Intuition does not say what things mean but sniffs out their possibilities. Meaning is given by thinking. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 21

 

But in a certain sense, the failure to answer your letter is also right; for your dream about “passive homosexuality” and “mental weakness” says clearly enough that you absolutely have to stand on your own feet, or you’ll be blown over by every wind (wind = animus). – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

Naturally you cannot release any woman from the animus, as long as you yourself are falling into the anima. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

One falls most easily into the anima when one is overrun by one’s feelings, because one fails to question them sufficiently. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

Anima-feelings, however, are symbols, or conditions, created by the anima when it commands psychic contents that it refuses to share with consciousness. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

A woman falls too much into the animus when the analyst is behaving in a too womanly manner towards himself and failing to keep his feelings objectively in hand. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 23

 

Since the Spirit is not made but fulfils its own laws of life as a living entity, superordinate to the human being,  so the human being also cannot build it up or point the way for it. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 24

 

Schmid died of a streptococcal infection, which he got from a small cut caused by a car accident. It was the fourth bad accident in half a year. Sadly, he ignored this warning. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 27

 

I recognize the individual necessity which leads Frau S. towards Indian practices, and I myself have advised her to do so. In principle of course I’m not at all in favor of imitating Indian methods, and consider it as mistaken as the Europeanization of Eastern civilization. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 33

 

I wouldn’t like to see the subjective conditions of Frau S. outweighing the spirit of analysis and ultimately even falsifying it into a theosophy. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 33

 

What disturbs you most in your dream, the sinking of the anima, corresponds to Faust’s words, “Go down then, I could also say, rise up!” – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 36

 

Correspondingly, fire rises from the ground. Tobacco in any form means a material for making fantasies ( = clouds of smoke). The southern Slavs are part of a warmer, southern zone = realm of sensation – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 36

 

Nothing has changed in our deeper relationship, but in the upper layers you must find your way to yourself as much as possible. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 39

 

The anima always takes possession of the ground one lives on. Therefore you are confronted with special tasks. Too much Europe isn’t good for you right now. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 39

 

It appears that amusing rumors are being spread about me. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 44

 

The only unquestionable fact which lies behind all this stupid gossip is that as the honorary chairman of the International Society for Psychotherapy, I could not desert the society at the moment when Kretschmer resigned. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 44

 

Neither have I addressed Hitler over the radio or in any other manner, nor have I expressed anything concerning politics. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 45

 

With regard to my view that, as far as one can see, the Jews will not create their own form of culture, this view is based on (1) historical facts, and (2) the additional fact that the specific cultural contribution of the Jew evolves most clearly within a host-culture, where the Jew frequently becomes the very carrier of this culture, or its promoter. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 45

 

The Jewish Christ-complex is a very remarkable business. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

The existence of this complex predisposes to a somewhat hystericized general mental attitude, which has become especially clear to me in the course of the present anti-Christian agitation against me. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

As you know, Freud previously accused me of anti-Semitism because I could not tolerate his soulless materialism. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

I cannot see why the Jew, like any so-called Christian, is incapable of accepting that he is being personally criticized when one has an opinion about him. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

Why must it always be assumed that one wants to condemn the Jewish people? Surely the individual is not the people? – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

So, if you perceived my reserved attitude in Ascona as anti-Semitism, you missed the mark completely. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 46

 

In general, you really ought to know me well enough not to attribute to me uncritically a non-individual stupidity like anti-Semitism. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 47

 

No one who is a Jew can become a human being without knowing he is a Jew, since this is the basis from which he must reach out toward a higher humanity. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 47

 

Finally I want to inform you that my new book, “Wirklichkeit der Seele,” has appeared. I’ve included in it a Jewish author on Old Testament psychology in order to annoy the National Socialists and all those Jews who have decried me as an anti-Semite. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 47

 

One of these days a situation may very well arise when we Jews will have to ask for your [Jung’s]help for the sake of our soul! – James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 41

 

Later, when you are more deeply rooted not only in Palestine but also in your inner life, everything you need will fall into place of its own accord. – Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 39

 

I have to admit that, without believing some of the specific accusations, my image of you was somewhat darkened, especially after Fraulein Wolff told me that, if you had been a German, you would have voted for the Nazis. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 48

 

