Richard L. Evans: Conversations with Jung – YouTube

 

Sex is a playground for lonely scientists. ~Carl Jung; C.G. Jung Speaks; Pages 85-87.

 

With the archetype of the anima, we enter the realm of the gods, or rather, the realm that metaphysics has reserved for itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 9l, Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, Page 28

 

 “He (Carl Jung) saw “a huge round block of stone sitting on a high plateau, and at the foot of the stone were engraved the words: “And this Shall all be a sign unto you of Wholeness and Oneness.”  ~Miguel Serrano, C.G. Jung and Hermann Hesse, Page 104

 

A concrete image is a manifestation requiring space in which the spirit clothes itself in the material in order to draw to man. Images and numbers are doors through which the spiritual can reach man. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 60.

 

Schizophrenics with visions and hallucinations have a better prognosis than those who hear voices. The latter are more enslaved by the unconscious.? ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 63.

 

The announcement of an important truth, even with the best of intentions, can lead to an extraordinary mess. That was the fate of Prometheus. It is therefore important to husband dangerous material very carefully so that first graders do not get hold of dynamite. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 59.

 

The articles of faith of science are: space, time and causality. The fourth is missing and rejected: the pleroma. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 59.

 

Darwin’s idea was discovered in different places simultaneously; it corresponds to a certain pattern in the unconscious. There are indeed many strange and extraordinary natural laws. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 51.

 

He who wishes to take the Kingdom of Heaven by storm, to conquer and eradicate evil by force, is already in the hands of evil. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 47.

 

Before my illness I had often asked myself if I were permitted to publish or even speak of my secret knowledge. I later set it all down in Aion. I realized it was my duty to communicate these thoughts, yet I doubted whether I was allowed to give expression to them. During my illness I received confirmation and I now knew that everything had meaning and that everything was perfect. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 68.

 

The problem of my destiny goes back a hundred and fifty years. Indeed it appeared as early as the twelfth century, as I have now discovered. Formerly I believed it only went back to Goethe’s Faust. (Jung now told the dream of his ancestors in which the last was only able to move his little finger.) The problem that appeared as a question in the twelfth century became my extremely personal destiny. Already Goethe had found an answer a hundred and fifty years ago. My father was so tormented by it that he died at the age of fifty-four. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 67.

 

I suffer from the fact that I can so seldom have a conversation with an adequate partner. The women in my circle understand me, but for women their home, their husband, and their children, come first. Only when this is all taken care of, does a woman still have a little time for the spirit; then it is interesting. Talking with a man, on the other hand, I get a response from the cosmic spheres of the spirit. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 67.

 

It is good to be old in years for it often looks as if we were arriving at the end of the history of our world; or at least that it will get terribly dark before the light can shine again and make it possible to see clearly. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 67.

 

In the Middle Ages the flight to the spiritual world was still necessary. It was meaningful then to want to live spiritually and give little attention to the material, for meaning was directed towards the spirit. But it is meaningful today to want to descend with dignity to the chthonic world. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 47.

 

By “Thy Will” one person may mean only what his unconscious dictates, while another may disregard all his thoughts and aspirations and fatalistically accept all that happens in his outer life. To some people we must say, “You must choose your own way; you must act.” Others have to learn to refrain from acting. Few take both into account, which is why Deus et home is so important.” ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 39.

 

Superman is an inflated ego and a disappearing self. He lacks the spark. What would the rainbow be if it had no dark cloud behind it? ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 63.

 

It seems to me that we are at the end of an era. The splitting of the atom and the nuclear bomb bring us a new view of matter. As physical man cannot develop any further, it would seem that this particular evolution ends with man. Like the caterpillar dissolves and turns into a butterfly, it is conceivable that the physical body of man could change into a more subtle body. It might not be necessary for him to die to be clothed afresh and be transformed. ? ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 63.

 

Analysts and mathematicians both consider themselves infallible; they live with invisible magic cloaks around them. They are both concerned with archetypes. Archetypes are living powers; they are the “thoughts of God.” ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 59.

 

The scientist is prejudiced by reason which acts to hide the world from him. Reality does not lie in statistical averages but in exceptions. There are events which do not obey statistical laws but only those of probability. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 59.

