If thou wouldst into the infinite stride,

Explore the finite on every side. ~Goethe, cited in Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 4

 Intuition provides us with perception and orientation in situations where sense, understanding, and feeling are completely useless to us …. This is an enormously important function if you live in more primitive circumstances or are faced with vital decisions that you cannot master with learned rules or logic. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 7

 Nobody, as long as he moves about among the chaotic currents of life, is without trouble …. I am on my road and I carry my burden just as well as I can do …. There is no difficulty in my life that is not entirely myself. Nobody shall carry me as long as I can walk on my own feet. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 8

 The psyche is not of today! Its age is measured in many millions of years. Individual consciousness is only the flower and fruit of a season, which grows up from the perennial rhizome under the earth, and it finds itself more in harmony with the truth if it takes the existence of the rhizome into account. For the root-network is the mother of all things.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 12

 I suspected that myth had a meaning, which I was bound to miss if l lived apart from it in the haze of my own speculation. I was compelled to ask myself in all seriousness, “What is the myth you are living?” … I simply had to know what unconscious and preconscious myth was shaping me, that is, what kind of rhizome I arose from. This resolve led me to my years of exploration into the subjective contents produced by unconscious processes, to work out the methods that would partly make possibly, and partly assist in, the practical exploration of the manifestations of the unconscious. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 13

 I did not know my maternal grandfather personally. But from all I have heard, his Old Testament name Samuel must have suited him well. He even believed that they spoke Hebrew in heaven, and therefore dedicated himself with the utmost diligence to the study of Hebrew. He was not only highly learned, but also had a pronouncedly poetical mind; indeed he was a rather peculiar man, and believed himself to be constantly surrounded by ghosts. My mother often told me how she had had to stand behind him while he wrote his sermons. He could not put up with ghosts getting behind his back and distracting him while he was trying to think! If a living person sat behind him, the ghosts would be scared off! Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 17

 She had a hearty animal warmth, cooked wonderfully, and was most companionable and pleasant. She was very stout, and a ready listener. She also liked to talk, and her chatter was like the gay plashing of a fountain. She had a decided literary gift, as well as taste and depth. But this quality never properly emerged; it remained hidden beneath the semblance of a kindly, fat old woman, extremely hospitable, and possessor of a great sense of humor. She held all the conventional opinions a person was obliged to have, but then her unconscious personality would suddenly put in an appearance. That personality was unexpectedly powerful: a somber, imposing figure possessed of unassailable authority-and no bones about it. I was sure that she consisted of two personalities, one innocuous and human, the other uncanny. This other emerged only now and then, but each time it was unexpected and frightening. She would then speak as if talking to herself, but what she said was aimed at me and usually struck to the core of my being, so that I was stunned into silence.  Carl Jung Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 18

 Theology had alienated my father and me from one another …. I had a dim premonition that he was inescapably succumbing to his fate. He was lonely and had no friend to talk with. At least I knew no one among our acquaintances whom I would have trusted to say the saving word. Once I heard him praying. He struggled desperately to keep his faith. I was shaken and outraged at once, because I saw how hopelessly he was entrapped by the Church and its theological thinking.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 20

As a child I felt myself to be alone, and I am still, because I know things and must hint at things which others apparently know nothing of, and for the most part do not want to know. Loneliness does not come from having no people about one, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 356.

In the cemetery nearby, the sexton would dig a hole-heaps of brown, upturned earth. Black, solemn men in long frock coats with unusually tall hats and shiny black boots would bring a black box. My father would be there in his clerical gown, speaking in a resounding voice. Women wept. I was told that someone was being buried in this hole in the ground. Certain persons who had been around previously would suddenly no longer be there. Then I would hear that they had been buried, and that Lord Jesus had taken them to himself. . . . I began to distrust Lord Jesus. He lost the aspect of a big, comforting, benevolent bird and became associated with the gloomy black men in frock coats, top hats and shiny black boots who busied themselves with the black box. These ruminations of mine led to my first conscious trauma. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 24

Not only has the symbolism of the phallus become foreign to us, but also many of its outward forms we no longer understand. Their disappearance from our everyday life is closely linked to the far-reaching social upheavals of our time. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 28-29

Albert Oeri, his childhood friend and later editor of the Basler Nachrichten, who rose to a position in the Swiss National Council, relates: “I suppose I saw Jung for the first time in my life when we were still very small boys. My parents were visiting his, and they wanted their little sons to play together. But it was no use. Carl sat in the middle of a room, busying himself with a litt:Te game of ninepins and not taking the least notice of me. Why do I even remember this encounter after some fifty-five years? Probably because I had just never run across such an asocial monster. I was brought up in an exuberantly crowded nursery, where you either played together or got beaten up, but either way you constantly associated with people; he was all by himself-his sister had not yet been born at that time.” Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 29-30

The Christmas carol “This Is the Day That God Has Made” pleased me enormously. And then in the evening, of course, came the Christmas tree. Christmas was the only Christian festival I could celebrate with fervor.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 34

The hero represents man’s unconscious self. This appears empirically as the sum total and the quintessence of all archetypes, and thus it also includes the type of the “father,” that is, the wise old man. In this sense the hero is his own father, and begets himself.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 36

I was taking the long road to school from Klein-Hiiningen, where we lived, to Basel, when suddenly for a single moment I had the overwhelming impression of having just emerged from a dense cloud. I knew all at once: now I am myself! It was as if a wall of mist were at my back, and behind that wall there was not yet an “I.” But at this moment I came upon myself. Previously I had existed, too, but everything had merely happened to me. Now I happened to myself. Now I knew: I am myself now, now I exist.  Previously I had been willed to do this and that; now I willed. This experience seemed to me tremendously important and new: there was “authority” in me.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 37.

The teacher pretended that algebra was a perfectly natural affair, to be taken for granted, while I didn’t even know what numbers really were. They were not flowers, not animals, not fossils; they were nothing that could be imagined, mere quantities that resulted from counting …. To my horror I found that no one understood my difficulty.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 38-39

I was thunderstruck. This was the collision with reality. “Why, then, I must get to work!” I thought suddenly. From that moment on I became a serious child. I crept away, went to my father’s study, took out my Latin grammar, and began to cram with intense concentration. After ten minutes of this I had the finest of fainting fits. I almost fell off the chair, but after a few minutes I felt better and went on working. “Devil take it, I’m not going to faint,” I told myself, and persisted in my purpose. This time it took about fifteen minutes before the second attack came. That, too, passed like the first. “And now you must really get to work!” I stuck it out, and after an hour came the third attack. Still I did not give up, and worked for another hour, until I had the feeling that I had overcome the attacks. Suddenly I felt better than I had in all the months before. And in fact the attacks did not recur. From that day on I worked over my grammar and other schoolbooks every day. A few weeks later I returned to school, and never suffered another attack, even there. The whole bag of tricks was over and done with! That was when I learned what a neurosis is. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 40

 Of his childhood neurosis Jung reported: … it induced in me a studied punctiliousness and an unusual diligence. Those days saw the beginnings of my conscientiousness, practiced not for the sake of appearances, so that I would amount to something, but for my own sake.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, , Pages 40-41

Now he [Carl Jung] gathered up all his courage to consider an unheard-of blasphemy, as if it meant jumping into the abyss of hellfire and thereby forfeiting his soul’s eternal salvation. In his imagination he saw before him the cathedral in Basel on a bright summer day, … the cathedral, the blue sky. God sits on His golden throne, high above the world-and from under the throne an enormous turd falls upon the sparkling new roof, shatters it, and breaks the walls of the cathedral asunder. So that was it!  Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 45

At that time, too, there arose in me profound doubts about everything my father said. When I heard him preaching about grace, I always thought of my own experience. What he said sounded stale and hollow, like a tale told by someone who knows it only by hearsay and cannot quite believe it himself. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 47

 The son thought his father had never experienced the miracle of grace. He had taken the Commandments of the Bible as his guide and more or less blindly believed in its contents, the tradition of his fathers demanded. But he did not know the immediate living God who stands, omnipotent and free, above His Bible and His Church, who calls upon man to partake of His freedom, and can force him to renounce his own views and convictions in order to fulfill without reserve the command of God. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 48

 Theology had alienated my father and· me from one another …. I was shaken and outraged at once, because I saw how hopelessly he was entrapped by the Church and its theological thinking. They had blocked off all avenues by which he might have reached God directly, and then faithlessly abandoned him. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr,Page 48

 The tragedy of my youth was that I saw my father, before my eyes, so to speak, break to pieces against the problem of his faith and come to an early death. This was the objective, external event that opened my eyes to the significance of religion. Subjective, inner experiences prevented me from drawing from my father’s fate negative conclusions with regard to faith that would otherwise have been obvious. I grew up, after all, in the heyday of scientific materialism …. I had to rely on experience alone. Paul’s experience in Damascus was always before me …. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 49

 Actually I had a good personal relationship with my father, and thus no “father complex” of the usual sort. To be sure I was not fond of theology, especially because it gave my father problems which he could not solve and which I felt were unjustified. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 50

 G. Jung discussed “The Significance of the Father in the Destiny of the Individual.” He remarked, among other things: If ever we wish to see the workings of a demonic power of fate, we see them here, in these dark, silent tragedies that are played out slowly and painfully in the diseased psyches of our neurotics …. If we who are “normal” investigate our lives, we see how a powerful hand guides us unfailingly to our destinies, and this hand cannot always be called a kindly one. Often we call it the hand of God or the devil, thereby expressing more correctly than we know an extremely important psychological factor, namely the fact that the impulse that shapes the life of our souls has the nature of an autonomous personality, or at least is experienced in this way, so that from time immemorial, as still in modern idiom, the source of such fates appears as a demon, a good or evil spirit. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 49-50

Actually I had a good personal relationship with my father, and thus no “father complex” of the usual sort. To be sure I was not fond of theology, especially because it gave my father problems which he could not solve and which I felt were unjustified.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 50

By day she (Jung’s) was a loving mother, but at night she seemed uncanny. Then she was like one of those seers who is at the same time a strange animal, like a priestess in a bear’s cave. Ancient and ruthless; ruthless as truth and nature. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 51

He (Nietzsche) was sincere, which cannot be said of so many academic teachers to whom career and vanity mean infinitely more than the truth.  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 56

 The words fell heavily on my soul. Once upon a time he too had been an enthusiastic student in his first year, as I was now; the world had opened out for him, as it was doing for me; the infinite treasures of knowledge had spread before him, as now before me. How can it have happened that everything was blighted for him, had turned to sourness and bitterness? I found no answer, or too many. The speech he delivered that summer evening over the wine was the last chance he had to live out his memories of the time when he was what he should have been. .  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 58

The observations of the spiritualists, weird and questionable as they seemed to me, were the first accounts I had seen of objective psychic phenomena …. For myself I found such possibilities extremely interesting and attractive. They added another dimension to my life; the world gained depth and background. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 63

 Even when Aniela Jaffe, his part-time secretary since 1955, lent a hand with the writing and organizing, the correspondence absorbed much of his strength. “Jung’s correspondence was terribly extensive and therefore often the cause of complaints and grumblings,” she recalled. “It was obvious that the letters tired him out. But they held an important place in his life. When his libido no longer flowed into the form of scientific works, the letters took the place of the manuscripts and became the receptacle for his creative thoughts. Thus their number continually grew in his later  years. But above all they formed a link to the world, and that reconciled him, living in the introverted, withdrawn way he did, with all the trouble and effort they caused him. He needed the letters, he had to admit; and if out of misplaced consideration I forwarded too little mail on his vacations, I earned an appropriate reprimand.” ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 417-418

 But when Barbara Hannah sought Jung out in Bollingen a few days later, she learned from him how the guest of honor himself had felt about the great discrepancy between the two events: in the morning it was the large crowd of those who wanted to be near Jung for the sake of the subject itself, of whom he said that it was they who would carry on his work. In the evening, in contrast, it was the strict regulation ruled by the institution.  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Jung: A Biography, Pages 420-421

 in order to know C. G. Jung in his totality, it was not enough to study his books, nor to do analytic work with him in his study in Kusnacht; one had to accompany him to Bollingen and be there as he cultivated his cornfield, worked on his stone, felled trees, chopped firewood, and cooked his food. – Gerhard Wehr, Page 422

 To the rediscoverer of the wholeness and polarity of the human psyche and its tendency toward unity; The diagnostician of the phenomena of human crises in the age of science and technology; The interpreter of primitive symbolism and the process of individuation in mankind.” – Degree of Doctor of Science honoris causa from The Swiss Technical Institute in Zurich on his 85th Birthday

 [At the time of Dr. Jung’s 85th Birthday]

“But when Barbara Hannah sought Jung out in a few days later, she learned from him how the guest of honor himself had felt about the great discrepancy between the two events: in the morning it was the large crowd of those who wanted to be near Jung for the sake of the subject itself, of whom he said that it was they who would carry on his work. In the evening, in contrast, it was the strict regulation ruled by the [Jung Institute] institution. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 420-421

 Jung was anything but fond of high words and sterile ceremony. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung, Page 421

 My name enjoys an existence quasi-independent of myself. My real self is actually chopping wood in Bollingen and cooking the meals, trying to forget the trial of an eightieth birthday. – Laurens Van Der Post, Jung: Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 417

 Stephen Black was inclined to compare the octogenarian with a typical Swiss peasant. Amused, Jung agreed: “Well, I think you are not just beside the mark. That is what I have often been called. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 421

 

