Intuition does not say what things mean but sniffs out their possibilities. Meaning is given by thinking. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 21

 

But in a certain sense, the failure to answer your letter is also right; for your dream about “passive homosexuality” and “mental weakness” says clearly enough that you absolutely have to stand on your own feet, or you’ll be blown over by every wind (wind = animus). – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

Naturally you cannot release any woman from the animus, as long as you yourself are falling into the anima. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

One falls most easily into the anima when one is overrun by one’s feelings, because one fails to question them sufficiently. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

Anima-feelings, however, are symbols, or conditions, created by the anima when it commands psychic contents that it refuses to share with consciousness. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

A woman falls too much into the animus when the analyst is behaving in a too womanly manner towards himself and failing to keep his feelings objectively in hand. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

Since the Spirit is not made but fulfils its own laws of life as a living entity, superordinate to the human being,  so the human being also cannot build it up or point the way for it. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 24

 

Schmid died of a streptococcal infection, which he got from a small cut caused by a car accident. It was the fourth bad accident in half a year. Sadly, he ignored this warning. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 27

 

I recognize the individual necessity which leads Frau S. towards Indian practices, and I myself have advised her to do so. In principle of course I’m not at all in favor of imitating Indian methods, and consider it as mistaken as the Europeanization of Eastern civilization. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 33

 

I wouldn’t like to see the subjective conditions of Frau S. outweighing the spirit of analysis and ultimately even falsifying it into a theosophy. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 33

 

What disturbs you most in your dream, the sinking of the anima, corresponds to Faust’s words, “Go down then, I could also say, rise up!” – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 36

 

Correspondingly, fire rises from the ground. Tobacco in any form means a material for making fantasies ( = clouds of smoke). The southern Slavs are part of a warmer, southern zone = realm of sensation – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 36

 

Nothing has changed in our deeper relationship, but in the upper layers you must find your way to yourself as much as possible. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 39

 

The anima always takes possession of the ground one lives on. Therefore you are confronted with special tasks. Too much Europe isn’t good for you right now. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 39

 

It appears that amusing rumors are being spread about me. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 44

 

The only unquestionable fact which lies behind all this stupid gossip is that as the honorary chairman of the International Society for Psychotherapy, I could not desert the society at the moment when Kretschmer resigned. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 44

 

Neither have I addressed Hitler over the radio or in any other manner, nor have I expressed anything concerning politics. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 45

 

With regard to my view that, as far as one can see, the Jews will not create their own form of culture, this view is based on (1) historical facts, and (2) the additional fact that the specific cultural contribution of the Jew evolves most clearly within a host-culture, where the Jew frequently becomes the very carrier of this culture, or its promoter. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 45

 

The Jewish Christ-complex is a very remarkable business. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

The existence of this complex predisposes to a somewhat hystericized general mental attitude, which has become especially clear to me in the course of the present anti-Christian agitation against me. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

As you know, Freud previously accused me of anti-Semitism because I could not tolerate his soulless materialism. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

I cannot see why the Jew, like any so-called Christian, is incapable of accepting that he is being personally criticized when one has an opinion about him. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

Why must it always be assumed that one wants to condemn the Jewish people? Surely the individual is not the people? – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

So, if you perceived my reserved attitude in Ascona as anti-Semitism, you missed the mark completely. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

In general, you really ought to know me well enough not to attribute to me uncritically a non-individual stupidity like anti-Semitism. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 47

 

No one who is a Jew can become a human being without knowing he is a Jew, since this is the basis from which he must reach out toward a higher humanity. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 47

 

Finally I want to inform you that my new book, “Wirklichkeit der Seele,” has appeared. I’ve included in it a Jewish author on Old Testament psychology in order to annoy the National Socialists and all those Jews who have decried me as an anti-Semite. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 47

 

One of these days a situation may very well arise when we Jews will have to ask for your [Jung’s]help for the sake of our soul! – James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 41

 

Later, when you are more deeply rooted not only in Palestine but also in your inner life, everything you need will fall into place of its own accord. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 39

 

I have to admit that, without believing some of the specific accusations, my image of you was somewhat darkened, especially after Fraulein Wolff told me that, if you had been a German, you would have voted for the Nazis. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 48

 

I did not go so far as believing you capable of a non-individual stupidity like anti-Semitism, but thought it necessary to inform you of these rumors, and since they’ve produced such a reaction from you, in the form of your clear and unequivocal letter, a great burden has been lifted from my heart. ~James, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 48

 

I recalled your wonderful explanations during the Berlin Seminar, where you demonstrated how the idea of ritual murder was projected onto Christians and later onto Jews, and the underlying subjective process experienced by the person originating such projections. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 49

 

I think it’s possible to project anti-Semitism onto you because you have opinions about the Jew which may be correct, but only insofar as they reflect the Galut existence, as it is called in the Kabbalah,  the banishment of the Shekhinah (the Jewish anima). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 49

 

Jesus and his way of redemption were necessarily rejected, a process which you’ve described precisely in Types, in the chapter on Prometheus and Epimetheus. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

As far as I can judge the Chinese intellectual, the Chinese path led to a whole – “completion” not “perfection”. Jewish consciousness, on the other hand, has the characteristic that something essential is missing; something suppressed lives in the Jewish soul, which induces even in the educated Jew the most peculiar affects and hysterical reactions. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

This rejection of Christ has, it seems to me (Jews will never admit this) determined the fate of the Jews. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

From a Jewish viewpoint, Christianity is its shadow (and also vice versa, by the way, but that’s the Christians’ concern). James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

It’s historically demonstrable that in every era when the Jewish people attempted to realize the idea of the Messiah, great disturbances also erupted in the Christian world. Sabbatai Zwi and the religious wars, Zionism National Socialism. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page

