At that time, too, there arose in me profound doubts about everything my father said. When I heard him preaching about grace, I always thought of my own experience. What he said sounded stale and hollow, like a tale told by someone who knows it only by hearsay and cannot quite believe it himself. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 47

 The son thought his father had never experienced the miracle of grace. He had taken the Commandments of the Bible as his guide and more or less blindly believed in its contents, as the tradition of his fathers demanded. But he did not know the immediate living God who stands, omnipotent and free, above His Bible and His Church, who calls upon man to partake of His freedom, and can force him to renounce his own views and convictions in order to fulfill without reserve the command of God. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 48

 Theology had alienated my father and· me from one another …. I was shaken and outraged at once, because I saw how hopelessly he was entrapped by the Church and its theological thinking. They had blocked off all avenues by which he might have reached God directly, and then faithlessly abandoned him. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 48

 The tragedy of my youth was that I saw my father, before my eyes, so to speak, break to pieces against the problem of his faith and come to an early death. This was the objective, external event that opened my eyes to the significance of religion. Subjective, inner experiences prevented me from drawing from my father’s fate negative conclusions with regard to faith that would otherwise have been obvious. I grew up, after all, in the heyday of scientific materialism …. I had to rely on experience alone. Paul’s experience in Damascus was always before me …. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 49

 Actually I had a good personal relationship with my father, and thus no “father complex” of the usual sort. To be sure I was not fond of theology, especially because it gave my father problems which he could not solve and which I felt were unjustified. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 50

At that time, too, there arose in me profound doubts about everything my father said. When I heard him preaching about grace, I always thought of my own experience. What he said sounded stale and hollow, like a tale told by someone who knows it only by hearsay and cannot quite believe it himself. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 47

 The son thought his father had never experienced the miracle of grace. He had taken the Commandments of the Bible as his guide and more or less blindly believed in its contents, as the tradition of his fathers demanded. But he did not know the immediate living God who stands, omnipotent and free, above His Bible and His Church, who calls upon man to partake of His freedom, and can force him to renounce his own views and convictions in order to fulfill without reserve the command of God. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 48

 Theology had alienated my father and· me from one another …. I was shaken and outraged at once, because I saw how hopelessly he was entrapped by the Church and its theological thinking. They had blocked off all avenues by which he might have reached God directly, and then faithlessly abandoned him. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 48

 The tragedy of my youth was that I saw my father, before my eyes, so to speak, break to pieces against the problem of his faith and come to an early death. This was the objective, external event that opened my eyes to the significance of religion. Subjective, inner experiences prevented me from drawing from my father’s fate negative conclusions with regard to faith that would otherwise have been obvious. I grew up, after all, in the heyday of scientific materialism …. I had to rely on experience alone. Paul’s experience in Damascus was always before me …. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 49

 Actually I had a good personal relationship with my father, and thus no “father complex” of the usual sort. To be sure I was not fond of theology, especially because it gave my father problems which he could not solve and which I felt were unjustified. Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 50

Theology had alienated my father and me from one another …. I had a dim premonition that he was inescapably succumbing to his fate. He was lonely and had no friend to talk with. At least I knew no one among our acquaintances whom I would have trusted to say the saving word. Once I heard him praying. He struggled desperately to keep his faith. I was shaken and outraged at once, because I saw how hopelessly he was entrapped by the Church and its theological thinking.  Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 20

Actually I had a good personal relationship with my father, and thus no “father complex” of the usual sort. To be sure I was not fond of theology, especially because it gave my father problems which he could not solve and which I felt were unjustified.  Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 50

 The words fell heavily on my soul. Once upon a time he too had been an enthusiastic student in his first year, as I was now; the world had opened out for him, as it was doing for me; the infinite treasures of knowledge had spread before him, as now before me. How can it have happened that everything was blighted for him, had turned to sourness and bitterness? I found no answer, or too many. The speech he delivered that summer evening over the wine was the last chance he had to live out his memories of the time when he was what he should have been. .  ~Carl Jung, Jung: A Biography, Page 58