Dear Professor Freud, 10 March 1912

Many thanks for your kindly letter. I haven’t the slightest intention of imitating Adler.

But often I am empty-headed, especially ‘when all my libido is concentrated on a problem.

I shall gather my wits together very soon.

About Pfister: I forgot to mention that he is in a bad way because his position is in jeopardy.

He has been too incautious.

He is happy enough with his girl, but she is much too young and infantile and still hasn’t realized what the situation is; she even wanted to call it off a second time.

Pfister is a child himself and needs an intelligent woman.

First he married a mother, now it’s a daughter.

I have told him she is thoroughly infantile; I heard he took it as an encouraging sign.

The whole enterprise is decidedly dangerous.

However, his libido is in it so it might turn out well.

I’m not meddling so long as he doesn’t ask me to.

His position in the parish is precarious.

What would he do if he were expelled?

He says he would work with some medical man as a an assistant. With whom?

There is no room for him here with us.

And what would his young wife or fiancee say about that?

Now he is terribly in love and imagines he can’t live without the girl.

I hope it will be all right in the end. We are very worried about him.

I hear bad reports of Stegmann.

The dragon he married is an unsavoury spirit and has done him no good at all.

I also heard he has made a virulent attack on psychoanalysis.

I have finished my work except for the addenda.

You will have received the Jahrbucli by now.

The setting of Volume IV has begun. P

lease send Bleuler’s manuscript to Deuticke.

This time B. is firing the opening shot.

The new issue will be entirely analytical except for Bleuler.

Have you read Spielrein’s new paper (manuscript) I’m afraid I shall have to trim it quite a bit.

This always takes me an awfully long time.

There are two or three Dementia praecox analyses still to come, one of which (Nelken) is extremely important.

I hope I can squeeze it in.

The volume will be a regular monster as I want to include my paper in toto.

On March 31st I shall go on a holiday for 3 weeks.

I’m fagged out. Many kind regards,

Most sincerely yours,

JUNG ~Carl Jung, Freud/Jung Letters, Vol. 1, Pages 493-494