51

 

You certainly know many people who have become restless through being cut off from the unconscious, who project the anima and seek salvation in every possible and impossible way, e.g. even in psychoanalysis, but never within themselves. The same is true for the Jews as a people. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 51

 

With the French Revolution a new historic era begins also for the Jewish people. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

Here [French Revolution] begins the purge of Jews, dissolving the Jewish ways of life which had existed heretofore, the disavowal of Jewishness, assimilation and cessation of the living Hebrew language, which from then on was used only literarily by the so-called “Maskilim” (representatives of the Enlightenment). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

The fact that the Jews repressed their Jewishness during the era of assimilation explains – besides the Christ-complex – also the psychological break of personalities like Heine,  as well as the soulless materialism of such inspiring but destructive individuals as Marx and Freud. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

I find your criticism of Freud essentially correct; it matches the image of the Jews during their period of assimilation in the previous century, and such Jews still exist today in droves. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

As two thousand years of suffering shows and especially the sorrowful events of the year 1933 – the Jew has injured himself gravely by his negative valuation of the unconscious. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 53

 

Since I’ve become very familiar with the Bible and have been living in Palestine, I understand now more than ever how enormously important for us is your vivid conception of the unconscious and the approach to the experience of the unconscious. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 53

 

For me, at least, it was only through you that it became possible to understand the experiences of the prophets, the Messianic idea, and to rediscover what was lost in the consciousness of the Jewish people since the time of the prophets. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 53

 

The great contribution of Jung ( and this is clearly expressed in the essay in question) is that he has declared that the unconscious is also the creative foundation of the soul, and that he thus sees both aspects, the negative and the positive. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

Whoever ventures to follow the phenotype of the Jew into his darkest abyss, that person cannot be accused of escaping into a non-existing image of a Jew. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

When Jung expressed his views concerning the current situation of psychotherapy, he had to clarify to what extent Freud’s particular Jewish attitude to the unconscious influenced all of modern psychology and psychotherapy. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

Freud, however, unequivocally rejects the positive aspect of the unconscious (see The Future of an Illusion). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

To overcome this attitude of godlessness and homelessness, we need Jung’s revelations about Freud and about the corresponding distortion of Jewish psychology, and Jung’s way – in contrast to Freud’s – in order to arrive at the positive aspect of the unconscious through accepting the shadow as fully as possible.  ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 56

 

For that reason the final sentence of my essay was as follows: “In Jung’s personality as well as in his psychology and psychotherapy, something is contained which speaks to the depth of the ailing Jewish soul and which may lead to its liberation.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 56

 

Since I spent my childhood in Guatemala, I am probably able to adapt more easily to this climate [Palestine]. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 61

 

Radiation is enormously high in Palestine. The worst of it isn’t the heat, but the unbelievable abundance of ultraviolet light, which is much higher than for instance in Davos. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 61

 

We have our Nazis, i.e. a party which wants to elevate the “Fuhrer” to be the King of Palestine and is organized like the military.

They wear brown! shirts, are responsible for acts of terror, and they murdered the most important labor leader. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 61

 

The world seems to be going through an immense shift. Aquarius is announcing himself powerfully. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60

 

The anti-religious attitude is a powerful reaction against the worn-out spirit of the past. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 69

 

In psychology we have already reached the other side; the anti-religious are just starting to turn away from the past. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60

 

Hitler persistently shirks the religious conflict, which signifies much the same as the end of Protestantism in Germany. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60

 

What comes next is the conflict with the Catholic Church. In Austria they are now placing Protestant and Jewish children together in special schools. I wonder if it will lead again to religious warfare, as before? Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60.

 

With regard to your article, I agree entirely with its intention and conclusion, and only object to the inference that in some way I identify the Jew with Freud. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 62

 

Formerly I was considered a hater of Germans because I criticized their barbarism; now the Jews are accusing me of trying to curry favor with the Germans (and meanwhile Palestine’s foreign trade with Germany happily increased last year, despite the boycott!). Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 63

 

The feminine mind is earth which awaits the seed. This is the meaning of transference. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 63

 

In the deepest sense, all of us do not dream out of ourselves but out of that which exists between myself and the other. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 63

 

It’s atrocious how I neglect you, but the things I perceived via your wife were so wide-ranging and made everything about your future seem so uncertain to me that I instinctively shrank from them. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 67

 

To your earlier letter, I have to note that schizophrenia is not an unequivocal matter. Certain cases are certainly organic in nature, i.e. more organic than psychic, while others are more psychic. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 67

 

Since time immemorial primitive peoples have  commonly believed that it is impossible to conquer a foreign land, because those who occupy a foreign land will then be taken over by the gods of that land. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Even though the whites in America did not absorb Indian blood to any extent worth mentioning, specific Indian traits are evident in the appearance, bearing, and physiognomy of present-day Americans. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Thus, we would do better to say, not that the inhabitants of North America exhibit Indian traits, but that when the Europeans were transplanted to America, the change of habitat bestowed on them a different physiognomy. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Only think of their rough training combats and boxing, the songs of a Walt Whitman, and more besides unimaginable for Europeans.

The gods of that country have taken possession of them. Only one people proves to be an exception to this rule: the Jews. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Through all lands they [Jews] took their god with them, the god they conceived in the desert. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, 15

 

Israel’s god is a god of the wind, not originating from the earth, and from the very beginning he was grasped in spiritual form, as the Everlasting: I will be who I will be! ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

For the Jewish people, God is the energetic principle before it divides into its polarities. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

The soul of the Jew was bound up with this single-singular principle; his soul was not permitted to open itself to the land where he traveled. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

The Jew’s bride, the Jew’s anima was Israel, the Jewish people, the Sabbath, the Torah. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16.

