Carl Jung: Letters Vol. 1 Quotations

 

Actually you shouldn’t want to have visions, they should just come to “May it be good, happy, favorable, and propitious.”   ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 111.   

 

Wanting to know the truth is also a striving for power and pleasure.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 111.   

 

The so-called “psychic” reactions of lower organisms are very well known to me, but there is no proof at all that these psychic reactions are conscious to an ego, they can be merely psychic.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 262.

 

Surely telepathy widens out our consciousness, but there is always an ego conscious of something. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 263.

 

The meaning of the dream is only that when the churches keep silent the psyche gives you food and drink.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 153.

 

The unconscious is the future in the form or disguise of the past.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 407.

 

I have tried all my life to din a bit of understanding into people.  May others have better luck.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 407.

 

What happens when man introjects God? A superman psychosis, because every blockhead thinks that when he withdraws a projection its contents cease to exist.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 407.

 

To interrupt life before its time is to bring to a standstill an experiment which we have not set up. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 434.

 

If, aside from your work, you read a good book, as one reads the Bible, it can become a bridge for you leading inwards, along which good things may flow to you such as you perhaps cannot now imagine.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 434.

 

Whoever can suffer within himself the highest united with the lowest is healed, holy, whole. ~Carl Jung; Letters Vol. 1; Pages 365.

 

Dreams do not “jumble up the personalities.” On the contrary, everything is in its proper place, only you don’t understand it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1,  327.

 

The fact of having dreams is not nearly enough. You also have a digestive system but this is not nearly enough to make you a physiological chemist.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 328.

 

Thus for me religious statements are not opinions but facts that one can look at as a botanist at his ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 327-328.

 

Religion consists of psychic realities which one cannot say are right or wrong.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 328.

 

The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are. ~Joseph Campbell “A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living.” [Not uttered by Carl Jung.]

 

Thus the fact that there is a genuine religiosity in the Catholic Church proves the existence of a need for fixed and immovable ideas and forms.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 396.

 

The individuation process is a development on the native soil of Christianity. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 397.

 

The Magna Mater has already had pagan children and as Ecclesia spiritualis she embraces a Christendom as huge as it is fragmented.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 397.

 

On account of my critical utterances I was “marked down” by the Gestapo, my books were banned in Germany, and in France they were for the most part destroyed.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 404

 

I can only hope and wish that no one becomes “Jungian.” I stand for no doctrine, but describe facts and put forward certain views which I hold worthy of discussion.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 405

 

It is a fact that the body very often apparently survives the soul, often even without a disease.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 438.

 

As far as we know at all there seems to be no immediate decomposition of the soul.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 438.

 

Light that wants to shine needs darkness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 514.

 

I may be all wrong, but I confess to have a feeling as if when you were in America a door had been shut, softly but tightly.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 514.

 

During the war I cultivated my own fields.  I have raised corn, potatoes, beans and lately even wheat, also poppy for oil. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 425.

 

I understand the resistance better in the case of philosophers, since psychology saws off the branch they are sitting on by wickedly robbing them of the illusion that they represent the absolute spirit. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 388-389.

 

The work of art has its own specific psychology which is sometimes notably different from the psychology of the artist. Were it not so, the work of art would not be autonomous.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 388-389.

 

It is all escapism to feel dependent.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol.1, Page 463.

 

Please consider every word I say in this letter.  Perhaps it puts some light into you.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol.1, Page 463.

 

It is certainly desirable to liberate oneself from the operation of opposites but one can only do it to a certain extent, because no sooner do you get out of the conflict than you get out of life altogether.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 247-248.

 

Occasionally we must also inquire whether something that wants to go upwards has not taken a false route downwards into the body.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 403.

 

The immense expanse of vaguely recognizable objects in the world has lured me forth to those twilit border zones where the figure I have meanwhile become steps towards me.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 404.

 

The long path I have traversed is littered with husks sloughed off, witnesses of countless moultings, those relicta one calls books. They conceal as much as they reveal. Every step is a symbol of those to follow.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 404.

 

He who mounts a flight of steps does not linger on them, nor look back at them, even though age invites him to linger or slow his pace. The great wind of the peaks roars ever more loudly in his ears. His gaze sweeps distances that flee away into the infinite.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 404.

 

The last steps are the loveliest and most precious, for they lead to that fullness to reach which the innermost essence of man is born.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 404.

 

One can indeed use analysis as an escape and one has to be quite particularly careful in your case that such a thing does not happen, because you must learn to use your own powers and the more one helps you to do so, the more one hinders you.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 441.

 

I am no more a black and endless sea of misery and suffering but a certain amount thereof contained in a divine vessel.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 450.

 

It seems to me as if I am ready to die, although as it looks to me some powerful thoughts are still flickering like lightnings in a summer night.  Yet they are not mine, they belong to God, as everything else which bears mentioning.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 450.

 

The Americans are certainly a very humane nation, or at least imagine they are, but this does not prevent so-and-so many Negroes from being lynched every year.   ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 447.

 

Only for outsiders, who have never been inside, is penal servitude not a hellish cruelty.  I know many cases from my psychiatric experience where death would have been a mercy in comparison with life in a prison.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 447

 

The unconscious is largely identical with the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, which are the physiological counterparts of the polarity of unconscious contents.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 278.

 

Of course, I did not invent the term Eros.  I learnt it from Plato.  But I never would have applied this term if I hadn’t observed facts that gave me a hint of how to use this Platonic notion.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 465.

 

As I am thoroughly empirical I never took a philosophical concept for its own sake.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 465.

 

As my whole psychology derives from immediate experience with living people, it is a matter of course that my concept of Eros also originated in immediate experiences.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 465.

 

There is not one single thing in my psychology which is not substantiated essentially by actual experiences.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 465.

 

Psychology is concerned simply and solely with experienceable images whose nature and biological behaviour it investigates with the help of the comparative method.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 487.

 

The mistake, it seems to me, is that these critics actually believe only in words, without knowing it, and then think they have posited God.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 487.

 

Well, Christ is in us and we in him! Why shouldn’t the workings of God and the presence of the “Son of Man” in us be real and experienceable?  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 487.

 

I thank God every day that I have been permitted to experience the reality of the imago Dei in me.  Had that not been so, I would be a bitter enemy of Christianity and of the Church in particular.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 487.

 

Thanks to this actus gratiae my life has meaning, and my inner eye was opened to the beauty and grandeur of dogma.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 487.

 

The reigning prince of this world shuns the light of knowledge like the plague. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 488.

 

So if a Pueblo Indian should one day say to me “You Europeans are worse than ravaging beasts,” I would have to agree politely, for in no circumstances should I win his just estimation by shaking off from the start every trace of complicity.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 370.

 

There are not a few patients who have to have fear driven into them because their instincts have atrophied.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 399.

 

A man who has no more fear is on the brink of the abyss.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 399.

 

If Christ in Gethsemane had no fear, then his passion is null and void and the believer can subscribe to docetism!  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 299

 

…as a psychotherapist I do not by any means try to deliver my patients from fear.  Rather, I lead them to the reason for their fear, and then it becomes clear that it is justified. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 399.

 

You are not only informed enough but also intelligent enough to go on for a long stretch on the assumption that I’m buried and that there is no analyst for you under the changing moon except the one that is in your own heart. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 459.

 

Pride is a wonderful thing when you know how to fulfil its expectations.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 459.

 

Did you never ask yourself who my analyst is? Yet, when it comes to the last issue, we must be able to stand alone vis a vis the unconscious for better or worse.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 459.

 

One could say that the whole world with its turmoil and misery is in an individuation process.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 442.

 

Individuation is by no means a rare thing or a luxury of the few, but those who know that they are in such a process are considered to be lucky.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 442.

 

Individuation is just ordinary life and what you are made conscious of.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 442.

 

I only wish the theologians would accept the Kabbala and India and China as well, so as to proclaim still more clearly how God reveals himself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 391-393.

 

I am not out to build a conceptual system, but use concepts to describe psychic facts and their peculiar modes of behaviour.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 406.

 

Hermeticism is not something you choose, it is a destiny, just as the ecclesia spiritualis is not an organization but an electio.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 351.

 

I am sorry for these people who have failed to hear the cock crowing for the third time. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 445.

 

Had, for instance, the Germans visited Switzerland, you would not now be able even to write to me anymore.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 443.

 

Anyone who has attained this emancipation has reached nirvana and thus made himself unreal. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 444.

 

It is a shame everything has to go to the devil, but human beings are such fools that they obviously deserve no better fate. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 456.

 

I think that if you immerse yourself in my thought-processes without regarding them as a new gospel, a light will gradually go up for you about the nature of psychotherapy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 456.

 

The psychotherapist must be a philosopher in the old sense of the word. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 456.

 

It is of course essential for the psychotherapist to have a fair knowledge of himself, for anyone who does not understand himself cannot understand others and can never be psychotherapeutically effective unless he has first treated himself with the same medicine. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 456

 

The future might easily be so bad that the Church could be forced by circumstances to give up all her childish worldliness and socialism and to turn to the spiritual problem of man, which she has so sadly neglected.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 312.

 

It is all like talking about the weather in a howling storm at sea or in a snowstorm on a glacier. It does not matter and nobody hears it.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 312.

 

The shrieking of the demons is the stillness of the spirit. It means a withdrawal unheard of, until one hears the great silence.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 312.

 

The opus consists of three parts: insight, endurance, and action. Psychology is needed only in the first part, but in the second and third parts moral strength plays the predominant role. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 375.

 

You yourself are a conflict that rages in itself and against itself, in order to melt its incompatible substances, the male and the female, in the fire of suffering, and thus create that fixed and unalterable form which is the goal of life. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 375.

 

A life without inner contradiction is either only half a life or else a life in the Beyond, which is destined only for angels.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 375.

 

Norway is the northern country, i.e., the intuitive sector of the mandala. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 448.

 

…as I have inserted some rather extensive material illustrating the multiple “luminosities” of the unconscious, representing the “conscious-like” nuclei of volitional acts (presumably identical with archetypes).  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 449.

 

The spirit shows its effective power only in the reshaping of matter. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 59.

 

An idol is a petrified symbol used stereotypically for “magical” effects.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 59.

 

The Master speaks a ”power word” born of the richness of his vision, the disciple merely conjures with it.   ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 60.

 

For the Master the communion means: I give you myself, my flesh, my blood. For the disciple this means: I eat the god, his flesh and blood.   ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 60.

 

The magical word is one that lets “a primordial word resound behind it”‘; magical action releases primordial action.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 60.

 

I am indeed convinced that creative imagination is the only primordial phenomenon accessible to us, the real Ground of the psyche, the only immediate reality. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 60.

 

For my private use I call the sphere of paradoxical existence, i.e., the instinctive unconscious, the Pleroma , a term borrowed from Gnosticism.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 60.

 

We can distinguish no form of being that is not psychic in the first place.  All other realities are derived from and indirectly revealed by it, actually with the artificial aid named science.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 60.

 

With a disordered consciousness order can come out of the unconscious, just as conversely unconscious chaos can break into the too narrow cosmos of consciousness.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 60.

 

At the founding of the great religions there was to begin with a collective disorientation which everywhere constellated in the unconscious an overwhelming principle of order (the collective longing for redemption.)  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 60.

 

Through his inner vision the prophet discerns from the needs of his time the helpful image in the collective unconscious and expresses it in the symbol: because it speaks out of the collective unconscious it speaks for everyone-le vrai mot de la situation!  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 60.

 

In the Pleroma, Above and Below lie together in a strange way and produce nothing; but when it is disturbed by the mistakes needs of the individual a waterfall arises between Above and Below, a dynamic something that is the symbol.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 61.

 

Yet real compulsion is one of the most hellish, devilish tortures, far worse than any organic disease.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 62.

 

…nowadays far too many Europeans are inclined to accept Oriental ideas and methods uncritically and to translate them into the mental language of the Occident. ~ Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 39

 

Like Wotan’s oaks, the gods were felled and a wholly incongruous Christianity, born of monotheism. The Germanic man is still suffering from this mutilation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 39.

 

This craving for things foreign and faraway is a morbid sign. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 40.

 

As you know, I am a doctor, and am therefore condemned to lay my speculations under the juggernaut of reality, though this has the advantage of ensuring that everything lacking in solidity will be crushed. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 40.

 

Man must after all be changed from within; otherwise he merely assimilates the new material to the old pattern. Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 40.

 

Through my study of the early Christian writings I have gained a deep and indelible impression of how dreadfully serious an experience of God is. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 41.

 

Thus, with Augustine, the first day of creation begins with self-knowledge, by which is meant knowledge not of the ego but of the self, that objective phenomenon of which the ego is the subject. ~Carl Jung, Alchemical Studies, Page 248, Para 301.

 

It is so important to keep close to the earth, as the spirit is always soaring up to heaven like a flame as much destructive as enlightening.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 42.

 

I can easily say that (without blushing) because I know how resistant and how foolishly obstinate I was when they first visited me, and what a trouble it was until I could read this symbolic language, so much superior to my dull conscious mind.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 42.