“In all my eighty years, Barbara Hannah attested, I have never seen a marriage for which I felt such a spontaneous and profound respect. Emma Jung was a most remarkable woman, a sensation type who compensated and completed her husband in many respects.” – Gerhard Wehr, Jung, Page 423

 I can only think that the illumination came from my wife, who was then mostly in a coma, and that the tremendous lighting up and release of this insight worked back upon her and was one reason that she could die such a painless and regal death. – Carl Jung , Jung: A Biography, Page 424

 She [Emma Jung] was an immensely sensitive, shy, solicitous, circumspect, and introverted spirit ….Yet she was as dauntless as she was enduring and delivered her meaning with great precision, erudition, and understanding.- Laurens Van Der Post, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 423

 The close of her [Emma] life, the end, and what it made me realize, wrenched me violently out of myself. It cost me a great deal to regain my footing, and contact with stone helped me. – Carl Jung , Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 425

 Among the carvings he produced in Bollingen in the severe winter of 1955-56 were three stone tablets. On these, which were placed in the open courtyard, he inscribed the names of his paternal ancestors. His family colors also came into their own, as the master of the house painted the ceiling with motifs from the family coats of arms of the Jung’s and the Rauschenbachs. On this point Jung noted that his family had originally borne on its arms a phoenix, the motif that illustrated youthfulness and rejuvenation. His grandfather, C. G. Jung the elder, the enthusiastic Freemason and Grand Master of the Swiss lodge, had changed the family arms, however, ostensibly out of resistance against his father.  The grandson mentioned this revision in order to point out the historical connection with his own life and thought. In the Memories we read on this point: “In keeping with this revision of my grandfather’s my coat of arms no longer contains the original phoenix. Instead there is a cross azure in chief dexter and in base sinister a blue bunch of grapes in a field d’or; separating these is an estoile d’or in a fess azure.  The symbolism of these arms is Masonic, or Rosicrucian. Just as cross and rose represent the Rosicrucian problem of opposites (“per crucem ad rosam”), that is, the Christian and Dionysian elements, so cross and grapes are symbols of the heavenly and the chthonic spirit. The uniting symbol is the gold star, the aurum philosophorum.” Although the heraldic animal of the phoenix represented an essentially spiritual message, there is also no question that Jung was fully able to affirm the Masonic and Rosicrucian symbolism-no doubt because it symbolized the goals and methods of his own work.  ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung:  Pages 426-427

 By carving the stone and building the tower, he [Jung] meant at the same time to fulfill “an impersonal karma” of his family, as if tasks had been assigned to him from out of the past which he had to carry out. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung Page 427

 It (Inner Experiences) had to remain hidden because it could not have borne the brutalities of the outside world. But now I have grown so old that I can give up my grip on the world, and the discordant cries die away in the distance – Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 427

 So, in that same year, I added an upper story to this [Bollingen] section, which represents myself, or my ego-personality. Earlier, I would not have been able to do this; I would have regarded it as presumptuous self-emphasis. Now it signified an extension of consciousness achieved in old age. With that the building was complete. – Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 426

 I was the first to emphasize the enormous role religion plays in the individuation process, as I was the first to raise the question of the relation between psychotherapy and religion in its practical aspects.  Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 436

 “Why do you American psychologists hate me so much?” One can only imagine the peculiar, partly amused and partly roguish twinkle in his eye! Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 436-437

 One more time he [Jung] had himself taken out for a drive in his own auto, as it was necessary to say goodbye to the world and the things around him. The earthly Bollingen had already drawn far into the distance.  ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung,” Page 452

 “Do the people know that I am dying?” he [Jung] asked once, as though he wanted to be sure that his distant friends were informed of his departure from the earth. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung,” Page 453-454.

 Eight days before his death he told Marie-Louise von Franz of a vision in which he had seen the destruction of a large part of the earth-“Thank God, not all of it,” he added-a hopeful look into the gloom of his premonitions. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung,” Page 453

 Now I know the truth down to a very little bit that is still missing. When I know this too, then I will have died. – Carl Jung shortly before his death, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 453

 Soon after his [Jung’s] death a strong thunderstorm came up. Lightning struck a tall poplar tree on the edge of the lake in his garden and tore a great hole in its trunk, so that afterward the ground was littered with small pieces of bark.  ~Lauren Van Der Post, Gerhard Wehr’s “Jung”, Page 453.

 I have also become acquainted with very many anthroposophists and theosophists and have always found to my regret that these people imagine all kinds of things and assert all kinds of things for which they are incapable of producing any proof at all. ~Carl Jung, Gerhard Wehr’s “Jung”, Page 466.

 These Eastern methods don’t enrich consciousness and they don’t increase our real knowledge and our self-criticism, and that is the thing we need, namely a consciousness with a wider horizon and a better understanding. That at least is what I am trying to do for the patient: to make him independent and conscious of the influences of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Gerhard Wehr’s “Jung”, Page 467.

 The “reality of the soul,” as Jung learned to see it, consists in the fact that it cannot be adequately described by the categories of the inside, or the depths. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 469

 … psychiatry, in the broadest sense, is a dialogue between the sick psyche and the psyche of the doctor, which is presumed to be “normal.” ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 60

 analysis is a dialogue demanding two partners. Analyst and patient sit facing one another, eye to eye; the doctor has something to say, but so has the patient. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 469

 My patients brought me so close to the reality of human life that I could not help learning essential things from them. Encounters with people of so many different psychological levels have been for me incomparably more important than fragmentary conversations with celebrities. The finest and most significant conversations of my life were anonymous. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 469

 It should not be overlooked that I deal with those psychic phenomena which prove empirically to be the bases of metaphysical concepts, and that when I say, for example, “God,” I can refer to nothing other than demonstrable psychic patterns which are indeed shockingly real. … It is certainly not the task of an empirical science to determine the extent to which such psychic contents are influenced and determined by the presence of a metaphysical Godhead …. I do not doubt his [Buber’s] conviction of his living relationship to a divine Thou, but I am, as always, of the opinion that this relationship first of all goes to an autonomous psychic content which is defined one way by him and otherwise by the Pope.  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 472-473

 Generally, he said, it was apparently the duty of modern artists “to show the world in its obscurity. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 477

 Jung called Priestley’s 1946 BBC presentation Description of a Visit to Carl Jung “a masterpiece. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 479

 You [J.B. Priestly] as a writer are in a position to appreciate what it means to an isolate72d individual like myself to hear one friendly human voice among the stupid and malevolent noises rising from the scribbler-infested jungle …. Your succour comes at a time when it is badly needed … . ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 480

 It should not be overlooked that I deal with those psychic phenomena which prove empirically to be the bases of metaphysical concepts, and that when I say, for example, “God,” I can refer to nothing other than demonstrable psychic patterns which are indeed shockingly real. … It is certainly not the task of an empirical science to determine the extent to which such psychic contents are influenced and determined by the presence of a metaphysical Godhead …. I do not doubt his [Buber’s] conviction of his living relationship to a divine Thou, but I am, as always, of the opinion that this relationship first of all goes to an autonomous psychic content which is defined one way by him and otherwise by the Pope. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 472

 I shall probably never be quite sure whether I did enjoy it, because it meant too much grinding of nerves and of grey matter. I also don’t know whether you will enjoy what I have written about Ulysses,” Jung wrote to Joyce, referring to his essay, the monologue “Ulysses,” because I couldn’t help telling the world how much I was bored, how I grumbled, how I cursed and how I admired. The 40 pages of non-stop run in the end is a string of veritable psychological peaches. I suppose the devil’s grandmother knows so much about the real psychology of a woman, I didn’t ….At all events you may gather from my article what Ulysses has done to a supposedly balanced psychologist. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 472

 In modern artists it is not individual illness that produces this tendency, but the spirit of his time. He responds not to an individual impulse but to a collective flow, which, it is true, has its source not directly in consciousness, but rather in the collective unconscious of the modern psyche. Because it is a collective manifestation, it also affects the various areas identically, painting as well as literature, sculpture as well as architecture. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 482

 Jung thought it indicative that Vincent van Gogh, one of the spiritual fathers of modern art, had actually been mentally ill.  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 482

 In view of Picasso’s bewildering diversity one hardly dares suggest it; I would rather say what I have found in my material. The nekyia is not an aimless, purely destructive, titanic crash, but a meaningful katabasis eis antron, a descent into the cave of initiation and secret knowledge. The journey through the history of the soul of humankind has as its goal the restoration of the person as a whole ….  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 483

 I often thought of Meister Eckhart, who was entombed for 600 years. I asked myself time and again why there are no men in our epoch who could see at least what I was wrestling with. I think it is not mere vanity and desire for recognition on my part, but a genuine concern for my fellow beings …. I see the suffering of mankind in the individual’s predicament and vice versa …. After 60 solid years of field-work I may be supposed to know at least something about my job. But even the most incompetent ass knew better and I received no encouragement. On the contrary I was misunderstood or completely ignored. Under those circumstances I even grew afraid to increase the chaos of opinion by adding considerations which could not be understood. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 484

 _I stand isolated between the faculties and must depend on someone else to seriously concern himself with this line of research, which up until now has happened only in a very few cases. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 486

 It is a historical event, as you are-so far as my knowledge goes-the first one who has called the attention of the Christian congregation to the fact that the Voice of God can still be heard …. The understanding of dreams should indeed be taken seriously by the Church, since the cura animarum is one of its duties, which has been sadly neglected by the Protestants ….The pilgrim’s way is spiked with thorns everywhere, even if he is a good Christian, or just therefore.  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 490

 Just as man, as a social being, cannot live in the long run without being connected with the community, so too the individual finds the real justification for his existence, and his own spiritual as well as moral autonomy, nowhere but in an extramundane principle that is capable of relativizing the overpowering influence of external factors. The individual who is not anchored in God can offer no resistance, on the strength of his own resources, to the physical and moral sway of the world. For this man needs the evidence of his own inner, transcendent experience …. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 491

 I am convinced that it is not Christianity, but the conception and interpretation of it hitherto, that is antiquated in the face of the circumstances of today’s world. The Christian symbol is a living being that carries the seeds of further development within itself. It can continue to develop, and it depends only on whether we can decide to meditate once again, somewhat more thoroughly, on the Christian premises ….   ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 491

 I stand isolated between the faculties and must depend on someone else to seriously concern himself with this line of research, which up until now has happened only in a very few cases. ~Carl Jung at age 85, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 487

 It is a historical event, as you [John A. Sanford] are-so far as my knowledge goes-the first one who has called the attention of the Christian congregation to the fact that the Voice of God can still be heard …. The understanding of dreams should indeed be taken seriously by the Church, since the cura animarum is one of its duties, which has been sadly neglected by the Protestants ….The pilgrim’s way is spiked with thorns everywhere, even if he is a good Christian, or just therefore. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 490

 Just as man, as a social being, cannot live in the long run without being connected with the community, so too the individual finds the real justification for his existence, and his own spiritual as well as moral autonomy, nowhere but in an extramundane principle that is capable of relativizing the overpowering influence of external factors. The individual who is not anchored in God can offer no resistance, on the strength of his own resources, to the physical and moral sway of the world. For this man needs the evidence of his own inner, transcendent experience …. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 491

 I am convinced that it is not Christianity, but the conception and interpretation of it hitherto, that is antiquated in the face of the circumstances of today’s world. The Christian symbol is a living being that carries the seeds of further development within itself. It can continue to develop, and it depends only on whether we can decide to meditate once again, somewhat more thoroughly, on the Christian premises ….  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 491

 In all my eighty years,” Barbara Hannah attested, “I have never seen a marriage for which I felt such a spontaneous and profound respect. Emma Jung was a most remarkable woman, a sensation type who compensated and completed her husband in many respects.” ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 423

Emma Jung’s life was one of uncommon richness and was one of fulfillment, because her faithfulness to her own nature coincided with her faithfulness to her husband and her profound understanding of his life’s work. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 423

 She [Emma Jung] was an immensely sensitive, shy, solicitous, circumspect, and introverted spirit …. Yet she was as dauntless as she was enduring and delivered her meaning with great precision, erudition, and understanding. ~Laurens Van Der Post, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 423

 Of course I know that as in the past my voice is much too weak to reach the ears of the many. It is not arrogance which drives me, but my conscience as a doctor that counsels me to fulfill my duty in order to warn those few to whom I can make myself heard that events are in store for mankind which signal the end of an eon. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 410

 There are, it would seem, alterations in the constellation of the psychic dominants, the archetypes, the “gods,” which cause or accompany long-term transformations of the collective psyche. This transformation began within historical tradition and left its traces, first in the passing of the age of Taurus into that of Aries, then from Aries to Pisces, the beginning of which coincides with the rise of Christianity. Now we are approaching the great change to be expected with the entering of the vernal equinox into Aquarius. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 411

 I am, to be honest, troubled by the lot of those who have been unprepared for the events and surprised by them and surrendered unsuspectingly to their incomprehensibility. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 411

 Something is being seen. What is seen may be in individual cases a subjective, in the case of several or even many simultaneous observers a collective vision ( or rather hallucination). Much like a rumor, such a psychic phenomenon would have a compensatory significance; it would be a spontaneous response from the unconscious to the present conscious state, or to anxiety over the apparently hopeless world political situation, which at any time may lead to a universal catastrophe. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 412

 Rather he [Jung] once recommended (in late 1957) that a competent psychiatrist should investigate the conscious and unconscious mentality of UFO witnesses in order to determine whether UFOs were to be traced to the projection of unconscious contents. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 413