 

The Jew’s homeland is the Torah, and the only content of his soul is God. And yet deep in every Jew is the yearning for oasis, for the earth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

It is a human being’s eternally impossible attempt to direct the soul away from the earth, to adapt collective energy and its specific formation to his soul, and to tum the Eternally Becoming into the only content of this soul. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

We [Jews] made a vital mistake by rejecting Christ. Christ is the repressed complex of the Jew. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 43

 

During one of her last sessions, Hilde [Kirsch’s wife] also talked to you at some length about me and my problem. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 70

 

To begin with, I have to tell you that the reason for my departure was not the land of Palestine, but the Jews. The Jews do not accept the land and the primitiveness there and instead attempt, consciously and unconsciously, to perpetuate their exile. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 70

 

Probably you told her something to the effect that I cannot reach my own depth, because I don’t realize my shadow sufficiently and am shirking the primitive within myself; my psychology seems as if I were floating, like a drop of oil, above my depth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 70

 

As you know, I am still constantly in great financial difficulties. I’m only now able to send you a portion of the amount I owe you. May I ask if you agree that I may send you the balance in about 2-3 months? ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 74.

The ears are connected with feelings, and you are not hearing feelings perceptively enough. That could be a not insignificant problem in relation to this patient. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 6

 

It is possible that he’s [Kirsch Patient]not reaching you properly on the feeling side. Masturbation is an expression of being isolated. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 6

 

It goes without saying that the anima problem is always present, and the anima always comes forward with very absolute demands, so absolute that it always signifies a kind of self-sacrifice (in the Christian sense) not to consent to them. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 9

 

The anima problem is always a problem of one’s own social inferiority; in other words, on the edge of a glacial crevasse it’s better not to make trial jumps, but rather to bring inner conditions into harmony with outer. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 10

 

In treating the anima, nothing is more dangerous than unworldly naivete. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 10

 

You can measure your anima’s social inferiority by your wife’s resistances. So be careful! Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 10

 

But I’m also afraid of all the brilliant people! Marianne Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 12

 

Your dream actually concerns the separation and differentiation of the anima. The Homunculus who takes care of this process is the Self. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 80

 

It [Alchemical Procedure] is a kind of yoga, aiming for the creation of the Self through “Imagination.” Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 81

 

Enclosed is a check in the amount of francs. According to my records, I owe you francs for my wife’s sessions and my own, and 4 francs for the Sermones. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 82

 

Odors are referred to occasionally in the alchemical writings. Psychologically they may be related to psychological exhalations, as you suspect. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 82

 

You must avoid carelessness and not lure a person who is meant for the collective into the path of danger. Nonnulli perierunt in opere

nostro! Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 85

 

I gladly take this opportunity, at least once a year, to express my deepest thanks to you for the inexpressible totality of what you’ve given me all these years. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page  87

 

What you write to me, though, about the 1574 edition of the Corpus Hermeticum decidedly piques my appetite. If the thing isn’t too expensive, I’d like to make a grab for it. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 88

 

During the past week I have read your Wotan essay and your commentary on the Tibetan Book of the Dead.  ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 90

 

Especially in connection with alchemy, it gave me an amazing amount and opened new aspects for me, which are so broad and deep that at times I’m quite stupefied. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 90

 

I have gone along old Maya trails as much as possible. The Indios hold on to their primitive religion, but do not give their secrets away to the white man. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 105

 

This calendar stone is valid for 52 years and includes Venus. It weighs many, many tons and has lain buried for several hundred years. Now it is in the Museum in Mexico. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 105

 

You ‘re to be congratulated for getting out of the hell of London. In Los Angeles you will surely have every opportunity to make your own way. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 96

 

Now I have an important announcement to make: My family and I have moved to Los Angeles. The war brought this about. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

During the war any kind of activity became almost impossible for us foreigners. All my books are burnt, even my seminar notes are gone. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

Now I am in California, in a climate which is quite similar to Guatemala’s, and have peace again and the possibility of regaining strength. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

Jung Clubs are a thorny problem, however, as you know better than anyone, and the effect of analysis on Jungian analysts (myself included!) gave rise to all sorts of questions in me, for which I have no answer. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

Please give my warmest greetings to your dear wife and to Fraulein Wolff, and do pass on my new address to them. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

In the meantime I reached my 70th birthday, for which I received in due time the congratulations of the Analytical Psychology Club of Los Angeles. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 100

 

Beside my gratitude for your kind remembrance I was very interested in the fact that such a new club has sprung up in Los Angeles. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 100

 

We passed through anxious times because we were twice immediately threatened by invasion and once it seemed to be inevitable, but miraculously enough we were spared. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 100

 

You can hardly imagine the devilish atmosphere in which we lived in Europe. It was psychically the hardest time I ever went through. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 101

 

I like it very much here in Los Angeles, but one of the things I do not like about Los Angeles is that we are here rather isolated from any news about you and the life in Zurich. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 101

 

I hear it again and again that you are a Nazi. It is such a ridiculous thing. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 102

 

In each case [Reports of Jung being a Nazi], I have been able to trace it to some Freudian, and it fits very well into the Freudian attempt to be considered the one and only form of depth-psychology. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 102

 

Recently, a vile article has been published in the official organ of the American Psychiatric Association, and maybe, this time we can kill this snake thoroughly. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 102

 

Professor Scholem is certainly all wet when he thinks that the Jewish Gnosis contains nothing of the Christian mystery. It contains practically the whole of it, but in its unrevealed pleromatic state. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 141

It’s very difficult to express in words how many riches were bestowed on me in Zurich on this visit, and I would like to thank you and your wife once again for the wonderful hours I was privileged to spend at your house. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 189

 