 

Astrology has actually nothing to do with the Stars but is the 5000 year old psychology of antiquity and the Middle Ages.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 56.

 

You mustn’t melt away or otherwise disappear, or get ill but wicked desires should pin you to the earth so your work can go on. ~Carl Jung to Richard Wilhelm, Letters Vol. 1, Page 63.

 

Medicine is switching over to psychology with a vengeance, and that’s where the East comes in.  There’s nothing to be done with the theologians and philosophers because of their arrogance. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 64

 

It has just struck me that in my commentary I have suggested using “logos” for “hun” instead of “animus,” because “animus” is a natural term for the “mind” of a woman, corresponding to the “anima” of a man.  European philosophy must take into account the existence of feminine psychology.  The “anima” of a woman might suitably be designated “Eros.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 69.

 

European philosophy must take into account the existence of feminine psychology.  ~Carl Jung, , Letters Vol. 1, Pages 69.

 

The “anima” of a woman might suitably be designated “Eros.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 69.

 

We live in the age of the decline of Christianity, when the metaphysical premises of morality are collapsing.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 69-70.

 

When the confusion is at its height a new revelation comes, i.e. at the beginning of the fourth month of world history.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 69.

 

The fear is not of myself but of the myth in you. ~Carl Jung to Walter Corte, Letters Vol. 1, Page 70.

 

People like you must look at everything and think about it and communicate with the heaven that dwells deep within them and listen inwardly for a word to come.  At the same time organize your outward life properly so that your voice carries weight.  ~Carl Jung to Walter Corti, Letters Vol. 1, Page 70.

 

In the last resort the value of a person is never expressed in his relation to others but consists in itself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 78.

 

Therefore we should never let our self-confidence or self-esteem depend on the behaviour of another person however much we may be humanly affected by him.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 78.

 

Everything that happens to us, properly understood, leads us back to ourselves; it is as though there were some unconscious guidance whose aim it is to deliver us from all ties and all dependence and make us dependent on our-selves.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 78.

 

This is because dependence on the behaviour of others is a last vestige of childhood which we think we can’t do without. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 78.

 

God as the greatest becomes in man the smallest and most invisible, otherwise man cannot endure him. Only in that form of the self does God dwell in the macrocosm (which he himself is, though in the most unconscious form). ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 337.

 

In man God sees himself from “outside” and thus becomes conscious of himself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 337.

 

The self must become as small as and yet smaller than the ego although it is the ocean of divinity: “God is as small as me,” says Angelus Silesius. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 336.

 

The self in its divinity (i.e., the archetype) is unconscious of itself It can be come conscious only within our consciousness. And it can do that only if the ego stands firm.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 336.

 

But every archetype before it is integrated consciously wants to manifest itself physically since it forces the subject into its own form. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 336.

 

It is a very good method to treat the anima as if she were a patient whose secret you ought to get at.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 461.

 

You must step into the fantasy yourself and compel the figures to give you an answer.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 561.

 

You barricade yourself from the world with exaggerated saviour fantasies. So climb down from the mountain of your humility and follow your nose. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 559.

 

Psychology as might be expected appears in the realm of physics in the field of theory-building. The outstanding question is a psychological critique of the space-time concept. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 494.

 

But reaching soon the station No. 74 of my trek through the lands, deserts, and seas of this three-dimensional world, I feel the burden of my years and the work not yet done. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 503.

 

I sincerely hope you don’t believe what people say about me. If I did, I should have buried myself long ago. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 503.

 

I cannot quite agree with your opinion about “individuation.”  It is not “individualization” but a conscious realization of everything the existence of an individual implies: his needs, his tasks, his duties, his responsibilities, etc. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 504.

 

Individuation does not isolate, it connects. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 504

 

The animus of women is an answer to the spirit which rules the man. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 480.

 

Only after I had written about pages in folio, it began to dawn on me that Christ-not the man but the divine being-was my secret goal. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 480.

 

My further writing led me to the archetype of the God-man and to the phenomenon of synchronicity which adheres to the archetype. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 480.

 

Ad ”neurosis”: I mean, of course, that it is as a rule better to leave neurotics to themselves as long as they do not suffer and seek health. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 481.

 

Indeed I have often thought: if only I could have opened my own father’s eyes! But he died before I had caught the fish whose liver contains the wonderworking medicine. Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 193-194.

 

It is a pleasure to receive the letter of a normally intelligent person in contrast to the evil flood of idiotic and malevolent insinuations I seemed to have released in the U.S.A. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 534.

 

It seems to me that at the bottom of all these problems lies the development of science and technology, which has destroyed man’s metaphysical foundation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 536.

 

Social welfare has replaced the kingdom of God. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 536.

 

Much better to know, therefore, that life on this earth is balanced between an equal amount of pleasure and misery, even when it is at its best, and that real progress is only the psychological adaptation to the various forms of individual misery. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 537.

 

Ancient Rome, not knowing how to deal with its own social problem, viz. slavery, succumbed to the onslaught of barbarous tribes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 537.

 

We have not understood yet that the discovery of the unconscious means an enormous spiritual task, which must be accomplished if we wish to preserve our civilization. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 537.

 

Precognitive dreams can be recognized and verified as such only when the precognized event has actually happened. Otherwise the greatest uncertainty prevails. Also, such dreams are relatively rare. It is therefore not worth looking at the dreams for their future significance. One usually gets it wrong. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 460.

 

It does not seem exactly probable to me that when Christ cuts off his shadow this is an immediate visionary experience, but chiefly a philosophical idea very drastically expressed. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 553.

 

It is of course extremely difficult, in judging Gnostic images, to tell how much is genuine inner experience and how much is philosophical superstructure. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 553.

 

Knowing your own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darknesses of other people. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 237.

 

If we consider the psyche as a whole, we come to the conclusion that the unconscious psyche likewise exists in a space-time continuum, where time is no longer time and space no longer space. Accordingly, causality ceases too. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 547.

 

But this is where the above-mentioned difficulty comes in: our knowledge of the instincts, i.e., of the underlying biological drives, is very inadequate, so that it is only with the greatest difficulty and great uncertainty that we can equate the archetypes with them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 547.

 

Thus, as early as the dream-book of Artemidorus, we come across the case of a man dreaming that his father perished in a fire, and after a few days the dreamer himself died of a high fever. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 547.

 

This means that when we observe statistically we eliminate the synchronicity phenomenon, and conversely, when we establish synchronicity we must abandon the statistical method. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 548.

 

Finding the right measure is also a way of relating to the world. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 527.

 

Fruitful introversion is possible only when there is also a relation to the outside. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 527.

 

No doubt the anima has a very important aspect as a giver of wisdom. She is the femme inspiratrice par excellence. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 498.

 

She [The Anima] herself is the archetype of mere life that leads into experiences and awareness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 499.

 

Thus the anima is always associated with the source of wisdom and enlightenment, whose symbol is the Old Wise Man. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 499.

 

Blind are the eyes of anyone who does not know his own heart, and I always recommend the application of a little psychology so that he can understand things like the gospel still better.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 463.

 

The community is nothing without the individual and if a community consists of individuals that do not fulfil their individual telos, then the community has no telos or a very wrong one. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 464.

 

Each man has his telos and inasmuch as he tries to fulfil it he is a real citizen. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 464.

 

If we consider the psychic process as an energic one, we give it mass. This mass must be very small, otherwise it could be demonstrated physically. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 522.

 

I wouldn’t call the ego a creation of mind or consciousness, since, as we know, little children talk of themselves first in the third person and begin to say ‘I’ only when they have found their ego. The ego, therefore, is rather a find or an experience and not a creation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume 1; Pages 254-255.

 

That is something I would definitely like to know, what sin really is, seeing that theology has been talking about it for thousands of years. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 253-254

 

Men would never have talked of sin and the forgiveness of sin had this not been a fundamental psychological fact that existed long before there were any laws. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 253-254

 

That is as you see the reason why I said that I haven’t come across Buddhist mandalas based upon 3, 5, or 6 (2 x 3). ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 222-223

 

The dream is in my opinion a look behind the scenes into the age-old processes of the human mind, which might explain your special feeling of happiness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol I, Pages 221-222

 

I never denied the fact that my psychiatry comes from Bleuler’s clinic. I was there already in 1900. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 210-211

 

The toad that appears in your book generally signifies an anticipation of the human being on the level of the coldblooded creatures, and actually stands for the psyche associated with the lower spinal cord. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 213

 

The West knows too much about sentimentalities to believe in them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 213

 

I have always found it very difficult to discuss these problems with an artist, whereas I could have learnt a lot from Mantegna. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 249-250

 

The greatness of the Renaissance artist lies not least in the fact that he worked with the whole of his personality, while the artist of today assiduously avoids anything meaningful. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 249-250

 

In the end there is no legitimate having-to-go-beyond-ourselves. Hence I would not recommend anybody to wish to go beyond himself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 192-193

 

For what we are stuck with we have a certain responsibility, namely for the way we act towards it, but not for the fact that it exists. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 192-193

 

You are not responsible for your constitution but you are stuck with it, and so it is with the anima, which is likewise a constitutional factor one is stuck with. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 192-193

 

At any rate we can never treat the anima with moral reprimands; instead of this we have, or there is, wisdom, which in our days seems to have passed into oblivion. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 192-193

 

My daughter from Paris and her children are with us since the beginning of the war, happily enough. But her husband is still in Paris. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 288-289

 

We are following the exploits of the R.A.F. with the greatest admiration and we marvel at the way the British people are carrying on. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 288-289

 

My whole family, including 11 grandchildren, have gone to a refuge in the mountains near Saanen. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 282

 

Fear is aggressivity in reverse. Consequently, the thing we are afraid of involves a task. If you are afraid of your own thoughts, then your thoughts are the task. ~Carl Jung; Letters Volume 1; Page 507.

 

For untold years it has happened for the first time that I could not plant my potatoes and my corn anymore and weed has overgrown my piece of black earth, as if its owner were no more. Things and exterior life slip past me and leave me in a world of unworldly thought and in a time measured by centuries. I am glad that you and others carry on the work I once began. The world needs it badly. It seems to come to a general showdown, when the question will be settled whether the actually existing man is conscious enough to cope with his own demons or not. ~Carl Jung Collected Letters Vol 1, Pages 468-469.

 

Whatever happens in the fantasy must happen to you. You should not let yourself be represented by a fantasy figure. You must safeguard the ego and only let it be modified by the unconscious, just as the latter must be acknowledged with full justification and only prevented from suppressing and assimilating the ego. ~ Carl Jung, Collected Letters Vol 1, Page 561

 

You can’t protect your anima by Yoga exercises which only procure a conscious thrill, but you can protect her by catching the unconscious contents that well up from the depths of yourself. ~Carl Jung; Collected Letters Vol 1, Page 97.

 

If one could arrive at the truth by learning the words of wisdom, then the world would have been saved already in the remote times of Lao-tze. ~Carl Jung, Collected Letters Vol 1, Pages 559-560.

 

The truth is one and the same everywhere and I must say that Taoism is one of the most perfect formulations of it I ever became acquainted with. ~Carl Jung, Collected Letters Vol 1, Pages 559-560.

 

At all events wisdom cannot be taught by words. It is only possible by personal contact and by immediate experience. ~Carl Jung, Collected Letters Vol 1, Pages 559-560.

 

Nobody can set right a mismanaged life with a few words.  But there is no pit you cannot climb out of provided you make the right effort at the right place. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 144

 

Sometimes a tree tells you more than can be read in books. ~ C.G. Jung; Letters Vol 1; Page 179.

 

Hermeticism is not something you choose, it is a destiny, just as the ecclesia spiritualis is not an organization but an electio. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol 1, Page 351.

 

 

 

The psychic seems to me to be in actual fact partly extra-spatial and extra-temporal. “Subtle body” may be a fitting expression for this part of the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 522.

 

I like to get reactions from my public, otherwise I am easily overcome by a feeling of isolation in the contemporary spiritual world. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 466.

 

Go not outside, return into thyself: truth dwells in the inner man.”  Augustine, Liber de vera religione. Motto to: “A Psychological Approach to the Dogma of the Trinity.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 466.

 

You can face eternity properly only when you have “forgotten the world.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 373.

 

Better to feel the weight of the earth too much than to hang out over the edge of it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 373-374.

 

Whenever the apples perfume the air, paradise is soon coming to an end. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 373.

 

 

From the alchemical saying :

Heaven above                                                      All that is above

Heaven below                                                      Also is below

Stars above                                                          Grasp this

Stars below                                                           And rejoice. ~Carl Jung, CW 1 6, par. 384.

 

I have made a great effort to explain what I mean by “psychic.” I call those biological phenomena “psychic” which show at least traces of a will that interferes with the regular and automatic functioning of instincts. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 457.

 

Your book is a remarkably clear survey of analytical psychology. ~Carl Jung to Esther Harding’s “Psychic Energy” Letters, Vol. 1, Page 468.