 But its elevation [UFO’s from Rumor] to the status of vision and hallucination stems from a stronger agitation and therefore a deeper source. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 413

 In the summer of 1959 Charles A. Lindbergh (1902-1974), accompanied by his wife Anne and the German-American publisher Kurt Wolff, was Jung’s guest in Bollingen. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 414

 There is the general feeling, to be sure, that we have reached a significant turning point in the ages, but people imagine that the great change has to do with nuclear fission and fusion, or with space rockets. What is concurrently taking place in the human psyche is usually overlooked. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 415

 Since my aim was to demonstrate the full extent to which my psychology corresponded to alchemy-or vice versa-I wanted to discover, side by side with the religious Mysterium Coniunctionis questions, what special problems of psychotherapy were treated in the work of the alchemists. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 396

 The alchemistic tradition enabled him [Jung] to connect the experiences and insights he had acquired through his direct, personal ‘descent into the unconscious with an objectively existing parallel material and to represent it in this way. This also made possible a connection with his insights into the historical roots of European intellectual development. ~Marie Louise von Franz, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 397

 The transcendental psychophysical background is equivalent to a “potential world,” insofar as in it all those conditions are at hand which determine the form of empirical phenomena. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 404

 if l know that the nature of reality lies in the infinite, the unconditional, the eternal, then things lose their power to fascinate. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 405

 On the contrary I am darkly aware of things lurking in the background of the problem-things too big for our horizons …. To deal with the coniunctio in human words is a disconcerting task, since you are forced to express and formulate a process taking place “in Mercurio” and not on the level of human thought and human language, i.e., not within the sphere of discriminating consciousness …. The “way” is not an upward-going straight line, f.i. from earth to heaven or from matter to spirit, but rather a circumambulatio of and an approximation to the Centrum. We are not liberated by leaving something behind but only be fulfilling our task as mixta composita, i.e., human beings between the opposites. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 408

 Barbara Hannah, who was equally close to both of them, recounted the great shock that Jung’s health suffered during those weeks:

 … his tachycardia returned, he kept an unusually high pulse for several weeks, and was not well enough to go to the funeral. Outwardly he kept extremely calm, so that both his wife and his secretary told me they thought he had overcome the shock after a few days, but from my notes for

April, 1953, I see that he said himself that his pulse was still between 80 and 120; moreover, this trouble continued for some time ….

 Although it took Jung a long time to overcome the shock physically, he was able much sooner to find a psychological attitude to Toni’s death and to accept the pain it gave him. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 407

 In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship. The feeling for the infinite, however, can be attained only if we are bounded to the utmost. The greatest limitation for man is the “self”; it is manifested in the experience:

 “I am only that!” Only consciousness of our narrow confinement in the self forms the link to the limitlessness of the unconscious. In such awareness we experience ourselves concurrently as limited and eternal, as both the one and the other. In knowing ourselves to be unique in our personal combination-that is, ultimately limited-we possess also the capacity for becoming conscious of the infinite. But only then!

 In an era which has concentrated exclusively upon extension of living space and increase of rational knowledge at all costs, it is a supreme challenge to ask man to become conscious of his uniqueness and his limitation. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Pages 405-406

 In the spring of 1951 Jung was repeatedly bedridden, as his liver was giving him trouble. Then, amid fevered states which gave the impression that his whole physical and mental structure was, as it were, collapsing, the patient was seized by the idea of the Book of Job. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 382

 And although Jung by his own admission was not an auditory type-one fixated on hearing sounds internally and externally-he perceived what pressed in upon him, and was to be turned into language through him, as a “great music,” like something by Bach or Handel. I felt as if l were listening to a great composition, or rather a concert. The whole thing was an adventure that befell me, and I hurried to write it  [Answer to Job] down. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 382

 The book [Answer to Job] does not pretend to be anything but the voice or question of a single individual who hopes or expects to meet with thoughtfulness in the public. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 385

 If Christianity claims to be a monotheism, it becomes unavoidable to assume the opposites as being contained in God. But then we are confronted with a major religious problem: the problem of Job. It is the aim of my booklet to point out its historical evolution since the time of Job down through the centuries to the most recent symbolic phenomena like the Assumptio Mariae, etc. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 387

 But naturally this was not meant to imply that the author intended merely to collect and comment upon historical evidence, as had been done for example even in his study of medieval natural philosophy. All this pointed to a complexio oppositorum and thus recalled again the story of Job to my mind: Job who expected help from God against God. This most peculiar fact presupposes a similar conception of the opposites ….

For several years I hesitated … , because I was quite conscious of the probable consequences and knew what a storm would be raised. But I was gripped by the urgency and difficulty of the problem and was unable to throw this off. Therefore I found myself obliged to deal with the whole problem and did so in the form of describing a personal experience, carried by subjective emotions. I deliberately chose this form because I wanted to avoid the impression that I had any idea of announcing an “eternal truth.” ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 387

 Jung read the Bible, and the Book of Job with it, as “utterances of the soul.” ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 387

 I write [Answer to Job] not as a scholar (which I am not), but as a layman and a doctor who has been privileged to look deep into the spiritual lives of many people. What I express is of course primarily my own opinion, but I know that I also speak in the name of many who have fared as I have. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 388-389

 . . . God becomes man. This means nothing less than the transformation of God which overturns the world. It means more or less what the creation did in its time, namely an objectivization of God. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 389

 

The feminine demands just as personal a representation as the masculine …. Just as the person of Christ cannot be replaced by an organization, so neither can the bride by the Church …. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 391

 To Upton Sinclair he [Jung] complained: “People mostly don’t understand my empirical standpoint. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 392

 I am always seeking quiet. I am a bundle of opposites and can only stand myself when I observe myself as an objective phenomenon. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 392

 It [Answer to Job] is a book that moves me deeply …. In a certain sense it is a debate with God, like that of Abraham when he pleaded with God over the ruin of Sodom. It is particularly for me personally-also a book against God, who allowed six million of ‘his’ people to be slain, for of course Job is really also Israel, and I mean this not in a ‘petty’ sense, as I know full well that we are only the paradigm for all of humanity, in whose name you speak, protest, and console. And precisely the conscious one-sidedness, and indeed often incorrectness of what you say, is for me an inner proof of the necessity and justness of your attack-which is of course no attack, as I know very well …. ~Erich Neumann, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 393-394

 It seems to me that it is only the person who seeks to realize his humanity who does God’s will, not the one who takes flight before the sad fact “man.” … To become human seems to me to be the intention of God in us …. God has obviously not chosen to be his sons those who hang on to him as a father, but those who have found the courage to stand on their own feet. Sarcasm is the means by which one conceals injured feelings from oneself, from which it can be gathered how much the knowledge of God has wounded me, and how much I would have preferred to remain as a child in the fatherly protection and avoid the problem of the opposites. It is probably even harder to free oneself from good than from evil. But without sin there is no breaking away from the good father …. One way or another certain questions must be openly asked and answered. I took it as my duty to encourage this. . ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 394-395

 Clearly coniunctio represents an archetypal image of the development of the human intellect, which expresses sometimes as sacred marriage, sometimes as mystical or chemical wedding,  the deepest longing of mankind, be it more erotic or-with no contradiction-more religious or even more technical and chemical in emphasis. It is always the combination of what has been separated, by means of which the individual is raised to a higher state, that of wholeness or selfhood. The outward process-be it a technical operation or a religious act-becomes the symbolic expression of an inward state, and even more: of a mysterium that encompasses the dimensions of both inner and outer and provides a hint of the unus mundus, the reality of a unified world. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 400

 Rationality is only one aspect of the world and does not cover the whole field of experience. Psychic events are not caused merely from without and mental contents are not mere derivatives of sense-perceptions. There is an irrational mental life within, a so-called “spiritual life,” of which almost nobody knows or wants to know except a few “mystics.” This “life within” is generally considered nonsense and therefore something to be eliminated-curiously enough in the East as well as in the West. Yet it is the origin and the still-flowing source of Yoga, Zen, and many other spiritual endeavours, not only in the East but in the West too.  ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 462

 A mere sensation or a new thrill is of no use to the European mind. We must rather learn to earn in order to possess. What the East has to give us should be merely a help to us in a work which we still have to do. What good is the wisdom of the Upanishads to us, and the insights of Chinese yoga, if we abandon our own foundations like outworn mistakes, to settle thievishly on foreign shores like homeless pirates? ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 463

 The split in the Western mind therefore makes it impossible at the outset for the intentions of yoga to be realized in any adequate way …. The Indian … not only knows his own nature, but he knows also how much he himself is nature. The European, on the other hand, has a science of nature and knows astonishingly little of his own nature, the nature within him. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 464.

 .. .I have long been keenly interested in building a bridge-or at least trying to do so-between the two disciplines which accept practical responsibility for the curaanimarum: theology on the one hand and medical psychology on the other. Different as their points de depart may be, they do both meet in the empirical psyche of the human individual. … We are both convinced that our endangered time needs psychological enlightenment, and that someone has to make a beginning, though cannot do it alone ….   Pages 436-437

In Time, and then in the Houston Post of 16 September 19 57, one read what effect the Swiss professor had had on his American guest: “The old gentleman with the white hair and the knowingly flashing eyes leaned back in his armchair and thoughtfully smoked his pipe. Seeming not to notice the microphone around his neck and the camera lens pointed at him, C. G. Jung spoke through the cloud of smoke that wreathed his head. His voice was loud and powerful. … ‘The world,’ said Jung, ‘hangs by a thin thread, and that thread is the human soul. … It is not the reality of the hydrogen bomb that we need to fear, but what man will do with it. If certain people in Moscow lose their nerve, then the world will be plunged into fire and flames. As never before the world depends on the soul of man.’ This, the old wise man explains, is why the exploration and understanding of the human soul is more important than ever. . . . Gently guided by his interviewer Richard Evans, Jung wandered through the whole wide realm of his convictions and theories of the psyche …. Jung’s presentation was as incomparable as it was fascinating. It was the first time he had ever been in front of a television camera, the first time he had spoken to American listeners since his lectures on “Psychology and Religion” at Yale in 1938, and apart from a few lectures in Zurich, it was his only public appearance in ten years …. Jung scintillated and joked, the whole thing seemed to give him the greatest enjoyment …. In the studio his eyes sparkled behind his steel-rimmed spectacles, and his bristly white mustache moved when he laughed …. ” And Jung’s laugh spoke for itself  Pages 438-439

When George Duplain interviewed C. G. Jung two years later for the Gazette de Lausanne, he too met with an outgoing interlocutor. Jung, who particularly toward the end of his life complained that no one understood him, above all his own profession, spoke highly of the reporter: Ordinarily my books are treated rather superficially by the press, and little attempt is made to get at their deeper meaning. This is true not only of the daily papers but also of scientific journals. George Duplain goes way beyond this sort ofreporting ….In taking the trouble to write such a thoughtful report, Georges Duplain has done a service not only to the interested public but to our psychological knowledge in general.  Page 439

I am sick of talking to people who do not even know the psychological ABC’s. There are so many people who either designate themselves as my pupils or aver that they know my “system” that I am always a bit scared when I have to meet an unknown person. Carl Jung to BBC London ; Jung: A Biography, Page 441

The varieties of psychic behavior are indeed of an eminently historical nature. Not only must the psychotherapist acquaint himself with the personal biography of his patient, but also with the intellectual presuppositions of his nearer and further intellectual milieu, where the influences of tradition and Weltanschauung come into play and often play a decisive role. No psychotherapist who is earnestly concerned with the understanding of the whole person is spared the necessity of coming to terms with the symbolism of the language of dreams.  Page 434

“Oh, plunge yourself into a positive belief,” wrote my grandfather Jung. Yes, “plunge,” gladly, if I could, if that depended only on my higher self. But an inexplicably difficult something, an immobility and torpor, exhaustion and weakness always prevents the decisive last step. I have already taken many steps, but nothing near the final one. The greater the certainty, the more superhuman the doubt, the disturbing infernal power. Page 63  Grandfather of Basel

My heart suddenly began to pound. I had to stand up and draw a deep breath. My excitement was intense, for it had become clear to me, in a flash of illumination, that for me the only possible goal was psychiatry. Here alone the two currents of my interest could flow together and in a united stream dig their own bed. Here was the empirical field common to biological and spiritual facts, which I had everywhere sought and nowhere found. Here at last was the place where the collision of nature and spirit became a reality.  Pages 65-66

… psychiatry, in the broadest sense, is a dialogue between the sick psyche and the psyche of the doctor, which is presumed to be “normal.” It is a coming to terms between the sick personality and that of the therapist, both in principle equally subjective. My aim was to show that delusions and hallucinations were not just specific symptoms of mental disease but also had a human meaning. Pages 66-67

Miss S. W. is very well built, exhibiting slightly rachitic skull formation without pronounced hydrocephalus, somewhat pale facial color, and dark eyes of a peculiarly piercing brightness. . . . In school she was average, showed little interest, and was absent-minded. In general she showed rather reserved behavior, which could however suddenly give way to the most boisterous, excited glee. She is of ordinary intelligence, has no particular talents, and is rather unmusical. She is not fond of books, preferring handicrafts or sitting about daydreaming …. As a result her level of education is relatively low, and her interests of correspondingly restricted scope. The range of her knowledge of literature is similarly limited. Page 71

… very much to my regret, for I had learned from this example how a No. 2 personality is formed, how it enters into a child’s consciousness and finally integrates it into itself …. All in all, this was the one great experience which wiped out all my earlier philosophy and made it possible for me to achieve a psychological point of view. I had discovered some objective facts about the human psyche. Yet the nature of the experience was such that once again I was unable to speak of it. I knew no one to whom I could have told the whole story.  Page 74