Special thanks also for the “Sermones ad mortuos”. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 189

 

I hope very much that your wife [Emma] will decide to publish the lectures about the Anima in book form. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 189

 

For, as I’ve observed, Christ is only now entering into the Jewish unconscious as a living symbol. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 190

 

“Physician heal thyself’ has become a necessity for me. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 191

 

I am very sorry that I am not mentioned as “joint translator” of your Job book, which I love so much; but I can also understand Mr. Read’s standpoint. ~James Kirsch to HRC Hull, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 192

 

Quite frankly, your [RFC Hull] letter means a great disappointment to me, since in your letter of November 2lst, 1953, you wrote that you “took the liberty of acknowledging my help by naming me as joint translator”. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 192

 

I regret that your [RFC Hull[ opinion on our work is now such, in contrast to your opinion expressed in your letter of November 2l. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 193

 

My attitude was certainly that of a translator who accepted full responsibility for his work. ~James Kirsch to RFC Hull, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 193

 

Frankly, I feel that Miss Hannah’s and Dr. von Franz’ share in the translation of Psychology and Alchemy have deserved much more acknowledgment than they actually received, but this is not my business. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 193

 

The gouty “irascibility” appears to manifest itself in a general emotional lack of control.  ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 194

 

With Dr. Jacobi you have “mis le pied dans le plat” in a most imprudent way. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 194

 

In your very own interest, you should pay more attention to your affects, otherwise you become too godlike. That’s why strict observance of the law was the guiding principle of your ancestors. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 194

 

Affects are actually volcanic: with the lava they bring nutritious minerals to the surface of the earth. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 195

 

The purpose of the Christian Reformation was to remove the bad moral consequences which are caused by the amoral divine model. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch, Page 195

 

One cannot simultaneously “strain at gnats and swallow camels” (Matt. 23 :24), or “serve two masters” (Matt. 6:24), etc. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 195

 

Without thorough knowledge of “good and evil,” of the ego and the shadow, there is no recognition of the Self, but at most an involuntary and therefore dangerous identification with it. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 195

 

As well as I, or perhaps even better, in the hostile pair of brothers – Christ-Satan – a Jew can recognize the Self, and with that the incarnation, or Yahweh’s assimilation to man. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 195

 

The Jew has the advantage of already having anticipated the development of human consciousness in his spiritual history. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 195

 

By that I mean the Lurianic level of the Kabbalah, the breaking of the vessel, and human help in its reconstitution. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 195

 

I have written you so many letters which were never mailed that, when it comes to sitting down at my desk and really writing down what I want to say other things come to the foreground. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 103

 

I have been feeling very close to you during these last two years in the U.S. Lately, I have been dreaming a great deal about you. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 103

 

My practice has been going well, Mrs. Kirsch sees some clients regularly, and we have been able to interest a number of people in Analytical

Psychology. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 97

 

So we were able at last to found a Club which has shown a small, but steady growth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 97

 

Unfortunately, I have not been able to read anything that you might have written or published during this time of war. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 99

 

The only thing I heard about in New York, but have not seen, was an article on the “Symbolism of the Holy Mass”. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 99

 

It is still too early to make any plans for the time after the war, but I would like to let you know that it is a great hope of mine to come to Zurich and to work with you. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 99

 

I see from your letters that you have heard that foolish rumour that I’m a Nazi. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 106

 

If the Germans had invaded Switzerland they certainly would have put me into a concentration camp or against a wall. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 106

 

My books were suppressed in Germany and destroyed in France. If I had been a Nazi they surely wouldn’t have behaved like that. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 106

 

I had a fracture of my right fibula with a big haematoma; on account of it a thrombosis developed in the right leg first and then it went over to the left leg, reaching as far as the vena cava. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 107

 

And then the worst came: two embolisms in the lungs and an embolism in the posterior part of the heart. That was the thing that almost knocked me out, but I recovered slowly. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 107

 

I’m now 71 years of age and I feel disinclined to do work with patients. I take on no new patients but of the old ones there are left enough to keep me busy. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 107

 

I really had no idea that astrology would make so much of my psychology. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 107

 

The more deeply and intensively I study the unconscious, the more enigmatic it becomes. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 107

 

During my afternoon with you, I was able to rid myself of my projection of the “mana” personality on you to such an extent that my inferiority-complexes are no longer obstructing my path, and I can tell you that I would be very pleased if you would come. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 125

 

Here in Zurich I feel I’m receiving many rich gifts, especially from you personally. Thus it seems presumptuous to ask you to see me one more time. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 126

 

Might I perhaps come by this Thursday and read the Morienus in a comer of your house? If the weather is good, in the garden? ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 126

 

But may I submit the enclosed letter to you and ask your help in my struggle to prevent Dr. Klopfer from being recognized as a training analyst by the San Francisco group of the M.S.A.P. (Medical Society of Analytical Psychologists )? ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 127

 

By human estimation, it’s certain that my wife will come to Zurich next summer and, if possible, will accept the invitation of your daughter (Frau Baumann) to my youngest son Thomas. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 130

 

This time I owe a special debt for my work with Fraulein [Toni] Wolff.  ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 130

 

By the way, your dream of September 810 gave you the correct answer. Maturation costs not only time but also suffering. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 139

 

Moreover, it was not I who invented the entire complication of the soul, nor did Freud succeed in removing it from the world. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page  141

 

I keep reading your book Antwort auf Hiob over and over, which has powerfully opened up new vistas for me and for so many other people I know. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 154

 

Your gospel: “One can love God, and one must fear God” is very much alive in me and has brought me deeply moving and liberating experiences. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 154

 

Synchronicity means a factor inherent in Nature. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 180

 