 

I don’t know T. S. Eliot. If you think that his book is worthwhile, then I don’t mind even poetry.  I am only prejudiced against all forms of modern art.  It is mostly morbid and evil on top [of that]. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 469.

 

For untold years it has happened for the first time that I could not plant my potatoes and my corn anymore and weed has overgrown my piece of black earth, as if its owner were no more. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 469.

 

Things and exterior life slip past me and leave me in a world of unworldly thought and in a time measured by centuries. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 469.

 

I am glad that you and others carry on the work I once began. The world needs it badly. ~Carl Jung to Esther Harding, Letters Vol. 1, Page 469.

 

Just now some hard chunks of reality have hit you, and hit all the harder because I have spoilt you but you needed spoiling in order to approach closer to the earth, where you could get at the stone. Hardness increases in proportion to the speed of approach. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 362.

 

I realize that under the circumstances you have described you feel the need to see clearly.  But your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Without, everything seems discordant; only within does it coalesce into unity. Who looks outside dreams; who looks inside awakes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume I, Page 33.

 

Philosophical criticism must, to my way of thinking, start with a maximum of factual knowledge if it is not to remain hanging in midair and thus be condemned to sterility. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 331.

 

I can put up with any amount of criticism so long as it is based on facts or real knowledge. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 331.

 

Heidegger’s modus philosophandi is neurotic through and through and is ultimately rooted in his psychic crankiness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 331.

 

In the critical philosophy of the future there will be a chapter on “The Psychopathology of Philosophy.”  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 331-332.

 

The collective systems, styled “party” or “State,” have a destructive effect on human relationships. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 472.

 

All big organizations that pursue exclusively materialistic aims are the pacemakers of mass-mindedness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 472.

 

The dissolution of the transference often consists in ceasing to describe the nature of one’s relationship as “transference.” This designation degrades the relationship to a mere projection, which it is not. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 475.

 

“Transference” consists in the illusion of its uniqueness, when seen from the collective and conventional standpoint. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 475

 

“Uniqueness” lies simply and solely in the relationship between individuated persons, who have no other relationships at all except individual, i.e., unique ones. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 475.

 

People talk of the State as though it were a living entity, when in fact it is only a conventional concept that could not live for a second unless man pumped the necessary life into it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 315.

 

I can scarcely keep pace and must watch out that the creative forces do not chase me round the universe at a gallop.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 321.

 

But you, just as naively, have intruded yourself as an Anima figure into this witches’ Sabbath and are therefore caught up in the dance as though you were nothing but an Anima. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 335.

 

Letters I get from there are with few exceptions either infantile or pig-headed or hysterical, which more than anything else confirms that my diagnosis of Germany’s spiritual condition was right. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 439.

 

Also my little book on transference is to appear soon. It’s a risky business, but when you are old you can say more than when life is still ahead. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 439.

 

He gets into the unconscious through the roof and as the corns on his feet are blind he can’t see what he’s climbing down into. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 439.

 

Here in Switzerland we are still rationed, but can’t complain about anything since we were miraculously spared the Nazi madness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 401.

 

“God imagined the world. The Trinity is imaged in the creature.” In spite of exhaustive inquiries the source remains unidentified. But cf. von Franz, Aurora Consurgens: A Document Attributed to Thomas Aquinas, p. 186, n. 141: “God created all visible things through imagination and manifests himself in everything . . . . Thus the creative fantasy of God is contained in the visible. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 400, Footnote 6.

 

I now see more clearly the terminological possibilities of a Babylonian confusion of tongues when one seriously sets about studying science as an object instead of practicing it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 330.

 

If it should later turn out that these means were not as good as those we shall have in a hundred years’ time, this is no reason for mortification today, since we know quite well that the better which is to come would never have hatched out had we not begotten the best that is possible now, however imperfect it may be. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 330.

 

It is also a plausible hypothesis that the archetype is produced by the original life urge and then gradually grows up into consciousness-with the qualification, however, that the innermost  essence of the archetype can never become wholly conscious, since it is beyond the power of imagination and language to grasp and express its deepest nature. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 313.

 

Your conception of the archetype as a psychic gene is quite possible. ~ Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 313.

 

Inspired by Justinus Kerner’s Kleksographien, I made a whole collection of inkblots back in my high school days, because these irrational configurations stimulated my fantasy activity so delightfully that they often afforded me day-long enjoyment. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 323.

 

Although since 1918 I knew that a terrible fire would spread over Europe beginning in the North East, I have no vision beyond 1940 concerning the fate of Europe. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 285.

 

This year reminds me of the enormous earthquake in 26 B.C. that shook down the great temple of Karnak. It was the prelude to the destruction of all temples, because a new time had begun. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 285.

 

1940 is the year when we approach the meridian of the first star in Aquarius. It is the premonitory earthquake of the New Age. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 285.

 

I loathe the new style, the new Art, the new Music, Literature, Politics, and above all the new Man. It’s the old beast that has not changed since the troglodytes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 286.

 

Your news that Churchill was not bored at our table was a great relief. Conversation with him was no easy matter since he directed his answers mostly to the House of Commons. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 443.

 

The reception Churchill had in Zurich was something you really have missed. Churchill told me afterwards that it was the best and most impressive reception he ever had in his life. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 446.

 

I keep to my daily regime: two hours of scientific work in the morning, and in the afternoon a rest plus a visitor. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 451.

 

I must confess I was against the C. G. Jung Institute only from aversion to the prominence given to my name. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 469.

 

You must go in quest of yourself, and you will find yourself again only in the simple and forgotten things. Why not go into the forest for a time, literally? Sometimes a tree tells you more than can be read in books… ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 479.

 

This centre was indirectly produced by an infernal deception through the figure of the Fuhrer. This happens in all societies where the spiritual centre has dropped out. Only in this spiritual centre is there any possibility of salvation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 470.

 

Only in this spiritual centre is there any possibility of salvation. The concept of the centre was called by the Chinese Tao, which the Jesuits in their day translated as Deus. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 470.

 

This centre is everywhere, i.e., in everybody, and when the individual does not possess this centre he infects all the others with this sickness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 471.

 

Concerning your view about Hatha-Yoga I can confirm your ideas entirely. Yoga as well as other “mystical” practices imitate nature and that explains their efficacy. Yoga postures are imitations of catatonic gestures, postures and mannerisms. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 498.

 

One could say that the classical catatonic condition is a fixed or congealed Yoga mechanism, i.e., a natural tendency released under pathological circumstances. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 498.

 

This [Hatha Yoga] is to be interpreted as a teleological attempt at self-cure, as it is a compensatory process produced under the stress of the schizophrenic dissociation of the mind. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 498.

 

The prana discipline has practically the same effect. It concentrates the psychic energy upon the inner ways in which the prana flows. The localization in the brain is doubtful, but in general it is correct to assume that the unconscious processes are chiefly located in the lower centres of the brain from the thalamus downwards. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 498.

 

Behind Gretchen stands the Gnostic sequence: Helen-Mary-Sophia. They represent a real Platonic world of ideas (thinking and sensation on the mystic level).  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 265.

 

“For He [God] doth know that . . . ye shall be as gods.” Gen. 3:5.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 266.

 

While I stood before the bed of the Old Man, I thought and felt: “I am not worthy Lord.” I know Him very well: He was my “guru” more than 30 years ago a real ghostly guru-but that is a long and-I am afraid-exceedingly strange story. It has been since confirmed to me by an old Hindu. You see, something has taken me out of Europe and the Occident and has opened for me the gates of the East as well, so that I should understand something of the human mind. ~Carl Jung on his vision of Philemon, Letters Vol. 1, Page 491.

 

The solitary man is either a beast or a god. ~Carl Jung citing Aristotle, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 492.

 

I wanted the proof of a living Spirit and I got it. Don’t ask me at what a price. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 492.

 

I don’t want to prescribe a way to other people, because I know that my way has been prescribed to me by a hand far above my reach. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 492.

 

My medical experience has increasingly compelled me to come to terms with Christian symbolism and here the Church Fathers were a great help. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 471.

 

The man of today is still boundlessly infantile, and therein lies the great danger and the continual incentive for the theological outlook to be equally infantile. Caution is indicated. The way up Mont Blanc consists of many little steps. But a beginning must be made. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 474.

 

As I am getting on in age and as I am going to be gathered to my ancestors and avatars within a measurable time, the Institute is meant to carry on the work.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 482.

 

The moment we enter the bridge, I fall on my knees, completely overcome by the sudden understanding that my father is going to lead me into the “supreme presence.” By sympathy he kneels at my side and I try to touch the ground with my forehead. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 491.

 

My eldest patient-a lady-has reached the stately age of 75. The psyche can be treated so long as a person has a psyche The only people you can’t treat are those who are born without a psyche. And of these there are not a few. ~Carl Jung,  Letters Vol 1; Page 95.

 

You see, in spite of being a man in advanced age, you still have a young soul, a lovely anima, and she is confronted with the dangerous lizard. In other words, your soul is threatened by’ chthonic poison. Now this is exactly the situation of our Western mind. We think we can deal with such problems in an almost rationalistic way, by conscious attempts and efforts, imitating Yoga methods and such dangerous stuff, but we forget entirely that first of all we should establish a connection between the higher and the lower regions of our psyche ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages  95-97.

 

My aged mother was sitting at a distance of about 3 meters near the window. I myself was outside the house in the garden and the servant was in the kitchen which is on the same floor. Nobody else was present in the house at that time. Suddenly the knife exploded inside the sideboard with the sound of an exploding pistol. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages  180-181.

 

Beyond the human obligation to look after ageing parents and to maintain a friendly relation with them, there should be no other dependencies, for the young generation has to start life anew and can encumber itself with the past only in case of the greatest necessity.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 218.

 

I begin to feel my age and whenever I get a bit too tired I also feel my heart and that is decidedly disagreeable and makes me cross with the whole world, which is damnable anyhow. I went through a period of black depression during the first 4 days.  Only yesterday I began to feel human again. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 307.

[Note:  The “period of black depression was related to The Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor 7 Dec. 1941.]

 

I just spent about 3 weeks in the tower where I finished the 3rd edition of a little book of mine [CW 7], much inspired by the peculiar atmosphere of the place . . .  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 42.

 

Every relationship has its optimal distance, which of course has to be found by trial and error. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 53-54.

 

It will be good for your humility if you can accept the gifts of your unconscious guide that dwells in yourself, and it is good for your pride to humiliate itself to such an extent that you can accept what you receive. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 459

 

I’m therefore quite willing to help in your attempt in this direction, but I refuse in your own interest to plague myself with your material which is only helpful when you acquire its understanding by your own effort. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 459

 

One must never look to the things that ought to change. The main question is how we change ourselves. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 314

 

Everything to do with the masses is hateful to me. Anything popularized becomes common. Above all I would not disseminate Goethe, rather cook books. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 88-89.

 

Apart from a few poems, the only thing of Goethe’s that is alive for me is Faust. For me this was always a study-for relaxation I prefer English novels. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 88-89.

 

Everything else of Goethe’s pales beside Faust, although something immortal glitters in the poems too. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 88-89.

 

What one could “enjoy” of Goethe is, for me, too patriarchal, too much de l’epoque. What I value in Goethe I cannot “enjoy”; it is too big, too exciting, too profound. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 88-89.

 

It seems to me that one cannot meditate enough about Faust, for many of the mysteries of the second part are still unfathomed. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 88-89.

 

You must pay especially careful attention to your body because your intuitive extraversion, stretching over continents, pulls energies into its vortex which are drawn from the body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 54-55

 

Above all things you must be clear that the uncovering of the unconscious, as it happens in analysis, is only the beginning of a journey that cannot be halted but must be continued to the end. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 142-143

 

The psychosis phobia is always a sign that the irrational psychic factors are piling up and want to be assimilated. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 142-143

 

This psychic substrate must necessarily be different from the so-called outer world, otherwise there would be no possibility of grasping it, for like cannot cognize like. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 142-143

 

One must have a far-reaching psychological understanding in order to enjoy the I Ching with advantage. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 159-150

 

So it will happen to you as it happens to most people. They die in exactly the same ways as they should have lived. Good Lord, how many impersonations do you reckon you need to understand this simple truth? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol 1, Pages 422-423.

 

But when you die, nobody else will die for you or instead of you. It will be entirely and exclusively your own affair. That has been expected of you through your whole life, that you live it as if you were dying. So it will happen to you as it happens to most people. They die in exactly the same ways as they should have lived. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol 1, Pages 422-423.

 

The only people you can’t treat are those who are born without a psyche. And of these there are not a few. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1; Page 95.

 

It frequently happens that when a person with whom one was intimate dies, either one is oneself drawn into the death, so to speak, or else this burden has the opposite effect of a task that has to be fulfilled in real life. ~Carl Jung, Letters 1, Page 239.

 

Everything in me has arisen from direct experience of the mentally ill or “seekers after truth.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume 1, Pages 59-61.

 

It [Music] expresses in sounds what fantasies and visions music express in    Visual images…music represents the movement, development and transformation of motifs of the collective unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 542.

