Carl Jung and “Memories, Dreams and Reflections’ – YouTube

 

Carl Jung: Memories, Dreams and Reflections

To Western man, the meaninglessness of a merely static universe is unbearable. He must assume that it has meaning. The Oriental does not need to make this assumption; rather, he himself embodies it. Whereas the Occidental feels the need to complete the meaning of the world, the Oriental strives for the fulfilment of the meaning in man, stripping the world and existence from himself (Buddha). I would say that both are right. Western man seems predominantly extraverted, Eastern man predominantly introverted. The former projects the meaning and considers that it exists in objects; the latter feels the meaning in himself. But the meaning is both within and without. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 317.

Then, to my intense confusion, it occurred to me that I was actually two different persons. One of them was the schoolboy who could not grasp algebra and was far from sure of himself; the other was important, a high authority, a man not to be trifled with, as powerful and influential as a manufacturer. The ‘other’ was an old man who lived in the eighteenth century, wore buckled shoes and a white wig and went driving in a fly with high, concave rear wheels between which the box was suspended on springs and leather straps. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Pages 33-34.

Leaving aside the rational arguments against any certainty in these matters, we must not forget that for most people it means a great deal to assume that their lives will have an indefinite continuity beyond their present existence. They live more sensibly, feel better, and are more at peace. One has centuries, one has an inconceivable period of time at one’s disposal. What then is the point of this senseless mad rush? ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 301.

I do not know for what reason the universe has come into being, and shall never know. Therefore I must drop this question as a scientific or intellectual problem. But if an idea about it is offered to me – in dreams or in mythic traditions – I ought to take note of it. I even ought to build up a conception on the basis of such hints, even though it will forever remain a hypothesis that I know cannot be proved. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Pages 301-302.

It is the individuals’ task to differentiate himself from all the others and stand on his own feet. All collective identities…interfere with the fulfillment of this task. Such collective identities are crutches for the lame, shields for the timid, beds for the lazy, nurseries for the irresponsible… ~Carl Jung; MDR

Our age has shifted all emphasis to the here and now, and thus brought about a daemonization of man and his world. The phenomenon of dictators and all the misery they have wrought springs from the fact that man has been robbed of transcendence by the shortsightedness of the super-intellectuals. Like them, he has fallen a victim to unconsciousness. But man’s task is the exact opposite: to become conscious of the contents that press upward from the unconscious. Neither should he persist in his unconsciousness, nor remain identical with the unconscious elements of his being, thus evading his destiny, which is to create more and more consciousness. As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being. It may even be assumed that just as the unconscious affects us, so the increase in our consciousness affects the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 326.

Wherever there is a reaching down into innermost experience, into the nucleus of personality, most people are overcome by fright, and many run away. Such was the case with this theologian. I am of course aware that theologians are in a more difficult situation than others. On the one hand they are closer to religion, but on the other hand they are more bound by church and dogma. The risk of inner experience, the adventure of the spirit, is in any case alien to most human beings. The possibility that such experience might have psychic reality is anathema to them. All very well if it has a supernatural or at least a “historical” foundation. But psychic? Face to face with this question, the patient will often show an unsuspected but profound contempt for the psyche. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Pages 141-142.

Archetypal statements are based upon instinctive preconditions and have nothing to do with reason; they are neither rationally grounded nor can they be banished by rational arguments. They have always been part of the world scene representations collectives, as Levy-Bruhl rightly called them. Certainly the ego and its will have a great part to play in life; but what the ego wills is subject in the highest degree to the interference, in ways of which the ego is usually unaware, of the autonomy and numinosity of archetypal processes. Practical consideration of these processes is the essence of religion, insofar as religion can be approached from a psychological point of view. ~Carl Jung MDR; Page 353

When I was working on the stone tablets, I became aware of the fateful links between me and my ancestors. I feel very strongly that I am under the influence of things or questions which were left incomplete and unanswered by my parents and grandparents and more distant ancestors. It often seems as if there were an impersonal karma within a family, which is passed on from parents to children. It has always seemed to me that I had to answer questions which fate had posed to my forefathers, and which had not yet been answered, or as if I had to complete, or perhaps continue, things which previous ages had left unfinished. It is difficult to determine whether these questions are more of a personal or more of a general (collective) nature. It seems to me that the latter is the case. A collective problem, if not recognized as such, always appears as a personal problem, and in individual cases may give the impression that something is out of order in the realm of the personal psyche. The personal sphere is indeed disturbed, but such disturbances need not be primary; they may well be secondary, the consequence of an insupportable change in the social atmosphere. The cause of disturbance is, therefore, not to be sought in the personal surroundings, but rather in the collective situation. Psychotherapy has hitherto taken this matter far too little into account. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams, Reflections; Pages 233-234.

Life has always seemed to me like a plant that lives on its rhizome. Its true life is invisible, hidden in the rhizome. The part that appears above ground lasts only a single summer. Then it withers away an ephemeral apparition. When we think of the unending growth and decay of life and civilizations, we cannot escape the impression of absolute nullity. Yet I have never lost a sense of something that lives and endures underneath the eternal flux. What we see is the blossom, which passes. The rhizome remains. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 4.

This expression, “God’s world,” may sound sentimental to some ears. For me it did not have this character at all. To “God’s world” belonged everything superhuman dazzling light, the darkness of the abyss, the cold impassivity of infinite space and time, and the uncanny grotesqueness of the irrational world of chance. “God,” for me, was everything and anything but “edifying.” ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 72.

As a child I felt myself to be alone, and I am still, because I know things and must hint at things which others apparently know nothing of, and for the most part do not want to know. Loneliness does not come from having no people about one, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 356.

Every man carries within him the eternal image of woman, not the image of this or that particular woman, but a definitive feminine image. This image is fundamentally unconscious, an hereditary factor of primordial origin engraved in the living organic system of the man, an imprint or ‘archetype’ [q.v.] of all the ancestral experiences of the female, a deposit, as it were, of all the impressions ever made by woman . . .Since this image is unconscious, it is always unconsciously projected upon the person of the beloved, and is one of the chief reasons for passionate attraction or aversion.” ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 391.

Myth is the revelation of divine life in man. It is not we who invent myth; rather it speaks to us as a Word of God. No science will ever replace myth, and a myth cannot be made out of any science. For it is not that “God” is a myth, but that myth is the revelation of a divine life in man. It is not we who invent myth; rather it speaks to us as a Word of God. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 340.

When Lao-tzu says: “All are clear, I alone am clouded,” he is expressing what I now feel in advanced old age. Lao-tzu is the example of a man with superior insight who has seen and experienced worth and worthlessness, and who at the end of his life desires to return into his own being, into the eternal unknowable meaning. The archetype of the old man who has seen enough is eternally true. At every level of intelligence this type appears, and its lineaments are always the same, whether it be an old peasant or a great philosopher like Lao-tzu. This is old age, and a limitation. Yet there is so much that fills me: plants, animals, clouds, day and night, and the eternal in man. The more uncertain I have felt about myself, the more there has grown up in me a feeling of kinship with all things. In fact it seems to me as if that alienation which so long separated me from the world has become transferred into my own inner world, and has revealed to me an unexpected unfamiliarity with myself. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 359.

From the beginning I had a sense of destiny, as though my life was assigned to me by fate and had to be fulfilled. This gave me an inner security, and, though I could never prove it to myself, it proved itself to me. I did not have this certainty, it had me. Nobody could rob me of the conviction that it was enjoined upon me to do what God wanted and not what I wanted. That gave me the strength to go my own way. Often I had the feeling that in all decisive matters I was no longer among men, but was alone with God. And when I was “there,” where I was no longer alone, I was outside time; I belonged to the centuries; and He who then gave answer was He who had always been, who had been before my birth. He who always is was there. These talks with the “Other” were my profoundest experiences: on the one hand a bloody struggle, on the other supreme ecstasy. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 48.

activity, has come from those initial fantasies and dreams which began in 1912, almost fifty years ago. Everything that I accomplished in later life was already contained in them…~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 191.

In the beginning I employed hypnosis in my private practice also, but I soon gave it up because in using it one is only groping in the dark. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Pages 119-120

I was on the way to discovering my own myth.

For the building game was only a beginning.

It released a stream of fantasies which I later carefully wrote down.

I went on with my building game after the noon meal every day, whenever the weather permitted.

As soon as I was through eating, I began playing, and continued to do so until the patients arrived; and if I was finished with my work early enough in the evening, I went back to building. In the course of this activity my thoughts clarified, and I was able to grasp the fantasies whose presence in myself I dimly felt.

Naturally, I thought about the significance of what I was doing, and asked myself, “Now, really, what are you about? You are building a small town, and doing it as if it were a rite!” I had no answer to my question, only the inner certainty that I This sort of thing has been consistent with me, and at any time in my later life when I came up against a blank wall, I painted a picture or hewed stone. Each such experience proved to be a rite d’entree for the ideas and works that followed hard upon it. Everything that I have written this year and last year, “The Undiscovered Self,” “Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth,” “A Psychological View of Conscience,” has grown out of the
stone sculptures I did after my wife’s death. The close of her life, the end, and what it made me realize, wrenched me violently out of myself. It cost me a great deal to regain my footing, and contact with stone helped me. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Pages 174-175

Myth is the revelation of divine life in man. It is not we who invent myth; rather it speaks to us as a Word of God. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 340.

No science Myth will ever replace myth, and a myth cannot be made out of any science. For it is not that “God” is a myth, but that myth is the revelation of a divine life in man. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 340.

It is not we who invent myth; rather it speaks to us as a Word of God. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 340.

Although we human beings have our own personal life, we are in large measure the representatives, the victims and promoters of a collective spirit whose years are counted in centuries. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 91.