It is a factor accounting for the existence of teleological arrangements, which does not mean that the whole of creation is premeditated, or in any way conscious. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 180

 

No sooner do you have a certain collectivity than people try, in the ratio of its increase, to emancipate themselves from the shadow.  Look what happened to Christianity when it became a church. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 180

 

I can only tell you how glad I am, firstly that I have not started a religion, and secondly that I have not founded a church. People may cast out devils in my name all they like or even send themselves into the Gergesene swine! ~Carl Jung, Jung-Neumann Letters, 19 Feb 1935

 

During my move here from Palestine, the “Sermones ad Mortuos” were unfortunately lost. Might I ask you to send them to me again? ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 80

 

I wrote about this in detail to your wife – and I’m wondering very seriously how it is even possible for such a woman [Jolandi Jacobi] to go out into the world as your messenger (or even as the messenger). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 182

 

She [Jolandi Jacobi[ is a true antimimos … an imitative spirit. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 182

 

Please excuse me for asking you the question, why such a woman [Jolandi Jacobi] has to go into the world in your name – and to teach students (at the Institute). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 182

 

Frau Jacobi’s appearance in L.A. has had far-reaching consequences, in the sense that minds are divided, and that many projections we had onto Zurich and the Institute are being withdrawn, and we will absolutely become more self-reliant. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 182

 

I saw her here with her [Jolandi Jacobi] old teacher, Dr. Charlotte Buhler from Vienna;  and I became aware how much Frau Jacobi represents the Viennese Freudian school. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 182

 

It seems that here in America people tend over and over again to forget the shadow, feeling suddenly very satisfied with whatever’s been

accomplished, patting themselves benevolently on the shoulder – while being cut off from everything real. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 177

 

But I cannot conceive of the creation as a game of dice after all, because a Dike or Moira would have to rule over it, i.e. something that would “arrange” the creation synchronistically, and not teleologically. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 178

 

The German word ‘Seele’, which by no means is the same as the English word ‘Soul’, is an old word, sanctioned by Tradition, used by the greatest German mystics like Eckhart and poets like Goethe to signify the Ultimate Reality, but experienced under a feminine aspect. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 179

 

At last I’m able to thank you personally for the kind letter you wrote me on the occasion of Toni Wolff’s death. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

 

On the day of her [Toni Wolff] death, even before I had received the news, I had a bad relapse of my tachycardia. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

 

  1. W. died so suddenly and so entirely unexpectedly that one could scarcely realize her disappearance. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

 

I had seen her two days earlier – both totally unsuspecting. As early as mid-February I had Hades dreams, which I related entirely to myself, because nothing pointed to Toni. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

 

None of the people who were close to her [Toni Wolff] had any warning dreams, while people in England and Germany did, and in Zurich only some who knew her merely superficially. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

 

At the beginning of my illness in Oct.  I dreamt of a big black elephant who uprooted a tree. (Since then I have written a rather long essay about the “philosophical tree.”) ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

 

The primordial uprooting of trees can also mean death. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

 

If God’s consciousness is clearer than human consciousness, then creation makes no sense and humanity has no purpose for existence. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

 

Then indeed God does not play dice, as Einstein says, but has invented a machine, which is even worse. In fact, the creation story resembles an experiment with dice more than anything intentional. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

 

The “white stone” (calculus albus) occurs in the Apocalypse as a symbol of election. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

 

The model of the Self in Aion is based on Ezekiel’s vision! ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 173

 

Even though I fully recognize and know deep down that you are by no means the “owner” of Jungian psychology, I still need to express the fact that you have worked incredibly hard, with concentration and a secure instinct, on behalf of the secular movement of the spirit. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 162

 

Today the personal problems have receded, and I am seized and possessed by something hard to name, about which I can only pray that I’ll endure the tension and have the intelligence to comprehend and integrate it. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 162

 

Dr. von Franz’s visit was a great experience. She was far better in all respects than I have ever experienced her in Zurich. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 164

 

Your remark about my dream of the mouse circling in my belly stayed with me for a long time. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 165

 

In an organic sense, of course, I do not suffer from epilepsy, but since childhood I have repeatedly been exposed to invasions of the unconscious

which led to attacks of all sorts. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 167

 

I very much hope and wish that God’s grace will sustain your health and creative power. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 172

 

Especially during the last sessions I had with her last year, I gratefully sensed the integrity of her creative intellect, which was inseparably linked to a warm humanity. In the night of her death I could not sleep – without knowing why. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 168

 

I had to think of you so much, who have so deeply experienced the sea of mercy as well as the fire of his wrath, while you always held fast to his oneness. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 168

 

You wrote me a detail about Toni’s death which nobody else had reported to me, and which completes the medical picture. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 166

 

What kind of physician one has is definitely part of one’s fate. I’m thinking of Toni a lot. It hurts me deeply to think of her lonesome death, as I experienced Toni as a very solitary person in the last years. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 166

 

I’m so deeply involved in the process of individuation myself, it’s difficult for me to imagine the psychic state that occurs when individuation is achieved, which is what the infinite “multiplicatio” actually represents. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 166

 

You also wrote about the experience of immortality which results from the ego’s contact with the Self I have not had this experience. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 166

 

It brightens the evening of my life and fills me with glad serenitas, that the grace was allotted to me to place my best in the service of a great cause. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 162

 

What you write in regard to the effect of Job upon analysts agrees with my own experiences: the number of individuals who are capable of reacting to it is relatively very small, and analysts are not exceptional people. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page159

 

Incidentally, a second edition of Job is just now being published, in which I’ve inserted the corrections you suggested. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 159

 

Today I finished a fairly long article about the “philosophical tree,” which has accompanied me during my illness. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 160

 

I entertained myself excellently with it as a compensation for the fact that so few of my contemporaries can understand what is meant by the psychology of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 160