 

The statistical method of science stands in a relationship of complementarity to synchronicity. This means that when we observe statistically we eliminate the synchronicity phenomena and. . . when we establish synchronicity we must abandon the statistical method. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 548.

 

If you look long enough into a dark hole you perceive what is looking in. This is also the principle of cognition in yoga, which derives all cognition from the absolute emptiness of consciousness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 174-175.

 

One cannot be simply Protestant or Catholic. That is much too facile, for in the end the one is the other’s brother and this cannot be got rid of simply by declaring one of them invalid. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 520.

 

We cannot simply restrict ourselves to our view of the world, but must perforce find a standpoint from which a view will be possible that goes a little step beyond the Christian as well as the Buddhist, etc. . . . ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 520.

 

Actually it is not correct to say that there is no mother goddess in the Christian Trinity. The mother is simply veiled by the Holy Ghost (Sophia), which is the connecting link between Father and Son. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 90-93

 

I grant you that I am on the best way to delivering up the Christian concept of the spirit to the chaos of Gnosis again, from which it was so carefully insulated. But in my view the spirit is alive only when it is an adventure eternally renewed. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 90-93

 

It is not, however, the actual East we are dealing with but the collective unconscious which is omnipresent. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 87.

 

I have landed in the Eastern sphere through the waters of the unconscious, for the truths of the unconscious can never be thought up, they can be reached only by following a path which all cultures right down to the most primitive level have called the way of initiation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 87.

 

There is no point in delivering yourself over to the last drop. . . . In my view it is absolutely essential always to have our consciousness well enough  in hand to pay sufficient attention to our reality, to the Here and Now. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 239.

 

The unconscious itself is neither tricky nor evil – it is Nature, both beautiful and terrible. . . .  The best way of dealing with the unconscious is the creative way. . . ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 108-109.

 

The hidden mystery of life is always hidden between Two, and it is the true mystery which cannot be betrayed by words or depleted by arguments. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 581.

 

The Divine Presence is more than anything else. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 491-492.

 

The dissolution of our time-bound form in eternity brings no loss of meaning. Rather does the little finger know itself a member of the hand. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 343.

 

God needs man in order to become conscious, just as he needs limitation in time and space. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 64-66

 

[I]t was my intention to write in such a way that fools get scared and only true scholars and seekers can enjoy its reading. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 425.

 

Science seeks the truth because it feels it does not possess it. The church possesses the truth and therefore does not seek it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 345-350

 

Why don’t people read my books conscientiously? Why do they gloss over the facts? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 345-350

 

And people do not see that I am gathering for tomorrow the factual material which will be desperately needed if the European of the future is to be convinced of anything at all.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 345-350

 

Should the facts be inconvenient for any kind of creed, then they are not to be got rid of by an authoritarian fiat or by faith. ~~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 345-350

 

 

Airplanes and such devilish inventions ought to be avoided.  C.G. Jung ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 198-200.

 

Body and spirit are to me mere aspects of the reality of the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 198-200.

 

Body is as metaphysical as spirit. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 198-200.

 

Ask the modern physicist what body is, they are coming fast across to the recognition of the reality of the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 198-200.

 

As you know I call intuition any kind of perception which takes place in a way that cannot be explained by the function of the senses.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol1, Pages 420-422.

 

The fact that extra-sensory perception is real proves that time and space are psychically relative. That means that they can be more or less annihilated. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol 1, Pages 420-422.

 

If a thing is capable of non-existence then we must assume that it is also capable of absolute existence. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol 1, Pages 420-422.

 

One has to stand below others if one wants something to drop down from them into one’s lap.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume 1, Page 435.

 

When I started analyzing I could usually endure only two cases a day because it was too much of a strain for me.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume 1, Page 204.

 

But I cannot say that material things or spiritual things in themselves are of psychic nature, although it may be that. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 255.

 

I wouldn’t call the ego a creation of mind or consciousness, since, as we know, little children talk of themselves first in the third person and begin to say ‘I’ only when they have found their ego. ~ Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 254.

 

You can learn a great deal of psychology through studying books, but you will find that this psychology is not very helpful in practical life.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 236-237.

 

That is a thing which is utterly jacking in our universities: the relation of master and disciple.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 236-237.

 

My subjective attitude is that I hold every religious position in high esteem but draw an inexorable dividing line between the content of belief and the requirements of science.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 124-125.

 

With our human knowledge we always move in the human sphere, but in the things of God we should keep quiet and not make any arrogant assertions about what is greater than ourselves.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 124-125.

 

It seems to me, however, that when belief enters into practical life we are entitled to the opinion that it should be coupled with the Christian virtue of modesty, which does not brag about absoluteness but brings itself to admit the unfathomable ways of God which have nothing to do with the Christian revelation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 124-125.

 

But one thing I will tell you: the exploration of the unconscious has in fact and in truth discovered the age-old, timeless way of initiation.  Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 140-143.

 

Nothing is submerged for ever-that is the terrifying discovery everyone makes who has opened that portal.   Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 140-143.

 

We know very well that a man’s ambition is for his concepts to be realized in life, whereas it is the most secret longing of all women for their lives to be realized in concepts.  ~ ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 151

 

I do not combat the Christian truth, I am only arguing with the modern mind.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 383-387.

 

You cannot preach to a man who does not understand the language.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 383-387.

 

Doubt is creative if it is answered by deeds, and so is neurosis if it exonerates itself as having been a phase—a crisis which is pathological only when chronic.  Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 332-334

 

Neurosis is a justified doubt in oneself and continually poses the ultimate question of trust in man and in God.  Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 332-334

 

But the moderns mistake morbidity for creative birth—part of the general lunacy of our time. Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 332-334

 

Spirit cannot be learned, it is given to us by God’s grace, which cannot be had by force or reason.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 293.

 

You know time and space are only relative realities, which under certain conditions do not exist at all. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 303-304.

 

In wanting to understand, ethical and human as it sounds, there lurks the devil’s will, which though not at first perceptible to me, is perceptible to the other. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 31-32

 

So is healing given to us in the unlockable and ineffable symbol, for it prevents the devil from swallowing up the seed of life.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 31-32.

 

True understanding seems to be one which does not understand yet lives and works. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 31-32

 

Your dream is very remarkable in that it coincides almost literally with my first systematic fantasy which I had between the ages of 15 and 16. It engrossed me for weeks, always on the way to school, which took three-quarters of an hour. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 218.

 

A child, too, enters into this sublimity, and there detaches himself from this world and his manifold individuations more quickly than the aged. So easily does he become what you also are that he apparently vanishes. Sooner or later all the dead become what we also are. But in this reality we know little or nothing about that mode of being, and what shall we still know of this earth after death? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 343.

 

During the war my health wasn’t too good. As a matter of fact I was seriously ill and having reached the biblical age of 70, I’m none too efficient any more, though I have done a decent amount of scientific work lately. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 379.

 

While I thank you for your kind letter I must tell you that unfortunately I am obliged to limit my activity for reasons of age and health and so it will not be possible for me to write an article for the projected number of Polyphoniet. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 542.

 

At my age it means going “slow and with care,” nor is my working capacity what it was, especially when you have all sorts of things on your programme which you want to bring to the light of day. ~Carl Jung,  Letters Vol. 1, Page 563.

 

We think we can deal with such problems in an almost rationalistic way, by conscious attempts and efforts, imitating Yoga methods and such dangerous stuff, but we forget entirely that first of all we should establish a connection between the higher and the lower regions of our psyche.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 96.

 

Thus the Western man has to develop that connection with his unconscious first, and then only he will understand really what the Eastern methods aim at. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 96.

 

You can protect your anima by Yoga exercises which only procure a conscious thrill, but you can protect her by catching the unconscious contents that well up from the depths of yourself. Try to see your fantasies are, no matter how disreputable they seem to be; that is your blackness, your shadow that ought to be swallowed. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 97.

 

You know, Eastern Yoga is based upon man as he really is, but we have a conscious imagination about ourselves and think this is our Self, which is an appalling mistake. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 97.

 

Parents must realize that they are trees from which the fruit falls in the autumn. Children don’t belong to their parents, and they are only apparently produced by them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 217.

 

Many thanks for kindly sending me your book on Rilke. I am reading it with pleasure, especially as I was always aware, since getting to know Rilke, of how much psychology there was hidden in him. In fact he came up against the same field of experience that has engrossed me for decades, though I approach it from a very different angle. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 483.

 

I was grieved for him. Now he has vanished and stepped outside time, as all of us will do after him. Life, so-called, is a short episode between two great mysteries, which yet are one. I cannot mourn the dead. They endure, but we pass over. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 485.

 

Life, so-called, is a short episode between two great mysteries, which yet are one. I cannot mourn the dead. They endure, but we pass over. ..  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 483.

 

The psychiatrist understands nothing of psychotherapy in principle because he is never in the position of having to practice it.  One could just as well subordinate internal medicine to surgery. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 163.

 

Unfortunately I know far too little of X.’s personal life to presume to an opinion, but with young people one must always be careful in this respect, because the demands of instinct are only too easily covered up by deceptive spiritual interests. …I would conjecture that this is so because middle life has set in too early in consequence of a relatively short life expectancy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 169.

 

I was particularly satisfied with the fact that you clearly understand that I am not a mystic but an empiricist. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 237.

 

There is very much conscious purpose in what I say, for I am persuaded that the Christian Church is one of the most powerful instruments for keeping the great masses more or less right in the head. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 494.

 

My chief curiosity was always the question: What does the human mind, inasmuch as it is a natural involuntary functioning, produce if left to itself? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 237.

 

Such a thing is possible only when there is a detachment of the soul from the body. When that takes place and the patient lives on, one can almost with certainty expect a certain deterioration of the character inasmuch as the superior and most essential part of the soul has already left.  Such an experience denotes a partial death.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 435-437.

 

But it is the lower man that keeps on living with the body and who is nothing else but the life of the body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 437.

 

“Therefore strive first to know yourselves, because ye are the city and the city is the kingdom.” ~Oxyrhynchus Papyrus 654; Cited by Carl Jung; Letters Vol. 1, Page 524.

 

As a matter of fact a positive relationship between the individual and society or a group is essential, since no individual stands by himself but depends upon symbiosis with a group. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 508.

 

The self, the very centre of an individual, is of a conglomerate nature. It is, as it were, a group. It is a collectivity in itself and therefore always, when it works most positively, creates a group. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 508.

 

Inasmuch as fantasy is not forced and violated by and subjugated to an intellectually preconceived bastard of an idea, it is a legitimate and authentic offspring of the unconscious mind and thus far it provided me with unadulterated information about the things that transcend the writer’s conscious mind. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 509.

 

There is no objection against your reading my volumes on Zarathustra. They have nothing to do with Zarathustra the prophet, of course. And they should be read with criticism, since they are merely notes taken by members of my audience which I never corrected. They certainly contain quite a number of mistakes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 512-514.

 

I find Blake a tantalizing study, since he has compiled a lot of half- or undigested knowledge in his fantasies. According to my idea, they are an artistic production rather than an authentic representation of unconscious processes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 513.

 

I have visited the holy places of Buddhism in India and was profoundly impressed by them, quite apart from my reading of Buddhist literature. If I were an Indian I would definitely be a Buddhist. But in the West we have different presuppositions. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 538.

 

No Hindu pantheon lies behind us, instead we have a Judeo-Christian background and a Mediterranean culture, consequently different questions await an answer. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 538.

 

Buddha would settle our account too early, and then it would go with us as it did when we European barbarians had that sudden arid shattering collision with the ripest fruit of antiquity-Christianity-not to the advantage of our inner development. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 538.

 

But the ground-plan of these images [Archetypal] is universal and must be assumed to be pre-existent, since it can be demonstrated in the dreams of small children or uneducated persons who could not possibly have been influenced by tradition. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 538.

 

Thus the archetype as a phenomenon is conditioned by place and time, but on the other hand it is an invisible structural pattern independent of place and time, and like the instincts proves to be an essential component of the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 539.

 

Do not forget that the original meaning of all letters and numbers was a magical one! Hence the “perils of the soul.”  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 529.

 

It is very important for your mental health that you should on the one hand concern yourself with psychic material but on the other hand should do so as systematically and accurately as possible, other-wise you are running a dangerous risk. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 528.

 

I too am in a retrospective phase and am occupying myself, for the first time in 25 years, thoroughly with myself, collecting my old dreams and putting them together. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 516.

 

I am like an old car with 2 50,000 km. on its back that still can’t shake off the memory of its 20 horsepower. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 515-516.

 

Nevertheless, I console myself with the thought that only a fool expects wisdom.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 515-516.

 

There have been so many pupils of mine who have fabricated every sort of rubbish from what they took over from me. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 518.

 

If Neumann recommends the “inner voice” as the criterion of ethical behaviour instead of the Christian conscience, this is in complete agreement with the Eastern view that in everybody’s heart there dwells a judge who knows all his evil thoughts. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 519.