 

The I Ching can change me, if I have the patience to meditate. It is like a wine of noble vintage. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 56.

 

It is possible to participate in the unconscious with other persons, with animals and even with objects, through an unconscious abaissement du niveau mental. Connection is made and something may happen. I may, for example, verbalize what the other person intended saying. But even the clouds, or a glass, can reflect the inner psychic situation. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 51.

 

Matter may be stimulated by the inner psychic process, understood archetypally, to produce something analogous. A latent tension, for example, can manifest itself in creaking wood. Matter plays along with the psychic process. There is a story that says that when Mohammed ascended into Heaven the stone in the Temple of Jerusalem wanted to go too. The archetype manifests itself in the outer world as sympathia. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 51.

 

We should be particularly watchful when synchronous events occur for a numen is then in sight. In a certain mood one notices that the crows fly towards the left. When an archetypal event approaches the sphere of consciousness, it also manifests itself in the outer life. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 51

 

Synchronous events are widely accepted in Chinese philosophy and are the basis of astrology. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 51.

 

When someone is under a grave threat, and the archetypes are constellated, synchronistic situations can arise — events that are independent of him, existing in the outside world. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 51.

 

A marriage is more likely to succeed if the woman follows her own star and remains conscious of her wholeness than if she constantly concerns herself with her husband’s star and his wholeness. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 51.

 

Christ said of Peter who disavowed him, “On this rock I will build my Church.” It is a psychological fact that someone who is disloyal or a liar can be capable of uttering the truth to an extent that we cannot fore see. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 47.

 

The words of the Bible and the sayings of Christ are paradox. We too must be paradox, for only then do we live our lives, only then do we reach completeness and integration of our personalities. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 40.

 

Psychologically the God concept includes every idea of the ultimate, of the first or the last, of the highest or lowest. The name makes no difference. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 44.

 

What does this mean for humanity? What does it mean to say that man dies yet only the risen still live? All these questions may become actual during the next two thousand years, in the era of Aquarius. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 43.

 

If the Nazis had invaded Switzerland during the Second World War, I would have become a Catholic out of protest because the Catholic Church would then have represented the only spiritual power. That is, of course, if I had not been shot first. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 45.

 

Evil is that which obstructs meaningful vitality. It may show itself differently in each case. That which is above by reason of its charity, suppresses that, which is below; then the lower craves what is above. . ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 47.

 

Instead of saying, “God is beyond good and evil,” we can say, “Life is both good and evil.” ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 40.

 

We can only speak of the relativity of good and evil in individual cases. The categories of good and evil cannot be suspended; they are continually alive and cannot be attached to material things. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 47.

 

Some examples of editorial slips made by the Church in the Bible:

“Ye will be as gods!”

“When thou art alone then I am with thee.”

“If thou would ‘st pray enter into thy chamber …”

The parable of the unjust steward. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 45.

 

The Kingdom of Heaven is a primordial condition like Paradise, but it is later in time and cannot be reached by regressing, only be going forward. We do not know whether our present order is final. At another level a new creative solution may be required. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 39.

 

When someone says, in the words of the “Our Father, ” “Thy will be done,” we must find out, if he is capable of taking both the inside and the outside, the ego and the world, into account. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 36.

 

A religious life presupposes a conscious connection of the inner and outer worlds and it requires a constant, meticulous attention to all circumstances to the best of our knowledge and our conscience. We must watch what the gods ordain for us in the outer world, but as well as waiting for developments in the outer world we must listen to the inner world; both worlds are expressions of God. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 36.

 

When we say “Our Father,” the Father also symbolizes that self which is hidden in Heaven, in the unconscious. The Son (Christ) is the consciously achieved self. The Holy Spirit is the Paraclete promised by Christ in the Words “Ye are as gods,” or “Greater things will be done by you.” ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 35.

 

I do not know whether Karma creates the ego or the ego creates Karma. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 43.

 

The inner man has access to the sense organs of God. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 39.

 

We would call the self a multiple consciousness in God, or a spiritual Olympus, or an inner firmament. Paracelsus already knew this and wrote it for us. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 36.