My effort has been aimed above all against public opinion, which has nothing but a disdainful smile for so-called occult phenomena, at presenting the numerous connections of these with the concerns of the physician and of psychology, and at drawing attention to the many important questions which this unexplored territory still holds in store for us. The beginning of this work has given me the conviction that a rich harvest for experimental psychology is ripening in this field … , Page 75

Through my work with the patients I realized that paranoid ideas and hallucinations contain a germ of meaning. A personality, a life history, a pattern of hopes and desires lie behind the psychosis. The fault is ours if we do not understand them. It dawned upon me then for the first time that a general psychology of the personality lies concealed within psychosis, and that even here we come upon the old human conflicts. Although patients may appear dull and apathetic, or totally imbecilic, there is more going on in their minds, and more that is meaningful, than there seems to be. At bottom we discover nothing new and unknown in the mentally ill; rather, we encounter the substratum of our own natures.  Pages 81-82

She had black hair and an olive complexion, and was quite different from my mother. I can see, even now, her hairline, her throat, with its darkly pigmented skin, and her ear. All this seemed to me very strange and yet strangely familiar. It was as though she belonged not to my family but only to me, as though she were connected in some way with other mysterious things I could not understand. This type of girl later became a component of my anima. The feeling of strangeness which she conveyed, and yet of having known her always, was a characteristic of that figure which later came to symbolize for me the whole essence of womanhood.  Page 87

Sad at heart, I retreated into myself. . . . Outwardly this encounter was completely meaningless. But, seen from within, it was so weighty that it not only occupied my thoughts for days but has remained forever in my memory, like a shrine by the wayside. At that time I was still in that childlike state where life consists of single, unrelated experiences. For who could discover the threads of fate which led from Brother Klaus to the pretty girl? Page 90

At the age of twenty-five I lacked the experience to appreciate Freud’s theories. Such experience did not come until later. In 1903 I once more took up The Interpretation of Dreams and discovered how it all linked up with my own ideas.  ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 97

 

Was Freud a modern-day Galileo? There is much to be said for this idea, at least as far as the stance of those in authority once the church, now the scientific community-is concerned, but Wilhelm Weygandt, a professor of psychiatry and private consulting physician, expressed it perfectly on the

occasion of a medical convention in Hamburg in 1910: “Freud’s theories have nothing to do with science; they are more a matter for the police.” (Three years earlier Jung had said of this “scholar”: “I know Weygandt personally, he is a hysteric par excellence, stuffed with complexes from top to bottom, so that he can’t get a genuine word out of his throat …. I would never have thought German scholarship could have produced such meanness.”  Page 100

Special mention may be made of a few letters scattered here and there in the collection from Emma Jung, who here also acted not only as the wife of her famous husband, but spoke for herself, standing on her own feet while at the same time taking sides with her spouse. With great maturity the young woman turned her attention to the problematic situation that Page 104

Sigmund Freud had long been developing between the two men. Partly thanks to her feminine intuition, but also through the practical application

of psychological understanding, she noted the complications that stood between “father” and “son” and searched for a humane solution. “Indeed, one can certainly not be the child of a great man with impunity, considering how much trouble it already takes to get away from even ordinary fathers. And then when this eminent father also has a patriarchal streak in him, as you said yourself “-this last in reference to Freud’s family circumstances. And, regarding Jung, “You can imagine how pleased and honored I am at the confidence which you place in Carl, but it would almost seem to me that sometimes you give him too much; do you not see in him more of a successor and fulfiller than is necessary? Doesn’t one often give much because one wishes to hold much back?” A revealing question! Finally she made an urgent appeal: “Please think of Carl not with the feelings of a father: ‘He will grow, but I must fade away,’ but as one person to another, who like you must follow his own law.” So she wrote, at twenty-nine, to the father of psychoanalysis, who was fifty-five-spirited words from a mature woman!  Pages 104-105

This book was written in 1911, in my thirty-sixth year. The time is a critical one, for it marks the beginning of the second half of life, when a metanoia, a mental transformation, not infrequently occurs. I was acutely conscious, then, of the loss of friendly relations with Freud and of the lost comradeship of our work together. The practical and moral support which my wife gave me at that difficult period is something I shall always hold in grateful remembrance.  Page 134

But Jung took the final step only when he heard through his colleague Alphonse Maeder that Freud had called his good faith (“bona fides”) into question. Further hesitation was no longer possible, and on 27 October Jung wrote to the “Most esteemed Herr Professor”: I would have expected you to have imparted something as weighty as this to me directly. Since this is the most serious accusation that can be made against a person, you make further collaboration with you impossible for me. Therefore I am resigning from the editorship of the Jahrbuch with which you entrusted me. I have also informed Bleuler and Deuticke [ the publisher J of my decision. Most respectfully, Dr. C. G. Jung  Page 158

 Jung pointed out to his Zurich colleague Maeder the impossibility of further collaboration with Freud: I have by no means fallen into Freud’s trap, for I consider it

no advantage of Freud’s if he disgusts me …. The outward impression will be very bad. But inner successes carry more weight than the howling of the crowd.  Page 159

 In spite of the astonishing lack of appreciation I incurred on the part of Freud, I cannot fail to recognize his significance as a cultural critic and pioneer in the realm of psychology, even considering my own resentment. A correct assessment of Freud’s efforts reaches into areas that concern not only the Jews but all European people, areas which I have tried to shed light on in my works. Without Freudian “psychoanalysis” I would have entirely lacked the key.  Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 160

Freud’s commentary [on the burning of his books by Nazis] and his poor consolation were: “At least I am burning in the best of company. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung: A Biography, Page 305.

 On the question of Hitler’s attitude toward women and marriage, Jung prophesied: “He cannot marry …. Hitler’s real passion, of course, is Germany.” ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 305.

 His [Jung’s] passionate commitment was to the droits de l’homme, the fundamental rights of man and the greatest possible freedom of the individual, which are guaranteed on one hand by the federal state, and on the other even more by the maturity, wisdom, and conscientiousness of the individual members of a community. The individual, in this sense, is even more important than the system. Naturally he repudiated any sort of dictatorship or tyranny; he did not believe in forcible ‘improvements’ in a system as long as the individual had not changed himself. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 306.

 For that is the great and redeeming thing about every genuine personality, that it voluntarily decides to sacrifice itself to its destiny, consciously translating into its own individual reality that which, if lived unconsciously by the group, would only lead to ruin. Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 306-307

 We are menaced to a terrifying degree by wars and revolutions that are nothing other than psychic epidemics. At any time several million people can be stricken with madness, and then we have another world war or a devastating revolution. Rather than wild animals, falling rocks, and flooding waters, man is now exposed to the elemental powers of his own soul. The psyche holds a great power, one that surpasses by many times all the forces of the earth. ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 307

 The more the absolute authority of the Christian worldview is lost, the more perceptibly the “blond beast” will turn over in its subterranean prison and threaten us with the outbreak of devastating consequences. This takes place as a psychological revolution in the individual just as it can also appear as a social phenomenon. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 307

 The collective man threatens to suffocate the individual, on whose responsibility all the work of man ultimately rests. The mass as such is always anonymous and unaccountable, and so-called Fuhrers are the inevitable symptoms of a mass movement. The true leaders of humanity are always those who look after themselves, relieving the heavy burden of the masses of their own weight at least, by consciously keeping aloof from the masses’ blind subjection to the laws of nature. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 309

 In view of this necessity, any over narrow restriction to artificial boundaries of whatever kind, be they of national, political, linguistic, doctrinal, or philosophical nature, would be a catastrophe for our science …. The nations of Europe form a European family, which like every family has its own distinctive spirit. Far apart as our political aims may lie, they rest in the last analysis on a common European soul, of whose aspects and facets a practical psychology cannot afford to remain unaware. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 313

 As you will remember, I informed you of my express wish that the German volume should be signed by Professor Goring. As a foreigner, German domestic policy does not suit me. And with regard to the foreign subscriber to the Zentralblatt, it is a regrettable tactical error for platforms dealing purely with domestic politics, which one can if one must understand as necessities for Germans, to be shoved down the throat of the foreign reader who is critical as it is …. I would like to urge you most strongly to keep the Zentralblatt, which is intended for external circulation, in every respect nonpolitical. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 314

 … the differences between Germanic and Jewish psychology, which actually exist and which have long been known to sensible people … should no longer be glossed over ….I would like to state expressly that this is not meant to suggest any depreciation of Semitic psychology, any more than a depreciation of that of the Chinese is intended when speaking of the characteristic psychology of the people of the Far East. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 315

 Was I supposed to sacrifice the interests of science, collegiality, and the friendship which binds me to several German doctors in the vital context of intellectual culture in the German language to my own egoistic well-being and my differing political convictions? I have seen too much of the agony of the German middle class, felt too much of the often unbounded misery of the life of a doctor in Germany at the present time, and I know too much of spiritual anguish to be able to withdraw from my clear duty as a man behind the shabby cloak of political pretense. So there was nothing left for me but to stand up for my friends with the weight of my reputation and my independent position.

If the doctors in communist Russia had sought his help, he said, he would have defended them in the same way without hesitation, “for the sake of the human soul.” Furthermore, we do not consider as a traitor to his country one who as a doctor,. in time of war, proffers help to a wounded enemy, for: As doctors we are firs. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 316

 Apart from certain creative individuals, the average Jew is, I  dare say, much too conscious and differentiated to labor with the tensions of an unborn future too. The Aryan unconscious has a greater potential than the Jewish; this is the advantage and the disadvantage of a youthfulness that is not yet fully estranged from barbarism. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 318

 Jung gave too much to the world and to mankind for his shadow ever to jeopardize his spiritual significance and his greatness as a man. ~Aniela Jaffe, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 325

 I am Herr Jung and nobody else, and there is Miss so-and-so. It would not be nice at all if I could not treat such sick people. Besides, I have a certain zest for work. I am enterprising; I have a pioneering spirit. If any kind of screwball at all comes to the door, the explorer in me is awakened, my curiosity, my spirit of adventure, my sympathy. It touches my heart, which is too soft-and people my size usually have something of this; they try to conceal it, but like fools they don’t succeed-and I enjoy seeing what can be done with such a crazy fellow. I have made a game out of healing even difficult cases. This is simply a kind of curiosity and sense of adventure.  ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 329

 I can tell you this: When you have to exhaust yourself terribly for a person and you don’t get paid for it, in time you lose your taste for it. So I confront the patient as a completely ordinary person, with all his pros and cons. The reporter could only add: “How cool this man stays at the mention of great, high-sounding words! How relentlessly he asks: what is really behind these high and mighty speeches? What does someone who talks this way have to hide? What is he trying to gain with such peremptory verbiage?” “Then a profoundly wise man with practically universal knowledge at his command stands with the deepest humility before the secrets of life. What he has read and learned in colleges and from books is not enough for him …. ~ Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Page 329

The psychologist of today has at last had to realize that it has long since been a matter not of dogmas and creeds, but rather of a religious attitude, a psychic function whose importance can hardly be imagined. And for the religious function especially, historical continuity is indispensable.  ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 292

 Of all my patients past middle life, that is, past thirty-five, there is not one whose ultimate problem is not one of religious attitude. Indeed, in the end every one suffered from having lost that which living religions of every age have given to their believers, and none is really cured who has not regained his religious attitude, which naturally has nothing to do with creeds or belonging to a church. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 292

 Not only Christianity with its salvation symbolism, but all religions, down to the forms of magical religion of primitives, are psychotherapies, which treat and heal the sufferings of the soul, and those of the body that come from the soul. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 293

 The farther away I was from church, the better I felt,” noted this parson’s son! ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 293

 As I have often heard him remark on other occasions, he spoke that night of what difficult days we live in, for the archetypal images of the collective unconscious are no longer content to flow into the prevailing religion. They have come loose from their moorings, so to speak, and are troubling modern man with the restless state of the energy which has been contained in the Christian religion for the last two thousand years. Some of this energy has gone into science, it is true, but that is too narrow and rational to satisfy anything like all of the floating archetypal images. This is the reason for our many isms today, and it confronts the modern free individual with the task of coming to terms with them in his own life ….”Then Jung said to his audience-and this is what struck so many of them as last words-that we could only follow Christ’s example and live our lives as fully as possible, even if it is based on a mistake …. No one has ever found the whole truth; but if we will only live with the same integrity and devotion as Christ, he hoped we would all, like Christ, win through to a resurrected body. ~Barbara Hannah, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 294.

