What happens within oneself when one integrates previously unconscious contents with the consciousness is something which can scarcely be described in words.

It can only be experienced.

It is a subjective affair quite beyond discussion; we have a particular feeling about ourselves, about the way we are, and that is a fact which it is neither possible nor meaningful to doubt.

Similarly, we convey a particular feeling to others, and that too is a fact that cannot be doubted.

So far as we know, there is no higher authority which could eliminate the probable discrepancies between all these impressions and opinions.

Whether a change has taken place as the result of integration, and what the nature of that change is, remains a matter of subjective conviction.

To be sure, it is not a fact which can be scientifically verified and therefore finds no place in an official view of the world.
Yet it nevertheless remains a fact which is in practice uncommonly important and fraught with consequences.

Realistic psychotherapists, at any rate, and psychologists interested in therapy, can scarcely afford to overlook facts of this sort. .” ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 287.