 

The self is the light of the world; it is the full realization of everything in consciousness. Every animal and every plant is a representation of the self… Thus the whole world enters consciousness. ~ Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 36.

 

A saying of the alchemist is, “God is a circle whose centre is everywhere and whose circumference is nowhere.” The saying holds for God, for the anima mundi and for the soul of man. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 35.

 

The ego is the workshop where the self is made. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 35.

 

Instead of saying, “God is beyond good and evil,” we can say, “Life is both good and evil.” ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 40.

 

We can only speak of the relativity of good and evil in individual cases. The categories of good and evil cannot be suspended; they are continually alive and cannot be attached to material things. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 47.

 

We can only become real by accepting our sexuality and not denying it through saintliness. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 25.

 

We should not try to escape upward or downward from the world. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 25.

 

The best protection against abandonment to demons is a conscious relationship to a close, living human being. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 25.

 

The power operating through the animus emanates specifically from the self, which is hidden behind it, and from its mana. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 29.

 

An archetype is composed of an instinctual factor and a spiritual image. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 21.

 

Archetypes are not matters of faith; we can know that they are there. ~Carl Jung; Conversations with C.G. Jung,  Page 21.

 

The archetype signifies that particular spiritual reality which cannot be attained unless life is lived in consciousness. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 21.

 

Archetypes are images in the soul that represent the course of one’s life. ~Carl Jung; Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 21.

 

There is no difference in intelligence level between those who tend to have dreams and those who have visions. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 19.

 

The insane do not stop up their ears so as not to hear the inner voices; rather they do it to close off the outside and so be better able to hear their own voices. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 17.

 

Everyone in the world is crying out to be accepted. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 16.

 

Psychology is a preparation for death. We have an urge to leave life at a higher level than the one at which we entered. ~Carl Jung; Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 16.

 

A certain amount of suffering and unhappiness is our lot and no one can escape all the dark phases of life. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 14.

 

It is a very real help to find an expression that combines and satisfies the demands of the inner and outer worlds, the unconscious and the conscious. That is the achievement of the so called transcendent function. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 19.

 

As therapists we are subject to the unavoidable destinies of our patients. ~Carl Jung; Conversations with C.G. Jung,  Page 113.

 

A variety of forms is revealed through the realization of the self. The self is dissolved into many egos. When the self has become conscious it leads to “participation mystique.” ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 36.

 

Look at the rebellion of modern youth in America, the sexual rebellion, and all that. These rebellions occur because the real, natural man is just in open rebellion against the utterly inhuman form of American life. Americans are absolutely divorced from nature in a way, and that accounts for that drug abuse. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 35.

 

Everyone who says that I am a Mystic is just and idiot. He just doesn’t understand the first word of Psychology. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Richard L. Evans, [Houston Film]

 

Yes. People have to read the books, by golly, in spite of the fact that they [His Books] are thick. I’m sorry. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 37.

 

Modern physics is truly entering the sphere of the invisible and intangible, as it were. It is in reality a field of probabilities, which is exactly the same as the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

You see, the archetype is a force. It has an autonomy, and it can suddenly seize you. It is like a seizure. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 17

 

So the identity with the body is one of the first things which makes an ego; it is the spatial separateness that induces, apparently, the concept of an ego. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 15.

 

And when you observe the stream of images within, you observe an aspect of the world, of the world within, because the psyche, if you understand it as a phenomenon that takes place in so-called living bodies, is a quality of matter, as our bodies consist of matter. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

You see, the ego is continuously building up; it is not ever a finished product—it builds up. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 15

 

Well you see, I couldn’t swear, but I have seen cases where I thought or wondered whether or not there was a psychogenic reason for that particular ailment; it came too conveniently. Many things can be found out about cancer, I’m sure. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 34.

 

A child definitely begins in a state where there is no ego, and about the fourth year or before, the child develops a sense of ego—”I, myself.” ~Carl Jung Conversations Evans, Pages 14-16.