 I am an empiricist, and as such I adhere to the phenomenological standpoint” stands at the very opening of his Terry Lectures on “Psychology and Religion. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 295

 Religion seems to me to be a distinctive attitude of the human spirit, which one could formulate, in keeping with the original use of the concept of religio, as an attentive consideration and observation of certain dynamic factors that are interpreted as “powers”: spirits, demons, gods, laws, ideas, ideals-whatever man has called such factors in his world as he has found powerful, dangerous, or helpful enough to be accorded careful consideration, or great, beautiful, and meaningful enough to be prayed to devoutly and loved. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 296

 Since the stars fell from heaven and our highest symbols faded, a secret life has held sway in the unconscious. That is why nowadays we have psychology, and why we speak of the unconscious. All this would be, and in fact is, entirely superfluous in a time and a culture that has symbols. For these are spirit from above, and when they are present the spirit, too, is above. For such people, therefore, it would be a foolish, senseless undertaking to experience or investigate an unconscious that contains nothing but the still, undisturbed powers of nature. But our unconscious holds turbulent water, that is spirit become part of nature, on account of which it has been stirred up. Heaven, to us, has become physical space, and the divine empyreum a fond remembrance of how it used to be. But “our hearts still burn,” and a secret unease gnaws at the roots of our being. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 298

 That psychological fact which possesses the greatest power in a person acts as a god, because it is always the overpowering psychic factor that is called “God.” … The place of the godhead seems to have been taken by the totality of humanity. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 299

 I can only formulate my thoughts as they escape from me, like a geyser. Those who come after me will have to put them in order. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 302

 Why do people not read my books conscientiously? Why do they skip over the facts? ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 302

 But he [Jung] was unable to unravel the images this patient had produced until he became familiar with the work of the well-known English Indologist Sir John Woodroffe (pseudonym Arthur Avalon). ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung: A Biography, Page 278.

 To be sure there was talk once of a trip to China, which Erwin Rousselle suggested to him. It was to take up about half a year, but it did not come off, probably owing to lack of time and his intensive involvement with his alchemical studies. ~Gerhard Wehr, Jung: A Biography, Page 278.

 As for North Africa, I had never had the opportunity there to talk with a person capable of putting his culture into words. In India, however, I had the chance to speak with representatives of the Indian mentality, and to compare it with the European. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 280

 There [Indian Countryside] I felt a great deal better-yellow grass, dusty fields, native huts, great, dark-green, weird banyan trees, sickly palmyra palms sucked dry of their life-juice (it is run into bottles near the top to make palm wine, which I never tasted), emaciated cattle, thin-legged men, the colorful saris of women, all in leisurely haste or in hasty leisure, with no need of being explained or of explaining themselves, because obviously they are what they are. They were unconcerned and unimpressed; I was the only one who did not belong to India. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 281

 I had felt the impact of the dreamlike world of India ….Perhaps I myself had been thrown into a dreamlike state by moving among fairytale figures of the Thousand and One Nights. My own world of European consciousness had become peculiarly thin, like a network of telegraph wires high above the ground, stretching in straight lines all over the surface of an earth looking treacherously like a geographic globe. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 283

 Its mosques are pure and beautiful, and of course wholly Asiatic. There is not much mind about it, but a great deal of feeling. The cult is one wailing outcry for the All-Merciful. It is a desire, an ardent longing and even greed for God; I would not call it love. But there is love, the most poetic, most exquisite love of beauty in these old Moguls. Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 283

 It [Taj Mahal] is the delicate secret of the rose gardens of Shiraz and of the silent patios of Arabian palaces, torn out of the heart of a great lover by a cruel and incurable loss. The mosques of the Moguls and their tombs may be pure and austere, their divans, or audience halls, may be of impeccable beauty, but the Taj Mahal is a revelation. It is thoroughly un-Indian. It is more like a plant that could thrive and flower in the rich Indian earth as it could nowhere else. It is Eros in its purest form; there is nothing mysterious, nothing symbolic about it. It is the sublime expression of human love for a human being. ~ Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 285

 I objected-pointing to a group of young peasants who were standing open-mouthed before the monument, admiring these splendors-that such young men were scarcely undergoing spiritualization at the moment, but were much more likely having their heads filled with sexual fantasies. Whereupon he replied, “But that is just the point. How can they ever become spiritualized if they do not first fulfill their karma? These admittedly obscene images are here for the very purpose of recalling to the people their dharma [law]; otherwise these unconscious fellows might forget it. ~ Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 286

 The stupas are tombs or containers of relics, hemispherical in shape, like two gigantic rice bowls placed one on top of the other (concavity upon concavity), according to the prescripts of the Buddha himself in the Maha Parinibbana-Sutta. ~ Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 287

 . . . Christ is an examplar who dwells in every Christian as his integral personality. But historical trends led to the imitatio Christi, whereby the individual does not pursue his own destined road to wholeness, but attempts to imitate the way taken by Christ. Similarly in the East, historical trends led to a devout imitation of the Buddha. That Buddha should have become a model to be imitated was in itself a weakening of his idea, just as the imitatio Christi was a forerunner of the fateful stasis in the evolution of the Christian idea.  ~ Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 287

 Imperiously, the dream wiped away all the intense impressions of Lyndia and swept me back to the too-long-neglected concerns of the Occident, which had formerly been expressed in the quest for the Holy Grail as well as in the search for the philosophers’ stone. I was taken out of the world of India, and reminded that India was not my task, but only a part of the way-admittedly a significant one which should carry me closer to my goal. It was as though the dream were asking me, “What are you doing in India? Rather seek for yourself and your fellows the healing vessel, the salvator mundi, which you urgently need. For your state is perilous; you are all in imminent danger of destroying all that centuries have built up. ~ Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 288-289

 But at bottom, Jung said to himself, the truth of these initiates of the East is not a truth for all the world. He himself must be satisfied with his own truth.  I would have felt it as a theft had I attempted to learn from the holy men and to accept their truth for myself. [Their wisdom belongs to them, and what belongs to me is only that which comes from within myself.] Neither in Europe can I make any borrowings from the East, but must shape my life out of myself-out of what my inner being tells me, or what nature brings to me. An unmistakable hint for, or rather against, those who wished to make Jung into a trailblazer of Eastern spirituality in the West! All in all, India did not pass him over without a trace. ~ Gerhard Wehr, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 290

 Of course I do not refer to the beati possidentes [those who are happily still in possession] of the faith, but to the many for whom the light has gone out, the mystery has vanished, and God has died. For most there is no going back, and indeed one does not really know for certain whether the way back is always the better one. Today, probably the only way to an understanding of religious matters is the psychological approach, and this is why I endeavor to melt down historically solidified ways of thinking again and recast them in the light of immediate experience. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 299

 That psychological fact which possesses the greatest power in a person acts as a god, because it is always the overpowering psychic factor that is called “God.” … The place of the godhead seems to have been taken by the totality of humanity. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 299

 Totality-so psychological research confirms-is only achieved where the Three are joined by the fourth principle, whether it be that of the feminine, or that of darkness or evil. The number four symbolizes the parts, qualities, and aspects of the One. In terms of God, the quaternity reveals “a more or less direct representation of God as manifested in his creation. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 300

 Thus Aniela Jaffe recounted one shining August day in 1940: the war had been under way for a year, and this time a particularly small crowd had gathered for the eight days of Eranos in Ascona-Moscia. Actually only one lecture was scheduled, by the Basel mathematician Andreas Speiser on the Platonic doctrine of the unknown god and the Christian Trinity. It was not desired to cancel the event altogether, and hence there was only this token short form among a small cadre. But of course matters did not stop with this one lecture. Aniela Jaffe recalled: “In the afternoon C. G. Jung, who was among the guests, withdrew to the shady garden on the shore of the lake. Taking a Bible from the library, he sat reading and making notes. The next day he surprised the crowd of anxious listeners with a reply to his Basel colleague’s arguments, which he supplemented ex tempore on the subject of ‘The Psychology of the Trinity.’ ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 300

 I practice science, not apologetics and not philosophy, and I have neither the competence nor the desire to found a religion. My interest is a scientific one …. I proceed from a positive Christianity that is as much Catholic as Protestant, and my concern is to point out in a scientifically responsible way those empirically tangible facts which would at least make plausible the legitimacy of Christian and especially Catholic dogma. Then an observation for his critics: “One ought to read and consider authors who take as positive a stance toward Christianity as I do somewhat more carefully, before wishing to convert them to what has already been a matter of the greatest concern to them.” ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 302

 Clearly coniunctio represents an archetypal image of the development of the human intellect, which expresses sometimes as sacred marriage, sometimes as mystical or chemical wedding,  the deepest longing of mankind, be it more erotic or-with no contradiction-more religious or even more technical and chemical in emphasis. It is always the combination of what has been separated, by means of which the individual is raised to a higher state, that of wholeness or selfhood. The outward process-be it a technical operation or a religious act-becomes the symbolic expression of an inward state, and even more: of a mysterium that encompasses the dimensions of both inner and outer and provides a hint of the unus mundus, the reality of a unified world. ~Carl Jung, Jung by Gerhard Wehr, Page 400

Eranos is really an extended, relatively narrow garden that falls away in terraces down to the shore of Lago Maggiore from the road that skirts the lake hard by the cliffs on its way from Ascona to Brissago. The areas was originally a vineyard-hence the terraces-and in a spiritual sense it remains so today, for there the wine of wisdom is pressed from the knowledge of thinkers and scholars as they meet and blend with one another. Alfons Rosenberg, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 262.

 The task of this mediation, and the need to create a place for the promotion of such an understanding of the spiritual realm, have become ever clearer …. The question of a fruitful confrontation of East and West is above all a psychological one. The clear-cut questions posed by Western people in matters of religion and psychology can undoubtedly find added, meaningful fructification in the wisdom of the Orient. It is not the emulation of Eastern methods and teachings that is important, nor the neglecting or replacing of Western knowledge about these things, but the fact that Eastern wisdom, symbolism, and methods can help us to rediscover the spiritual values that are most distinctively our own. Olga Frobe-Kapteyn, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 262.

 In the first volume of [Eranos] proceedings, therefore, Jung’s contribution turned out to be comparatively short, as it was drawn from the sketchy notes taken by Toni Wolff. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 265.

 After the pleasant fragrance of the Orient comes the European: disagreeable, a pirate, a conquistador, dripping with the “religion of love,” an opium trafficker, disoriented and miserable in spite of his superabundance of knowledge and his intellectual arrogance. This is the picture of Western man …. ~Carl Jung (At Eranos), “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 266.

 The essential thing can only grow out of ourselves.  Hence if the white man is true to his instinct, he reacts with instinctive defensiveness against everything that one might tell him or advise him.  And what he has already swallowed, he must excrete again as a corpus alienum, for his blood rejects that which has grown on foreign soil. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 266.

 The Western road to health must be built upon Western ground, work with Western symbols, and be formed from Western material. Too much Eastern wisdom, however, takes the place of immediate experience, and thus the way to psychology is cut off. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 268

 It would be wrong for religiously estranged people, figuratively speaking, to attempt somehow to cover up this inadequacy in “robes of Oriental splendor” in the manner of the Theosophists. One could not allow the house of his own fathers to go to ruin, and then attempt to break into “Oriental palaces,” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 269.

 To me it seems risky, on the whole, to bring too many of these dark things to light; but sometimes a wanderer in the darkness of night is grateful for the faltering yellow glow of a lone lantern, or the pale streaks of the first light of dawn. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 269.

Under no circumstances do I wish it to seem as if the independent and spontaneous collaboration of others has been as it were shunted by me onto a psychological track, and thus pressed into my service. It is extraordinarily important, for Eranos in particular, that each individual speaker has the feeling that he is providing an independent contribution, not one that serves some other goal. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 272.

 Even today a kind of legend survives of a ‘night sea journey,’ which is not really accurate; one can hardly imagine a night sea journey as ear-splittingly loud as our nekyia was. It was tremendously boisterous and drunken. Baron von der Heydt ( the owner of the hotel on Monte Verita) had donated the wine. Although there was no music for the dancing, the sound of it echoed far across the lake. The whole neighborhood near and far sent messages to Mrs. Frobe complaining about the unaccustomed disturbance of the peace, but it did no good. Jung was pretty tipsy, and the words his friend and student comrade Albert Oeri had written in his memoirs of him came to my mind: ‘Jung’s drunks were rare, but they were loud!’ But it was not only Jung who was tipsy; everybody else was too. Jung was very pleased at this, and he roused those who were too sober to render due homage to Dionysos. Plunging in now here, now there, he sparkled with wit, banter, and drunken high spirits. This, though, was the only party that was ever held at the Eranos conferences. Apparently Dionysos was satisfied once and for all with this sacrifice in wine and drunkenness. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 272-273.

 Thus Mircea Eliade, who met Jung repeatedly in Ascona and in Mascia, confided to his diary what he had heard from Henry Corbin’s wife:

“Jung is a gourmet, and really knows his way around the kitchen. Since he knows that the dining at Mrs. Frobe-Kapteyn’s is not too good, he buys himself little snacks in secret and eats them alone in his room at night. But eventually word of this got out, and one of his admiring young ladies from Ascona, also in secret, sent him a roast chicken.” From the same journal, the entry from 23 August 1950, obviously about a dinner together in an Ascona restaurant: “I eat with Jung, on his left, and we converse .from twelve-thirty until three o’clock. He is a captivating old gentleman, utterly without conceit, who is as happy to talk as he is to listen.  What could I write down here first of this long conversation? Perhaps his bitter reproaches of ‘official science’?  In university circles he is not taken seriously. ‘Scholars have no curiosity,’ he says with Anatole France. Professors are satisfied with recapitulating what they learned in their youth and what does not cause any trouble; above all, their spiritual world is in balance …. For all that, I sense that at the bottom of his heart Jung is a little troubled by this indifference. That is why he is so interested in a scholar, in any line of research, who takes him seriously, or quotes or comments on him.” ~Mircea Eliade, Jung: A Biography by Gerhard Wehr, Pages 273-274

 What troubles me is that I seldom get to have a conversation with an adequate partner-Father White is in England, Neumann lives in Israel; women of my circle do understand me, but with women their home, their husband, and their children always come first. If all these things are in order, then a woman also has some time for the spirit, and then it is interesting. But talking with a man, one listens to the reverberation from the cosmic spaces of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 275.