 

I only wish the Christians of today could see for once that what they stand for is not Christianity at all but a god-awful legalistic religion from which the founder himself tried to free them by following his voice and his vocation to the bitter end. Had he not done so there would never have been a Christianity. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 521.

 

When I came to Zurich, the most materialistic city of Switzerland, there was nobody ready-made for my needs. I then shaped some for me.  They were meant for this experience.  One could see it from their dreams.   ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 517.

 

One’s anxiety always points out our task.  If you escape it you have lost a piece of yourself, and a most problematic piece at that, with which the Creator of things was going to experiment in His unforeseeable ways.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 517

 

The combination of priest and medicine man is not so impossible as you seem to think.  They are based upon a common archetype, which will assert its right provided your inner development will continue as hitherto. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 517

 

I spent two delightful evenings with William James alone and I was tremendously impressed by the clearness of his mind and the complete absence of intellectual prejudices. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 531

 

We spent a very interesting week in Dr. Putnam’s camp in the Adirondacks and continued to be bewildered by the peculiar ways and ideas of the many native guests at that camp. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 532.

 

The unbeliever knows as well as anybody else that this world is in a frightful mess and always was. This knowledge alone has probably never yet prompted any modern man to believe. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 216.

 

Misery does not always teach prayer by any means but far more often cursing, violence, and criminality. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 216.

 

That collective effects also occur is shown by the amazing success of the Oxford Movement. My own personal view is that this is merely a “Psychology of Crowds” with a prognosis to match. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 216.

 

A Church that has only the support of the masses can hardly be distinguished from the State.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 217.

 

There were and there are simply not enough doctors who have any reliable training in psychotherapy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 543.

 

You know what my attitude is to the unconscious. There is no point in delivering oneself over to it to the last drop. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 239

 

In my view it is absolutely essential always to have our consciousness well enough in hand to pay sufficient attention to our reality, to the Here and Now. Otherwise we are in danger of being overrun by an unconscious which knows nothing of this human world of ours. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 240.

 

The unconscious can realize itself only with the help of consciousness and under its constant control.  At the same time consciousness must keep one eye on the unconscious and the other focused just as clearly on the potentialities of human existence and human relationships. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 240.

 

We live in so many lives and so many lives live in us. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 440.

 

Above all, this is the day when I must remember with gratitude all the persevering and self-sacrificing work you [Jolande Jacobi] have done throughout the years to spread and develop my ideas. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 551.

 

But I am fully persuaded that if you settled a Siberian tribe for a few hundred years in Switzerland, regular Appenzellers would come out in the end. It is probably a matter of something like psychic mimicry. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 538.

 

I don’ t hold it against the Swiss for being officially one of the most unspiritual nations in Europe, on the contrary I sympathize, since their spirituality consists in their fear of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 341.

 

Then the spirit comes in the form of the devil, as the cruel fate of Germany shows. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 341.

 

But this does not prevent us from being continually licked round by the flames of hell. All of us have to atone, inwardly and outwardly, for this guilt of unconsciousness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 342.

 

The Catholic Church arranges the codification of memories and the lessons of history so much better.  The conservation of so much classical paganism is of inestimable value. Therefore the Catholic is the Christian Church par excellence. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 340.

 

Your idea about the image of the medicine-man being the everlasting model for the impressive doctor is quite correct. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 301.

 

Like the physician who attended me, Dr. Haemmerl, he died on the eve of his fame. ~Carl Jung on Heinrich Zimmer, Letters Vol. 1, Page 345.

 

The quiet meditativeness that radiates from the fate you have described is rather like a verse from a hymn-book which one unexpectedly comes across again after 50 years. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 297.

 

The classic compulsion neurosis is an exception in that it is always due to a latent psychosis, which is also the reason why it is uncurable. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 299.

 

About God himself I have asserted nothing, because according to my premise nothing whatever can be asserted about God himself. All such assertions refer to the psychology of the God-image. Their validity is therefore never metaphysical but only psychological. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 294.

 

…it is advisable to approach every illness from the psychological side as well, because this may be extraordinarily important for the healing process. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 375.

 

When these two aspects [physical and psychological] work together, it may easily happen that the cure takes place in the intermediate realm, in other words that it consists of a complexio oppositorum, like the lapis. In this case the illness is in the fullest sense a stage of the individuation process….  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 375.

 

The feeling of inner detachment and isolation is not in itself an abnormal phenomenon but is normal in the sense that consciousness has withdrawn from the phenomenal world and got outside time and space. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 240.

 

As long as it is so difficult for us to understand the secrets of an atom or of the living protoplasm, we are surely not fit to touch upon a question like that of a continuation of life beyond material visibility.  We don’t even understand it when it is in matter, how could we hope to have any insight into it without matter? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 242.

 

I also don’t know whether continuation of life beyond earthly existence would be a good or bad thing. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 241.

 

In such big matters I always argue that we are here and now and whatever the future here and now is will be seen when it is there. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 241.

 

Where the road branches off towards infinite multiplicity it has come to a stop in me and I have preferred the footpath.  Since then I have lost all desire to speak of multiplicity because simplicity seems to me so much more useful. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 314.

 

We have all become “prisoners of God” miraculously without knowing it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 315.

 

I had almost lost the courage to publish this farrago. ~Carl Jung referring to Mysterium Coniunctionis, Letters Vol. 1, Page 343.

 

I’m pretty certain that psoriasis is a psychological disease, though I’m not able to establish a specific psychological cause for it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 294

 

These psychological skin diseases seem to be nothing else than a sort of psychological perspiration. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 294.

 

He [Hitler] really is the incarnation of the German’s psychopathic inferiority, which also accounts for the German’s feeling of national inferiority. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 367.

 

Why aren’t they told betimes that the “prince of this world” and lord of the air” takes good care that the tastier morsels are snapped up by the wicked ones they envy so much, and that marriage is not the end but the beginning of the romance? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 370.

 

That you have picked on me, of all people, as a speaker arouses very mixed feelings, because the problem of love seems to me a monster of a mountain which, for all my experience, has always soared to still greater heights -which, I thought I had almost reached the top. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 39.

 

And yet you are quite right when you say that the problem of love is the most important in human life.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 38.

 

I simply cannot conceive that there is anything Christian about churches whose main motive is division. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 246.

 

It is remarkable how people can act so dumb when dealing with inner figures. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 246.

 

I would not be surprised if one day we saw a far-reaching agreement between the basic formulations of psychology and physics. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 246.

 

To begin with I did not have the feeling at all that I was guilty of plagiarism with my [anima/animus] theory, but in the last 5 years it has become more and more uncanny as I have discovered quite suspicious traces of it also in the old alchemists, and now the mischief seems complete since it turns out that I was discovered already in the 18th century. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 248.

 

It is lovely to hear the word “friend” from you. Fate seems to have apportioned to us the role of two piers which support the bridge between East and West. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 66.

 

Please give X. my best greetings and tell him-because his love is all too easily injured-he should meditate on Paul’s words in the Epistle to the Corinthians: “Love endureth all things.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 120.

 

Anyone who solved the conflict for you would have got the better of you, for he would rob you of a reward on which all self-respect and manliness are ultimately grounded. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 121.

 

If you need human help, there are enough simple folk who from the simplicity of their hearts could give you the support you need. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 121.

 

Beyond that I have had experiences which are, so to speak, “ineffable,” “secret” because they can never be told properly and because nobody  can understand them (I don’t know whether I have even  approximately understood them myself), “dangerous” because 99% of humanity would declare l was mad if they heard such things from me, “catastrophic” because the prejudices aroused by their telling  might block other people’s way to a living and wondrous mystery, “taboo”  because they are “Holy”  protected by “Fear of the Gods” as faithfully described by Goethe:

 

Shelter gives deep cave.

Lions around us stray,

Silent and tame they rove, And sacred honors pay To the holy shrine of love. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 141.

 

A genuine and proper ethical development cannot abandon Christianity but must grow up within it, must bring to fruition its hymn of love, the agony and ecstasy over the dying and resurgent god the mystic power of the wine, the awesome anthropophagy of the Last Supper-only this ethical development can serve the vital forces of religion. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 18.

 

I think we must give it time to infiltrate into people from many centers, to revivify among intellectuals a feeling for symbol and myth, ever so gently to transform Christ back into the soothsaying god of the vine, which he was, and in this way absorb those ecstatic instinctual forces of Christianity for the one purpose of making the cult and the sacred myth what they once were a drunken feast of joy where man regained the ethos and holiness of an animal. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 18.

 

The ethical problem of sexual freedom really is enormous and worth the sweat of all noble souls. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 18.

 

The feminine mind is the earth waiting for the seed. That is the meaning of the transference. Always the more unconscious person gets spiritually fecundated by the more conscious one. Hence the guru in India. This is an age old truth. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 172.

 

As soon as certain patients come to me for treatment, the type of dream changes. In the deepest sense we all dream not out of ourselves but out of what lies between us and the other. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 172.

 

Marriage is indeed a brutal reality, yet the experimentum crucis of life.  I hope you learn to endure and not to struggle against the suppressing necessities of fate. Only thus you remain in the centre. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 172.

 

There always are and there always will be the two standpoints, the standpoint of the social leader who, if he is an idealist at all, seeks salvation in a more or less complete suppression of the individual, and the leader of minds who seeks improvement in the individual only. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 174.

 

Equally, psychological enlightenment after a psychotic attack can be extraordinarily helpful in some circumstances.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 371.

 

I am not convinced that schizophrenia is absolutely fatal any more than tuberculosis is. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 371.

 

Like neurosis, psychosis in its inner course is a process of individuation, but one that is usually not joined up with consciousness and therefore runs its course in the unconscious as an Ouroboros. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 371.

 

Hence I am all for the psychotherapist calmly acknowledging that he treats and cures neither with diet nor pills nor with the surgeon’s knife. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 180.

 

Discovery of the unconscious means an enormous spiritual task, which must be accomplished if we wish to preserve our civilization. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 537.

 

A genuine and proper ethical development cannot abandon Christianity but just grow up within it, must bring to fruition its hymn of love, the agony and ecstasy over the dying and resurgent god/ the mystic power of the wine, the awesome anthropophagy of the Last Supper-only this ethical development can serve the vital forces of religion. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 18.

 

Not being a prophet, it is impossible for me to predict where the world is going to. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 18.

 

There are doctrines which suit the Indians themselves very well but which one cannot even mention to a European because they provoke the most violent misunderstandings. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 160.

 

You seem to forget that I am first and foremost an empiricist, who was led to the question of Western and Eastern mysticism only for empirical reasons. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 195.

 

Dr. Meier has drawn my attention to your short review of Rosenberg’s book. For anyone who knows Jewish history, and in particular Hasidism, Rosenberg’s assertion that the Jews despise mysticism is a highly regrettable error. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 238.

 

Owing to rather obvious reasons Protestant theologians are rather reticent and they don’t know yet whether I should be condemned as a heretic or depreciated as a mystic. As you know, mysticism and hereticism enjoy about the same bad reputation in Protestantism. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 382.

 

The individual is all-important as he is the carrier of life, and his development and fulfillment are of paramount significance. It is vital for each living being to become its own entelechia and to grow into that which it was from the very beginning. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 19.

 

I positively do not believe that Christianity is the only and the highest manifestation of the truth. There is at least as much truth in Buddhism and in other religions too. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 127.

 

I only wish the theologians would accept the Kabbala and India and China as well so as to proclaim still more clearly how God reveals himself. If in the process Christianity should be relativized up to a point, this would be ad majorem Dei gloriam [for the greater glory of God] and would do no harm to Christian doctrine. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 392.

 

Your medical man is a stupid shitbag who ought to become a psychiatrist so that he can be better acquainted with X., whose sister I saved from the madhouse. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 65.

 

Hypertrophy of intellectual intuition” is a diagnosis I would apply also to Nietzsche and Schopenhauer and many others.  I myself am one-sided in this respect.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 64

 

But we must see where we stand, otherwise we are immoral illusionists. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 65.

 

And what if this has no roots in the earth? If it is not a house of stone where the fire of God can dwell, but a wretched straw hut that flares up and vanishes? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 65.

 

One must be able to suffer God. That is the supreme task for the carrier of ideas. He must be the advocate of the earth. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 65

 

Zen is a true goldmine for the needs of the Western “psychologist.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 128

 

My acquaintance with the classical works of the Far East has given me no end of support in my psychological endeavours. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 128

 

Seldom in my analytical work have I been so struck by the “beauty” of neurosis as with this patient. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 5.

 

For Christmas my wife gave me a really superb photograph of Freud, ca. 12 x 20 cm.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 6.

 

I once said in the seminar it would be by no means impossible that the next savior might be a coloured man for the better humiliation of the white man’s spiritual inflation.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 81.