It was then that I dedicated myself to service of the psyche. I loved it and hated it, but it was my greatest wealth. My delivering myself over to it, as it were, was the only way by which I could endure my existence and live it as fully as possible. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 192.

Loneliness does not come from having no people about one, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 356.

What does God want? To act or not to act? I must find out what God wants with Me, and I must find out right away. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams Reflections, Page 38.

If there were no imperfections, no primordial defect in the ground of creation, why should there be any urge to create , any longing that must be fulfilled? ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 32.

While the man who despairs marches towards nothingness, the one who has placed his faith in the archetype follows the tracks of life and lives right into his death. Both, to be sure, remain in uncertainty, but the one lives against his instincts, the other with them. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 306.

After my wife’s death. . . I felt an inner obligation to become what I myself am. To put it in the language of the Bollingen house, I suddenly realized that the small central section which crouched so low, so hidden was myself! ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 225.

I have always advised analysts: “Have a father confessor, or a mother confessor!” Women are particularly gifted for playing such a part. They often have excellent intuition and critical insight, and can see what men have up their sleeves, at times see also into men’s anima intrigues. They see aspects that the man does not see. That is why no woman has ever been convinced that her husband is a superman! ~Carl Jung, MDR; Page 134.

Man always has some mental reservation, even in the face of divine decrees. Otherwise, where would be his freedom? And what would be the use of that freedom if it could not threaten Him who threatens it? ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 220

I have become convinced that at least part of our psychic existence is characterized by the relativity of space and time. This relativity seems to increase, in proportion to the distance from consciousness, to an absolute condition of timelessness and spacelessness. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 305.

The finest and most significant conversations of my life were anonymous. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 145.

Rather, we must hold clearly in mind that there is no possible way for us to attain certainty concerning things that pass our understanding. ~Carl Jung; MDR, Page 300.

Hierosgamos. Sacred or spiritual marriage, union of archetypal figures in the rebirth mysteries of antiquity and also in alchemy. Typical examples are the representation of Christ and the Church as bridegroom and bride (sponsus et sponsa) and the alchemical conjunction of sun and moon. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 395.

Am I a combination of the lives of these ancestors and do I embody these lives again? Have I lived before in the past as a specific personality, and did I progress so far in that life that I am now able to seek a solution? I do not know. Buddha left the question open, and I like to assume that he himself did not know with certainty. In the meantime it is important to ensure that I do not stand at the end with empty hands. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Pages 317-318.

There is so much that fills me: plants, animals, clouds, day and night, and the eternal in man. The more uncertain I have felt about myself, the more there has grown up in me a feeling of kinship with all things. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 359.

I know only that I was born and exist, and it seems to me that I have been carried along. I exist on the foundation of something I do not know. In spite of all uncertainties, I feel a solidity underlying all existence and a continuity in my mode of being. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 358.

In knowing ourselves to be unique in our personal combination – that is, ultimately limited – we possess also the capacity for becoming conscious of the infinite. But only then! ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 325.

Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities which we regard as personal possessions: our talent and our beauty. The more that man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 325

Attainment of consciousness is culture in the broadest sense, and self-knowledge is therefore the heart and essence of the process. The Oriental attributes unquestionably divine significance to the self, and according to the Christian view self-knowledge is the road to knowledge of God. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Pages 324-325

Certain souls, I imagine, feel the state of three-dimensional existence to be more blissful than that of Eternity. But perhaps that depends upon how much of completeness or incompleteness they have taken across with them from their human existence. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 321.

The images of the unconscious place a great responsibility upon a man. Failure to understand diem, or a shirking of ethical responsibility, deprives him of his wholeness and imposes a painful fragmentariness on his life. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 193.

Similarly, other people are established inalienably in my memories only if their names were entered in the scrolls of my destiny from the beginning, so that encountering them was at the same time a kind of recollection. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 5.

Philemon and other figures of my fantasies brought home to me the crucial insight that there are things in the psyche which I do not produce, but which produce themselves and have their own life. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 183.

The crucial point is that I confront the patient as one human being to another. Analysis is a dialogue demanding two partners. … The doctor has something to say, but so has the patient. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams, and Reflections; Page 131.

Only gradually did I discover what the mandala really is: Formation, Transformation, Eternal Mind’s eternal recreation. And that is the self, the wholeness of the personality, which if all goes well is harmonious, but which cannot tolerate self-deceptions. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 326.

Nothing so promotes the growth of consciousness as [the] inner confrontation of opposites. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 345.

Similarly, other people are established inalienably in my memories only if their names were entered in the scrolls of my destiny from the beginning, so that encountering them was at the same time a kind of recollection. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 5.

Love “bears all things” and “endures all things’* (i Cor. 13:7). These words say all there is to be said; nothing can be added to them. For we are in the deepest sense the victims and the instruments of cosmogonic “love.” ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 354

The sea is like music, it has all the dreams of the soul within itself and sounds them over. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 369.

Christ cried out to the Jews, “You are the Gods” (John 10:34) but men were incapable of understanding what he meant. ~Carl Jung; Memories dreams and Reflections; Page 280

Being a part, man cannot grasp the whole. He is at its mercy. He may assent to it, or rebel against it; but he is always caught up by it and enclosed within it. He is dependent upon it and is sustained by it. Love is his light and his darkness, whose end he cannot see. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 354

Eros…might well be the first condition of all cognition and the quintessence of divinity itself. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 353.

Nothing so promotes the growth of consciousness as [the] inner confrontation of opposites. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 345.

I regret many follies which sprang from my obstinacy; but without that trait I would not have reached my goal. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 358

If a man knows more than others, he becomes lonely. But loneliness is not necessarily inimical to companionship, for no one is more sensitive to companionship than the lonely man, and companionship thrives only when each individual remembers his individuality and does not identify himself with others. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 356.

“All my writings may be considered tasks imposed from within, their source was a fateful compulsion. What I wrote were things that assailed me from within myself. I permitted the spirit that moved me to speak out.” ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 222.

I have also realized that one must accept the thoughts that go on within oneself of their own accord as part of one’s reality. The categories of true and false are, of course, always present; but because they are not binding they take second place. The presence of thoughts is more important than our subjective judgment of them. But neither must these judgments be suppressed, for they also are existent thoughts which are part of our wholeness. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 298.

The majority of my patients consisted not of believers but of those who had lost their faith. The ones who came to me were the lost sheep. Even in this day and age the believer has the opportunity, in his church, to live the “symbolic life.” ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Page 140.

In science I missed the factor of meaning; and in religion, that of empiricism. Science met, to a very large extent, the needs of No. i personality, whereas the humane or historical studies provided beneficial instruction for No. 2. ~ Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams, Reflections; Page 72

When one reflects upon what consciousness really is, one is profoundly impressed by the extreme wonder of the fact that an event which takes place outside in the cosmos simultaneously produces an internal image, that it takes place, so to speak, inside as well, which is to say: becomes conscious. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 394

The myth of the necessary incarnation of God . . . can be understood as man’s creative confrontation with the opposites and their synthesis in the self, the wholeness of his personality. . . . That is the goal . . . which fits man meaningfully into the scheme of creation and at the same time confers meaning upon it. –Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Page 338.

Myths which day has forgotten continue to be told by night, and powerful figures which consciousness has reduced to banality and ridiculous triviality are recognized again by poets and prophetically revived; therefore they can also be recognized “in changed form” by the thoughtful person. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 282

In science I missed the factor of meaning; and in religion, that of empiricism. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 72.

Every form of addiction is bad, no matter whether the narcotic be alcohol or morphine or idealism. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections; Page 329.

It may even be assumed that just as the unconscious affects us, so the increase in our consciousness affects the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 326.

Our souls as well as our bodies are composed of individual elements which were all already present in the ranks of our ancestors. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 235.

Man’s task is to become conscious of the contents that press upward from the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 326.

I had the feeling that everything was being sloughed away. . . . Nevertheless something remained; it was as if I now carried along with me everything I had ever experienced or done, everything that had happened around me. . . . I consisted of my own history, and I felt with great certainty: this is what I am. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, pp. 290-291.

The risk of inner experience, the adventure of the spirit, is in any case alien to most human beings. ~Carl Jung; Memories, Dreams and Reflections; Pages 141-142.

Meaninglessness inhibits fullness of life and is therefore equivalent to illness. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 340.

And if we happen to have a precognitive dream, how can we possibly ascribe it to our own powers? ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 340.

I find that all my thoughts circle around God like the planets around the sun, and are as irresistibly attracted by Him. I would feel it to be the grossest sin if I were to oppose any resistance to this force. ~Carl Jung; Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page xi.

The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not? ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 325.

Everything in the unconscious seeks outward manifestation, and the personality too desires to evolve out of its unconscious conditions and to experience itself as a whole. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 3.

An autobiography is so difficult to write because we possess no standards, no objective foundation, from which to judge ourselves. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 3.

The older I have become, the less I have understood or had insight into or known about myself. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 358.

The psyche is distinctly more complicated and inaccessible than the body. It is, so to speak, the half of the world which comes into existence only when we become conscious of it. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflection, Page 132.

Because they are so closely akin to us and share our unknowingness, I loved all warm-blooded animals who have souls like ourselves and with whom, so I thought, we have an instinctive understanding. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 67.

In Bollingen, silence surrounds me almost audibly, and I live “in modest harmony with nature.” Thoughts rise to the surface which reach back into the centuries, and accordingly anticipate a remote future. Here the torment of creation is lessened; creativity and play are close together. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 226.

I falter before the task of finding the language which might adequately express the incalculable paradoxes of love. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Page 353.

Like many sons, Adler had learned from his “father” not what the father said, but what he did. Instantly, the problem of love (Eros) and power came down upon me like a leaden weight. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 153.

God is an image and those who worship him must worship him in the images of the supreme meaning. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Pages 276.