 The nature and the influence of these dynamically charged archetypes were first recognized and interpreted for us through his work. In the course of his fifteen years of cooperation with the Eranos conferences he [Jung] has created an authoritative body of work and earned our deepest thanks. ~Adolf Portmann, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 276.

 Eranos-lakeside scene, garden and house. Inconspicuous and out of the way, and yet a navel of the world, a small link in the Golden Chain. ~Erich Neumann, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 277.

 the encounter with Carl Gustav Jung, the great researcher of the psyche, was decisive for the first period of Eranos, and even in later years, when it was no longer possible for Jung to take an active part, his silent presence and his inner participation contributed materially to the spirit of this gathering. To all those who shared the good fortune of being able to witness this volcanic spirit in action, these encounters with a great man remain unforgettable and alive. ~Adolf Portmann, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 277.

 If I had not succeeded in finding such evidence, I would never have been able to substantiate my ideas. Therefore, my encounter with alchemy was decisive for me, as it provided me with the historical basis which I had hitherto lacked. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 245-246

 The background of alchemy is initiation, an indoctrination into the mysteries that dates back millennia. Originating in the Egyptian-Chaldean Hellenistic universal consciousness in the pre-Christian era, and later flowing into the West via the Arabic cultural orbit, it became tinged with the substance of Christianity …. To be sure, the idea of transmutation stands at the center of alchemical initiation; not, however, that of the transformation of metals but rather the mystical process of inner transmutation, of which the outward chemical and physical transformation of metals is but the external manifestation, realized and made visible in the material world. Alexander von Bernus, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 246

 Evil needs to be taken into account just as much as good, for good and evil are ultimately nothing but the idealized extensions and abstractions of action, and both are part of the chiaroscuro phenomenon of life. In the end, after all, there is no good that cannot produce evil, and no evil from which some good cannot come. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 252

 I am very impressed to see a belated appreciation even for alchemy beginning to develop here again; I have long felt, you know, that the wholly superficial assessment of alchemy that has persisted up to this time stood in need of  liquidation, but until now I had looked in vain for a more incisive explanation of what really lay behind this phenomenon that is so important in the history of our culture. ~Pascual Jordan, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 255

 My late friend Richard Wilhelm sent me the text of The Secret of the Golden Flower in 1928, at a moment that was full of problems for my own work. Since 1913 I had been engaged in investigating the processes of the collective unconscious, and I had obtained results which struck me as difficult in more than one respect. Not only were they far removed from anything known to “academic” psychology, but they also went beyond the bounds of medical, purely personalistic psychology. It was an extensive phenomenology to which hitherto known categories and methods could no longer be applied. My results, which rested on the efforts of fifteen years, seemed to be hanging in midair, for there was nothing anywhere to compare them with. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 256

 … the fantasy-images, the empirical material I had gathered in my practice, and the conclusions I had drawn from it. I now began to understand what these psychic contents meant when seen in historical perspective. My understanding of their typical character, which had already begun with my investigation of myths, was deepened. The primordial images. and the nature of the archetype took a central place in my researches, and it became clear to me that without history there can be no psychology, and certainly no psychology of the unconscious. A psychology of consciousness can, to be sure, content itself with material drawn from personal life, but as soon as we wish to explain a neurosis we require an anamnesis which re6aches deeper than the knowledge of consciousness. And when in the course of treatment unusual decisions are called for, dreams occur that need more than personal memories for their interpretation. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 257

 From this material it appears quite clearly what alchemy was seeking, in the last analysis. It wished to produce a corpus subtile, the transfigured body of the resurrection-a body that is simultaneously spirit .. In this it matches Chinese alchemy, as it has become known to us through the text of The Secret of the Golden Flower. This is the “diamond body,” that is immortality, attained through the transformation of the body. Because of its transparency, its brilliance, and its hardness, the diamond is a fitting symbol. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 258

 The experiences of the alchemists were, in a sense, my experiences, and their world was my world. Thus I had at last reached the ground which underlay my own experiences of the years 1913 to 1917; for the process through which I had passed at that time corresponded to the process of alchemical transformation discussed in [Psychology and Alchemy]. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 260

 Rumpite libros, ne corda vestra rumpantur. Tear up your books, that your hearts may not be torn! ~Carl Jung [Citing an Alchemist], “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 261

 Without stirring abroad

One can know the whole world;

Without looking out of the window

One can see the way of heaven.

The further one goes

The less one knows.

Therefore the sage knows without having to stir,

Identifies without having to see,

Accomplishes without having to act.  ~Lao Tzu, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 215

 Like every true introvert, Jung thoroughly enjoyed the positive aspects of extraversion travel and success-from the very beginning. ~Aniela Jaffe, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 215-216

 How, for example, can we become conscious of national peculiarities if we have never had the opportunity to regard our own nation from outside?  Regarding it from outside means regarding it from the standpoint of another nation.  To do so, we must acquire sufficient knowledge of the foreign collective psyche, and in the course of this process of assimilation we encounter all those incompatibilities which constitute the national bias and the national peculiarity. Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 216

 How, for example, can we become conscious of national peculiarities if we have never had the opportunity to regard our own nation from outside?  Regarding it from outside means regarding it from the standpoint of another nation.  To do so, we must acquire sufficient knowledge of the foreign collective psyche, and in the course of this process of assimilation we encounter all those incompatibilities which constitute the national bias and the national peculiarity. Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 216

 Every morning at half past ten the cuirassiers ride by in their golden armor with red helmet plumes and black cloaks. They go to the royal palace and guard the king and the princes and princesses. Astonishing sights were everywhere: … the king has his golden throne and his golden scepter in another castle, in a high tower, with thick fences and iron gates. In the daytime the crown is up in the tower and you can see it, but at night it and the scepter sink down into a deep cellar that is shut up with plates of armor, so no one can steal them. There are jewels in the crown as big as dove’s eggs …. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 217-218

 In many ways he [Helton Godwin Baynes] was the best assistant Jung ever had. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 218

 We are the men of the hour here. It is very good to be able to spread oneself in this way one in a while. I can feel that my libido is gulping it in with vast enjoyment …. [Referring to Jung and Freud at Clark University 1909] ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 216

 Jung, himself an avid cook, was well known as a patron of the culinary arts and a connoisseur of noble spirits. ~Aniela Jaffe, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 217

 This Africa is incredible! ~Carl Jung in 1920, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 218

 You no longer think of yourself; you are dissolved in this potpourri which cannot be evaluated, still less described: a Roman column stands here as part of a wall; an old Jewish woman of unspeakable ugliness goes by in white baggy breeches; a crier with a load of burnooses pushes through the crowd, shouting in gutturals that might have come straight from the canton of Zurich; a patch of deep blue sky, a snow-white mosque dome; a shoemaker busily stitching away at shoes in a small vaulted niche, with a hot, dazzling patch of sunlight on the mat before him; blind musicians with a drum and tiny three-stringed lute; a beggar who consists of nothing but rags; smoke from oil cakes, and swarms of flies; up above, on a white minaret in the blissful ether, a muezzin sings the midday chant; below, a cool, shady, colonnaded yard with horseshoe portal framed in glazed tiles; on the wall a mangy cat lies in the sun; a coming and going of red, white, yellow, blue, brown mantles, white turbans, red fezzes, uniforms, faces ranging from white and light yellow to deep black; a shuffling of yellow and red slippers, a noiseless scurrying of naked black feet, and so on and so on. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 219-220

 In the morning the great god rises and fills both horizons with his joy and power, and all living things obey him. At night the moon is so silvery and glows with such divine clarity that no one can doubt the existence of Astarte. ~Carl Jung in 1920, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 220

 … in a non-European country where no European language was spoken and no Christian conceptions prevailed, where a different race lived and a different historical tradition and philosophy had set its stamp upon the face of the crowd. I had often wished to be able for once to see the European from outside, his image reflected back at him by an altogether foreign milieu. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 220=221

 There is nothing more magnificent than the desert. The deeper we penetrated into the Sahara, the more time slowed down for me; it even threatened to move backward. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 221.

 Obviously, my encounter with Arab culture had struck me with overwhelming force. The emotional nature of these unreflective people who are so much closer to life than we are exerts a strong suggestive influence upon those historical layers in ourselves which we have just overcome and left behind, or which we think we have overcome. It is like the paradise of childhood from which we imagine we have emerged, but which at the slightest provocation imposes fresh defeats on us. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 222.

 At Bollingen I am in the midst of my true life, I am most deeply myself. Here I am, as it were, the “age-old son of the mother.” That is how alchemy puts it, very wisely, for the “old man,” the “ancient,” whom I had already experienced as a child, is personality No. 2, who has always been and always will be. He exists outside time and is the son of the maternal unconscious. In my fantasies he took the form of Philemon, and he comes to life again at Bollingen. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 225.

 At times I feel as if I am spread out over the landscape and inside things, and I am myself living in every tree, in the plashing of the waves, in the clouds and the animals that come and go, in the procession of the seasons. There is nothing in the Tower that has not grown into its own form over the decades, nothing with which I am not linked. Here everything has its history, and mine; here is space for the spaceless kingdom of the world and the psyche’s hinterland.  ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 226.

He never took it as something obvious. It always remained a wonder to him and was sacred to him. He had a way all his own of piling the wood and kindling the flame; indeed there was even something in it of the way in which fire was made with such trouble by primitives, who prepared it with endless patience, as if it were a matter of life of death and must never, once it was kindled, be allowed to die. Jung did this instinctively, as if he were carrying out a religious ritual, and then when the Hindu flame flickered up, in its light his face would take on an expression of godliness like that of an ancient priest. ~Laurens Van Der Post, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 227.

 Behind us a clear stream purled past the houses, and on it: opposite bank stood a second pueblo of reddish adobe houses, built one atop the other toward the center of the settlement, thus strangely anticipating the perspective of an American metropolis with its skyscrapers in the center. Perhaps half an hour’s journey upriver rose a mighty isolated mountain, the mountain, which has no name. The story goes that on days when the mountain is wrapped in clouds the men vanish in that direction to perform mysterious rites. ~Carl Jung at Taos Pueblos,  “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 228.

 For the first time in my life, so it seemed to me, someone had drawn for me a picture of the real white man. It was as though until now I had seen nothing but sentimental, prettified color prints. This Indian had struck our vulnerable spot, unveiled a truth to which we are blind. I felt rising within me like a shapeless mist something unknown and yet deeply familiar. And out of this mist, image upon image detached itself ….  ~Carl Jung,  “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 229.

 The sun was a central mystery for the Indians and their race: “The sun is God. Anyone can see that.” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 230

 Although no one can help feeling the tremendous impress of the sun, it was a novel and deeply affecting experience for me to see these mature, dignified men in the grip of an overmastering emotion when they spoke of it. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 230

 After all,” he said, “we are a people who live on the roof of the world; we are the sons of Father Sun, and with our religion we daily help our father to go across the sky. We do this not only for ourselves, but for the whole world. If we were to cease practicing our religion, in ten years the sun would no longer rise. Then it would be night forever. ~Mountain Lake, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 230

 If for a moment we put away all European rationalism and transport ourselves into the clear mountain air of that solitary plateau, which drops off on one side into the broad continental prairies and on the other into the Pacific Ocean; if we also set aside our intimate knowledge of the world and exchange it for a horizon that seems immeasurable, and an ignorance of what lies beyond it, we will begin to achieve an inner comprehension of the Pueblo Indian’s point of view …. That man feels capable of formulating valid replies to the overpowering influence of God, and that he can render back something which is essential even to God, induces pride, for it raises the human individual to the dignity of a metaphysical factor. “God and us” … ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 231.

 We are sorely in need of a truth or a self-understanding similar to that of Ancient Egypt, which I have found still living with the Taos Pueblos. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 232.

 Times are very hard indeed and unfortunately I can’t travel as far as I [Jung[ used to do,” he wrote on 21 October 1932 to Antonio Mirabal in Taos, New Mexico. “All you tell me about religion is good news to me. There are no interesting religious things over here, only remnants of old things. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 232.

 For the often-referred-to modern man, living entirely within his present consciousness, past levels of consciousness and psychic possibilities have faded away, and therefore he is psychically isolated and impoverished, because every step toward higher and wider consciousness further distances him from the original, purely animal mystery participation with the herd, the state of immersion in a universal unconscious. Every step forward means a tearing away from this all-encompassing maternal womb of initial unconsciousness, in which the bulk of humanity, for the most part, persist. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 232-233.

 There is a great psychological truth in this; foreign soil assimilates the conqueror …. It is the way of virgin land everywhere that at least the unconscious of the conqueror sinks down to the level of the autochthonous inhabitants. Thus in the American there is a distance between conscious and unconscious that is not found in the European, a tension between advanced conscious culture and unconscious primitivity …. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 233.

 The soil there is quite red,” he wrote to Hans Kuhn, “and red dust swirled around the train until our white clothes became completely red. We saw wild Masai Negroes with long spears and shields. They were completely naked and had only hung an ox-skin over themselves. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 236.

 We drew up to the mountain some twelve kilometers away, until we came to the great, impassable primeval forests. There we set up camp. Almost every night we heard lions; often leopards and hyenas crept around the camp. We stayed there three weeks and climbed the mountain and looked at the wild Negroes there …. The camp was 6900 feet high. I went up to 9600 feet. Up there the bamboo forests are full of black buffalo and rhinoceros. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 237.

 It was as if I were this moment returning to the land of my youth, and as if l knew that dark-skinned man who had been waiting for me for five thousand years. The feeling-tone of this curious experience accompanied me throughout my whole journey through savage Africa. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 238.