 

[About the Assumption of the Virgin Mary] Jung said that she has already entered into the nuptial chamber and that thus, naturally, after a time there will be a child. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 15

 

Buddha too was born in the year of the swine and there is a certain resemblance between himself [Jung].  Buddha was born the son of a king, yet had to go away alone until he found the Eightfold Path; and C.G. to had to struggle alone until he discovered the mandala an eight fold symbol of wholeness.  ~E. Harding Conversations with Jung, Page 18

 

Thus, vice too, if entered into sincerely as a means of finding and expressing the Self, is not vice, for the fearless honesty cuts that out. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 9

 

The inferior is your master, and you must adapt yourself to it. Yet it is nature; there is life there.  The thing that wants to be born must first be found. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 7

 

Extraverts’ language is thin and poor, but profuse, so that although what they want to say may be very slight, at least when they have finished they have said what they set out to say. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 8

 

He went on to say that when speaking to an extravert he has to cut down his thought; also when he is speaking to an introvert he has to cut down, for the thought of an introvert, even if expanded into a book, would not be fully expressed …. ~E. Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 8

 

Dr. Jung went on to speak of the strength of womanhood, how it is stronger than any [imitation of the] male adaptation, and how a woman who is woman from the crown of her head to the tip of her toe can afford to be masculine, just as a man who is sure of his masculinity can afford to be tender and patient like a woman ….  ~Esther Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 8.

 

He [Jung] replied, “Yes. God spoke and created from the chaos-and here we are all gods for ourselves. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 8

 

Do not make a long theory or you will entangle yourself in a net, in a trap. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 8

 

He said, “Be afraid of the world, for it is big and strong; and fear the demons within, for they are many and brutal; but do not fear yourself, for that is your Self.” ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 8

 

Go as far as your desire goes, and you will presently find that you have gone as far as your own laws allow: If you feel afraid, be brave enough to run away. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 8

 

But when we are bound by an artificial barrier, or laws and moralities that have entered into us, then we are prevented from finding, or even from seeing, that there is a real barrier of the Self outside this artificial barrier. ~Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 9

 

But within each of us is the self-regulating Self. ~Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 9

 

If we are conscious, morality no longer exists.  If we are not conscious, we are still slaves and are accursed if we obey not the law.  Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 9

 

He [Jung] said that if we belong to the secret church, then we belong, and we need not worry about it, but can go our own way. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 9

 

Possibly, after man will come a period of the animal and then again the plant-who knows?-and who or what will carry on the lamp of consciousness? Who knows? ~Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 10

 

There is a third kind of relationship, the only lasting one in which it is as though there were an invisible telegraph wire between two humans. He [Jung] said, “I call it, to myself, the Golden Thread.”  ~ E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 10

 

It is only when the veil of Maya, of illusion, is rent for us that we can begin to recognize the Golden Thread. ~Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 10

 

He [Jung] went on to speak of the three realities that make up the individuated state; God; the Self; and Relatedness. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 11

 

And just as it is impossible to individuate without relatedness, so it is impossible to have real relationships without individuation. For otherwise illusion comes in continually, and you don’t know where you are. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 11

 

He  [Jung] felt, we had to view him like that, that Hitler is not to be taken primarily as a human man, but as an instrument of ‘divine’ forces, as Judas, or, still better, as the Antichrist must be. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 12

 

He [Jung] said he felt that the observed phenomena could only be explained with the hypothesis that time is a psychic phenomenon, i.e., a conditioning of our psyches, or of our consciousness. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 13

 

If one can once get outside this ego conditioning, time becomes entirely relative, and the present moment is as if eternal. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 13

 

This observation, however, does not tell us anything about immortality or life after death. It refers only to the quality of our experience. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with Jung, Page 13

 

He twice dreamed of Baynes after his death, each time in connection with Churchill, and each time when Churchill was actually in Switzerland, though C. G. did not know this at the time. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 13

 

Speaking of the foolishness of the wise, he [Jung] said one must always recognize it but one does not know what a dream means, especially one’s own dream. ~E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 15

 

Nature is just what we do not know. ~ Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 17

 

One must allow one’s own foolishness, for Nature is naive; there is always the joke, the just-so. ~Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 17

 

A man who is truly in love can only stammer, “I love you.” ~Carl Jung, E Harding, Conversations with Jung, Page 17

 

God has a longing for man and it seems there is provision for God to be created in man’s consciousness. Consciousness is the cradle of the birth of God in man. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 39.