I cannot be liberated from anything that I do not possess, have not done or experienced. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Pages 276.

Individuation does not only mean that man has become truly human as distinct from animal, but that he is to become partially divine as well. That means practically that he becomes adult, responsible for his existence, knowing that he does not only depend on God but that God also depends on man. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 408.

The painful question then presented itself: Where was the money to come from? My father could raise only part of it. He applied to the University of Basel for a stipend for me, and to my shame it was granted. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 86.

If I ask the value of my life, I can only measure myself against the centuries and then I must say, Yes, it means something. Measured by the ideas of today, it means nothing. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams Reflections, Page xii.

A book of mine is always a matter of fate. A creative person has little power over his own life. He is not free. He is captive and drawn by his daimon. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 357.

A Creative person has little power over his own life. He is not free. He is captive and drawn by his daimon. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 359.

I early arrived at the insight that when no answer comes from within to the problems and complexities of life, they ultimately mean very little. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 5.

I began to blame the philosophers for rattling away when experience was lacking, and holding their tongues when they ought to have been answering with facts. In this respect they all seemed like watered-down theologians. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 104.

I maintained that psychiatry, in the broadest sense, is a dialogue between the sick psyche and the psyche of the doctor, which is presumed to be ‘normal.’ It is a coming to terms between the sick personality and that of the therapist, both in principle equally subjective. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 110.

If God is the highest good, why is the world, His creation, so imperfect, so corrupt, so pitiable? ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 59.

In my case it must have been a passionate urge to understand that brought about my birth. For that is the strongest element in my nature. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 297

In the end, man is an event which cannot judge itself, but, for better or worse, is left to the judgment of others. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 113.

The life of man is a dubious experiment. It is a tremendous phenomenon only in numerical terms. Individually, it is so fleeting, so insufficient, that it is literally a miracle that anything can exist and develop at all. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 6.

My aim was to show that delusions and hallucinations were not just specific symptoms of mental disease but also had a human meaning. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 110

The images of the unconscious place a great responsibility upon a man. Failure to understand them, or a shirking of ethical responsibility, deprives him of his wholeness and imposes a painful fragmentariness on his life. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 193.

I am an orphan, alone; nevertheless I am found everywhere. I am one, but opposed to myself. I am youth and old man at one and the same time. I have known neither father nor mother, because I have had to be fetched out of the deep like a fish, or fell like a white stone from heaven. In woods and mountains I roam, but I am hidden in the innermost soul of man. I am mortal for everyone, yet I am not touched by the cycle of eons. ~Carl Jung, Quoting an Alchemical Text, MDR 227

Outward circumstances are no substitute for inner experience. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page V.

When we are old, we are drawn back, both from within and from without, to memories of youth. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page viii.

My own understanding is the sole treasure I possess, and the greatest. Though infinitely small and fragile in comparison with the powers of darkness, it is still a light, my only light. Carl Jung, MDR, Page 88.

In therapy the problem is always the whole person, never the symptom alone. We must ask questions which challenge the whole personality. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 117.

The mandala is an archetypal image whose occurrence is attested throughout the ages. It signifies the wholeness of the Self. This circular image represents the wholeness of the psychic ground or, to put it in mythic terms, the divinity incarnate in man. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 334-335.

Trees in particular were mysterious and seemed to me direct embodiments of the incomprehensible meaning of life. For that reason the woods were the place where I felt closest to its deepest meaning and to its awe-inspiring workings. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 68.

What we are to our inward vision, and what man appears to be sub specie aeternitatis, can only be expressed by way of myth. Myth is more individual and expresses life more precisely than does science. Science works with concepts of averages which are far too general to do justice to the subjective variety of an individual life. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 3.

Only a mythical being has a range greater than man’s. How then can man form any definite opinions about himself? ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 4.

It called the figure Atmavictu-the ‘breath of life.’ It is a further development of that quasi-sexual object of my childhood, which turned out to be the ‘breath of life,’ the creative impulse. Basically, the manikin is a kabir” ~Carl Jung, MDR, pp. 38-39.

Although there is no way to marshal valid proof of continuance of the soul after death, there are nevertheless experiences which make us thoughtful. I take them as hints, and do not presume to ascribe to them the significance of insights. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 312.

Myth is the natural and indispensable intermediate stage between unconscious and conscious cognition. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 311.

The kernel of all jealousy is lack of love. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 137.

Consequently, the sight of a child or a primitive will arouse certain longings in adult, civilized persons longings which relate to the unfulfilled desires and needs of those parts of the personality which have been blotted out of the total picture in favor of the adapted persona. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 244

. . . my father did not dare to think, because he was consumed by inward doubts. He was taking refuge from himself and therefore insisted on blind faith. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 73.

God is not human, I thought; that is His greatness, that nothing human impinges on Him. He is kind and terrible— both at once— and is therefore a great peril from which everyone naturally tries to save himself. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Pages 55-56.

I began to understand that the goal of psychic development is the self. There is no linear evolution; there is only a circumambulation of the self. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 196.

After this dream I gave up drawing or painting mandalas. The dream depicted the climax of the whole process of development of consciousness. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 199

My family and my profession remained the base to which I could always return, assuring me that I was an actually existing, ordinary person. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 189

The self, I thought, was like the monad which I am, and which is my world. The mandala represents this monad, and corresponds to the microcosmic nature of the soul. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 206 and MDR, Page 221.

In the experience of the self it is no longer the opposites “God” and “man” that are reconciled, as it was before, but rather the opposites within the God-image itself. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 338.

… at any time in my later life, when I came up at a blank wall, I painted a picture or hewed stone. Each such experience proved to be a “rite d ‘entree” for the ideas and works that followed hard upon it. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 175.

It was most essential for me to have a normal life in the real world as a counterpoise to that strange inner world. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 189

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 247.

It is the prime task of all education (of adults) to convey the archetype of the God image, or its emanations and effects, to the conscious mind. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 47.

The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 154.

What is remarkable about Christianity is that in its system of dogma it anticipates a metamorphosis in the divinity, a process of historic change on the “other side.” ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 327.

The angels are a strange genus: they are precisely what they are and cannot be anything else. They are in themselves soulless beings who represent nothing but the thoughts and intuitions of their Lord. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Pages 327-328.

I often asked Jung for specific data on outward happenings, but I asked in vain. Only the spiritual essence of his life’s experience remained in his memory, and this alone seemed to him worth the effort of telling. ~Aniela Jaffe, MDR, vii-viii.

I have suffered enough from incomprehension and from the isolation one falls into when one says things that people do not understand. . . . ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page p. xii.

My life has been in a sense the quintessence of what I have written, not the other way around. The way I am and the way I write are a unity. All my ideas and all my endeavors are myself. Thus the “autobiography” is mere dot on the i. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page p. xii.

The feeling for the infinite, however, can be attained only if we are bounded to the utmost. . . . Only consciousness of our narrow confinement in the self forms the link to the limitlessness of the unconscious. In such awareness we experience ourselves concurrently as limited and eternal as both the one and the other. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 225.

… at any time in my later life, when I came up at a blank wall, I painted a picture or hewed stone. Each such experience proved to be a “rite d ‘entree” for the ideas and works that followed hard upon it. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 175.

It was most essential for me to have a normal life in the real world as a counterpoise to that strange inner world. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 189

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 247.

It is the prime task of all education (of adults) to convey the archetype of the God image, or its emanations and effects, to the conscious mind. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 47.

The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 154.

What is remarkable about Christianity is that in its system of dogma it anticipates a metamorphosis in the divinity, a process of historic change on the “other side.” ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 327.

The angels are a strange genus: they are precisely what they are and cannot be anything else. They are in themselves soulless beings who represent nothing but the thoughts and intuitions of their Lord. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Pages 327-328.

I often asked Jung for specific data on outward happenings, but I asked in vain. Only the spiritual essence of his life’s experience remained in his memory, and this alone seemed to him worth the effort of telling. ~Aniela Jaffe, MDR, vii-viii.

I have suffered enough from incomprehension and from the isolation one falls into when one says things that people do not understand. . . . ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page p. xii.

My life has been in a sense the quintessence of what I have written, not the other way around. The way I am and the way I write are a unity. All my ideas and all my endeavors are myself. Thus the “autobiography” is mere dot on the i. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page p. xii.

The feeling for the infinite, however, can be attained only if we are bounded to the utmost. . . . Only consciousness of our narrow confinement in the self forms the link to the limitlessness of the unconscious. In such awareness we experience ourselves concurrently as limited and eternal as both the one and the other. ~Carl Jung, MDR, Page 225.

Thus we remain ignorant of whether our ancestral components find an elementary gratification in our lives, or whether they are repelled. Inner peace and contentment depend in large measure upon whether or not the historical family which is inherent in the individual can be harmonized with the ephemeral conditions of the present. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 237.

Nature, the psyche, and life appear to me like divinity unfolded – and what more could I wish for? To me the supreme meaning of Being can consist only in the fact that it is, not that it is not or is no longer. ~Carl Jung; MDR, Page 276.

I knew that in finding the mandala as an expression of the Self I had attained what was for me the ultimate. Perhaps someone else knows more, but not I. ~Carl Jung; MDR, Page 197.

At times I feel as if I am spread out over the landscape and inside things, and am myself living in every tree, in the splashing of the waves, in the clouds and the animals that come and go, in the procession of the seasons. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Pages 225-226.

A man who has not passed through the inferno of his passions has never overcome them. They then dwell in the house next door, and at any moment a flame may dart out and set fire to his own house. Whenever we give up, leave behind, and forget too much, there is always the danger that the things we have neglected will return with added force. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 277.

The collective unconscious is common to all; it is the foundation of what the ancients called the ‘sympathy of all things’. ~Carl Jung; MDR; Page 138.