 Jung found out one of the reasons for this when an old laibon, a medicine man, explained to him with tears in his eyes, “In old days the laibons had dreams, and knew whether there is war or sickness or whether rain comes and where the herds should be driven. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 239.

 At this numinous instant the men would hurry out of their huts, spit into their hands, and hold their palms up to the sun with great emotion. Why they did this they could not say. For them it was enough to perform the rite of worship. The act of worship evidently no longer required any theological explanation. And just as the rising dawn represented the divine presence, so too did the first, equally golden, shimmering crescent of the new moon. Jung translated the wordless prayer thus: “I offer to God my living soul.” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 239-40

 Jung spoke of the “profoundly moving experience” of being at the sources of the Nile and discovering anew the wisdom of the ancient Egyptian concepts, referring to the knowledge of the mystery god Osiris, with the solar falcon or sky-god Horus and his dangerous adversary Seth.

 In the great dualism of day and dark, of glittering sunlight and deep black night, Jung recognized the primal yearning of the soul to free itself from the darkness and enter the light, an “inexpressible longing for light.”

 He could perceive it in the glance of the primitive, indeed even in the eyes of animals.

 That sadness also reflects the mood of Africa, the experience of its solitudes. It is a maternal mystery, this primordial darkness. That is why the sun’s birth in the morning strikes the natives as so overwhelmingly meaningful. The moment in which light comes is God. That moment brings redemption, release. To say that the sun is God is to blur and forget the archetypal experience of that moment. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 240.

 I thought that if there was anything at all which I knew and could understand, it was Africa and its people. But when we talked about Africa, I had to realize that Jung knew the archaic pattern of African life even better than I did, and revered it if possible even more deeply. There were a few moments when I felt a little disconcerted that a Swiss-and so of course he still was-seemed to understand the deepest nature of iny native continent better than l. ~Laurens Van Der Post, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 241.

His [Jung’s] eyes flashed as he told me of the tension of that moment. This was also the turning point in his relationship to Africa …. ~Laurens Van Der Post, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 242.

It became clear to me that this study had been not so much an objective scientific project as an intensely personal one, and that any attempt to go deeper into it touched every possible sore spot in my own psychology. I had to admit to myself that it was scarcely the Wembley Exhibition which had begotten my decision to travel, but rather the fact that the atmosphere had become too highly charged for me in Europe. Amid such thoughts I glided on the peaceful waters of the Nile toward the north-toward Europe, toward the future.  ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 243

Thus the journey from the heart of Africa to Egypt became, for me, a kind of drama of the birth of light. That drama was intimately connected with me, with my own psychology. I realized this, but felt incapable of formulating it in words. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 243

 Barbara Hannah followed Jung’s description:

 .. .it [Islamic Mosque] was a perfect square with very beautiful broad pillared corridors on each side. The House of Ablution, where the ritual washings take place, was in the center. A spring of water welled forth there and formed the bath of rejuvenation, of spiritual rebirth. Jung described the dusty, crowded streets outside, and said that this vast hall seemed like entering the Court of Heaven, as if it were heaven itself. He had the impression of perfected concentration and of being accepted in the immense void of heaven, and this religion, where God is really a call, at last became comprehensible to him …. He spoke of hearing the call-“Allah!”-echoing through this vast hall, and of feeling that the call itself penetrated to heaven. Such impressions and those of the far more ancient culture were so enthralling to Jung …. Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 243

 It is a widespread error to imagine that I do not see the value of sexuality. On the contrary, it plays a large part in my psychology as an essential-though not the sole-expression of psychic wholeness. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 200.

 There are cases where psychoanalysis works worse than anything else.  But who said that psychoanalysis was to be applied always and everywhere? Only a fanatic could maintain such a thing. Patients must be selected for psychoanalysis …. Any preconceived scheme in these matters makes one shudder. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 201.

 It is fascinating and at the same time heart-wrenching to follow the inner split with which Jung struggled in his efforts to do justice to Freud’s findings on the one hand, while remaining true to his own inner demons on the other. ~ Liliane Frey-Rohn, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 201-202

 But still too few look inward, to their own selves, and still too few ask themselves whether the ends of human society might not best be served if each man tried to abolish the old order in himself, and to practice in his own person and in his own inward state those precepts and victories which he preaches at every street-corner, instead of always expecting these things of his fellow men. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 203.

 Every individual needs revolution, inner division, overthrow of the existing order, and renewal, but not by forcing these things upon his neighbors under the hypocritical cloak of Christian love or the sense of social responsibility …. Individual self-reflection, return of the individual to the ground of human nature, to his own deepest being with its individual and social destiny-here is the beginning of a cure for that blindness which reigns at the present hour. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 203.

 New ideas, if they are not just a flash in the pan, generally require at least a generation to take root. Psychological innovations probably take much longer, since in this field more than in any other practically everybody sets himself up as an authority. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 203-204

 Grounded in the natural philosophy of the Middle Ages, alchemy formed the bridge on the one hand into the past, to Gnosticism, and on the other into the future, to the modern psychology of the unconscious.  ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 205

 Individuation means becoming a single, homogeneous being, and, insofar as “individuality” embraces our innermost, last, and incomparable uniqueness, it also implies becoming one’s own self. We could therefore translate individuation as “coming to selfhood” or “self-realization.” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 205

 It [Transcendent Function] is a natural process, a manifestation of the energy that springs from the tension of opposites, and it consists in a sequence of fantasy-occurrences which appear spontaneously in dreams and visions. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 206

 What I have to say in this book [Psychological Types] has been tested line by line, so to speak, a hundred times in the practical treatment of sick people, and was originally inspired by such treatment …. Hence the layman cannot be blamed if certain statements strike him as odd, or if he should even suspect that my typology comes out of some idyllically undisturbed study. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 207

 The first attitude is normally characterized by a hesitant, reflective, retiring nature that keeps itself to itself, shrinks from objects, is always slightly on the defensive, and prefers to hide behind mistrustful scrutiny. The second is normally characterized by an outgoing, candid, and accommodating nature that adapts easily to a given situation, quickly forms attachments, and, setting aside any possible misgivings, will often venture forth with careless confidence into unknown situations. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 208-209

 All my writings may be considered tasks imposed from within; their source was a fateful compulsion. What I wrote were things that assailed me from within myself. I permitted the spirit that moved me to speak out. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 209

 No experimental methodology ever has or ever will succeed in capturing the essence of the human soul, or even so much as tracing out an approximately faithful picture of its complex manifestations. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 211

 The more unbalanced the conscious attitude is, and the further removed from the optimum of life’s potentialities, the greater the possibility that vivid dreams of a strongly contrasting, suitably compensatory aspect will appear, as an expression of the psychological self-regulation of the individual. Just as the body reacts in appropriate ways to injuries, infections, or abnormal habits, so too the psychic functions react to unnatural or dangerous disturbances with suitable defensive measures. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 215

 My life is a story of the self-realization of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 166

 I had to try to understand what had happened and to what extent my own experience coincided with that of mankind in general. Therefore my first obligation was to probe the depths of my own psyche. I made a beginning by writing down the fantasies which had come to me …. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 167

 I saw a monstrous flood covering all the northern and lowlying lands between the North Sea and the Alps. When it came up to Switzerland I saw that the mountains grew higher and higher to protect our country. I realized that a frightful catastrophe was in progress. I saw the mighty yellow waves, the floating rubble of civilization, and the drowned bodies of uncounted thousands. Then the whole sea turned to blood. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 167

 The monster has descended upon us. The time we live in is full of horrors; there is no one upon whose head its heavy fist has not fallen …. Everything around us has been changed …. The air around us is laden with tears suppressed, forgotten, and to come. The gravity of this hour cries aloud. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 168

 In the third dream frightful cold had again descended from out of the cosmos. This dream, however, had an unexpected end. There stood a leaf-bearing tree, but without fruit (my tree of life, I thought), whose leaves had been transformed by the effects of the frost into sweet grapes full of healing juices. I plucked the grapes and gave them to a large, waiting crowd. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 168

 

I did not know that I was living a myth, and even if I had known it, I would not have known what sort of myth was ordering my life without my knowledge. So, in the most natural way, I took it upon myself to get to know “my” myth, and I regarded this as the task of tasks, for-so I told myself-how could I, when treating my patients, make due allowance for the personal factor, for my personal equation, which is yet so necessary for a knowledge of the other person, if I was unconscious of it? I simply had to know what unconscious or preconscious myth was forming me, from what rhizome I sprang. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 169

 It [Collective Unconscious] is a modern, scientific expression for an inner experience that has been known to mankind from time immemorial, the experience in which strange and unknown things from our own inner world happen to us, in which influences from within can suddenly alter us, in which we have dreams and ideas which we feel as if we are not doing ourselves, but which appear in us strangely and overwhelmingly. In earlier times these influences were attributed to a divine fluid (mana), or to a god, demon, or ‘spirit,’ a fitting expression of the feeling that this influence has an objective, quite foreign and autonomous existence, as well as the sense of its being something overpowering, which has the conscious ego at its mercy. ~Marie Louise Von Franz, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 170

 I felt totally suspended in mid-air [After his break with Freud], for I had not yet found my own footing. Above all, I felt it necessary to develop a new attitude toward my patients. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 169

 Therefore I twice went over all the details of my entire life, with particular attention to childhood memories; for I thought there might be something in my past which I could not see and which might possibly be the cause of the disturbance. But this retrospection led to nothing but a fresh acknowledgment of my own ignorance. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 172

 Here [Childhood Edifices] is a creative life that is not extinguished yet, but could be reactivated under the right circumstances. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 172

 I went on with my building game after the noon meal every day, whenever the weather permitted. As soon as I was through eating, I began playing, and continued to do so until the patients arrived; and if I was finished with my work early enough in the evening, I went back to building …. Naturally, I thought about the significance of what I was doing, and asked myself, “Now, really, what are you about? You are building a small town, and doing it as if it were a rite!” I had no answer to my question, only the inner certainty that I was on the way to discovering my own myth. For the building game was only a beginning. It released a stream of fantasies which I later carefully wrote down. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 172-173

 To the extent that I managed to translate the emotions into images-that is to say, to find the images which were concealed in the emotions-I was inwardly calmed and reassured. Had I left those images hidden in the emotions, I might have been torn to pieces by them. There is a chance that I might have succeeded in splitting them off; but in that case I would inexorably have fallen into a neurosis and so been ultimately destroyed by them anyhow. As a result of my experiment I learned how helpful it can be, from the therapeutic point of view, to find the particular images which lie behind emotions. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 173

 The unconscious contents could have driven me out of my wits. But my family and the knowledge: I have a medical diploma from a Swiss university, I must help my patients, I have a wife and five children, I live at 228 Seestrasse in Kusnacht-these were actualities which made demands upon me and proved to me again and again that I really existed, that I was not a blank page whirling about in the winds of the spirit, like Nietzsche. Nietzsche had lost the ground under his feet because he possessed nothing more than the inner world of his thoughts-which incidentally possessed him more than he it. He was uprooted and hovered above the earth, and therefore he succumbed to exaggeration and irreality. For me, such irreality was the quintessence of horror, for I aimed, after all, at this world and this life. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 174

 I myself had to undergo the original experience, and, moreover, try to plant the results of my experience in the soil of reality; otherwise they would have remained subjective assumptions without validity …. Today I can say that I have never lost touch with my initial experiences. All my works, all my creative activity, has come from those initial fantasies and dreams. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 174

 I myself had to undergo the original experience, and, moreover, try to plant the results of my experience in the soil of reality; otherwise they would have remained subjective assumptions without validity …. Today I can say that I have never lost touch with my initial experiences. All my works, all my creative activity, has come from those initial fantasies and dreams. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 176

 I was sitting at my desk once more, thinking over my fears. Then I let myself drop. Suddenly it was as though the ground literally gave way beneath my feet, and I plunged down into dark depths. I could not fend off a feeling of panic. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 179

 It is of course ironical that I, a psychiatrist, should at almost every step of my experiment have run into the same psychic material which is the stuff of psychosis and is found in the insane. This is the fund of unconscious images which fatally confuse the mental patient. But it is also the matrix of a mythopoeic imagination which has vanished from our rational age. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 179

 Near the steep slope of a rock I caught sight of two figures, an old man with a white beard and a beautiful young girl. I summoned up my courage and approached them as though they were real people, and listened attentively to what they told me. The old man explained that he was Elijah, and that gave me a shock. But the girl staggered me even more, for she called herself Salome! She was blind. What a strange couple: Salome and Elijah. But Elijah assured me that he and Salome had belonged together from all eternity, which completely astounded me …. They had a black serpent living with them which displayed an unmistakable fondness for me. I stuck close to Elijah because he seemed to be the most reasonable of the three, and to have a clear intelligence. Of Salome I was distinctly suspicious. Elijah and I had a long conversation which, however, I did not understand. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 180

 Jung himself thought of the sage Lao-tse and the dancer in Holderlin’s poem:

“Who has thought of the deepest/Loves what is most living. He understands high virtue/Who has looked into the world. And the wise often bow/To beauty in the end.” ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 181

Salome is an anima figure. She is blind because she does not see the meaning of things. Elijah is the figure of the wise old prophet and represents the factor of intelligence and knowledge; Salome, the erotic element. One might say that the two figures are personifications of Logos and Eros. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 182

 Later I consciously linked my work to what Faust had passed over: respect for the eternal rights of man, recognition of ‘the ancient,’ and the continuity of culture and intellectual history. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 183.

