Hence the optimistic assumption of psychotherapy that conscious realization accentuates the good more than the overshadowing evil. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 254.

Becoming conscious reconciles the opposites and thus creates a higher third. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 254.

The goal of life is the realization of the self. If you kill yourself you abolish that will of the self that guides you through life to that eventual goal. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 25.

I observe myself in the stillness of Bollingen and with all my experience of nearly eight decades must admit that I have found no rounded answer to myself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 163.

Have your congregation understood that they must close their ears to the traditional teachings and go through the darknesses of their own souls and set aside everything in order to become that which every individual bears in himself as his individual task, and that no one can take this burden from him? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 76.

We grow up, we blossom and we wilt, and death is ultimate quietude—or so it seems. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 596.

Man is the mirror which God holds up to himself, or the sense organ with which he apprehends his being. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 112

It is therefore better not to “understand” people who might be heroes, because the same fate might befall oneself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 31.

The core of the individual is a mystery of life, which is snuffed out when it is “grasped.” ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 31.

We must understand the divinity within us, but not the other, so far as he is able to go by himself and understand himself. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 32.

Since man’s nature is temperamentally set against wisdom, it is incumbent upon us to pay its price by what seems foolish to us. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 580.