 

If the encounter with the shadow is the “apprentice piece” in the individual development, then, that with the anima is the “masterpiece.” ~Carl Jung, CW 9, Page 29.

 

For the son, the animus is hidden in the dominating power of the mother and sometimes she leaves him with a sentimental attachment that lasts throughout life and seriously impairs the fate of the adult. ~Carl Jung, CW 9, Page 29.

 

When a woman realizes her shadow the animus can be constellated. If the shadow remains in the unconscious the animus possesses her through the shadow. When she realizes her animus, mystical generation can occur. Sarah was Abraham’s legitimate wife, but Hagar, the dark one, had the procreative animus. Out of darkness the light is born. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 30.

 

A woman is oriented towards the animus because it is the son of the unknown father, the Old Sage, whom she never comes to know. This motive is hinted at in the Gnostic texts where Sophia in her madness loves the Great Father On the other hand a man does not know the mother of the anima. She may be personified, for example, in Sophia or the seven times veiled Isis. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 30.

 

When the woman experiences the mystery of creativeness in herself, in her own inner world, she is doing the right thing and then no longer demands it from the outside — from her husband, her son, or anyone else close to her. . ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 29.

 

There is no difference in intelligence level between those who tend to have dreams and those who have visions. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Psychotherapy, Page 19.

 

The animus which is not realized by the mother is like a part of a soul with a relative existence of its own. . ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 29.

 

Evil is that which obstructs meaningful vitality. It may show itself differently in each case. That which is above by reason of its charity, suppresses that, which is below; then the lower craves what is above. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 47.

 

To a man the anima is the Mother of God who gives birth to the Divine Child. To a woman the animus is the Holy Spirit, the procreator. He is at once the light and the dark God — not the Christian God of Love who contains neither the Devil nor the Son. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Pages 31-32.

 

Consciousness is the transformation and the transformer of the primordial instinctual images. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 9.

 

Consciousness is the divine light; it is the possibility of seeing oneself, and this means to me that it is the very basis of life. ~Carl Jung, Conversations with C.G. Jung, Page 9.

 

Of course, any creation is a creations beyond oneself, because one is already in existence, and if anything is created it must be beyond. ~Carl Jung, Nietzsche’s Zarathustra, Page 49.

 

Without soul, spirit is as dead as matter, because both are artificial abstractions; whereas man originally regarded spirit as a volatile body, and matter as not lacking in soul. ~Carl Jung, CW13, Para 76n

 

Anima means soul and should designate something very wonderful and immortal…  ~Carl Jung, 9i, para. 55

 

Those who have no neurotic symptoms are probably beyond help by anyone. ~Carl Jung, NY Times 29 Sept 1912

 

Up until the last moment Jung still seemed to be searching. Perhaps his was the road of the Magician who, unlike the Saint, did not yearn for fusion or for the peace of God, but preferred the eternal highway with all its unhappiness. But I cannot be certain of that. ~Michael Serrano, Two Friendships, Page 112.

 

You see, “alcohol” in Latin is spiritus, and you use the same word for the highest religious experience as well as for the most depraving poison.   ~Carl Jung, Jung/ Bill Wilson Letters.

 

When I last saw him [Jung] he had a vision. “I see enormous stretches devastated, enormous stretches of the earth. But thank God it’s not the whole planet. ~Marie-Louise Von Franz, “ A Matter of Heart.

 

Now I know the truth but there is a small piece not filled in and when I know that I shall be dead. ~Carl Jung [2 days before his death] ~Miguel Serrano, Two Friendships, Page 104.

 

Today no one pays attention to what lies behind words. . .to the basic ideas that are there. Yet the idea is the only thing that is truly there. What I have done in my work, is simply to give new names to those ideas, to those realities. ~Carl Jung, Two Friendships, Page 100.

 

Consider, for example, the word “Unconscious.” I have just finished reading a book by a Chinese Zen Buddhist. And it seemed to me that we were talking about the same thing, and that the only difference between us was that we gave different words to the same reality. ~Carl Jung, Two Friendships, Page 100.