I had another experience of the evolution of the soul after death when about a year after my wife’s death I suddenly awoke one night and knew that I had been with her in the south of France, in Provence, and had spent an entire day with her.  ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 309

But the thought that my wife was continuing after death to work on her further spiritual development however that may be conceived struck me as meaningful and held a measure of reassurance for me.  ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 309

The infinite series of natural numbers corresponds to the infinite number of individual creatures. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 310

The properties of numbers are, however, simultaneously properties of matter, for which reason certain equations can anticipate its behavior.  ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 310-311

True, the unconscious knows more than consciousness does; but it is knowledge of a special sort, knowledge in eternity, usually without reference to the here and now, not couched in language of the intellect. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 311

In himself he [Wotan] is an important god a Mercury or Hermes, as the Romans correctly realized, a nature spirit who returned to life again in the Merlin of the Grail legend and became, as the spiritus Mercurialis, the sought-after arcanum of the alchemists. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 313

Thus the dream says that the soul of my mother was taken into that greater territory of the self which lies beyond the segment of Christian morality, taken into that wholeness of nature and spirit in which conflicts and contradictions are resolved. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 313-314

A man should be able to say he has done his best to form a conception of life after death, or to create some image of it even if he must confess his failure.  ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 302

I have been convinced that at least a part of our psychic existence is characterized by a relativity of space and time. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 305

Not only my own dreams, but also occasionally the dreams of others, helped to shape, revise, or confirm my views on a Me after death. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 306

The figures from the unconscious are uninformed too, and need man, or contact with consciousness, in order to attain to  knowledge. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 306

Quite early I had learned that it was necessary for me to instruct the figures of the unconscious, or that other group which is often indistinguishable from them, the “spirits of the departed.” ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 306

People have the idea that the dead know far more than we, for Christian doctrine teaches that in the hereafter we shall “see face to face.”

Apparently, however, the souls of the dead “know” only what they knew at the moment of death, and nothing beyond that. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 308

I frequently have a feeling that they [the Dead] are standing directly behind us, waiting to hear what answer we will give to them, and what answer to destiny. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 308

Prejudice cripples and injures the full phenomenon of psychic life. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 299

Rationalism and doctrinairism are the disease of our time; they pretend to have all the answers. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 300

Unfortunately, the mythic side of man is given short shrift nowadays. He can no longer create fables. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 300

There are people who feel no craving for immortality, and who shudder at the thought of sitting on a cloud and playing the harp for ten thousand years! ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 301

There are also quite a few who have been so buffeted by life, or who feel such disgust for their own existence, that they far prefer absolute cessation to continuance. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 301

He [Jung] told Marie-Louise, the last time she saw him, eight days before his death, that he had had a vision in which a large part of the world was destroyed, but, he added, “Thank God, not all of it.” – Barbara Hannah, Jung His Life and Work

 . . . death is indeed a fearful piece of brutality; there is no sense in pretending otherwise. It is brutal not only as a physical event but far more so psychically: a human being is torn away from us, and what remains is the icy stillness of death. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 314

 There are many human beings who throughout their lives and at the moment of death lag behind their own potentialities and even more important behind the knowledge which has been brought to consciousness by other human beings during their own lifetimes. Hence their demand to attain in death that share of awareness which they failed to win in life.  I have come to this conclusion through observation of dreams about the dead. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 308-309

 Myth is the natural and indispensable intermediate stage between unconscious and conscious cognition. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 311

 Only here, in life on earth, where the opposites clash together, can the general level of consciousness be raised. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 311

 My parent’s marriage was not a happy one, but full of trials and difficulties and tests of patience. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 315

 We lack concrete proof that anything of us is preserved for eternity.  At most we can say that there is some probability that something of our psyche continues beyond physical death. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 322

What is remarkable about Christianity is that in its system of dogma it anticipates a metamorphosis in the divinity, a process of historic change on the “other side.” ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 327

 The angels are a strange genus: they are precisely what they are and cannot be anything else. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 327.

 They [Angels] are in themselves soulless beings who  In the original sense of the Greek iheorein, ‘looking about the world,” or they represent nothing but the thoughts and intuitions of their Lord. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 327-328

 As early as the period of primitive Christianity, the idea of the incarnation had been refined to include the intuition of “Christ within us.” ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 328

 The Christian world is now truly confronted by the principle of evil, by naked injustice, tyranny, lies, slavery, and coercion of conscience. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 328

 Evil has become a determinant reality. It can no longer be dismissed from the world by a circumlocution. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 329

 We achieve knowledge of nature only through science, which enlarges consciousness; hence deepened self-knowledge also requires science, that is, psychology. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 331

 Quite right: we have no imagination for evil, but evil has us in its grip. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 331

 Evil today has become a visible Great Power. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 331

 A further development of myth might well begin with the outpouring of the Holy Spirit upon the apostles, by which they were made into sons of God, and not only they, but all others who through them and after them received the filiation sonship of God and thus partook of the certainty that they were more than autochthonous animalia sprung from the earth, that as the twice-born they had their roots in the divinity itself. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 333

 In keeping with the spirit of the East, the succession of birth and death is viewed as an endless continuity, as an eternal wheel rolling on forever without a goal, Man lives and attains knowledge and dies and begins again from the beginning. Only with the Buddha does the idea of a goal emerge, namely, the overcoming of earthly existence.  ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 316

 To Western man, the meaninglessness of a merely static universe is unbearable. He must assume that it has meaning. The Oriental does not need to make this assumption; rather, he himself embodies it. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 317

 Whereas the Occidental feels the need to complete the meaning of the world, the Oriental strives for the fulfillment of meaning in man, stripping the world and existence from himself (Buddha).  I would say that both are right. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 317

 I know no answer to the question of whether the karma which I live is the outcome of my past lives, or whether it is not rather the achievement of my ancestors, whose heritage comes together in me. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 317

 Am I a combination of the lives of these ancestors and do I embody these lives again? ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 317

 When I die, my deeds will follow along with me that is how I imagine it. I will bring with me what I have done. In the meantime it is important to insure that I do not stand at the end with empty hands. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 318

 What I feel to be the resultant of my ancestors’ lives, or a karma acquired in a previous personal life, might perhaps equally well be an impersonal archetype which today presses hard on everyone and has taken a particular hold upon me an archetype such as, for example, the development over the centuries of the divine triad and its confrontation with the feminine principle; or the still pending answer to the Gnostic question as to the origin of evil, or, to put it another way, the incompleteness of the Christian God-image. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 316

 The question of karma is obscure to me, as is also the problem of personal rebirth or of the transmigration of souls. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 319

 Recently, however, I observed in myself a series of dreams which would seem to describe the process of reincarnation in a deceased person of my acquaintance. But I have never come across any such dreams in other persons, and therefore have no basis for comparison. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 319

 Thus the psyche might be that existence in which the hereafter or the land of the dead is located. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 319

 In old age one begins to let memories unroll before the mind’s eye and, musing, to recognize oneself in the inner and outer images of the past.

This is like a preparation for an existence in the hereafter, just as, in Plato’s view, philosophy is a preparation for death. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 319

 Many old people become too involved in their reconstruction of past events.  They remain imprisoned in these memories. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 320

 Thus in most conceptions the hereafter is pictured as a pleasant place. That does not seem so obvious to me. I hardly think that after death we shall be spirited to some lovely flowering meadow. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 320

 The world into which we enter after death will be grand and terrible, like God and like all of nature that we know. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 321

 Granted that what I experienced in my 1944 visions liberation from the burden of the body, and perception of meaning gave me the deepest bliss.  Nevertheless, there was darkness too, and a strange cessation of human warmth. Remember the black rock to which I came! ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 321

 If there were no imperfections, no primordial defect in the ground of creation, why should there be any urge to create, any longing for what must yet be fulfilled? ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 321

 The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life.

Uniqueness and limitation are synonymous. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 325

 Without them, no perception of the unlimited is possible and, consequently, no coming to consciousness either merely a delusory identity with it which takes the form of intoxication with large numbers and an avidity for political power. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 325

 The phenomenon of dictators and all the misery they have wrought springs from the fact that man has been robbed of transcendence by the shortsightedness of the super-intellectuals. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 326

What, finally, does it mean when St. Paul confesses: “The evil which I would not, that I do”? ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 353

The old question posed by the Gnostics, “Whence comes evil?” has been given no answer by the Christian world, and Origen’s cautious suggestion of a possible redemption of the devil was termed a heresy. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 332

The mandala symbol sketched by Boehme is a representation of the split God, for the inner circle is divided into two semicircles standing back to back. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 334

In contrast to Boehme’s mandala, the modern ones strive for unity; they represent a compensation of the psychic cleavage, or an anticipation that the cleavage will be surmounted. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 335

Our psyche is set up in accord with the structure of the universe, and what happens in the macrocosm likewise happens in the infinitesimal and most subjective reaches of the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 335

Hence I prefer the term “the unconscious,” knowing that I might equally well speak of “God” or “daimon” if I wished to express myself in mythic language. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 336-337

By this act of incarnation man that is, his ego is inwardly replaced by “God,” and God becomes outwardly man, in keeping with the saying of Jesus: “Who sees me, sees the Father.” ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 337

Theological thinkers have therefore felt it necessary to equip Jesus with qualities which raise him above ordinary human existence. Above all he lacks the macula peccati (stain of original sin). ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 337

…the myth of the necessary incarnation of God the essence of the Christian message can then be understood as man’s creative

confrontation with the opposites and their synthesis in the self, the wholeness of his personality. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 338

The world becomes the phenomenal world, for without conscious reflection it would not be. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 338-339

If the Creator were conscious of Himself, He would not need conscious creatures; nor is it probable that the extremely indirect methods of creation, which squander millions of years upon the development of countless species and creatures, are the outcome of purposeful intention. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 339