I did not go so far as believing you capable of a non-individual stupidity like anti-Semitism, but thought it necessary to inform you of these rumors, and since they’ve produced such a reaction from you, in the form of your clear and unequivocal letter, a great burden has been lifted from my heart. ~James, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 48

 

I recalled your wonderful explanations during the Berlin Seminar, where you demonstrated how the idea of ritual murder was projected onto Christians and later onto Jews, and the underlying subjective process experienced by the person originating such projections. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 49

 

I think it’s possible to project anti-Semitism onto you because you have opinions about the Jew which may be correct, but only insofar as they reflect the Galut existence, as it is called in the Kabbalah,  the banishment of the Shekhinah (the Jewish anima). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 49

 

Jesus and his way of redemption were necessarily rejected, a process which you’ve described precisely in Types, in the chapter on Prometheus and Epimetheus. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

As far as I can judge the Chinese intellectual, the Chinese path led to a whole – “completion” not “perfection”. Jewish consciousness, on the other hand, has the characteristic that something essential is missing; something suppressed lives in the Jewish soul, which induces even in the educated Jew the most peculiar affects and hysterical reactions. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

This rejection of Christ has, it seems to me (Jews will never admit this) determined the fate of the Jews. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

From a Jewish viewpoint, Christianity is its shadow (and also vice versa, by the way, but that’s the Christians’ concern). James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 50

 

It’s historically demonstrable that in every era when the Jewish people attempted to realize the idea of the Messiah, great disturbances also erupted in the Christian world. Sabbatai Zwi and the religious wars, Zionism National Socialism. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page

51

 

You certainly know many people who have become restless through being cut off from the unconscious, who project the anima and seek salvation in every possible and impossible way, e.g. even in psychoanalysis, but never within themselves. The same is true for the Jews as a people. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 51

 

With the French Revolution a new historic era begins also for the Jewish people. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

Here [French Revolution] begins the purge of Jews, dissolving the Jewish ways of life which had existed heretofore, the disavowal of Jewishness, assimilation and cessation of the living Hebrew language, which from then on was used only literarily by the so-called “Maskilim” (representatives of the Enlightenment). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

The fact that the Jews repressed their Jewishness during the era of assimilation explains – besides the Christ-complex – also the psychological break of personalities like Heine,  as well as the soulless materialism of such inspiring but destructive individuals as Marx and Freud. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

I find your criticism of Freud essentially correct; it matches the image of the Jews during their period of assimilation in the previous century, and such Jews still exist today in droves. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 52

 

As two thousand years of suffering shows and especially the sorrowful events of the year 1933 – the Jew has injured himself gravely by his negative valuation of the unconscious. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 53

 

Since I’ve become very familiar with the Bible and have been living in Palestine, I understand now more than ever how enormously important for us is your vivid conception of the unconscious and the approach to the experience of the unconscious. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 53

 

For me, at least, it was only through you that it became possible to understand the experiences of the prophets, the Messianic idea, and to rediscover what was lost in the consciousness of the Jewish people since the time of the prophets. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 53

 

The great contribution of Jung ( and this is clearly expressed in the essay in question) is that he has declared that the unconscious is also the creative foundation of the soul, and that he thus sees both aspects, the negative and the positive. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

Whoever ventures to follow the phenotype of the Jew into his darkest abyss, that person cannot be accused of escaping into a non-existing image of a Jew. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

When Jung expressed his views concerning the current situation of psychotherapy, he had to clarify to what extent Freud’s particular Jewish attitude to the unconscious influenced all of modern psychology and psychotherapy. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

Freud, however, unequivocally rejects the positive aspect of the unconscious (see The Future of an Illusion). ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 55

 

To overcome this attitude of godlessness and homelessness, we need Jung’s revelations about Freud and about the corresponding distortion of Jewish psychology, and Jung’s way – in contrast to Freud’s – in order to arrive at the positive aspect of the unconscious through accepting the shadow as fully as possible.  ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 56

 

For that reason the final sentence of my essay was as follows: “In Jung’s personality as well as in his psychology and psychotherapy, something is contained which speaks to the depth of the ailing Jewish soul and which may lead to its liberation.” ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 56

 

Since I spent my childhood in Guatemala, I am probably able to adapt more easily to this climate [Palestine]. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 61

 

Radiation is enormously high in Palestine. The worst of it isn’t the heat, but the unbelievable abundance of ultraviolet light, which is much higher than for instance in Davos. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 61

 

We have our Nazis, i.e. a party which wants to elevate the “Fuhrer” to be the King of Palestine and is organized like the military.