 

I cannot define for you what God is. I can only say that my work has proved empirically that the pattern of God exists in every man and that this pattern has at its disposal the greatest of all his energies for transformation and transfiguration of his natural being. Carl Jung, “Jung” Van der Post, Page 216.

 

Modern physics shattered the absolute validity of natural law and made it relative. . . . But if cause and effect turns out to be only statistically valid and relatively true we have to look for other factors of explanation in explaining natural processes. ~Carl Jung, Interpretation of Nature and Psyche, Page 7.

 

The archetypes are complementary and equivalents of the “outside” world and therefore possess “cosmic” character. Thins explains their numinosity and godlikeness. ~Carl Jung, CW 9, Page 196.

 

Oh my, yes! Mind you, every patient you have gets interested in psychology. Nearly everyone thinks he is meant to be an analyst, inevitably. ~Carl Jung, Conversations Evans, Page 11.

 

And then I wrote a book about psychology of dementia praecox, as it was called then— now it is schizophrenia—and I sent the book to Freud, writing to him about my association experiments and how they confirmed his theory thus far. That is how my friendship with Freud began. ~Carl Jung, Conversations Evans, Page 11.

 

For instance, there are many big business men who are impotent because their full energy is going into money making or dictating  the roles to everybody ‐ else.  That is much more interesting to them than the affairs of women. ~Carl Jung, Conversations Evans, Page 12.

 

I knew the work of Nietzsche very well. He had been a professor at Basel University, and the air was full of talk about Nietzsche; so naturally I had studied his works. And from this I saw an entirely different psychology, which was also psychology—a perfectly competent psychology, but built upon the power drive. ~Carl Jung, Conversations [Evans], Page 12.

 

Freud was a successful man; he was on top, and so he was interested  only in pleasure and the pleasure principle,  and Adler was interested in the power drive. ~Carl Jung, Conversations Evans, Page 12.

 

I think, you see, that when Freud says that one of the first interests, and the foremost interest is to feed, he doesn’t need such a peculiar kind of terminology like “oral zone.” Of course, they put it into the mouth— ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 13.

 

The child is born as a high complexity, with existing determinants that never waver through the whole life, and that give the child his character. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 13.

 

Already, in earliest childhood, a mother recognizes the individuality of her child; and so, if you observe carefully, you see a tremendous difference, even in very small children. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 13.

 

In any case of a child’s neurosis, I go back to the parents and see what is going on there, because children have no psychology of their own, literally taken. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 13.

 

That is the first archetype [Oedipus] Freud discovered; the first and the only one. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 13.

 

No one is hampered by one’s self. And that’s what he [Freud] never could admit to me. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 14.

 

And who in Hell would have invented the Decalogue? That is not invented by Moses, but that is the eternal truth in man himself, because he checks himself. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 16.

 

So the identity with the body is one of the first things which makes an ego; it is the spatial separateness that induces, apparently, the concept of an ego. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 15.

 

Now, Freud refers very little to Pierre Janet, but I studied with him while in Paris and he very much helped form my ideas. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 15.

 

It is quite certain, however, that man is born with a certain functioning, a certain way of functioning, a certain pattern of behavior which is expressed in the form of archetypal images, or archetypal forms. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 16.

 

For instance, the way in which a man should behave is expressed by an archetype. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 16.

 

The archetypes are, at the same time, dynamic. They are instinctual images that are not intellectually invented. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 16.

 

Mythology is a pronouncing of a series of images that formulate the life of archetypes. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 16.

 

They [Gnostics] were concerned with the problem of archetypes, and made a peculiar philosophy of it. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 17.

 

It [Alchemy] is the mental work of 1,700 years, in which there is stored up all they could make out about the nature of the archetypes, in a peculiar way that’s foolish. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 17.

 

It [Alchemy] is also called Hermetic Philosophy, though, of course, that conveys just as little as the term alchemy. —It was the parallel development, as Narcissism was,  to the conscious development of Christianity, of our Christian philosophy, of the whole psychology of the middle ages. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 17.

