless it has become the innermost experience and possession of the individual. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1292

 

Not to have an intellectual conception of things, but to find our way to the inner, and perhaps wordless, irrational experience—that is the great problem. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1292

 

Most people know very well how things should be, but who can point the way to get there? ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1292

 

Absolute assertions belong to the realm of faith—or of immodesty. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1294

 

I owe my relations to China and to Richard Wilhelm simply and solely to certain psychological discoveries. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1286

 

As soon as the Romans, beginning with the campaigns of Pompey, made themselves the political masters of Asia Minor, Rome became inundated

with Hellenistic-Asiatic syncretism. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1287

 

I do not know how much the spiritual and political decline of Spain and Portugal had to do with their conquest of the primitive South American continent, but the fact remains that the two countries which first established their rule in East Asia, namely Holland and England, were also the first to be thoroughly infected with theosophy. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1287

 

For instance, in dreams we think in very much the same way as the primitive thinks consciously. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1290

 

With primitives, waking life and dream life are less divided than with us—so little, in fact, that it is often difficult to find out whether what a primitive tells you was real or a dream. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1290

 

The psychological peculiarities of the Americans exhibit features that would be accessible to psychoanalysis, since they point to intense sexual repression. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1284

 

The motif of the anima is developed in its purest and most naive form in Rider Haggard. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1280

 

It is a symptom of profound unconsciousness that our scientific age has lost sight of the paramount importance of the psyche as a fundamental condition of human existence. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1278

 

What is the use of technological improvements when mankind must still tremble before those infantile tyrants, ridiculous yet terrible, in the style of

Hitler? ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1278

 

I know of so many who, opening one of my books and, stumbling upon a number of Latin quotations, shut it with a bang, because Latin suggests history and therefore death and unreality. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1264

 

No matter how much we are of today, there has been a yesterday, which was just as real, just as human and warm, as the moment we call Now,

which—alas—in a few hours will be a yesterday as dead as the first of January anno Domini 1300. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1266

 

The psyche is not only of today, it reaches right back to prehistoric ages. Has man really changed in ten thousand years? Have stags changed their antlers in this short lapse of time? ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1266

 

Instincts are the most conservative determinants of any kind of life. The mind is not born a tabula rasa. Like the body, it has its predetermined individual aptitudes: namely, patterns of behaviour. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para  1271

 

I have called the psychological manifestations of instinct “archetypes.” ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1271

 

Thus Communism is an archaic, highly insidious pattern of life which characterizes primitive social groups. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1272

 

The instinct to survive is aroused as a reaction against the tendency to mass suicide represented by the H-bomb and the underlying political schism of the world. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 1274