They wear brown! shirts, are responsible for acts of terror, and they murdered the most important labor leader. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 61

 

The world seems to be going through an immense shift. Aquarius is announcing himself powerfully. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60

 

The anti-religious attitude is a powerful reaction against the worn-out spirit of the past. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 69

 

In psychology we have already reached the other side; the anti-religious are just starting to turn away from the past. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60

 

Hitler persistently shirks the religious conflict, which signifies much the same as the end of Protestantism in Germany. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60

 

What comes next is the conflict with the Catholic Church. In Austria they are now placing Protestant and Jewish children together in special schools. I wonder if it will lead again to religious warfare, as before? Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 60.

 

With regard to your article, I agree entirely with its intention and conclusion, and only object to the inference that in some way I identify the Jew with Freud. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 62

 

Formerly I was considered a hater of Germans because I criticized their barbarism; now the Jews are accusing me of trying to curry favor with the Germans (and meanwhile Palestine’s foreign trade with Germany happily increased last year, despite the boycott!). Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 63

 

The feminine mind is earth which awaits the seed. This is the meaning of transference. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 63

 

In the deepest sense, all of us do not dream out of ourselves but out of that which exists between myself and the other. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 63

 

It’s atrocious how I neglect you, but the things I perceived via your wife were so wide-ranging and made everything about your future seem so uncertain to me that I instinctively shrank from them. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 67

 

To your earlier letter, I have to note that schizophrenia is not an unequivocal matter. Certain cases are certainly organic in nature, i.e. more organic than psychic, while others are more psychic. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 67

 

Since time immemorial primitive peoples have  commonly believed that it is impossible to conquer a foreign land, because those who occupy a foreign land will then be taken over by the gods of that land. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Even though the whites in America did not absorb Indian blood to any extent worth mentioning, specific Indian traits are evident in the appearance, bearing, and physiognomy of present-day Americans. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Thus, we would do better to say, not that the inhabitants of North America exhibit Indian traits, but that when the Europeans were transplanted to America, the change of habitat bestowed on them a different physiognomy. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Only think of their rough training combats and boxing, the songs of a Walt Whitman, and more besides unimaginable for Europeans.

The gods of that country have taken possession of them. Only one people proves to be an exception to this rule: the Jews. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

Through all lands they [Jews] took their god with them, the god they conceived in the desert. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, 15

 

Israel’s god is a god of the wind, not originating from the earth, and from the very beginning he was grasped in spiritual form, as the Everlasting: I will be who I will be! ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 15

 

For the Jewish people, God is the energetic principle before it divides into its polarities. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

The soul of the Jew was bound up with this single-singular principle; his soul was not permitted to open itself to the land where he traveled. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

The Jew’s bride, the Jew’s anima was Israel, the Jewish people, the Sabbath, the Torah. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16.

 

The Jew’s homeland is the Torah, and the only content of his soul is God. And yet deep in every Jew is the yearning for oasis, for the earth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

It is a human being’s eternally impossible attempt to direct the soul away from the earth, to adapt collective energy and its specific formation to his soul, and to tum the Eternally Becoming into the only content of this soul. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 16

 

We [Jews] made a vital mistake by rejecting Christ. Christ is the repressed complex of the Jew. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 43

 

During one of her last sessions, Hilde [Kirsch’s wife] also talked to you at some length about me and my problem. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 70

 

To begin with, I have to tell you that the reason for my departure was not the land of Palestine, but the Jews. The Jews do not accept the land and the primitiveness there and instead attempt, consciously and unconsciously, to perpetuate their exile. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 70

 

Probably you told her something to the effect that I cannot reach my own depth, because I don’t realize my shadow sufficiently and am shirking the primitive within myself; my psychology seems as if I were floating, like a drop of oil, above my depth. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 70

 

As you know, I am still constantly in great financial difficulties. I’m only now able to send you a portion of the amount I owe you. May I ask if you agree that I may send you the balance in about 2-3 months? ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 74.

