The notion of the fallen Lucifer means that a being of the light has fallen under the law of gravity, that it has assumed a material body. In Dante’s Divine Comedy, Lucifer, with his three heads in the earth’s deepest abyss, is the counterpart to the Holy Trinity. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar; Pages 173-176.

Finally, as Lucifer, true to his name, he is the bearer of the spark of light, who descended through the planetary spheres from the highest light down into matter, seeking to liberate it as a work of salvation. ~Carl Jung, Children’s Dreams Seminar; Pages 173-176.

The only thing that really matters now is whether man can climb up to a higher moral level, to a higher plane of consciousness, in order to be equal to the superhuman powers which the fallen angels have played into his hands. ~Carl Jung, Answer to Job, Para 746.

“God . . . wants to become man, and for that purpose he has chosen, through the Holy [Spirit], the creaturely man filled with darkness — the natural man who is tainted with original sin and who learnt the divine arts from the fallen angels. The guilty man is eminently suitable and is therefore chosen to become the vessel for the continuing incarnation, not the guiltless one who holds himself aloof from the world and refuses to pay his tribute to life, for in him the dark [side of] God would find no room.” ~Carl Jung, Answer to Job, paragraph 746.

But God, who also does not hear our prayers, wants to become man, and for that purpose he has chosen, through the Holy Ghost, the creaturely man filled with darkness—the natural man who is tainted with original sin and who learnt the divine arts and sciences from the fallen angels. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 746.

The theme of the Fire Mountain is to be met with in the Hook of Enoch. Enoch sees the seven stars chained “like great mountains and burning with fire” at the angels’ place of punishment.

Originally the seven stars were the seven great Babylonian gods, but at the time of Enoch’s revelation they had become the seven Archons, rulers of “this world,” fallen angels condemned to punishment.

In contrast to this menacing theme there is an allusion to the miracles of Jehovah on Mount Sinai, while according to other sources the number seven is by no means sinister, since it is on the seventh mountain of the western land that the tree with the life-giving fruit is to be found, i.e., the arbor sapientiae (cf. fig. 188) ~Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy.

It is remarkable that the angels are always in the plural, a choir of angels. With the exception of Lucifer, and the arch-angels Gabriel and Michael, the angels are not individuals, they appear in choirs and multitudes. They are essentially collective beings. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture, 9 February 1940

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