This photograph of Carl Jung and Heinrich Zimmer was taken at the 1936 Eranos. The title of Jung’s presentation that year was “The Idea of Redemption in Alchemy.” Paul Tillich also lectured at the 1936 conference and again in 1954.

Heinrich Robert Zimmer (1890–1943) was an Indologist and historian of South Asian art, most known for his works, Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization and Philosophies of India. He was the most important German scholar in Indian Philology after Max Müller . In 2010, a “Heinrich Zimmer Chair for Indian Philosophy and Intellectual History” was inaugurated at Heidelberg University.

“He was born in Greifswald, Germany. Zimmer began his career studying Sanskrit and linguistics at the University of Berlin where he graduated in 1913.

Between 1920-24 he lectured at the University of Greifswald, moving to Heidelberg University to fill the Chair of Indian Philology (1924-1938).

In 1938 he was dismissed by the Nazis, and he emigrated to England where between 1939-40 he taught at Balliol College, Oxford. In 1940 he moved to New Rochelle, New York where he eventually accepted a Visiting Lecturer position in Philosophy at Columbia University. Here, Joseph Campbell, who was then working on his first book, A Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake (1944) attended his lectures. The two men became good friends.

Zimmer died there, of pneumonia, the following year (1943). After his death, Campbell was given the task of editing and posthumously publishing Zimmer’s papers, which he did over the next 12 years, turning Zimmer’s lecture notes into four books, in the Bollingen Series: Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization, Philosophies of India, The Art of Indian Asia, and The King and the Corpse, which in turn became Zimmer’s lasting legacy.

Zimmer’s method was to examine religious images using their sacred significance as a key to their psychic transformation. His use of (Indian) philosophy and religious history to interpret art was at odds with traditional scholarship. His vast knowledge of Hindu mythology and philosophy gave him insights into the art, insights that were appreciated by Joseph Campbell among others. Campbell edited many of Zimmer’s writings after his death. The psychiatrist Carl Jung also developed a long-standing relationship with Zimmer, and incidentally edited a volume of Zimmer’s entitled The Way to the Self). The two men first met in 1932.” ~Wikipedia

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