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My soul leads me into the desert, into the desert of my own self. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 235.

The serpent represents magical power, which also appears where animal drives are aroused imperceptibly in us. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 366.

My God rose in the Eastern sky; brighter than the heavenly host, and brought about a new day for all the peoples. This is why I want to go to Hell. Would a mother not want to give up her life for her child? How much easier would it be to give up my life if only my God could overcome the torment of the last hour of the night and victoriously break through the red mist of the morning? ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

I do not doubt: I also want evil for the sake of my God. I enter the unequal battle, since it is always unequal and without doubt a lost cause. How terrible and despairing would this battle be otherwise? But precisely this is how it should and will be. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

The devil knows what is beautiful, and hence he is the shadow of beauty and follows it everywhere, awaiting the moment when the beautiful, writhing great with child, seeks to give life to the God. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

There is nothing the emptiness can sacrifice, since it always suffers lack Only fullness can sacrifice, since it has fullness. Emptiness cannot sacrifice its hunger for fullness, since it cannot deny its own essence. Therefore we also need evil. But I can sacrifice my will to evil, because I previously received fullness. All strength flows back to me again, since the evil one has destroyed the image I had of the formation of the God. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

But the image of the God’s formation in me was not yet destroyed. I dread this destruction, since it is terrible, an unprecedented desecration of temples. Everything in me strives against this abysmal abomination. For I still did not know what it means to give birth to a God. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 289.

The sacrifice has been accomplished: the divine child, the image of the God’s formation, is slain, and I have eaten from the sacrificial flesh. The child, that is, the image of the God’s formation, not only bore my human craving, but also enclosed all the primordial and elemental powers that the sons of the sun possess as an inalienable inheritance. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

We must regenerate ourselves. But as the creation of a God is a creative act of highest love, the restoration of our human life signifies an act of the Below. This is a great and dark mystery. Man cannot accomplish this act solely by himself but is assisted by evil, which does it instead of man. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

But man must recognize his complicity in the act of evil. He must bear witness to this recognition by eating from the bloody sacrificial flesh. Through this act he testifies that he is a man, that he recognizes good as well as evil, and that he destroys the image of the God’s formation through withdrawing his life force, with which he also dissociates himself from the God. This occurs for the salvation of the soul, which is the true mother of the divine child. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

When it bore and gave birth to the God, my soul was of human nature throughout; it possessed the primordial powers since time immemorial, but only in a dormant condition. They flowed into forming the God without my help. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 291.

If one accepts the symbol, it is as if a door opens leading into a new room whose existence one previously did not know. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 311.

But the soul suffers great need, since outer freedom is of no use to it. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 311.

Salvation is a long road that leads through many gates. These gates are symbols. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 311.

Each new gate is at first invisible; indeed it seems at first that it must be created, for it exists only if one has dug up the spring’s root, the symbol. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 311.

But if you pay close attention, you will see that the most masculine man has a feminine soul, and the most feminine woman has a masculine soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 263.

The more manly you are, the more remote from you is what woman really is, since the feminine in yourself is alien and contemptuous. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 263.

The outer opposition is an image of my inner opposition. Once I realize this, I remain silent and think of the chasm of antagonism in my soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 279.

Outer oppositions are easy to overcome. They indeed exist, but nevertheless you can be united with yourself. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 279.

Did you ever think of the evil in you? ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 274.

But did you know what evil is, and that it stands precisely right behind your virtues, that it is also your virtues themselves, as their inevitable substance? ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 274.

You locked Satan in the abyss for a millennium, and when the millennium had passed, you laughed at him, since he had become a children’s fairy tale. But if the dreadful great one raises his head, the world winces. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 274.

I am alone, but I fill my solitariness with my life. I am man enough. I am noise, conversation, comfort, and help enough unto myself. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 277.

I hurry toward the East and my rising—I will my rising. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 277.

My God, I love you as a mother loves the unborn whom she carries in her heart. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 286.

But woe unto you, who replace this incompatible multiplicity with a single God. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 351.