The ears are connected with feelings, and you are not hearing feelings perceptively enough. That could be a not insignificant problem in relation to this patient. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 6

 

It is possible that he’s [Kirsch Patient]not reaching you properly on the feeling side. Masturbation is an expression of being isolated. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 6

 

It goes without saying that the anima problem is always present, and the anima always comes forward with very absolute demands, so absolute that it always signifies a kind of self-sacrifice (in the Christian sense) not to consent to them. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 9

 

The anima problem is always a problem of one’s own social inferiority; in other words, on the edge of a glacial crevasse it’s better not to make trial jumps, but rather to bring inner conditions into harmony with outer. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 10

 

In treating the anima, nothing is more dangerous than unworldly naivete. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 10

 

You can measure your anima’s social inferiority by your wife’s resistances. So be careful! Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 10

 

But I’m also afraid of all the brilliant people! Marianne Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 12

 

Your dream actually concerns the separation and differentiation of the anima. The Homunculus who takes care of this process is the Self. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 80

 

It [Alchemical Procedure] is a kind of yoga, aiming for the creation of the Self through “Imagination.” Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 81

 

Enclosed is a check in the amount of francs. According to my records, I owe you francs for my wife’s sessions and my own, and 4 francs for the Sermones. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 82

 

Odors are referred to occasionally in the alchemical writings. Psychologically they may be related to psychological exhalations, as you suspect. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 82

 

You must avoid carelessness and not lure a person who is meant for the collective into the path of danger. Nonnulli perierunt in opere

nostro! Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 85

 

I gladly take this opportunity, at least once a year, to express my deepest thanks to you for the inexpressible totality of what you’ve given me all these years. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page  87

 

What you write to me, though, about the 1574 edition of the Corpus Hermeticum decidedly piques my appetite. If the thing isn’t too expensive, I’d like to make a grab for it. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 88

 

During the past week I have read your Wotan essay and your commentary on the Tibetan Book of the Dead.  ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 90

 

Especially in connection with alchemy, it gave me an amazing amount and opened new aspects for me, which are so broad and deep that at times I’m quite stupefied. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 90

 

I have gone along old Maya trails as much as possible. The Indios hold on to their primitive religion, but do not give their secrets away to the white man. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 105

 

This calendar stone is valid for 52 years and includes Venus. It weighs many, many tons and has lain buried for several hundred years. Now it is in the Museum in Mexico. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 105

 

You ‘re to be congratulated for getting out of the hell of London. In Los Angeles you will surely have every opportunity to make your own way. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 96

 

Now I have an important announcement to make: My family and I have moved to Los Angeles. The war brought this about. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

During the war any kind of activity became almost impossible for us foreigners. All my books are burnt, even my seminar notes are gone. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

Now I am in California, in a climate which is quite similar to Guatemala’s, and have peace again and the possibility of regaining strength. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

Jung Clubs are a thorny problem, however, as you know better than anyone, and the effect of analysis on Jungian analysts (myself included!) gave rise to all sorts of questions in me, for which I have no answer. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

Please give my warmest greetings to your dear wife and to Fraulein Wolff, and do pass on my new address to them. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 95

 

In the meantime I reached my 70th birthday, for which I received in due time the congratulations of the Analytical Psychology Club of Los Angeles. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 100

 

Beside my gratitude for your kind remembrance I was very interested in the fact that such a new club has sprung up in Los Angeles. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 100

 

We passed through anxious times because we were twice immediately threatened by invasion and once it seemed to be inevitable, but miraculously enough we were spared. Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 100

 

You can hardly imagine the devilish atmosphere in which we lived in Europe. It was psychically the hardest time I ever went through. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 101

 

I like it very much here in Los Angeles, but one of the things I do not like about Los Angeles is that we are here rather isolated from any news about you and the life in Zurich. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 101

 

I hear it again and again that you are a Nazi. It is such a ridiculous thing. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 102

 

In each case [Reports of Jung being a Nazi], I have been able to trace it to some Freudian, and it fits very well into the Freudian attempt to be considered the one and only form of depth-psychology. ~James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 102

 

Recently, a vile article has been published in the official organ of the American Psychiatric Association, and maybe, this time we can kill this snake thoroughly. James Kirsch, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 102

 

Professor Scholem is certainly all wet when he thinks that the Jewish Gnosis contains nothing of the Christian mystery. It contains practically the whole of it, but in its unrevealed pleromatic state. ~Carl Jung, Jung-Kirsch Letters, Page 141