This grasping of the whole is obviously the aim of science as well, but it is a goal that necessarily lies very far off because science, whenever possible, proceeds experimentally and in all cases statistically.

Experiment, however, consists in asking a definite question which excludes as far as possible anything disturbing and irrelevant.

It makes conditions, imposes them on Nature, and in this way forces her to give an answer to a question devised by man.

She is prevented from answering out of the fullness of her possibilities since these possibilities are restricted as far as partible.

For this purpose there is created in the laboratory a situation which is artificially restricted to the question which compels Nature to give an unequivocal answer.

The workings of Nature in her unrestricted wholeness are completely excluded.

If we want to know what these workings are, we need a method of inquiry which imposes the fewest possible conditions, or if possible no conditions at all, and then leave Nature to answer out of her fullness. ~Carl Jung; Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle; Page 35