 

His [Freud] is the honour of having discovered the first archetype, the Oedipus complex. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 525

 

I am only continuing what Freud began and I often regret that the Freudian school have not known how to develop their master’s fortunate discovery. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 536

 

There are indeed few authors, as you yourself have probably observed, who could wring from themselves an objective evaluation of my work. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 555

 

Can man adopt any standpoint outside the psyche? He may assert that he can, but the assertion does not create a point outside, and were he there he would have no psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 556

 

Because it is tied to the timeless, the inferior function never wants to affirm the world of the moment, the world of time, since it ·would rather cling on to timelessness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 94

 

The Jahrbuch affair is a private matter to be settled between myself and Freud. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 28

 

But inner successes count more with me than the howling of the mob. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 28

 

I shall soon be able to give you news of Deuticke and Freud, if the latter does not deem it beneath his papal dignity to answer me. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 28

 

There might be a reason for such a sudden death in youth. Anyhow he did not know that he died. He vanished at the moment of joy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 45

 

Perhaps other centuries will, in which case I am thankful to the Creator that man doesn’t live for 200 years, otherwise he would suddenly find himself in an age in which he would choke to death. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 114-115

 

Death is a faithful companion of life and follows it like its shadow. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 34.

 

We have still to understand how very much wanting to live = wanting to die. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 34.

 

Yes, it is true, such a death and such suffering seem to be pointless if one assumes that this life is the acme of all existence. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 127

 

I have seen quite a number of people who died when they had reached the most they could. Obviously then the measure of their life was fulfilled, everything said and everything done and nothing remained. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 127

 

The answer to human life is not to be found within the limits of human life. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 127

 

Oh, I quite agree with you, intellect is a great sorcerer: it can make even itself disappear. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 134

 

The ego, therefore, is rather a find or an experience and not a creation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 254

 

We rather might say: the empirical existence of an ego is a condition through which continuous consciousness becomes possible. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 255.

 

But I cannot say that material things or spiritual things in themselves are of psychic nature, although it may be that there is no other kind of existence but a psychic one. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 255.

 

India, it seems to me, is still convinced of the possibility of metaphysical assertions. Perhaps she is right and perhaps not. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 255

 

Even as a child I had alchemical insights which would sound much more astonishing than anything I said about them in my libido book. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 275

 

James Hillman was asked by interviewer Cliff Bostock what he thought of Noll’s books on Jung. I hate them, Hillman replied. I think he’s a shit.  ~James Hillman: Therapy and the Image, Creative Loafing

 

You rightly emphasize that man in my view is enclosed in the psyche (not in his psyche). ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 556

 

When I was 3 years old I had my first anima-experience, the woman that was not my mother. It means a lot that escapes me for the time being. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 493

 

I would ask you to find the little book [Septem Sermones ad Mortuos,] a discreet resting place in your writing desk. I don’t want a profane hand to touch my memory of those limpid nights. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 34

 

I am essentially an empiricist and have discovered to my cost that when people do not understand me they think I have seen visions. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 122

 

Shame is a soul eating emotion. ~Carl Jung (purportedly; Citation Needed)

 

My mother drew my attention to Faust when I was about 15 years old. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 88.

 

Faust is out of this world and therefore it transports you; it is as much the future as the past and therefore the most living present. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 88.

 

The second part of it, the secretary-bird and the snake, has been correctly interpreted, in spite of the fact that the snake is not exactly Kundalini because the Kundalini serpent actually dissolves into light. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 95.

 

I’m terribly sorry X. has to suffer from cancer, in her case cancer really comes too early and it is a mean way of killing people anyhow. But nature is horrible in many respects. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 438.

 

… When I treat Catholics who are suffering from neurosis I consider it my duty to lead them back to the bosom of the Church where they belong. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 191

 

Hegel seems to me a romantic thinker in contrast to Kant and hence a typical child of his time; and as a romantic he is already on the way to psychology. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 194

 

The actual persecution of the Jews in Germany is causing so much hatred that it is almost impossible for the smaller countries to keep their organization together because we are far outnumbered by the Germans. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 202.

 

Did you never ask yourself who my analyst is? Yet, when it comes to the last issue, we must be able to stand alone vis a vis the unconscious for better or worse.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 459.

 

We live not only inwardly, but also outwardly. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 455

 

So long as you keep to the physical side of the world, you can say pretty well anything that is more or less provable without incurring the prejudice of being unscientific, but if you touch on the psychological problem the little man, who also goes in for science, gets mad. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 177.

 

A “scream” is always just that – a noise and not music. ~ Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 107.

 

I confess I am afraid of a long drawn-out suffering. It seems to me as if I am ready to die, although as it looks to me some powerful thoughts are still flickering like lightnings in a summer night. Yet they are not mine, they belong to God, as everything else which bears mentioning.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 450.

 

It happens very often that your memory fails you in an almost diabolical way. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 262

 

For what we are stuck with we have a certain responsibility, namely for the way we act towards it, but not for the fact that it exists. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 193

 

Analysis is not only a “diagnosis” but rather an understanding and a moral support in the honest experimental attempt one calls “life.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol I, Page 47.

 

The transcendent function is not something one does oneself; it comes rather from experiencing the conflict of opposites. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 269

 

Eastern yoga is based upon man as he really is.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 97.

 

If I understand anything of the I Ching, then I should say it is the book that teaches you your own way and the all-importance of it. Not in vain has the book been the secret treasure of the sages. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 201

 

It may be said in passing that Chinese science is based on the principle of synchronicity, or parallelism in time, which is naturally regarded by us as superstition. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 178

 

With our human knowledge we always move in the human sphere, but in the things of God we should keep quiet and not make any arrogant assertions about what is greater than ourselves. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 125.

 

Belief as a religious phenomenon cannot be discussed. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 125.

 

It seems to me, however, that when belief enters into practical life we are entitled to the opinion that it should be coupled with the Christian virtue of modesty, which does not brag about absoluteness but brings itself to admit the unfathomable ways of God which have nothing to do with the Christian revelation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 125.

 

God has never spoken to man except in and through the psyche, and the psyche understands it and we experience it as something psychic. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 98

 

God wants to be born in the flame of man’s consciousness, leaping ever higher. And what if this has no roots in the earth?  If it is not a house of stone where the fire of God can dwell, but a wretched straw hut that flares up and vanishes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 65-66

 

The unconscious is on no account an empty sack into which the refuse of consciousness is collected, as it appears to be in Freud’s view; it is the whole other half of the living psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 143.

 

Your destiny is the result of the collaboration between the conscious and the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 283.

 

One can only say that it is advisable to approach every illness from the psychological side as well, because this may be extraordinarily important for the healing process. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 429

 

The materialistic premise is that the physical process causally determines the psychic process. The spiritualistic  premise is the reverse of this. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 366.

 

Regarding organic illness (accidents, injuries, etc.) it can be stated with certainty that these things do at least have psychological syndromes, i.e., there is a concomitant psychic process which can sometimes also have an aetiological significance, so that it looks as though the illness were a psychic arrangement. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 429

 

I am indeed convinced that creative imagination is the only primordial phenomenon accessible to us, the real Ground of the psyche, the only immediate reality. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 60

 

All the difficulties you overcome in such a fantasy are symbolic expressions of psychological difficulties in yourself, and inasmuch as you overcome them in your imagination you also overcome them in your psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 109.

 

Switch off your noisy consciousness and listen quietly inwards and look at the images that appear before your inner eye, or hearken to the words which the muscles of your speech apparatus are trying to form. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 82

 

I can’t wait for the dissertation “How is Death Possible?” or “The Philosophical Foundations of Death.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 273.

 

The tension between above and below [In Ancient Egypt] was undoubtedly extreme, hence the opposites  could be held together only by means of equally rigid forms. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 259

 

The “duality” of the ruler is based on the primitive belief that the placenta is the brother of the new-born child, which as such often accompanies him throughout life in ghostly fashion, since it dies early and is ceremonially buried. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 259-260

 

The ka is probably a descendant of the placenta. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 260

 

The tension between above and below in ancient Egypt is in my opinion the real source of the Near Eastern saviour figures, whose patriarch is Osiris. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 260

 

The purpose of nearly all rebirth rites is to unite the above with the below. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 260

 

On the primitive level the totemistic rite of renewal is always a reversion to the half animal, half human condition of prehistoric times. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 260

 

But as you can see from the I Ching, heaven sometimes separates from the earth, thus producing a disorderly and unfavourable state of affairs. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 261

 

The possibility of the deepest insight existed at all times, but we were always too far away from it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 274.

 

A true understanding would say that there is no ground to cover and therefore no movement through space, but an inner awareness which cannot be expressed in spatial categories. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 275

 

All the same, I can very well imagine that for Jews living in Palestine the direct influence of the surroundings brings out the chthonic and ancient Jewish element in a much more pregnant form. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 251

 

It is clear that the devil has been up to his tricks again. As soon as one notices that, one should say no more but withdraw into oneself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 252

 

Since we are bilingual in Switzerland my name is “Carl” as well as “Charles” (French), so there was not much of a mistake. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 219

 

It is true that I have insisted upon the difference between Jewish and Christian psychology since 1917, but Jewish authors have done the same long ago as well as recently. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 219

 

I am no anti-Semite. From all this I gained neither honours nor money, but I am glad that I could be of service to those in need. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 219

 

I have as little need to convince myself of how good the Catholic Church is for very many people. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 198

 

I have always known this as I had the advantage of a Christian education and have consequently never felt isolated or dried up. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 198

 

I am sincerely happy to know that you have found the atmosphere that agrees with you and that the meaning of the nearly two-thousand-year-old Christian religion has dawned upon you.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 198

 

It is a downright lie to quote me as saying that Jews are dishonest in analysis. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 161

 

The mere fact that I speak of a difference between Jewish and Christian psychology suffices to allow anyone to voice the prejudice that I am an anti-Semite. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 161

 

I have included in it an essay by a Jewish author on the psychology of the Old Testament, just to annoy the Nazis and all those who have decried me as an anti-Semite. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 163

 

I have the need to tell you once again of the special joy I felt yesterday evening when I saw how close we are in spirit to one another in our different ways. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 33

 

I would like to take this opportunity to rectify the error that I come from the Freudian school. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 122

 

I am a pupil of Bleuler’s and my experimental researches had already won me a name in science when I took up the cudgels for Freud and opened the discussion in real earnest in 1905. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 122

 

I am turning over and over in my mind the problem of antiquity. It’s a hard nut! ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 99

 

I have an idea that the Dionysian frenzy was a backwash of sexuality, a backwash whose historical significance has been insufficiently appreciated, essential elements of which overflowed into Christianity but in another compromise formation.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 15

 

I don’t know whether I am writing you banalities or hieroglyphics. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 16

 

I found something very similar in Hindus, namely an extension or extensibility of consciousness into the subconscious mind which is not to be found or is at least very rare with non-Jews. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 223

 

There is a number of Jewish doctors who have studied with me, but the reason why you haven’t discovered them is that they are undiscoverable on account of their fear of being recognized as Jungians. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 224

 

As a matter of fact my first and most gifted pupils were Jews. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 224

 

One risks being labelled as anti-Semite or pro-Semite without being heard at all. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 224

 

I have not the faintest idea what “psyche” is in itself, yet, when I come to think and speak of it, I must speak of my abstractions, concepts, views, figures, knowing that they are our specific illusions. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 57

 

We have no idea of absolute reality, because “reality” is always something “observed.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 57

 

Jesus wants not to succumb to the temptation; then, thanks to the function that results from every conflict, a symbol appears: it is the idea of the Kingdom of Heaven, a spiritual  kingdom rather than a material one. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 268

 

Two things are united in this symbol, the spiritual attitude of Christ and the devilish desire for power. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 268

 

Thus the encounter of Christ with the devil is a classic example of the transcendent function. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 268

 

You can find a detailed exposition of the transcendent function in Goethe’s Faust. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 268

 

The transcendent function is not something one does oneself; it comes rather from experiencing the conflict of opposites. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 269

 

In a certain sense the symbol has a life of its own which guides the subject and eases his task; but it cannot be invented or fabricated because the experience of it does not depend on our will. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 269

 

There can be no doubt that Dr. X.’s statements are projections of his “Jewish” anima. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 308

 

Watch your tongue, for it can sting. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 309

 

First we had (at the end of Oct.) a regrettable accident: my wife fell in the corridor (slipping on a carpet) and  broke her right arm in the shoulder a nasty fracture indeed. I had her in the hospital for 2 months. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 539

 

This privatio boni business is odious to me on account of its dangerous consequences: it causes a negative inflation of man, who can’t help imagining himself, if not as a source of the [Evil], at least as a great destroyer, capable of devastating God’s beautiful creation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 540

 

I make no metaphysical assertions and even in my heart I am no Neo-Manichean; on the contrary I am deeply convinced of the unity of the self, as demonstrated by the mandala symbolism. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 541.

 

Hitler and Stalin go on representing a mere “accidental lack of perfection.” [within Privatio boni]  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 541.

 

Evil is-psychologically speaking-terribly real. It is a fatal mistake to diminish its power and reality even merely metaphysically. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 541

 

Evil verily does not decrease by being hushed up as a non-reality or as mere negligence of man. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 541.

 

God is the mystery of all mysteries, a real Tremendum. Good and Evil are psychological relativities And as such quite real, yet one does not know what they are. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 541.