The importance of consciousness is so great that one cannot help suspecting the element of meaning to be concealed somewhere within all the monstrous, apparently senseless biological turmoil, and that the road to its manifestation was ultimately found on the level of warm-blooded vertebrates possessed of a differentiated brain found as if by chance, unintended and unforeseen, and yet somehow sensed, felt and groped for out of some dark urge. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 339

The Water Bearer seems to represent the self.  With a sovereign gesture he pours the contents of his jug into the mouth of Piscis austrinus which symbolizes a son, a still unconscious content. Out of this unconscious content will emerge, after the passage of another aeon of more than two thousand years, a future whose features are indicated by the symbol of Capricorn: an aigokeros, the monstrosity of the Goat-Fish, made up of two undifferentiated animal elements which have grown together. This strange being could easily be the primordial image of a Creator-god confronting “man,” the Anthropos. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 339

The need for mythic statements is satisfied when we frame a view of the world which adequately explains the meaning of human existence in the cosmos, a view which springs from our psychic wholeness, from the co-operation between conscious and unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 340

No science will ever replace myth, and a myth cannot be made out of any science. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 340

For it is not that “God” is a myth, but that myth is the revelation of a divine life in man. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 340

The Word happens to us; we suffer it, for we are victims of a profound uncertainty: with God as a complexio oppositorum, all things are possible, in the fullest meaning of the phrase. Truth and delusion, good and evil, are equally possible. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 341

Myth is or can be equivocal, like the oracle of Delphi or like a dream. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 341

When no valid secrets really exist, mysteries are invented or contrived to which privileged initiates are admitted. Such was the case with the Rosicrucians and many other societies. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 342.

The man, therefore, who, driven by his daimon, steps beyond the limits of the intermediary stage, truly enters the “untrodden, untreadable regions/’

sallies into no man’s land last only as long as no such conflicts occur, and come swiftly to an end as soon as conflict is sniffed from afar. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 344.

There is now an authentic secret in his life which cannot be discussed if only because he is involved in an endless inner trial in which he is his own counsel and ruthless examiner, and no secular or spiritual judge can restore his easy sleep. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 345

Just as all energy proceeds from opposition, so the psyche too possesses its inner polarity, this being the indispensable prerequisite for its aliveness, as Heraclitus realized long ago. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 346

 If, Therefore, we speak of “God” as an “archetype,” we are saying nothing about His real nature but are letting it be known that “God” already has a place in that part of our psyche which is pre-existent to consciousness and that He therefore cannot be considered an invention of consciousness. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 347-348

 Or if not atheism, then Gnosticism anything, heaven forbid, but a psychic reality like the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 348

If the unconscious is anything at all, it must consist of earlier evolutionary stages of our conscious psyche. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 348

Consciousness is phylogenetically and ontogenetically a secondary phenomenon.  It is time this obvious fact were grasped at last. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 348

Just as the body has an anatomical prehistory of millions of years, so also does the psychic system. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 348

Consciousness began its evolution from an animal-like state which seems to us unconscious, and the same process of differentiation is repeated in every child. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 348

The psyche of the child in its preconscious state is anything but a tabula rasa; it is already preformed in a recognizably individual way, and is moreover equipped with all specifically human instincts, as well as with the a priori foundations of the higher functions. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 348

This instinct comes to us from within, as a compulsion or will or command, and if as has more or less been done from time immemorial we give it the name of a personal daimon we are at least aptly expressing the psychological situation. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 349

Psychology has no room for judgments like “only religious” or “only philosophical” despite the fact that we too often hear the charge of something’s being “only psychological” especially from theologians. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 350

Once more I fell into a strange mood in the tomb of Galla Placidia; once more I was deeply stirred. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 284

I had, from the first visit, been personally affected by the figure of Galla Placidia, and had often wondered how it must have been for this highly cultivated, fastidious woman to live at the side of a barbarian prince. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and, Page 286

Her [Galla Placidia] fate and her whole being were vivid presences to me; with her intense nature, she was a suitable embodiment for my anima. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 286

The anima of a man has a strongly historical character. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 286

To the individual, the anima is all life that has been in the past and is still alive in him. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 286

What happens within oneself when one integrates previously unconscious contents with the consciousness is something which can scarcely be described in words. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 287

Since my experience in the baptistery in Ravenna, I know with certainty that something interior can seem to be exterior, and that something exterior can appear to be interior. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 287

India affected me like a dream, for I was and remained in search of myself, of the truth peculiar to myself. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 275

India gave me my first direct experience of an alien, highly differentiated culture. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 275

In India, however, I had the chance to speak with representatives of the Indian mentality, and to compare it with the European. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 275

Neither in Europe can I make any borrowings from the East, but must shape my life out of myself out of what my inner being tells me, or what nature brings to me. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 275

In a conversation with a cultivated Chinese I was also impressed, again and again, by the fact that these people are able to integrate so-called “evil” without ‘losing face.” ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 275

I want to be freed neither from human beings, nor from myself, nor from nature; for all these appear to me the greatest of miracles. Nature, the psyche, and life appear to me like divinity unfolded and what more could I wish for? ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 276

I cannot be liberated from anything that I do not possess, have not done or experienced. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 276

Real liberation becomes possible for me only when I have done all that I was able to do, when I have completely devoted myself to a thing and participated in it to the utmost. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 276

If I withdraw from participation, I am virtually amputating the corresponding part of my psyche. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 276

A man who has not passed through the inferno of his passions has never overcome them. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 277

I grasped the life of the Buddha as the reality of the self which had broken through and laid claim to a personal life. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 279

Buddha saw and grasped the cosmogonic dignity of human consciousness; for that reason he saw clearly that if a man succeeded in extinguishing this light, the world would sink into nothingness. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 279

Christ like Buddha is an embodiment of the self, but in an altogether different sense. Both stood for an overcoming of the world: Buddha out of rational insight; Christ as a foredoomed sacrifice. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 279

I want to be freed neither from human beings, nor from myself, nor from nature; for all these appear to me the greatest of miracles. Nature, the psyche, and life appear to me like divinity unfolded and what more could I wish for? ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 276

Buddha lived out his life and died at an advanced age, whereas Christ’s activity as Christ probably lasted no more than a year. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 279

Buddhism underwent the same transformation as Christianity: Buddha became, as it were, the image of the development of the self; he became a model for men to imitate, whereas actually he had preached that by overcoming the Nidana-chain every human being could become an illuminate, a buddha. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 280

India honored me with three doctorates, from Allahabad, Benares, and Calcutta representatives of Islam, of Hinduism, and of British-Indian medicine and science. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 280

Some ten years before, I had discovered that in many places in England the myth of the Grail was still a living thing, in spite of all the scholarship that has accumulated around this tradition. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 282

But India did not pass me by without a trace; it left tracks which lead from one infinity into another infinity. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 284

All conceivable statements are made by the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 350

The psyche cannot leap beyond itself. It cannot set up any absolute truths, for its own polarity determines the relativity of its statements. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 350

I have never drawn this overhasty conclusion, for I have never been inclined to think that our senses were capable of perceiving all forms of being. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 351

I sometimes feel that Paul’s words ‘Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not love” might well be the first condition of all cognition and the quintessence of divinity itself. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 353

Primitive huts concretize an idea of wholeness, a familial wholeness in which all sorts of small domestic animals likewise participate. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 224

In my retiring room [at Bollingen] I am by myself. I keep the key with me all the time; no one else is allowed in there except with my permission. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 224

After my wife’s death in 1955, I felt an inner obligation to become what I myself am. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 225

I had started the first tower in 1923, two months after the death of my mother. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 225

At Bollingen I am in the midst of my true life, I am most deeply myself. Here I am, as it were, the “age-old son of the mother.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 225

Evenings, I light the old lamps. There is no running water, and I pump the water from the well. I chop the wood and cook the food. These simple acts make man simple; and how difficult it is to be simple! ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 226

It might be said that the secret of Merlin was carried on by alchemy, primarily in the figure of Mercurius. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 228

At the same time I had a visual image of several hundred dark-clad figures, possibly peasant boys in their Sunday clothes, who had come down from the mountains and were pouring in around the Tower, on both sides, with a great deal of loud trampling, laughing, singing, and playing of accordions. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 229

My daughter had sensed the presence of the dead body. Her power to sense such things is something she inherits from my grandmother on my mother’s side. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 232

I feel very strongly that I am under the influence of things or questions which were left incomplete and unanswered by my parents and grandparents and more distant ancestors. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 233

It often seems as if there were an impersonal karma within a family, which is passed on from parents to children. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 233

A collective problem, if not recognized as such, always appears as a personal problem, and in individual cases may give the impression that something is out of order in the realm of the personal psyche. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 233

Therefore I felt personally implicated, and when Faust, in his hubris and self-inflation, caused the murder of Philemon and Baucis, I felt guilty, quite as if I myself in the past had helped commit the murder of the two old people. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 234

The dichotomy of Faust-Mephistopheles came together within myself into a single person, and I was that person.  In other words, I was directly struck, and recognized that this was my fate. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 234

We no longer live on what we have, but on promises, no longer in the light of the present day, but in the darkness of the future, which, we expect, will at last bring the proper sunrise. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 236

Thus we remain ignorant of whether our ancestral components find an elementary gratification in our lives, or whether they are repelled. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 237

Inner peace and contentment depend in large measure upon whether or not the historical family which is inherent in the individual can be harmonized with the ephemeral conditions of the present. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 237

At last I was where I had longed to be: in a non-European country where no European language was spoken and no Christian conceptions prevailed, where a different race lived and a different historical tradition and philosophy had set its stamp upon the face of the crowd. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams an Reflections, Page 238