 

Man has a certain pattern that makes him specifically human, and no man is born without it. We are only deeply unconscious of these facts because we live by all our senses and outside of ourselves. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 18.

 

The anima is an archetypal form, expressing the fact that a man has a minority of feminine or female genes. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 18.

 

As early as the 16th century, the Humanists had discovered that man had an anima, and that each man carried female within himself. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 18.

 

If somebody is clever enough to see what is going on in people’s minds, in their unconscious minds, he will be able to predict. For instance, I could have predicted the Nazi rising in Germany through the observation of my German patients. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 20.

 

And I was absolutely certain—in the years before Hitler, before Hitler came in the beginning; I could say the year, in the year 1919—I was sure that something was threatening in Germany, something very big, very catastrophic. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 20.

 

It is a peculiar fact that the archetype of the anima plays a very great role in Western literature, French and Anglo-Saxon. But in Germany, there are exceedingly few examples in German literature where the anima plays a role. . . . ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 21.

 

Nobody can say where man ends. That is the beauty of it, you know. It is very interesting. The unconscious of man can reach—God knows where. There we are going to make discoveries. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 21.

 

It [The Mandala] is the archetype of inner order; and it is always used in that sense, either to make arrangements of the many, many aspects of the universe, a world scheme, or to arrange the complicated aspects of our psyche into a scheme. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 21.

 

So you see, in a moment during a patient’s treatment when there is a great disorder and chaos in a man’s mind, the symbol can appear, as in the form of a mandala in a dream, or when he makes imaginary and fantastical drawings, or something of the sort. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 21.

 

A mandala spontaneously appears as a compensatory archetype during times of disorder. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 21.

 

I am not whole in my ego as my ego is but a fragment of my personality; so you see, the center of a mandala is not the ego. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 21.

 

In the Middle Ages it [The Mandala] played an equally great role for the West; but there it has been lost now and is thought of as a mere sort of allegorical, decorative motif. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 21.

Now you see, the subjective factor, which is very characteristic, was understood by Freud as a sort of pathological auto-egotism. Now this is a mistake. The psyche has two conditions, two important conditions. The one is environmental influence and the other is the given fact of the psyche as it is born. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

As I told you yesterday, the psyche is by no means tabula rasa here, but a definite mixture and combination of genes, which are there from the very first moment of our life; and they give a definite character, even to the little child. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

When you observe the world, you see people; you see houses; you see the sky; you see tangible objects. But when you observe yourself within, you see moving images, a world of images generally known as fantasies. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

Everything you do here, all this, everything, was fantasy to begin with, and fantasy has a proper reality. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

That is not to be forgotten; fantasy is not nothing. It is, of course, not a tangible object; but it is a fact nevertheless. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

Fantasy is, you see, a form of energy, despite the fact that we can’t measure it. It is a manifestation of something, and that is a reality. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

We discover that this matter has another aspect, namely, a psychic aspect. And so it is simply the world from within, seen from within.  It is just as though you were seeing into another aspect of matter. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

And that’s the great mistake, because man is just that which he is born, and he is not born as tabula rasa but as a reality. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

And there I was, in between the two. I could see the justification of Freud’s view, and also could see the same for Adler; and I knew that there were plenty of other ways in which things could be envisaged. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 22.

 

Those [Introvert and Extrovert] are only terms to designate a certain penchant, a certain tendency.  For instance, the tendency to be more influenced by environmental influences, or more influenced by the subjective fact—that’s all. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 23.

 

There is no such thing as a pure ‐ extrovert or a pure introvert.  Such a man would be in the lunatic asylum. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 23.

 

There are people who are fairly well-balanced who are just as much influenced from within as from without, or just as little. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 23.

 

The classification of individuals [By Type] means nothing at all. It is only the instrumentality, or what I call “practical psychology,” used to explain, for instance, the husband to a wife, or vice versa. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 23.

 

So, through the study of all sorts of human types, I came to the conclusion that there must be many different ways of viewing the world through these type orientations—at least 16, and you can just as well say 360. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 24.

 

The psyche is nothing different from the living being. It is the psychical aspect of the living being. It is even the psychical aspect of matter. It is a quality. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 27.