 

It seems to be the hierosgamos motif: the cut-down tree has been brought into the cave of the mother, in this case: the hold of a ship. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 566.

 

If the miracle of the Assumptio is not a living and present spiritual event, but consists of a physical phenomenon that is reported or only believed to have happened some 2000 years ago, then it has nothing to do with the spirit, or just as little as any parapsychological stunt of today. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 567.

 

A physical fact never proves the existence and reality of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 567.

 

It is more than probable that the idea of the Assumptio did not begin its real life in apostolic times but  considerably later. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 567.

 

The miracle of the Assumptio obviously began to operate noticeably from the VI century onwards only. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 567.

 

If the Assumptio  means anything, it means a spiritual fact which can be formulated as the integration of the female principle into the Christian conception of the Godhead. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 567.

 

If the Assumptio is an essentially concrete historical fact, then it is no more a living spiritual experience. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 567.

 

When insisting on historicity you risk not only the most awkward and unanswerable questions, but you also help everybody to tum his eyes away from the essential idea to the realistic crudity of a merely physical phenomenon, as it is only physical phenomena that happen in a distinct place at a distinct time, whereas the spirit is eternal and everywhere. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 568.

 

If we designate the Assumptio as a fact in time and space we ought to add that it happens really in eternity and everywhere, and what we perceive of it through our senses is corruptible matter, i.e., we don’t see it, but we infer or believe in the idea. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 568.

 

In addition, a good acquaintance with the fundamental facts of the unconscious is to be found in Paracelsus’ esoteric doctrine, and it is very important, particularly for the treatment of neuroses, to be acquainted with the symbolic forms that are expressive of pathogenic contents. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 565

 

Paracelsus passed on his knowledge of the fundamental facts of the unconscious to his pupils (and especially to Gerard Dorn) but they were lost later, thanks to the rise of rationalism and scientific materialism. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 565

 

One’s 75th birthday is a moment when one looks back with one laughing and one lachrymose eye on the long path one has left behind, hoping also that it will be of some benefit to one’s fellows. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 562.

 

The unio mystica is more a dissolution of the ego in the divine Ground-a very different experience. [from the Hieros Gamos] ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 544.

 

Not only am I deeply indebted to psychiatry, but I have always remained close to it inwardly, since from the very beginning one general problem engrossed me: From what psychic stratum do the immensely impressive ideas found in schizophrenia originate? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 562.

 

It is generally overlooked that the psyche cannot of necessity be based only on the instinct of sexuality, but rests on the totality of the instincts, and that this basis is only a biological foundation and not the whole edifice. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 564.

 

Reducing the total psyche to its darkest beginnings not only devalues it but shifts the problem on to an Inadmissibly simple plane, rather as if one were to reduce man to a cell, which, highly complicated though it is, even in the form of an amoeba is constructed very much more simply than a man. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 564.

 

If you take the concept of prayer in its widest sense and if you include also Buddhist contemplation And Hindu meditation (as being equivalent to prayer), one can say that it is the most universal form of religious or philosophical concentration of the mind and thus not only one of the most original but also the most frequent means to change the condition of mind. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 558.

 

I would only like to draw your attention to one small discrepancy: seen in psychological perspective, the concept of the self cannot be described as a summum bonum. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 529

 

Your [J.B. Rhine’s] experiments have established the fact of the relativity of time, space, and matter with reference to the psyche beyond any doubt. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 495

 

My chief concern is the theoretical problem of the connection between the psyche and the time-space-continuum of microphysics. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 495

 

It is not only possible, but for certain reasons quite probable, that the collective unconscious coincides in a strange and utterly inconceivable way with objective events. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 533.

 

Owing to rather obvious reasons Protestant theologians are rather reticent and they don’t know yet whether I should be condemned as a heretic or depreciated as a mystic. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 382.

 

To give you an idea: I do my own cooking and chop my own wood and raise my own potatoes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 419.

 

I always had a sort of hunch that whatever I had learnt about the unconscious was due to a somewhat similar but internal catastrophe in my psychic neighborhood and that the war outside was a repetition on the collective scale. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 380.

 

Although I was fully aware of the most incredible powers of evil lurking in the depths, I never expected such a gigantic outburst of abysmal horrors. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 380.

 

Parapsychology plays a subtle part in psychology because it lurks everywhere behind the surface of things. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 379.

 

I am always profoundly impressed by the riches of Greek mythology, which have hitherto been presented so paltrily. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 376.

 

Nor can one cite the supposed planetary arrangement of electrons round the atomic nucleus, as this is only a controversial model by means of which certain physicists have envisioned the mathematical relation between electrons and the atomic nucleus. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 533.

 

Owing to rather obvious reasons Protestant theologians are rather reticent and they don’t know yet whether I should be condemned as a heretic or depreciated as a mystic. As you know, mysticism and hereticism enjoy about the same bad reputation in Protestantism. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 382.

 

I have plumb forgotten my Greek as I have to read mainly Latin texts, Greek ones being something of a rarity in alchemy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 305.

 

Kant’s categorical imperative is of course a philosophical touching up of a psychic fact which, as you have quite correctly seen, is unquestionably a manifestation of the anima. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 305.

~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 305

 

My anima constantly repeats the saying: “The power of truth is great and will prevail”. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 305-306

 

Particularly here in Switzerland we have the feeling that we can only live vertically. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 303

 

When we go on holiday my wife and I push a two-wheeled cart ahead of us with the luggage, which is not so sad but uncommonly amusing. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 303

 

Meanwhile I would like an older edition of the Vulgate and Septuagint and should be grateful if you could get these texts for me. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 324

 

Depending on the peculiar nature of the case the most primitive therapeutic methods can achieve even better results than the most refined. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 324

 

Nor is it the task of theory to paint a picture of life, but rather to create a workmanlike language which is satisfied with conventional signs. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 324

 

Your dream unquestionably refers to the archetypal problem of the extrusion of the soul from the body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 306

 

One is forced to conclude ‘that in your case the soul is only loosely seated in your body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 306

 

However, the friendly lion in the dream seems to indicate that the looseness of the soul is not exactly desirable, since the lion compensates your condition in a very obvious way: the Zurich lion  represents your localized instinct, firmly rooted in your earth, just as the lion’s soul-as with all animals -is securely fixed in its body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 306

 

Moreover you seem prone to eczema, which not infrequently indicates that one is not properly inside one’s body. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 306

 

If you devote yourself, intentionally and intellectually, to dangerous problems such as the squaring of the circle, this is yet another indication of a tendency to get away from the body, because this problem symbolizes an irrational state of wholeness which cannot be contrived but can only be experienced. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 306.

 

It is as though you were defecating yourself out of the anus, and this is a topsy-turvy procedure since you really ought to be producing yourself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 306.

 

Somewhere there is a place where you are not making yourself felt, not creating yourself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 307

 

You are squeezing yourself out behind, so to speak, acting not in accordance with your instinct but in accordance with reflections or inclinations which are the very reverse of instinctively correct actions. You jump out of your skin, but backwards. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 307

 

The valley of darkness has to be gone through in reality and not in fantasy, otherwise one could spare oneself an infinite number of unpleasantnesses which are nevertheless important for life. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 307

 

I think, therefore, that if you keep as closely as possible to concrete reality and try to create yourself there and illuminate the darkness, you will be on a more normal road than when you engross yourself in squaring the circle as a substitute. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 307

 

Best thanks for your New Year letter, with its welcome news that the pebbles ejected by the volcano on whose edge I am sitting have landed somewhere. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 309

 

You have hit the mark absolutely: all of a sudden and with terror it became clear to me that I have taken over Faust as my heritage, and moreover as the advocate and avenger of Philemon and Baucis, who, unlike Faust the superman, are the hosts of the gods in a ruthless and godforsaken age. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 309

 

I would give the earth to know whether Goethe himself knew why he called the two old people “Philemon” and “Baucis.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 310

 

I often mention your [J.B. Rhine] work to people over here and I think it is of the greatest importance for the understanding of certain peculiar phenomena of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 321

 

In our practical work we come across peculiar telepathic influences which throw a most significant light on the relativity of space and time in our unconscious psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 321-322

 

Hitler himself (from what I heard) is more than half crazy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 278

 

Is it not a nice time when food reigns supreme?  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 325

 

Nothing would be more sterile than to squeeze the whole world into a psychological straitjacket. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 113.

 

You are quite right, the main interest of my work is not concerned with the treatment of neurosis but rather with the approach to the numinous. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 377.

 

Wisdom is not and never has been something for the many, because foolishness forever will be the main thing the world craves for. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 200

 

One shouldn’t attach the dead to the living, otherwise they both get estranged from their proper spheres and are thrown into a state of suffering. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 53

 

All things pass away, graves are the milestones of existence. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 569

 

When you can give up the crazy will to live and when you seemingly fall into a bottomless mist, then the truly real life begins I saw its entrance illuminated by a thousand small flames of coconut oil. I knew I was to enter the temple and I would reach full knowledge. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 357-358

 

But at this moment a messenger from the world (which by then was a very insignificant corner of the universe) arrived and said that I was not allowed to depart and at this moment the whole vision collapsed completely. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 357-358

 

Death is the hardest thing from the outside and as long as we are outside of it.  But once inside you taste of such completeness and peace and fulfillment that you don’t want to return. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 357-358

 

The self in its divinity (i.e., the archetype) is unconscious of itself. It can become conscious only within our consciousness. And it can do that only if the ego stands firm. ~Carl Jung; Letters Vol. 1; 335-336.

 

Psychological treatment cannot rid you of the basic facts of your nature; it can only give you the necessary insight, and only to the extent that you are capable of it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 292.]

 

The ego wants explanation always in order to assert its existence…Try to live without the ego. Whatever must come to you, will come. Don’t worry! …Don’t allow yourself to be led astray by the ravings of the animus…He will try every stunt to get you out of the realization of stillness, which is truly the Self. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1; Page 427.

 

You trust your unconscious as if it were a loving father. But it is nature and cannot be made use of as if it were a reliable human being. It is inhuman and it needs the human mind to function usefully for man’s purposes. Nature is an incomparable guide if you know how to follow her. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 283.

 

…the figures in the unconscious could be explained by a long-lasting primeval matriarchy if only we knew for certain that it ever existed, just as the flood myths could be explained by the myth of Atlantis if only we knew that there ever was an Atlantis. Equally, the contents of the unconscious could be explained by reincarnation if we knew that there is reincarnation. ~ Carl Jung to Baroness Tinti, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 208-209.

 

Accordingly the capacity to nullify space and time must somehow inhere in the psyche, or, to put it another way, the psyche does not exist wholly in time and space. ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume I, Page 256.

 

It is very probable that only what we call consciousness is contained in space and time, and that the rest of the psyche. The unconscious, exists in a state of relative spacelessness and timelessness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume I, Page 256.

 

I realize that under the circumstances you have described you feel the need to see clearly. But your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Without, everything seems discordant; only within does it coalesce into unity. Who looks outside dreams; who looks inside awakes. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 33.

 

On the whole my illness proved to be a most valuable experience which gave me the inestimable opportunity of a glimpse behind the veil. The only difficulty is to get rid of the body, to get quite naked and void of the world and the ego-will. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 355-357

 

For the psyche this means a relative eternality and a relative non-separation from other psyches, or a oneness with them. ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume I, Page 256.

 

Hence there is only one collective unconscious, which is everywhere identical with itself, from which everything psychic takes shape before it is Personalized, modified, assimilated, etc. by external influences.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume I, Page 408.

 

Hence there is only one collective unconscious, which is everywhere identical with itself, from which everything psychic takes shape before it is Personalized, modified, assimilated, etc. by external influences.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 408.

 

Hence there is only one collective unconscious, which is everywhere identical with itself, from which everything psychic takes shape before it is Personalized, modified, assimilated, etc. by external influences.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 408.

 

We are cut off from our earth through more than two thousand years of Christian training. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 96.

 

I’m busy as usual and as often as I can I work in the garden to prepare a field for potatoes ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 288-289.

 

Rightness is not a category that can be applied to religion anyway. Religion consists of psychic realities which one cannot say are right or wrong. Are lice or elephants right or wrong? It is enough that they exist. ~Carl Jung, Letters Volume 1, Page 327.

 

…the fact is that free will only exists within the limits of consciousness. Beyond those limits there is mere compulsion. ~Carl Jung; Letters Volume 1, Page 227

 

Analysis is not only a “diagnosis” but rather an understanding and a moral support in the honest experimental attempt one calls “life.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 47

 

God needs man in to become conscious, just as he needs limitation in time and space.  Let us therefore be for him limitation in time and space an earthly tabernacle.  ~Carl Jung, Letters, Vol 1, Page 65.

 

Jesus-Mani-Buddha-Lao-tse are for me the four pillars of the temple of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Letters, Vol 1, Page 65.

 

Bergson is quite right when he thinks of the possibility of a relatively loose connection between the brain and consciousness, because despite our ordinary experience the connection might be less tight than we suppose.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page  76.