What the Europeans regard as Oriental calm and apathy seemed to me a mask; behind it I sensed a restlessness, a degree of agitation, which I could not explain. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams an Reflections, Page 239

What the technological age will do with Islam remains to be seen. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams an Reflections, Page 239

The deeper we penetrated into the Sahara, the more time slowed down for me; it even threatened to move backward. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams an Reflections, Page 240

What we lack is intensity of life. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams an Reflections, Page 242

In traveling to Africa to find a psychic observation post outside the sphere of the European, I unconsciously wanted to find that part of my personality which had become invisible under the influence and the pressure of being European. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams an Reflections, Page 244

The Arab’s dusky complexion marks him as a “shadow,” but not the personal shadow, rather an ethnic one associated not with my persona but with the totality of my personality, that is, with the self. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams an Reflections, Page 245

Knowledge does not enrich us; it removes us more and more from the mythic world in which we were once at home by right of birth.  ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 252

In talk with a European, one is constantly running up on the sand bars of things long known but never understood; with this [Pueblo[ Indian, the vessel floated freely on deep, alien seas. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 247

What we from our point of view call colonization, missions to the heathen, spread of civilization, etc., has another face the face of a bird of prey seeking with cruel intentness for distant quarry a face worthy of a race of pirates and highwaymen. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 248

Never before had I run into such an atmosphere of secrecy [Pueblo Religion]; the religions of civilized nations today are all accessible; their sacraments have long ago ceased to be mysteries. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 249

See,” how cruel the whites look. Their lips are thin, their noses sharp, their faces furrowed and distorted by folds. Their eyes have a staring expression; they are always seeking something. What are they seeking? The whites always want something; they are always uneasy and restless. We do not know what they want. We do not understand them. We think that they are mad.” ~Mountain Lake, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 247-248

“Why,” Mountain Lake said, “do the Americans not let us alone? Why do they want to forbid our dances? Why do they make difficulties when we want to take our young people from school in order to lead them to the kiva (site of the rituals) , and instruct them in our religion?  We do nothing to harm the Americans!”  ~Mountain Lake, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 251

“The Americans want to stamp out our religion. Why can they not let us alone? What we do, we do not only for ourselves but for the Americans also. Yes, we do it for the whole world. Everyone benefits by it.”  ~Mountain Lake, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 251-252

“After all,” he said, “we are a people who live on the roof of the world; we are the sons of Father Sun, and with our religion we daily help our

father to go across the sky. We do this not only for ourselves, but for the whole world. If we were to cease practicing our religion, in ten years the sun would no longer rise. Then it would be night forever.”  ~Mountain Lake, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 252

Mombassa remains in my memory as a humidly hot, European, Indian, and Negro settlement hidden in a forest of palms and mango trees. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 254

It [Being in Mombassa] was as if I were this moment returning to the land of my youth, and as if I knew that dark-skinned man who had been waiting for me for five thousand years. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 254

“What nature leaves imperfect, the art perfects,” say the alchemists. Man, I, in an invisible act of creation put the stamp of perfection on the world by giving it objective existence. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 255

Now I knew what it was, and knew even more: that man is indispensable for the completion of creation;  that, in fact, he himself is the second creator of the world, who alone has given to the world its objective existence without which, unheard, unseen, silently eating, giving birth, dying,

heads nodding through hundreds of millions of years, it would have gone on in the profoundest night of non-being down to its unknown end. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 256

Because I already had gray hair at the time (I was then fifty), I was the “mzee” the old man, and was regarded as a hundred years old. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 259

They termed me a “man of the Book” because of my knowledge of the Koran. To their minds, I was a disguised Mohammedan. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 265

The old man said that this was the true religion of all peoples, that all Kevirondos, all Buganda, all tribes for as far as the eye could see from the mountain and endlessly farther, worshiped adhista that is, the sun at the moment of rising. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 267

Evidently, the meaning of the Elgonyi ceremony was that an offering was being made to the sun divinity at the moment of its rising. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 267

It was a profoundly stirring experience for me to find, at the sources of the Nile, this reminder of the ancient Egyptian conception of the two acolytes of Osiris, Horus and Set. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 268

There is a sadness in animals’ eyes, and we never know whether that sadness is bound up with the soul of the animal or is a poignant message which speaks to us out of that still unconscious existence. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 269

To say that the sun is God is to blur and forget the archetypal experience of that moment. “We are glad that the night when the spirits are abroad is over now,” the natives will say but that is already a rationalization. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 269

My greatest illumination in this respect had been my discovery of the Horus principle among the Elgonyi. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 274

I am not my own history or historiographer ~Carl Jung, BBC Interview 1959

 Analytical psychology is fundamentally a natural science, but it is subject far more than any other science to the personal bias of the observer. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 200

 Between 1918 and 1926 1 had seriously studied the Gnostic writers, for they too had been confronted with the primal world of the unconscious and had dealt with its contents, with images that were obviously contaminated with the world of instinct. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 201

 But the Gnostics were too remote for me to establish any link with them in regard to the questions that were confronting me. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 201

 As far as I could see, the tradition that might have connected Gnosis with the present seemed to have been severed, and for a long time it proved impossible to find any bridge that led from Gnosticism or neo-Platonism to the contemporary world. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 201

 Grounded in the natural philosophy of the Middle Ages, alchemy formed the bridge on the one hand into the past, to Gnosticism, and on the other into the future, to the modern psychology of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 201

                                                                                                     

The motif of the Gnostic Yahweh and Creator-God reappeared in the Freudian myth of the primal father and the gloomy superego deriving from that father. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 201

 I was in correspondence with him at the time and had let him know how much I valued his work.  As his tragic death shows, Silberer’s discovery of the problem was not followed by insight into it. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 204

 This (Alchemy) was, of course, a momentous discovery: I had stumbled upon the historical counterpart of my psychology of the unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 205

 The possibility of a comparison with alchemy, and the uninterrupted intellectual chain back to Gnosticism, gave substance to my psychology. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 205

 I regard my work on alchemy as a sign of my inner relationship to Goethe. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 206

 My real scientific work began with the association experiment in 1903. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 206

 I was presumptuous enough to send a copy of my book [Psychological Types] to Spitteler. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 207

 Through the study of these collective transformation processes and through understanding of alchemical symbolism I arrived at the central concept of my psychology: the process of individuation. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 209

 Not only do I leave the door open for the Christian message, but I consider it of central importance for Western man. It needs, however, to be seen in a new light, in accordance with the changes wrought by the contemporary spirit. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 210

 A vision as such is nothing unusual for me, for I frequently see extremely vivid hypnagogic images. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 210

 The green gold is the living quality which the alchemists saw not only in man but also in inorganic nature. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 210

 My vision was thus a union of the Christ-image with his analogue in matter, the filius macrocosmi. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 211

 It was also important to me to show how Christ could have been astrologically predicted, and how he was understood both in terms of the spirit of his age and in the course of two thousand years of Christian civilization. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 211

The ancient idea of the Anthropos, whose roots lie in Jewish tradition on the one hand and in the Egyptian Horus myth on the other, had taken possession of the people at the beginning of the Christian era, for it was part of the Zeitgeist. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 211

 

The main problem of medical psychotherapy is the transference. In this matter Freud and I were in complete agreement. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 212

 I knew that this was the room where my mother, who in reality had long been dead, was visited, and that she had set up these beds for visiting spirits to sleep. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 213

 Thus both my parents appeared burdened with the problem of the “cure of souls,” which in fact was really my task. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 214

 Had it not been for my unwillingness to intrude upon my wife’s field, I would unquestionably have had to include the Grail legend in my studies of alchemy. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 215

 Blind acceptance never leads to a solution; at best it leads only to a standstill and is paid for heavily in the next generation. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 215

 The “pisciculi Christianorum” show that those who imitate Christ are themselves fish that is, unconscious souls who require the cura animarum. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 216

 There I had dealt with the psychology of Christianity, and Job is a kind of prefiguration of Christ. The link between them is the idea of suffering. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 216

 In the final analysis it is God who created the world and its sins, and who therefore became Christ in order to suffer the fate of humanity. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 216

 My Answer to Job was meant to be no more than the utterance of a single individual, who hopes and expects to arouse some thoughtfulness in his public. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 217

Only later did I understand what this allusion to Uriah signified: not only was I forced to speak publicly, and very much to my detriment, about the ambivalence of the God-image in the Old Testament; but also, my wife would be taken from me by death. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 220

 A synchronicity exists between the life of Christ and the objective astronomical event, the entrance of the spring equinox into the sign of Pisces. Christ is therefore the “Fish” (just as Hammurabi before him was the “Ram”), and comes forth as the ruler of the new aeon. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 221

 The moment I touched bottom, I reached the bounds of scientific understanding, the transcendental, the nature of the archetype per se, concerning which no further scientific statements can be made. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 221

 Miracles and terrible mysteries are close at hand. I feel the things that were and that will be. Behind the ordinary the eternal abyss yawns. The earth gives me back what it hid.” ~C.G. Jung, The Red Book, Page 305

Everything that I have written this year and last year, “The Undiscovered Self,” “Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth,” “A Psychological View of Conscience,” has grown out of the stone sculptures I did after my wife’s death. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 175

 But there was a demonic strength in me, and from the beginning there was no doubt in my mind that I must find the meaning of what I was experiencing in these fantasies. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 177

 When I endured these assaults of the unconscious I had an unswerving conviction that I was obeying a higher will, and that feeling continued to uphold me until I had mastered the task. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 177

 I was frequently so wrought up that I had to do certain yoga exercises in order to hold my emotions in check. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 177

 As soon as I had the feeling that I was myself again, I abandoned this restraint upon the emotions and allowed the images and inner voices to speak afresh. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 177