 

You should have seen the reviews of Job in the press! How much naive stupidity showed up there, you can’t imagine. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 160

                                                                                                              

In the Cathedral of Strasbourg I saw a depiction of the conquered synagogue and the ecclesia triumphans,  and above it – in the middle and upper spaces -the coronation of Mary by Christ – a depiction which touched me deeply. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 153

 

In Ascona, I asked Professor Scholem whether he was aware of corresponding themes in Judaism. “Absolutely not,” he said; “that does not exist in Judaism.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 153

 

I believe this problem of God’s becoming human has a special meaning for the Jew and his tragic history. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 153

 

By the way, do you by any chance know the history of the Rabbi Acher? He lived in the 2nd century. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 154

 

He maintained that the Jews had to take cognizance of the fact that according to Christian view, God had a son and thus was no longer

one but two. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 154                      

 

When you read the Bible in the ordinary way, apparently all human beings derived from Adam, so quite certainly Jews who go right back to the primordial parents, but then you suddenly find that beside Adam and his children there must have been other human beings. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 151

 

I have no intention to suggest that the Jews are the only ones that have received the divine imprint, since besides the Jews many other peoples and nations descend from Adam’s children, but we have not heard that those human beings from whom Adam’s sons took wives have received the divine image. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 151

 

I had another attack of arrhythmia and tachycardia due to overwork. I am now slowly recovering and my pulse is normal again since almost a week, but I am still tired and have to go slowly. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 143

 

I am rather certain that the sefirot tree contains the whole symbolism of a Jewish development parallel to the Christian idea. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 143

 

The characteristic difference is that God’s incarnation is understood to be a historical fact in the Christian belief, while in the Jewish Gnosis it is an entirely pleromatic process symbolized by the concentration of the supreme Trias of Kether, Chochma and Bina in the figure of Tiferet. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 143

 

Being the equivalent of the Son and the Holy Ghost, he is the sponsus bringing about the great solution through his union with Malchut. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 143

 

I am pretty certain that the extraordinary and venomous response of the orthodox rabbis against the Cabbala is based upon the undeniable fact of this most remarkable Judeo-Christian parallelism. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 145

 

This is hot stuff, and since the 17Th century, as far as my knowledge goes, nobody has dared to touch it, but we are interested in the soul of man and therefore we are not blindfolded by foolish confessional prejudices. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 145

 

I must say I got enough from the study of Knorr von Rosenroth’s “Cabbala Denudata”. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 145

 

I believe you saw Dr. Harms article: “Carl Gustav Jung-Defender of Freud and the Jews.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page  108

 

I sent it [Dr. Harms article] to a committee which collected material in New York to refute the stupid accusation that you are a Nazi. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 108

 

To-day, I saw a letter by Heyer to one of his former Jewish patients who lives here in Los Angeles. He was evidently hit in his guilt-complex by your article in the “Schweizer Weltwoche.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 109

 

It is very sad to see that a psychologist is unable to face his shadow, his national shadow. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 109

 

To-day, I saw a letter by Heyer to one of his former Jewish patients who lives here in Los Angeles. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 109

 

He was evidently hit in his guilt-complex by your article in the “Schweizer Weltwoche.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 109

 

It is very sad to see that a psychologist is unable to face his shadow, his national shadow. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 109

 

On one side, there are Rabbis who instruct their pupils strictly and in great detail about sacrificial offerings, in anticipation of the “fuhrer’s” entrance into Jerusalem as king, which they expect in the foreseeable future, believing that he will raise the temple again; and in that event, enough people would be required who know the sacrificial ritual and can execute it. This in the year of grace 1934! ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 62

 

Then if money, socialism, or the belly take the place of God, the Jew turns away from his eternal task; he becomes inauthentic and his psychology a fraud. It is then that the earth-born peoples perceive him as harboring hand-grenades in his unconscious. This is the deepest ground for anti-Semitism. On the other hand, if the Jew lives according to his proper dynamic psychology, he is the salt of the earth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16.

 

In an organic sense I’m certain that I’m not epileptic, but it is a fact that unconscious events often happen to me like attacks, that the invasions

of the unconscious happen to me suddenly, and that I am preoccupied with the Self in a manner I can absolutely designate as possession, or morbus sacer. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 167

 

It would be my inclination to tell her [A patient] quite frankly that her time of life is limited, and that she should realize it so that she could take care of her three children in the best possible way and prepare properly for death. On the other hand, I just haven’t got the courage to tell her that. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 133

 

I assume that Evans is bristling with resistances against my psychological point of view because, as every true Easterner, he believes that he has produced an eternal truth, but, with the whole of the East, he has, of course, never heard of a theory of cognition and of Immanuel Kant, just as little as the Catholic Church. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 179

 

Apart from this insight, I can fully accept the postulate that Christ is “the only Begotten one,” if Christ is also an eternal mystery and one which was a unique historical event, and especially if the ego clearly distinguishes itself from the one who dwells within it. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 155

 

For instance, the lady who is translating Job with me and thus should really know it very well, had a great shock today when I explained to her what it means, on pages 125-126, where you say, “John’s unconscious personality is closely identified with Christ; that is, he is born in similar circumstances and for a similar destiny.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 162

 

I’m especially indebted to you for taking the great trouble to send me evidence of the American literature concerning double-bodied vessels. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 227.