 

There is no reason why one shouldn’t suppose that consciousness could exist detached from a brain. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page  76.

 

It is, as far as I know, the pack of cards [Tarot] originally used by the Spanish gypsies, the oldest cards historically known. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page  77.

 

The Great Mother is impregnated by the loneliness of him that seeks her. ~Carl Jung to Hermann Hesse, Letters Vol 1, Pages 573-574.

 

A good book, like every proper human life, must have an ending. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol 1, Pages 573-574. 

 

Through the self we are plunged into the torrent of cosmic events.  Everything essential happens in the self and the ego functions as a receiver, spectator, and transmitter.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol 1, Pages 325-326.

 

I have never asserted, nor do I think I know, what the unconscious is in itself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 196.

 

It was like dying. I did not want to live and to return into this fragmentary, restricted, narrow, almost mechanical life, where you were subject to the laws of gravity and cohesion, imprisoned in a system of 3 dimensions and whirled along with other bodies in the turbulent stream of time. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 357-358

 

You have paid a salutary tribute to the earth with your illness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 49-50

 

Dreams are always beautiful when the development of the personality has to proceed via the unconscious.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 46-47

 

The neurotic constitution demands a bit more sacrifice and a bit more effort and a bit more patience than does the normal. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 35-36

 

The incest barrier can no more be explained by reduction to the possibility of real incest than the animal cult can be explained by reduction to real bestiality. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 25-27

 

Between Freud’s speaking and writing there is “a gulf fixed” which is very wide. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 13-14

 

It is difficult to understand that there are still Americans who do not realize what the world situation really is. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 301-302

 

I learnt to split stones in the Bollingen quarries and the masons also taught me a lot and I learnt their art relatively quickly with a certain native intelligence. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 168

 

The problem of “anti-Semitism” has been thrown up for the psychotherapists but not for the political daily press. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 154-155

 

Nor was it ever my intention to characterize personalities, for which reason I did not put my description of the types at the beginning of the book; rather I tried to produce a clear conceptual scheme based on empirically demonstrable factors. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 129-130

 

Hence my typology aims, not at characterizing personalities, but at classifying the empirical material in relatively simple and clear categories, just as it is presented to a practising psychologist and therapist. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 129-130

 

I have never thought of my typology as a characterological method and have never applied it in this sense. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 129-130

 

In the last resort every individual alone has to win his battle, nobody else can do it for him. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 127

 

The mythological motifs have never yet been classified, as their name is legion. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 66-67

 

The negative relationship to the mother is always an affront to nature, unnatural. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 52-53

 

Your one-sided spiritual tendency is probably meant, for anyone whose stature requires the size of a continent is not so very far away from Father Heaven (Zeus). ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 52-53

 

But if you want to go your individual way, it is the way you make for yourself, which is never prescribed, which you do not know in advance, and which simply comes into being of itself when you put one foot in front of the other. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 133

 

If you always do the next thing that needs to be done, you will go most safely and sure-footedly along the path prescribed by your unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 133.

 

The fact that astrology nevertheless yields valid results proves that it is not the apparent positions of the stars which work, but rather the times which are measured or determined by arbitrarily named stellar positions. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 139

 

Time thus proves to be a stream of energy filled with qualities and not, as our philosophy would have it, an abstract concept or precondition of knowledge. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 139.

 

One of the most important and difficult tasks in the individuation process is to bridge the distance between people. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 53.

 

In cases of inferior feeling, a trauma very often has pathological consequences in the realm of sensation, e.g., physical pain unaccompanied by feeling. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 54.

 

My exterior is in strange contrast to my spirit. When I am dead, nobody will think that this is the corpse of one with spiritual aspirations. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 59

 

My whole psychology is such that it can be accepted only by someone who is ready for it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 131.

 

I have found over and over again that it is not worthwhile speaking to an unprepared public. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 131.

 

I have heard indirectly how badly it goes with him [X], and from the talk I had with him in Vienna this catastrophic decline could be foreseen, as nobody can defy life’s laws with impunity. Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 120.

 

As you have observed, I am also well aware of the difference between myth and revelation, having concerned myself solely with myths and never with revealed truths. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 123.

 

I have even found that men are far more irrational than animals. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 119

 

The existence of telepathy in time and space is still denied only by positive ignoramuses. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 117.

 

It is clear that timeless and spaceless perceptions are possible only because the perceiving psyche is similarly constituted. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 117.

 

Timelessness and spacelessness must therefore be somehow inherent in its nature, and this in itself permits us to doubt the exclusive temporality of the soul, or if you prefer, makes time and space appear doubtful. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 117.

 

I can only agree with you when you equate St. Francis with the essence of primitive religiosity, but even so a special illumination is needed for a person living in more highly developed centuries to become as simple again as a primitive. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 118

 

Equally I share your conviction that genuine religiosity is the best cure for all psyche suffering. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 118

 

The Catholic Church must hold fast to what still remains from earlier times of living religiosity; I on the contrary must do pioneer work in a world where everything pristine has vanished. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 118

 

There lies the gravamen of the book, [Psychological Types] though most readers have not noticed this because they are first of all led into the temptation of classifying everything typologically, which in itself is a pretty sterile undertaking. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 186.

 

So it is not the case at all that I begin by classifying my patients into types and then give them the corresponding advice, as a colleague of mine whom God has endowed with a peculiar wit once asserted. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 186.

 

I’m busy as usual and I am going to give a seminar at the ETH in spring for the most elementary beginners, i.e., very young students who know nothing whatever. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 187

 

If things are going on like this, I shall in a few years’ time be giving a seminar in a nursery which I think would be still more profitable because this kind of teaching forces me to the utmost simplicity of expression. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 187

 

The feminine mind is pictorial and symbolic and comes close to what the ancients called Sophia. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 189

 

The psoriasis of the anima figure is due to certain contents which the anima has within her, as though in the blood, and which sweat out on the surface. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 189

 

The puerilization of the conscious attitude should not be understood as a regression; it is often necessary in order to produce an unprejudiced, naive, receptive consciousness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 189

 

There are things which are simply incomprehensible to the tough brains of our race and time. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 190

 

Those are the reasons why I prefer not to communicate too many of my experiences. They would confront the scientific world with too upsetting problems. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 190

 

 I would strongly advise you to do this bit of analysis with a woman, since experience has shown that analysis with a man always has an effect on the animus, which for its part loosens up the personality again, whereas analysis with a woman tends on the contrary to have a “precipitating” effect. C.G. Jung ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 190-191

 

I would be very chary of the assumption of “make-believe.” I have good reasons for doubting whether there is such a thing in dreams at all. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 185-186

 

If, on the other hand, people who ordinarily dream very little suddenly get into a phase of dreaming very much, this is a sure sign that an overloading of the unconscious has set in, usually because there is a problematical situation which the dreamer has tended to overlook or has not mastered. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 182

 

As you know, in olden times the ancestral souls lived in pots in the kitchen. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 168

 

Incidentally, if I were a Jew-eater I would hardly bring out books together with Jews as I have just done, or introduce books by Jewish authors. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 167

 

No one is more deeply convinced than I that the Jews are a people with a culture. Between culture and cultural form there is, as we know, an essential difference.  ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 167

 

For many years I’m closely following the progress of mediumistic research, but I must say that I hardly ever came across a more wonderful case of mediumism than the Margery case. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 166

 

It is no pleasure to be well known. You are then like a city on a mountain and cannot remain hidden. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 157

 

Its development in Germany will also be crucial for us. Freud once told me, very rightly: “The fate of psychotherapy will be decided in Germany.” Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 156.

 

What with the hue and cry against me it has been completely forgotten that by far the greatest number of psychotherapists in Germany are Jews. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 156

 

People do not know, nor is it said in public, that I have intervened personally with the regime on behalf of certain Jewish psychotherapists. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 156

 

I am absolutely not an opponent of the Jews even though I am an opponent of Freud’s. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 154.

 

I criticize him [Freud] because of his materialistic and intellectualistic and-last but not least-irreligious attitude and not because he is a Jew. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 154.

 

Infinite nuances are needed if justice is to be done to human beings. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 155.

 

My relation with Germany is very recent and is due to idiotic altruism and not at all to political sentiment. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 155

 

Personally a creative man can be an introvert, but in his work he is an extravert and vice versa. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 301.

 

His [Freud] general way of living was a genuinely introverted style, whereas Adler, whom I met as a young man, being of my age, gave me the impression of a neurotic introvert, in which case there is always a doubt as to the definite type. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 302.

 

As you know, Freud himself was neurotic his life-long. I myself analyzed him for a certain very disagreeable symptom which in consequence of the treatment was cured. That gave me the idea that Freud as· well as Adler underwent a change in their personal type. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 301.

 

Adler, I suppose, was personally never a real introvert, therefore as soon as he had a certain success he began to develop an extraverted behaviour. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 302.

 

As a matter of fact Freud was the far greater mind than Adler. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 302.

 

Either you begin your life with the shadow (putting the wrong foot forward) and later on you continue with your real personality, or vice versa. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 301-302

 

But the task of the Church is not the same as that of psychotherapy. The Church means serving the community, therapy serves the individual. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 235

 

Your honest words will be a thorn in the flesh for many. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 235

 

Very often certain apparently impossible intentions of the shadow are mere threats due to an unwillingness on the part of the ego to enter upon a serious consideration of the shadow. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 234.

 

As a matter of fact, you have to heat up such conflicts until they rage in full swing so that the opposites slowly melt together. It is a sort of alchemistic procedure rather than a rational choice and decision. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 234.

 

Every real solution is only reached by intense suffering. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 247.

 

I myself have personally treated very many Jews and know their psychology in its deepest recesses, so I can recognize the relation of their racial psychology to their religion, but it would be quite beyond me to relate Islam or the ancient Egyptian religion to its devotees as I lack any intimate knowledge of Arab and Egyptian psychology. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 233

 

Your dream is really the stuff artists work with. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 232

 

Action as we know can take place only in the third dimension, and the fourth dimension is that which actually wants to grow into our conscious three-dimensional world. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 232

 

I find him [Kierkegaard ] simply insupportable and cannot understand, or rather, I understand only too well, why the theological neurosis of our time has made such a fuss over him. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 231.

 

It is perfectly clear to me that everything I do is pioneer work which has still to be followed by a real laying of foundations, but there are gratifying signs that others are beginning  to make forays into this territory. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 232.

 

I’m therefore quite willing to help in your attempt in this direction, but I refuse in your own interest to plague myself with your material which is only helpful when you acquire its understanding by your own effort. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 459

 

We are all terribly sorry for England and France. If they should lose the war, we also shall not escape the reign of the Antichrist. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 282

 

I myself am too old to do active service, but I have been asked to “stand for Parliament.” That means, a large group of people seem to want me as a member of the Conseil National (which would be the House of Commons in England.) ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 277.

 

The Germans as far as I know them are partially terrified and partially drunk with blood and victory. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 278.

 

If ever there was a mental epidemic it is the actual mental condition in Germany. Hitler himself (from what I heard) is  more than half crazy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 278.

 

There is not the ghost of a plan for my going to America during the war. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 276

 

We naturally hope not to be implicated in the war, but there is only one conviction in Switzerland, that if it has to be, it will be on the side of the Allies. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 276

 

The symbolic form of love (animus-anima) shrinks from nothing, least of all from sexual union.  Carl Jung, Letters Volume 1, Pages 213-214.

 

There is no doubt and no hesitation; the unanimous conviction in Switzerland is that Germany has lost her national honour to an unspeakable degree, and the Germans inasmuch as they still think know it too. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 276

 

What the public still doesn’t know and can’t get into its head is that the collective man is subhuman, nothing but a beast-man, as was clearly demonstrated by the exquisite bestiality of the young German fighters during the Blitzkrieg in Poland. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 282

 

Any organization in which the voice of the individual is no longer heard is in danger of degenerating into a subhuman monster. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Page 282

 

So for the time being we need not worry about future congresses, delegate meetings, translators, etc. Hitler is reaching his climax and with him the German psychosis. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 275-276

 

Man has to cope with the problem of suffering. The Oriental wants to get rid of suffering by casting it off.  Western man tries to suppress suffering with drugs.  But suffering has to be overcome, and the only way to overcome it is to endure it. We learn that only from him.” [And here he pointed to the Crucified.]  ~ Carl Jung, Letters, Vol 1, Page 236.

 

A political situation is the manifestation of a parallel psychological problem in millions of individuals. This problem is largely unconscious (which makes it a particularly dangerous one!) ~Carl Gustav Jung, Letters, Vol 1, Page 535.

 

The unconscious is useless without the human mind. It always seeks its collective purposes and never your individual destiny. ~Carl Jung; Letters; Vol. 1; Page 283.

 

When the confusion is at its height a new revelation comes, i.e., at the beginning of the fourth month of world history. ~Carl Jung, Letters, Vol. I, Page 12.

I cannot and shall not exclude non-Aryan speakers.  C.G. Jung ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Page 242.

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