 Had I left those images hidden in the emotions, I might have been torn to pieces by them. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 177

 As a result of my experiment I learned how helpful it can be, from the therapeutic point of view, to find the particular images which lie behind emotions. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 178

 Archetypes speak the language of high rhetoric, even of bombast. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 178

 From the beginning I had conceived my voluntary confrontation with the unconscious as a scientific experiment which I

myself was conducting and in whose outcome I was vitally interested. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 178

 This idea that I was committing myself to a dangerous enterprise not for myself alone, but also for the sake of my patients helped me over several critical phases. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 179

 After the deed I felt an overpowering compassion, as though I myself had been shot: a sign of my secret identity with Siegfried, as well as of the grief a man feels when he is forced to sacrifice his ideal and his conscious attitudes. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 180

 This identity and my heroic idealism had to be abandoned, for there are higher things than the ego’s will, and to these one must bow. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 180

 Salome is an anima figure. She is blind because she does not see the meaning of things. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 181

 Philemon was a pagan and brought with him an Egypto-Hellenistic atmosphere with a Gnostic coloration. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 182

 He said I treated thoughts as if I generated them myself, but in his view thoughts were like animals in the forest, or people in a room, or birds in the air, and added, “If you should see people in a room, you would not think that you had made those people, or that you were responsible for them.”  ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 183

 It was he [Philemon] who taught me psychic objectivity, the reality of the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 183

 Psychologically, Philemon represented superior insight. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 183

 “There are ghostly gurus too,” he added. “Most people have living gurus. But there are always some who have a spirit for teacher.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 184

 Later, became relativized by the emergence of yet another figure, whom I called Ka. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 184

 Philemon was the spiritual aspect, or “meaning.” Ka, on the other hand, was a spirit of nature like the Anthroparion of Greek alchemy with which at the time I was still unfamiliar. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 185

 Ka was he who made everything real, but who also obscured the halcyon spirit, Meaning, or replaced it by beauty, the “eternal reflection.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 185

 Then I thought, “Perhaps my unconscious is forming a personality that is not me, but which is insisting on coming through to expression.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 185

For decades I always turned to the anima when I felt that my emotional behavior was disturbed, and that something had been constellated in the unconscious.  I would then ask the anima: “Now what are you up to? What do you see? I should like to know.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 187

Today I am directly conscious of the anima’s ideas because I have learned to accept the contents of the unconscious and to understand them.  ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 186

I know how I must behave toward the inner images. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 188

Nietzsche had lost the ground under his feet because he possessed nothing more than the inner world of his thoughts which incidentally possessed him more than he it. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 189

Thus my family and my profession always remained a joyful reality and a guarantee that I also had a normal existence. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 189

My eldest daughter saw a white figure passing through the room. My second daughter, independently of her elder sister, related that twice in the night her blanket had been snatched away; and that same night my nine-year-old son had an anxiety dream. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 190

But what a dreary world it would be if the rules were not violated sometimes! ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 191

From that time on, the dead have become ever more distinct for me as the voices of the Unanswered, Unresolved, and Unredeemed; for since the questions and demands which my destiny required me to answer did not come to me from outside, they must have come from the inner world. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 191

These conversations with the dead formed a kind of prelude to what I had to communicate to the world about the unconscious: a kind of pattern of order and interpretation of its general contents. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 192

I took great care to try to understand every single image, every item of my psychic inventory, and to classify them scientifically so far as this was possible and, above all, to realize them in actual life. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 192

It [Faust] is a link in the Aurea Catena which has existed from the beginnings of philosophical alchemy and Gnosticism down to Nietzsche’s Zarathustra. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 189

I found that Freud’s technique of dream analysis and dream interpretation cast a valuable light upon schizophrenic forms of expression.  ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 146

As early as 1900 1 had read Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams. 1 had laid the book aside, at the time, because I did not yet grasp it. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 146-147

The situation was different when it came to the content of the repression. Here I could not agree with Freud. He considered the cause of the repression to be a sexual trauma. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 147

But then I heard the voice of my second personality: “If you do a thing like that, as if you had no knowledge of Freud, it would be a piece of trickery. You cannot build your life upon a lie.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 148

Above all, Freud’s attitude toward the spirit seemed to me highly questionable. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 149

I had a strong intuition that for him [Freud] sexuality was a sort of numinosum. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 150

To me the sexual theory was just as occult, that is to say, just as unproven an hypothesis, as many other speculative views. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 151

Freud, who had always made much of his irreligiosity, had now constructed a dogma; or rather, in the place of a jealous God whom he had lost, he had substituted another compelling image, that of sexuality. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 151

Although, for Freud, sexuality was undoubtedly a numinosum, his terminology and theory seemed to define it exclusively as a biological function. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 152

Freud himself had told me that he had never read Nietzsche; now I saw Freud’s psychology as, so to speak, an adroit move on the part of intellectual history, compensating for Nietzsche’s deification of the power principle. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 153

Nietzsche, helpless in the hands of his destiny, had to create a “superman” for himself. Freud, I concluded, must himself be so profoundly affected by the power of Eros that he actually wished to elevate it into a dogma aere perennius like a religious numen. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 153-154

When I thought about dreams and the contents of the unconscious, I never did so without making historical comparisons; in my student days I always used Krug’s old dictionary of philosophy. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page  161

I was never able to agree with Freud that the dream is a “facade” behind which its meaning lies hidden a mean Jing already known but maliciously, so to speak, withheld from consciousness. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 161

In the course of this reading I came across Friedrich Creuzer’s Symbolik und Mythologie der alten Volker  and that fired me! ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 162

I read like mad, and worked with feverish interest through a mountain of mythological material, then through the Gnostic writers, and ended in total confusion. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 162

Freud himself had a neurosis, no doubt diagnosable and one with highly troublesome symptoms, as I had discovered on our voyage to America. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 167

When I was working on my book about the libido and approaching the end of the chapter “The Sacrifice,” I knew in advance that its publication would cost me my friendship with Freud. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 167

I spoke with my wife about this, and told her of my fears (Freud’s reaction to “The Sacrifice”. She attempted to reassure me, for she thought that Freud would magnanimously raise no objections, although he might not accept my views. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 167

After the break with Freud, all my friends and acquaintances dropped away. My book was declared to be rubbish; I was a mystic, and that settled the matter. Riklin and Maeder alone stuck by me. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 167

It is a widespread error to imagine that I do not see the value of sexuality. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 168

He [Freud] saw with the patient’s eyes, so to speak, and so reached a deeper understanding of mental illness than had hitherto been possible. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 168

Like an Old Testament prophet, he [Freud] undertook to overthrow false gods, to rip the veils away from a mass of dishonesties and hypocrisies, mercilessly exposing the rottenness of the contemporary psyche. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 169

The assimilation of the fundamental insight that psychic life has two poles still remains a task for the future. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 169

When I became acquainted with his work I was planning an academic career, and was about to complete a paper that was intended to advance me at the university. But Freud was definitely persona non grata in the academic world at the time, and any connection with him would have been damaging in scientific circles. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 148

In response to this article, two German professors wrote to me, warning that if I remained on Freud’s side and continued to defend him, I would be endangering my academic career. I replied: “If what Freud says is the truth, I am with him. I don’t give a damn for a career if it has to be based on the premise of restricting research and concealing the truth.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 148

The years at Burgholzli were my years of apprenticeship. Dominating my interests and research was the burning question: “What actually takes place inside the mentally ill?”  ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 114

In my practice I was constantly impressed by the way the human psyche reacts to a crime committed unconsciously. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 122

She (a patient) had seen people and animals turn away from her, and had been so struck by this silent verdict that she could not have endured any further condemnation. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 123

It dawned upon me then for the first time that a general psychology of the personality lies concealed within psychosis, and that even here we come upon the old human conflicts.  ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 127

Although patients may appear dull and apathetic, or totally imbecilic, there is more going on in their minds, and more that is meaningful, than there seems to be. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 127

At bottom we discover nothing new and unknown in the mentally ill; rather, we encounter the substratum of our own natures. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 127

Outward appearances are frequently deceptive, as I discovered to my astonishment in the case of a young catatonic patient. She was eighteen years old, and came from a cultivated family. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 128

Psychotherapy and analysis are as varied as are human individuals. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 131

I treat every patient as individually as possible, because the solution of the problem is always an individual one. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 131

Universal rules can be postulated only with a grain of salt. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 131

A psychological truth is valid only if it can be reversed. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 131

In one analysis I can be heard talking the Adlerian dialect, in another the Freudian. The crucial point is that I confront the patient as one human being to another. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 131

What counts, after all, is not whether a theory is corroborated, but whether the patient grasps himself as an individual. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Pages 131-132

The psyche is distinctly more complicated and inaccessible than the body. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 132

It is, so to speak, the half of the world which comes into existence only when we become conscious of it. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 132

The psychotherapist, however, must understand not only the patient; it is equally important that he should understand himself. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 132

“Only the wounded physician heals.” ~Carl Jung [citing a Greek Proverb], Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 134

But when the doctor wears his personality like a coat of armor, he has no effect. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 134

By means of a relativization of time and space in the unconscious it could well be that I had perceived something which in reality was taking place elsewhere. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 138

The collective unconscious is common to all; it is the foundation of what the ancients called the “sympathy of all things.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 138

Under my treatment a pagan becomes a pagan and a Christian a Christian, a Jew a Jew, according to what his destiny prescribes for him. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 138

The risk of inner experience, the adventure of the spirit, is in any case alien to most human beings. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Pages 141-142

I no longer recall the figures exactly; but, on a conservative estimate, a third of my cases were really cured, a third considerably improved, and a third not essentially influenced. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 143

For psychotherapy to be effective a close rapport is needed, so close that the doctor cannot shut his eyes to the heights and depths of human suffering. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 143