 

Now with psychical phenomena you have no possibility to measure exactly, so it always remains a sort of analogy. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 26.

 

Now in order not to presume or to prejudice things, I speak simply of energy, and energy is a quantity of energy that can manifest itself via sexuality or via any other instinct. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 26.

 

You see, the neurosis is made every day by the wrong attitude the individual has. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 27.

 

One has observed in the beginning of the war cases of compulsion neuroses which had lasted for many years and suddenly were cured, because they got into an entirely new condition. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 27.

Even the schizophrenic can be vastly improved by a shock because that’s a new condition; it is a very shocking thing, so it shocks them out of their habitual attitude. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 27.

 

Consider for instance, those animals that have specially differentiated anatomical characteristics, those of the teeth or something like that. Well, they have a mental behavior which is in accordance with those organs. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 27.

 

In fact, even Rhine does not understand how often extrasensory phenomena really occur, because it is a revelation  which in these sacred rooms is anathema, a revelation of time and space through the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 33.

 

When you observe the unconscious, you will come across plenty of cases which show a very peculiar kind of parallel events. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 33.

 

As an example of this, I see a lot of astounding cures of tuberculosis—chronic tuberculosis—effected by analysts; people learn to breathe again. The understanding of what their complexes were—that has helped them. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 34.

 

You see, with us it has been always a question of how to treat these things, because any disease possible has a psychological accompaniment. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 34.

 

You can have an infectious disease in a certain moment, that is, a physical ailment or predicament, because you are particularly accessible to an infection—maybe sometimes because of a psychological attitude. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 34.

 

For instance, there is the toxic aspect of schizophrenia. I published it fifty years ago—just fifty years ago—and now everyone discovers it. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 35.

 

You are far ahead in America with technological things, but in psychological matters and such things, you are fifty years back. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 35.

 

There are historical reasons for the qualities of the psyche and there is such a thing as the history of man’s evolution in past eons, which as a combination show that real understanding of the psyche must consist in the elucidation of the history of the human race—history of the mind, for instance, as in the biological data. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

So you see, man is not complete when he lives in a world of statistical truth. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

Our natural science makes everything an average, reduces everything to an average; yet the truth is that the carriers of life are individuals, not average numbers. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

In fact, it is unhygienic, because if you wipe out the mythology of a man, his entire historical sequence, he becomes a statistical average, a number; that is, he becomes nothing. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

We think that we are born today tabula rasa without a history, but man has always lived in the myth. To think that man is born without a history within himself— that is a disease. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

If you are growing up with no connection from the past, it is like being born without eyes and ears and trying to perceive the external world with accuracy. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

Natural science may say, “You need no connection with the past; you can wipe it out,” but that is a mutilation of the human being. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

Fifty years ago we already had these cases; ulcer of the stomach, tuberculosis, chronic arthritis, skin diseases.  All are psychogenic under certain conditions. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 34.

 

It seems quite strange to me that one doesn’t see what an education without the humanities is doing to man. He loses his connection with his family, his connection with his whole past—the whole stem, the tribe —that past in which man has always lived. ~Carl Jung, Evans Conversations, Page 36.

 

Nobody can say where man ends. That is the beauty of it. The unconscious of man can reach God knows where. There we are going to make discoveries. ~Four Filmed Interviews with Richard I. Evans” (1957). Conversations with Carl Jung.

 

Nobody can say where man ends. That is the beauty of it. The unconscious of man can reach God knows where. There we are going to make discoveries. ~Carl Jung,  Richard L. Evans Interview. Para 62.

 

You see, you have that lie detector in the United States, and that’s like an association test I have worked out with the psycho-galvanic phenomenon. Also, we have done a lot of work on the Pneumograph which will show the decrease of volume of breathing under the influence of a complex. You know, one of the reasons for tuberculosis is the anifestation of a complex. People have very shallow breathing; don’t ventilate the aspices of their lungs anymore, and get tuberculosis. Half of tuberculosis cases are psychic. ~C.G. Jung – Richard Evans interviews Transcript of the 1957 films.

 

 

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