 

My sincere thanks for the explanation of Adam’s rib! By this representation, what the woman apparently originated from was an illness in the male; yet she is destined to heal this illness. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 226

 

Also last week he visited the Indian Embassy in Berne where he was invited to a festivity. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Pages 224-225

 

And – last but not least – he wrote a preface to the new edition of Discourses of the Buddha for Artemis Press, Zurich. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Pages 224-225

 

I’m afraid it’s been a long time since I heard from you directly, but from my friends in Zurich and also from my wife I understand that you are doing quite well but that your wife hasn’t been so well and has had a stomach resection. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Pages 220-221

 

On pages 105 and 107 you’ll find a confirmation of the hypothesis that the Fourth Gospel is purely Jewish. In no way do I wish to deny that even the Essenes were influenced by the Greek spirit. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 222

 

What an evil guard dog it would be, who could successfully keep visitors away from you! ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 218

 

I’m surprised to hear you complain about the stupidity of humankind, you of all people, who have given your best to humankind again and again, literally risked your skin, doing so much pioneer work, and you continually ran into the resistance, inertia, and hostility of the masses. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 218

 

I also want to tell you that during the hours I observed the “flying saucer” my camera – loaded with film – was in the adjacent room, and the idea never

occurred to me to photograph it! ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 218

 

it is obvious that Father White has suffered a lot. In personal relations he is very friendly, and I like him very much. But as a Catholic and a servant of the Church, it’s obvious that he can never go beyond a certain limit. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 219

 

But Father W. can never belong to himself, but finally only to Mother Church. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 219

 

The article about you in Time has made us “respectable” at a single stroke and has already had its consequences. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page  219

 

The English Job has now been published, although with some printing errors, e.g. “childish” instead of “childlike.” ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 217

 

The printing of “Synchronicity” gives endless difficulties, which are principally due to the fact that the editors hardly understand what it’s about; e.g. they don’t grasp the astrological experiment. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 217

 

They think one would have to believe in astrology in order to make such an experiment!! ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 217

 

I was deeply impressed by his ability to experience music, and that he lived his shadow so consciously. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 211

 

What so much distinguishes him, besides his enormous scholarship, is his ability to let the ucs. speak and his respect for the numinosity of the ucs. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 211

 

The only trouble I’m having is that I no longer have any need to work with Meier and ( or) Liliane Frey. I don’t have a negative attitude toward them, but simply feel a need to keep working by myself. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 212.

 

I am glad you’ve had the experience of the primitive ceremonies; I never saw the katchina, only the buffalo dances of the Pueblo Indians of Taos, where I made friends with the old Locotenente Gobemador,  Ochwiii Biano. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 208

 

Of my two writings, Synchronicity and Job, I can say: “Habent sua fata libelli.” ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 208

 

In America no one except Knoll of Princeton has properly understood what I mean by it;  especially the statistics have just driven people crazy. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 208

 

Therefore I decided to take all tables out of the book and have replaced them with a description in words, probably with the same result, that people cannot get away from their causalistic thinking habits. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 208

 

In contrast, Job will be printed in England in short order, though significantly not in America; the Bollingen Press prefers to keep its distance, because Job could be misunderstood as “unamerican activity”!  ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 208

 

The other day I received a manuscript by Progoff,  in which he discusses the question of synchronicity very skillfully, especially under the aspect of archetypes. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 209

 

It’s especially not understood what an excellent joke was made with the astrological statistic; people have even thought I wanted to prove

something in favor of astrology. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 209

 

A whole squadron [of UFO’s] was seen near Lake Constance, as well as in Southern Germany. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 209

 

McCarthy is an exponent of American one-sidedness, which is what gives him the fanatical, paranoid character. It’s probably not a genuine paranoia; he gives me more the impression of being an instrument of the American collective. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 209

 

Both these dreams contain unconscious thinking – hence the oxygen bomb which contains compressed pneuma. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 206

 

The Gnosticism of which John the Evangelist is a descendent is certainly Jewish, but in its essence Hellenistic, in the style of Philo Judaeus, who also originated the Logos doctrine. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 207

 

If I may say it in somewhat simplified terms, what’s essential for L.A. is the attitude to the unconscious, while S.F. hopes to be accepted someday as the Jungian group in the AMA (American Medical Association) and in the APA (American Psychological Association). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 201

 

But it was very important for me to see John as a product of Gnosticism (the Jewish school, even, and not the Greek, according to the latest discoveries in the Jordan Valley). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 205

 

Considering my age, some days I feel worse and sometimes less bad. Nevertheless, I’ve just turned out a short commentary to Radin’s Trickster. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 207

 

Also, I wanted to tell you that I read the only book which exists in the Library of Congress under the name of Freud’s son, the lawyer. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 199

 

It doesn’t contain one word about his father. It’s nothing but the love adventures of an Austrian officer during the first World War! ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 200

 

The integration of the collective unconscious means about the same as taking note of and adapting to the world; but that doesn’t mean that one would have to become acquainted with the whole world, or that one must have lived in all climates and continents of the world. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 196

 

Your explanations with respect to the integration of the collective unconscious contributed a lot toward transforming some of the fog which had spread over us into therapeutic water. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 197

 

At once, the anima shows up and tries to make me believe what a “devil of a fellow” I am. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 197

 

I am very concerned about Dr. Frey’s state of health. Psychologically she has developed greatly in recent time. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 199

 

I would be very grateful to you if you could comment on this question of whether Satori, or any form of sudden widening of consciousness, could exist

without some image, and also what this image-less state is to which Zen and also Indian Yoga so often refers. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 239

 

What shed the most light for me was your remark that Zen meditation could also represent a kind of dumbing-down yoga.  This is indeed the case with anyone who has some intellectual development. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 237

 

One needs to be of an unusual mental simplicity in order to become a once-and-for-all Enlightened One as a result of a broken foot. Satori experiences occur for us as well. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 237

 

I remind you, e.g. of Jakob Bohme, who enters his workshop; on his table is a flat pewter plate in which a ray of sunlight is reflected; it hits Bohme in the eye, and with this he’s “enraptured into the innermost of Nature.” ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 237