I am speaking of those who cannot tolerate the loss of myth and who can neither find a way to a merely exterior world, to the world as seen by science, nor rest satisfied with an intellectual juggling with words, which has nothing whatsoever to do with wisdom. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 144

I have had mainly women patients, who often entered into the work with extraordinary conscientiousness, understanding, and intelligence. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 145

 Even the pope has a confessor. I always advise analysts: “Have a father confessor, or a mother confessor!” Women are particularly gifted for playing such a part. They often have excellent intuition and a trenchant critical insight, and can see what men have up their sleeves, at times see also into men’s anima intrigues. They see aspects that the man does not see. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 134

 Fromthe clinical point of view which then prevailed, the human personality of the patient, his individuality, did not matter at all. Rather, the doctor was confronted with Patient X, with a long list of cut-and-dried diagnoses and a detailing of symptoms. Patients were labeled, rubber-stamped with a diagnosis, and, for the most part, that settled the matter. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 114

The material had been published by my revered and fatherly friend, Theodore Flournoy, in the Archives de Psychologie (Geneva). ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 162

He [Jung’s Father] said once, “The boy is interested in everything imaginable, but he does not know what he wants.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 84

, was not so much because our poverty was laid bare for all the world to see, but because I had secretly been I wconvinced that all the “top” people, the people who “counted,” were ill disposed toward me. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 86

Through No. 1’s {personality] eyes I saw myself as a rather disagreeable and moderately gifted young man with vaulting ambitions, an undisciplined temperament, and dubious manners, alternating between naive enthusiasm and fits of childish disappointment, in his innermost essence a hermit and obscurantist. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 86

When No. 2 [personality] predominated, No.1 was contained and obliterated in him, just as, conversely, No. 1 regarded No. 2 as a region of inner darkness. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 87

No. 2 [personality] felt that any conceivable expression of himself would be like a stone thrown over the edge of the world, dropping soundlessly into infinite night. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 87

No. 2, [personality] on the other hand, felt himself in secret accord with the Middle Ages, as personified by Faust, with the legacy of a past which had obviously stirred Goethe to the depths. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 87

Faust, on the other hand, was the living equivalent of No. 2, [personality] and I was convinced that he was the answer which Goethe had given to his times. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 87

When I awoke I realized at once that the figure was a “specter of the Brocken,” my own shadow on the swirling mists, brought into being by the little light I was carrying. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 88

I knew, too, that this little light was my consciousness, the only light I have. My own understanding is the sole treasure I possess, and the greatest. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 88

Now I knew that No. 1 was the bearer of the light, and that No. 2 followed him like a shadow. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 88

My view of the world spun around another ninety degrees; I recognized clearly that my path led irrevocably outward, into the limitations and darkness of three-dimensionality. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 88

It seemed to me that Adam must once have left Paradise in this manner; Eden had become a specter for him, and light was where a stony field had to be tilled in the sweat of his brow. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 88

For the extraordinary idea that in the light of consciousness the inner realm of light appears as a gigantic shadow was not something I would have hit on of my own accord. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 88

I must leave No. 2 behind me, that was clear. But under no circumstances ought I to deny him to myself or declare him invalid. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 89

Children react much less to what grown-ups say than to the imponderables in the surrounding atmosphere. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 89

The peculiar “religious” ideas that came to me even in my earliest childhood were spontaneous products which can be understood only as reactions to my parental environment and to the spirit of the age. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 90

I never had the impression that these influences emanated from my mother, for she was somehow rooted in deep, invisible ground, though it never appeared to me as confidence in her Christian faith. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 90

My mother’s “No. 2,” offered me the strongest support in the conflict then beginning between paternal tradition and the strange, compensatory products which my unconscious had been stimulated to create. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 91

Although we human beings have our own personal life, we are yet in large measure the representatives, the victims and promoters of a collective spirit whose years are counted in centuries. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 91

Thus at least a part of our being lives in the centuries that part which, for my private use, I have designated “No. 2.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 91

During the years 1892-94 I had a number of rather vehement discussions with my father. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 91

As a country parson he [Jung’s Father] lapsed into a sort of sentimental idealism and into reminiscences of his golden student days, continued to smoke a long student’s pipe, and discovered that his marriage was not all he had imagined it to be. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 91

Theology had alienated my father and me from one another. I felt that I had once again suffered a fatal defeat, though I sensed I was not alone. I had a dim premonition that he was inescapably succumbing to his fate. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 93

Once I heard him [Jung’s Father] praying. He struggled desperately to keep his faith. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 93

What were men, anyway? “They are born dumb and blind as puppies” I thought, “and like all God’s creatures are furnished with the dimmest light, never enough to illuminate the darkness in which they grope.” ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 93

The arch sin of faith, it seemed to me, was that it forestalled experience. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 94

His [Jung’s Father] depressive moods increased in frequency and intensity, and so did his hypochondria. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 94

I would not have missed this time of poverty. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 95

The material [Miss Miller Fantasies] had been published by my revered and fatherly friend, Theodore Flournoy, in the Archives de Psychologie (Geneva). ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 162

I was equally sure that none of the theologians I knew had ever seen “the light that shineth in the darkness” with his own eyes, for if they had they would not have been able to teach a “theological religion” which seemed quite inadequate to me, since there was nothing to do with it but believe it without hope. ~Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams and Reflections, Page 94

For a number of years he [Jung’s Father] had complained of all sorts of abdominal symptoms, though his doctor had been unable to find anything definite wrong with him. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 94

 One learns to value simple things [when in Poverty]. I still remember the time when I was given a box of cigars as a present. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 97

 Lord Jesus was to me unquestionably a man and therefore a fallible figure, or else a mere mouthpiece of the Holy Ghost. This highly unorthodox view, a far cry from the theological one, naturally ran up against utter incomprehension. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 98

 Then, for the first time, I became aware how poor we were, that my father was a poor country parson and I a still poorer parson’s son who had holes in his shoes and had to sit for six hours in school with wet socks. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 24

When I was nine years old my mother had had a little girl. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 25

 

To this day, writing down my memories at the age of eighty-three, I have never fully unwound the tangle of my earliest memories. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 27

School came to bore me. It took up far too much time which I would rather have spent drawing battles and playing with fire. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 27

Divinity classes were unspeakably dull, and I felt a downright fear of the mathematics class. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 27

The teacher pretended that algebra was a perfectly natural affair, to be taken for granted, whereas I didn’t even know what numbers really were. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 27

All my life it remained a puzzle to me why it was that I never managed to get my bearings in mathematics when there was no doubt whatever that I could calculate properly. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 28

In addition, I was exempted from drawing classes on grounds of utter incapacity. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 29

To my defeats in mathematics and drawing there was now added a third: from the very first I hated gymnastics. I could not endure having others tell me how to move. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 29

When, as I shall describe later, my neurotic fainting spells began, the doctor forbade me to engage in gymnastics, much to my satisfaction. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 30

But at this moment I came upon myself. Previously I had existed, too, but everything had merely happened to me. Now I happened to myself. Now I knew: I am myself now, now I exist. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 32

I could not understand this identity I felt with the eighteenth century. Often in those days I would write the date 1786 instead of 1886, and each time this happened I was overcome by an inexplicable nostalgia. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 34

One must be utterly abandoned to God; nothing matters but fulfilling His will. Otherwise all is folly and meaninglessness. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 40

It made a lasting impression on me that the unjust steward was praised, and that Peter, the waverer, was appointed the rock upon which the Church was built. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 41

I often thought of myself as a corrupt and inferior person, With the experience of God and the cathedral I at last had something tangible that was part of the great secret as if I had always talked of stones falling from heaven and now had one in my pocket. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 41

As a matter of fact, I did not say anything about the phallus dream until I was sixty-five. I may have spoken about the other experiences to my wife, but only in later years. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 41

Thus the pattern of my relationship to the world was already prefigured: today as then I am a solitary, because I know things and must hint at things which other people do not know, and usually do not even want to know. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 41

Later my mother told me that in those days I was often depressed. It was not really that; rather, I was brooding on the secret. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 42

“The stone has no uncertainties, no urge to communicate, and is eternally the same for thousands of years,” I would think, “while I am only a passing phenomenon which bursts into all kinds of emotions, like a flame that flares up quickly and then goes out.” ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 42

I was but the sum of my emotions, and the Other in me was the timeless, imperishable stone. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 42

I hated all competition, and if someone played a game too competitively I turned my back on the game. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 43

Everything in the unconscious seeks outward manifestation, and the personality too desires to evolve out of its unconscious conditions and to experience itself as a whole. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 3

I cannot employ the language of science to trace this process of growth in myself, for I cannot experience myself as a scientific problem. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 3

What we are to our inward vision, and what man appears to be sub specie aeternitatis, can only be expressed by way of myth. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 3

Science works with concepts of averages which are far too general to do justice to the subjective variety of an individual life. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 3

Whether or not the stories are “true” is not the problem. The only question is whether what I tell is my fable, my truth. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 3

Like every other being, I am a splinter of the infinite deity, but I cannot contrast myself with any animal, any plant or any stone. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 4

We are a psychic process which we do not control, or only partly direct. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 4

Life has always seemed to me like a plant that lives on its rhizome. Its true life is invisible, hidden in the rhizome. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 4

When we think of the unending growth and decay of life and civilizations, we cannot escape the impression of absolute nullity. Yet I have never lost a sense of something that lives and endures underneath the eternal flux. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 4

In the end the only events in my life worth telling are those when the imperishable world irrupted into this transitory one. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 4

Similarly, other people are established inalienably in my memories only if their names were entered in the scrolls of my destiny from the beginning, so that encountering them was at the sam4e time a kind of recollection. ~Carl Jung, Memories Dreams and Reflections, Page 5