 This task was undertaken by the figure of Philemon, whom in this respect I had willy-nilly to recognize as my psychagogue. And the fact was that he conveyed to me many an illuminating idea. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 184

 The ka was “an expression of the creative and preserving power of life; in earliest times it referred specifically to the masculine power of procreation … , but early on it was applied to spiritual and psychic power …. The ka was born together with the person. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 185

 Wherever there exists an absolutely magical relationship, as it were, between the two sexes, it is a matter of projection of the soul-image [in this case the anima]. Now since these relationships are so common, the psyche must frequently be unconscious; that is, many people must be unconscious of how they are related to their inner psychic processes …. If the soul-image is projected, an unconditional affective tie to the object of the projection appears. If it is not projected, a relatively unadapted condition arises which Freud described in part as “narcissism.” The projection of the soul-image is a release from concern with the inner processes, so long as the behavior of the object corresponds to the soul-image. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 186

 The hetaira or companion is instinctively related to the personal psychology of the man …. The man’s individual interests, tendencies, and, if need be, problems lie within the purview of her consciousness, and through her they are stimulated and advanced. She gives him a sense of personal value apart from collective values, for her own development requires that an individual relationship be drawn out and realized in all its nuance and depth …. The function of the hetaira would be to awaken in the man the individual psychic life which goes beyond his masculine responsibility, to make him a whole personality. This development generally becomes a task only for the second half of life, after his social existence has been established. ~Toni Wolff, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 187-188

 He [Jung] was “the prototype . , of the wise old man,” whereas Toni Wolff enjoyed “the quality of eternal youth. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 187-188

 At much the same time of the fantasy he made the extraordinary discovery that of all his friends and acquaintances only one young girl [Toni] was able to follow his extraordinary experiences and to accompany him intrepidly on his Nekyia to the underworld …. It was anything but easy at first for him to find a modus vivendi by which she could give him her extraordinary gift-it would not be an exaggeration to call it her genius-for companionship in the ‘confrontation with the unconscious. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 188

 The Jungian analyst Barbara Hannah said flatly that Emma and Toni, the mother figure and the hetaira figure, were the two fundamentally inseparable sides of a single problem. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189

 Toni Wolff was perhaps-of all the ‘anima types’ I have ever known-the most suited to carry the projection of this figure. She was not beautiful in the strictly classical sense, but she could look far more than beautiful, more like a goddess than a mortal woman. She had an extraordinary genius for accompanying men-and sometimes women too, in a different way-whose destiny it was to enter the unconscious. Indeed, she learned of this gift through her relation to Jung, but she afterward showed the same gift when she became an analyst; in fact it was her most valuable quality as an analyst. Curiously enough, she did not ever enter the unconscious on her own account. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189

 What saved the situation was that there was no ‘lack of love’ in any of the three. Jung was able to give both his wife and Toni a most satisfactory amount, and both women really loved him. Therefore, although for a long while they were at times most painfully jealous of each other, love always won out in the end and prevented any destructive action on either side. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 189-190

 You see, he [Carl Jung] never took anything from me to give to Toni, but the more he gave her the more he seemed able to give me. ~Emma Jung, Jung: His Life and Work by Barbara Hannah, Page 119.

 I think he [Jung] was doubtful that he could have survived this most difficult of all journeys had he been entirely alone in it. ~Barbara Hannah, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 190

 In the Red Book I tried anesthetic elaboration of my fantasies, but never finished it. I became aware that I had not yet found the right language, that I still had to translate it into something else. Therefore I gave up this estheticizing tendency in good time, in favor of a rigorous process of understanding. I saw that so much fantasy needed firm ground underfoot, and that I must first return wholly to reality. For me, reality meant scientific comprehension. I had to draw concrete conclusions from the insights the unconscious had given me-and that task was to become a life work. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 186

 Jung recalled Goethe’s dictum: “Dare to storm those gates which everyone gladly sneaks past,” referring to the common deep-rooted human aversion to looking behind the pleasant facade of self-deception and coming to know oneself. ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 191

 Around five o’clock in the afternoon on Sunday the front doorbell began ringing frantically. It was a bright summer day; the two maids were in the kitchen, from which the open square outside the front door could be seen. Everyone immediately looked to see who was there, but there was no one in sight. I was sitting near the doorbell, and not only heard it but saw it moving. We all simply stared at one another. The atmosphere was thick, believe me! Then I knew that something had to happen. The whole house was filled as if there were a crowd present, crammed full of spirits. They were packed deep right up to the door, and the air was so thick it was scarcely possible to breathe. As for myself, I was all a-quiver with the question: “For God’s sake, what in the world is this?” Then they cried out in chorus, “We have come back from Jerusalem where we found not what we sought.” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 193

 Instinctively seizing on the sentence the “spirits” had uttered, he [Jung] began the first of the seven Sermones with the declaration, “The dead came back from Jerusalem, where they found not what they sought. They prayed me let them in and besought my word, and thus I began my teaching.” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 193

 We are, however, the pleroma itself, for we are a part of the eternal and infinite. But we have no share thereof, as we are from the pleroma infinitely removed; not spiritually or temporally, but essentially, since we are distinguished from the pleroma in our essence as creature, which is confined within time and space. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 194

 Its name is Abraxas.

 Then the dead demand further information about this primal being, which is neither the summum bonum nor limitless evil; Abraxas is life, “the mother of good and evil.”

 Hence Abraxas begets truth and falsehood. The third sermon continues:

 

It is the hermaphrodite of the earliest beginning.

It is abundance that seeketh union with emptiness.

It is holy begetting.

It is love and love’s murder.

It is the saint and his betrayer.

It is the brightest light of day and the darkest night of madness.

To look upon it is blindness.

to know it is sickness.

To worship it is death.

To fear it is wisdom.

To resist it not is redemption.  ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 191

 From then on, my life belonged to the generality. The knowledge I was concerned with, or was seeking, still could not be found in the science of those days. I myself had to undergo the original experience, and, moreover, try to plant the results of my experience in the soil of reality; otherwise they would have remained subjective assumptions without validity. It was then that I dedicated myself to service of the psyche. I loved it and hated it, but it was my greatest wealth. My delivering myself over to it, as it were, was the only way by which I could endure my existence and live it as fully as possible. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 196

 Only gradually did I discover what the mandala really is: “Formation, Transformation, Eternal Mind’s eternal recreation.”

And that is the self, the wholeness of the personality, which if all goes well is harmonious, but which cannot · tolerate self-deceptions. My mandalas were cryptograms concerning the state of the self which were presented to me anew each day. In them I saw the self-that is, my whole being-actively at work. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 197

Sooner or later polemics are certainly going to arise within our camp. ~Jung to Freud 1909 ~ “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 128

 I am glad that you share my conviction that we must thoroughly conquer mythology. ~Freud to Jung 1909, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 128

 With the Nuremberg meeting our movement’s infancy comes to a close; this is my impression. I hope that now there will come a rich and handsome youth. ~Freud to Ferenczi, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 128

 My mythology is oscillating in an inner motion of its own, and here and there meaningful pieces are ‘proffered up. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 128

 You lie in wait to see where your inclination draws you, and leave the obvious straight way untrodden. I believe this is the right thing too; afterward one is astonished at how logical all these detours have been. ~Jung to Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 132

 The time is a critical one, for it marks the beginning of the second half of life, when a metanoia, a mental transformation, not infrequently occurs. I was acutely conscious, then, of the loss of friendly relations with Freud and of the lost comradeship of our work together. The practical and moral support which my wife gave me at that difficult period is something I shall always hold in grateful remembrance. But to return to the time when the first version of the work originated: Along with mythology, psychology of religion, and investigation of the manifestations of unconscious fantasies came a renewed interest in the occult. The motto was, “We shall also have to conquer occultism.” ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 134

 I am more than ever convinced that he is the man of the future. ~Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 137

 One attendee of the Weimar Congress, Frau Lou Andreas-Salome, was recently in Berlin for some time. I have become closely acquainted with her and must say that I have never met with such an understanding of psychoanalysis down to the last and smallest detail. ~Karl Abraham. “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 137

 Think of Carl not with the feelings of a father … , but as one person does of another, who like you must follow his own law. ~Emma Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 139

 My dear Jung, promise me never to abandon the sexual theory. That is the most essential thing of all. You see, we must make a dogma of it, an unshakable bulwark. ~Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 140

 From time to time I am plagued by conflict as to how I can be noticed next to Carl; I find that I have no friends, but that everyone who comes to visit us really only wants to see Carl, aside from a few boring people who are totally uninteresting to me.  Emma Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 140

 A patient [Sabina Spielrein] whom I extricated years ago from the most severe neurosis has betrayed my confidence and my friendship in the most offensive way imaginable. She has caused a nasty scandal for me, simply because I chose to forgo the pleasure of begetting a child with her. I have always remained a perfect gentleman toward her, but before my somewhat too sensitive conscience I still do not feel clean, and that is what hurts the most …. These painful and yet extremely salutary realizations have gnawed at me hellishly, but because of this they have, so I hope, ensured moral qualities in me that will be of the greatest benefit in my later life. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 140

 Being slandered and singed by the love with which we operate are our occupational hazards, but we are not really going to give up the profession on their account. ~Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 140

 It would not have been hard for the analyst, thinking as he did in metaphors and analogies, to make the association that the nearly six-foot-one Carl from Kusnacht, whom his Jewish colleagues especially, including his friend Sabina, used to call the “blond Siegfried,” was himself really a “Carlus Magnus.” ~Gerhard Wehr, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 145

 I know that my experience in no way rivals the extraordinary experience and insight of Freud, but nevertheless it seems to me that certain of my formulations express the empirical facts more aptly than is the case with the Freudian model. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 147

 Our real opponents will be those who commit the greatest atrocities with psychoanalysis, as they are already doing, according to their strengths, with all the means at their disposal. Woe to psychoanalysis in the hands of these fleecers and fools! ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 145

 I have asserted consistently for years in my courses and writings that the concept of libido should be understood in an extremely general way, somewhat in the sense of the preservation of the species, referring, in psychoanalytical terminology, not to “local sexual excitation” but to all the urges and desires reaching beyond the area of self-preservation, and should be applied in this sense. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 146

 I am far from seeing modest and sober criticism as a “defection” or a schism; on the contrary, through it I hope to further the continued flourishing and growth of the psychoanalytic movement, and also to open up an avenue to the treasures of knowledge of psychoanalysis for those who … have been unable before now to master the psychoanalytic method.  ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 146

 I had an audience of about ninety psychiatrists and neurologists …. Naturally I also made room for my own views, which differ in places from previous conceptions. ~Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 148

 I think I deserve this much, if only from the standpoint of expediency, for the psychoanalytic movement is indebted to me for its promotion more than Rank, Stekel, Adler, and the rest of them put together. I can only assure you that there is no resistance on my part, unless it be that I refuse to be judged as a complex-laden idiot … , Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 148

 Dear Doctor Jung”-“I greet you on your return from America no longer so affectionately as the last time in Nuremberg; you have successfully weaned me of that, but still with sufficient sympathy, interest, and gratification over your personal success. ~Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 149

 I picked him “Freud” up, carried him into the next room, and laid him on a sofa. As I was carrying him, he half came to, and I shall never forget the look he cast at me. In his weakness he looked at me as if I were his father.  Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 150.

 Dear Professor Freud, I shall submit to your wish to discontinue our personal relationship, for I never force my friendship on anyone. For the rest, you yourself know best what this moment means to you. “The rest is silence.” ~ Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 153.

 I had first to come to the fundamental realization that analysis, insofar as it is reduction and nothing more, must necessarily be followed by synthesis, and that certain kinds of psychic material mean next to nothing if simply broken down, but display a wealth of meaning if, instead of being broken down, that meaning is reinforced and extended by all the conscious means at our disposal-by the so-called method of amplification. The images or symbols of the collective unconscious yield their distinctive values only when subjected to a synthetic mode of treatment. Just as analysis breaks down the symbolical fantasy-material into its components, so the synthetic procedure integrates it into a universal and intelligible statement. ~ Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 154-155

 At the Munich Congress I found myself obliged to illuminate this semi-darkness, and I did so with the explanation that I do not recognize the Swiss innovations as a legitimate continuation or further development of the psychoanalysis that started with me …. Abraham is correct in saying that Jung is in total retreat from psychoanalysis. ~Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 158

 I would have expected you [Freud] to have imparted something as weighty as this to me directly. Since this is the most serious accusation that can be made against a person, you make further collaboration with you impossible for me. Therefore I am resigning from the editorship of the Jahrbuch with which you entrusted me.  ~ Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 158

 … my main concern has been to investigate, over and above [ the personal significance and biological function [ which Freud attributed to sexuality], its spiritual aspect and its numinous meaning, and thus to explain what Freud was so fascinated by but was unable to grasp. ~ Carl Jung, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 159.

 He Jung] was someone who was sympathetic to me, so long as he went along blindly and quietly as I did. Then came his religious and ethical crisis with its high morality, rebirth, and Bergson, together with lies, brutality, and anti-Semitic presumptions against me. ~Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 160.

 Naturally I also know that adversaries, popularizers, and distorters also serve an important purpose, in that they prepare otherwise unpalatable material for the digestive systems of the masses. But that should not be acknowledged aloud, and I support them only in the proper fulfillment of this mission, while I continue to curse the taint that the pure thing suffers through this procedure. ~Sigmund Freud, “Jung” by Gerhard Wehr, Page 160.