 

At the same time my respect for Freud increased greatly and also an understanding of the enormous human tragedy which was summed up in

the fact that he valued his authority higher than the truth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 233

 

The concreteness of the image points to a certain identity of the subject with the God-image. Seen from the side of the coll. unc: a fall of the archetype into the three-dimensional world. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 230

 

The god must not enter too far into matter, or the human being perishes. A human being has to walk the narrow path: “erit via et semita sancta.”  ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 230

 

I know only few theologians who take the difference between image and original seriously and understand it. Too little humilitas and too much hybris ! And what about the psychologists? Vae scientibus! ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 230

 

I’ve never really succeeded in convincing an Indian that if no conscious ego is present, no conscious memory can be present, either. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 241

 

in a satori experience something is perceived; namely, that an illumination, or something like it, has taken place. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 242

 

It is utterly incomprehensible how an event can be registered, if no one is present who has had it. This someone who registers is always an ego. If no ego is present, absolutely nothing can be perceived. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 242

 

Recently I saw photographs that were taken in the area of the Bernina, showing a landed saucer. According to the opinion of all, including that of experts, these photographs seem to be genuine, as strange as it may sound. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 242

 

The Japanese unconscious burdened me to a much greater extent than I anticipated and perceived. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 249

 

From time to time I find it on the whole quite amazing that here in the American desert – such a group exists, where a number of people are seriously gripped by the unconscious and are seriously working through your books. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 249

 

By the way, Erich Fromm quotes a letter to Jones about you (January 22, 1911 !), from Jones’s Life and Work of Sigmund Freud: “I am more than ever convinced that he is the man of the future. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 250

 

Inwardly, I find the transference problem and the Mysterium Coniunctionis the most difficult of all, and almost impossible to master. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 251

 

He is indeed a very solid person with an unqualified sense of responsibility.  It is a pity that the universities are so far behind the times. He would deserve a professorship. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 252

 

I’m also glad to hear about your activity on the radio. Today that’s the way to reach the public. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 252

 

It’s beyond my comprehension how one can talk about “Job” on the radio without causing misunderstandings, since its argument is one of the most subtle I’ve encountered, especially if such a banal brain as a Fromm precedes you onstage as a premise, so to speak. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 252

 

But at the present time he’s sharply limited in any kind of reading: he is totally absorbed by his writing and not interested in anything else. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 267

 

I don’t know whether I wrote to you that he did not feel very well, but after a six-day stay at the hospital he returned home not only rested but reassured and with prescriptions for a helpful course of treatment. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 267

 

Perhaps such an opportunity is required, not only to feel but also to acknowledge what you and Hilde have accomplished as “pioneers.”  Almost like clearing a primeval forest. And you persevered. Isn’t that worth everything? ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 267

 

Many years ago you already called my attention to my “godlikeness,” but I also remember that as early as 1929 you noticed my puffy and pale face, a symptom which my American doctor considers characteristic for a lack of thyroid hormones. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 263

 

For years I’ve been aware of the fact that I am internally confronted with the Anthropos. My fear and flight reactions have been quite terrible. But I’ve also become very bewildered, because I did not understand the nature of my dreams. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 263

 

You should have sent me the visions of the androgynous XP before anything else, because he holds the key to your situation. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 261

 

Not only this vision but also the fact that you gave a seminar about XP as a symbol of the Self shows that you are being confronted inwardly by the Anthropos. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 261

 

On the other hand, you are also the Anthropos. The XP of your dream teaches you that he is “the foundation of the world, the only reality,” thus what we commonly designate as “God.” ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 262

 

Hence, when you occupy yourself with explanations, such as the relationship to your wife or other people, whether you should go to New York or stay in Los Angeles, etc. you play with symptoms and are on the wrong track and the downward path, fleeing backward, and thus you drown in the great waters of inflation. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 262

 

The fact that something is not quite right with me has been evident to me for a long time, and I am also aware that a major change is necessary and close at hand, but without knowing in what direction it’s going. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 256

 

When I decided not to send you this dream, so as not to burden you, I had additional dreams about Christ, and others where deities made personal

appearances. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 257

 

In retrospect, I realize that this was also the time when suddenly a lot of water collected in my body. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 257

 

The whole thing has a terribly close connection to my relationship with my wife, or the lack of relationship, that’s gone on for the last nine years, and very generally to the difficulties I experience in relating to others. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 257

 

My wife is also doing much better. She walks quite well with her crutches, sees her patients, cooks, etc. The X-rays show that the bones are healing well. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 258

 

In 1944 I also suffered a broken foot because I did not want to submit to a “higher” will.  I had to change my “standpoint”; I was still too high up, i.e. not “humble” enough to accept my life in all its forms. I knew better and for that reason could not touch the real ground. I was – so to speak – thrown down the steps because I did not want to go down. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 254

 

Once I also gave up smoking for a quarter of a year without noticing much difference. Was it the cigarettes? I only smoke pipes & 1 cigar in the evening. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 255

 

The fact is, I don’t feel at all comfortable with this radio work, and I had to overcome the greatest inner difficulties before agreeing to do these radio lectures. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 253

 

[Erich] Fromm is doubtless a banal intellect, as you say.  He’s a friend of mine from our student days at Heidelberg. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 253

 

He has learned a lot and stolen a lot from you, but he’d never admit it. His great difficulty is that he cannot comprehend that the objective psyche exists. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 253

 

When it suits him [Fromm], or when things get dangerous, he feels free to revise dreams. He truly believes that dreams are produced by the ego. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 254

 

He ]Fromm] comes from an orthodox Jewish family, is enormously learned in Jewish subjects, but doesn’t believe in God. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 254