Dear Professor Freud, 29 September 1910

So you are back safe and sound from the cholera country!

Nevertheless I wish I could have been with you.

I understand very well what you say about your travelling companion.

I find that sort of thing exasperating, and still have an aftertaste of it from our American trip.

Your advice concerning the way to treat our Uncle “Euler”! is opportune and reinforces my natural bent for philanthropy, I shall have the galleys of his manuscript sent to you; I was unable to read it because it was sent direct to Deuticke at the last moment.

Silberer’s paper on mythology” is good, except that his “functional category” for the investigation of myths has not blossomed into a thorough going working hypothesis.

I think you will recommend it for separate publication.

I am working like a horse and am at present immersed in Iranian archaeology.

I think my conjecture that the Miller fantasies” really add up to a redemption mystery can be proved to the hilt.

Only the other day a so-called Dem. praec. patient, whom I have almost set on her” feet again, came out with a really grand, hitherto anxiously
guarded, moon-fantasy which is a redemption mystery composed entirely of liturgical imagery.

A thing of marvellous beauty but very difficult, built on incest with her brother.

In the case of another patient I could spot fragments of a Peter-Antichrist legend; origin obscure.

The interesting thing in the first case is that prior knowledge is entirely lacking; the fantasy originated in early childhood (about the 7th year).

She is now 181/2 years old, Jewish. – As I said, I wallow in wonders.

I was touched and overjoyed to learn how much you appreciate the greatness of Schreber’s mind and the liberating of the basic language.

I am still very intrigued by the fate of those unfortunate corps brothers who were miracled up to the skies and are described as “those suspended under Cassiopeia?”

The Manichaeans (Schreber’s godfathers?) hit on the idea that a number of demons or “archons” were crucified on, or affixed to, the vault of heaven and were the fathers of human beings.

I use the winged word “Why don’t you say it (scil. aloud) ?” every day in analysis, where it proves its efficacy.

The book is a worthy one; it deserves the .place of honour in every psychiatric library if only for the sake of “little Flechsig.””

I have had a disgruntled letter from Jones.

Everybody seems to have it in for him.

He says the directors have stopped the Asylum Bulletin because of his psychoanalytic writings.

“Schottlander” has announced an article in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology: “Hysteria and Modern Psychoanalysis.”

There you will reap the rewards of your psychoanalytic endeavours with him.

Won’t you admit now that my kicking-out technique is therapeutically unsurpassable in such cases?

With many kind regards,

Yours very sincerely,

JUNG ~Carl Jung, Freud/Jung Letters, Vol., Pages 355- 356